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A ground-breaking new MA delivered in partnership with the BFI to prepare students to build successful careers in film exhibition, programming, criticism or archival work. Read more
A ground-breaking new MA delivered in partnership with the BFI to prepare students to build successful careers in film exhibition, programming, criticism or archival work.

Quick Facts:

2 Year Course
Full-time
Course runs Jan-Dec each year
Next intake: January 2017
NFTS Scholarships available for UK Students

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/masters/film-studies-programming-and-curation

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 08 SEP 2016

COURSE OVERVIEW

- The course is delivered in partnership with the BFI (the leading body for film in the UK) who will also provide hands-on placement opportunities across a range of curatorial and critical activities.
- The course is delivered by film professionals in film exhibition and distribution, festivals, archives and film criticism, alongside academics and film makers
- Students on the course will attend film festivals.
- Students learn how to conceptualise film work in terms of idea, form and style, as well as understanding the relationship between film and audience.
- Students will learn about the practicalities of film exhibition, distribution and preservation in the changing digital landscape.
- Students will study the practice of film criticism and comment, including reviewing and critical writing about films, filmmakers and the broader culture.
- Students have the opportunity to mount festivals, pop up screenings and other events.

This course commences at the end of January each year.

The National Film and Television School’s Film Studies Programming and Curation Masters delivered in partnership with the BFI is designed for students who wish to make a career in the wider film and media culture, whether in the fields of curation, exhibition, criticism, archives, preservation or restoration. The course provides a detailed understanding of the concepts, contexts and critical thought that have shaped the production and reception of film as a basis for engagement with rapidly changing contemporary film and moving image culture. A rigorous academic framework is combined with real world applications enabling each student to develop their own skills, knowledge and understanding to provide a strong basis for a career in film and media.

The philosophy of this course is to give students a theoretical, historical and critical understanding of film, which they will apply practically in the fields of film curating and programming, distribution and archiving.

With all the resources of the National Film and Television School available to them, students on this Master’s programme benefit from working alongside a new generation of filmmakers, encouraging creative dialogue between makers and curators/critics.

CURRICULUM

Students on this course gain a thorough understanding of the process by which a film moves from a creative idea to an audience experience. They will explore the history, theory and critical contexts of film. In addition they will look at a variety of critical writing on film, to give them access to the major ideas that inform film.

Optional units and a professional placement allow a more specialised focus on industry practices in programming, curation, archives and film criticism through project work and research portfolios.

1: Conceptualising Film: Idea, Form and Style

The unit provides an introduction to key ways of conceptualising film that underpin approaches to critical, theoretical and creative practice. The main topics include:

- The Evolution of the moving image – from scientific experiment to mass entertainment and beyond
- Ways of seeing: approaches to studying film
- The development of an industry and its audience. Film and Commerce
- Film and Realism: Cinema as a Mirror of Society?
- The Subconscious Art: Dream Cinema and the language of film
- Historical movements in Cinema: Influential developments, including the early avant-garde, Italian neo-realism, the Nouvelle Vague, Third Cinema
- Contemporary and British World Cinema: approaches development and trends
- Film Forum: the evolution of film criticism and comment
- Film and Digital Media (technology, and the impact on form and style)
- Expanded cinema: Film as a gallery experience, film as a live event

The unit draws on a wide range of illustrative film examples, and explores each concept with in-depth analysis of one or more key films. Each topic will be introduced by a film and media practitioner and/or an academic.

Students will write an essay in order to explore one of the key concepts.

2: Identifying the Audience: The Practice of Cinema from Idea to Exhibition

This unit looks at the changing sites and forms of film viewing, providing a detailed exploration of the cultural, economic and technological contexts that structure the processes and pathways by which films reach an audience. Whilst primary examples will largely be drawn from Europe and the USA, these will be considered in a global context.

- Audiences: bringing people together to watch films: who, why and how, from fairground attraction to movie palace to pop-up and online.
- The relationship between production and audiences: creativity, development journeys, film finance and funding.
- Contemporary patterns of distribution: buying and selling films in a multi-platform world; from conglomeration and globalisation to independence and self-distribution
- The business of contemporary exhibition: the ‘majors’ and the alternatives; the digital revolution
- Cultural cinema in the UK and Europe; the status of ‘specialised cinema’, including repertory and archive film
- Film Festivals and markets: cultural and economic impact; models of programming;
- Programming for diverse audiences
- Programming beyond the single screen: event cinema, alternative content, installation and on-line platforms
- Marketing and promotion: identifying, reaching and developing audiences
- Critics and criticism in the age of the internet and social media: continuity and change
- Reception: case studies

In addition to regular lectures and seminars by NFTS tutors, the teaching programme includes a wide range of talks by cinema and festival directors and programmers; industry executives working in exhibition, distribution, sales and marketing; venue and event managers; filmmakers and critics.

Students will prepare and present a case study one of the subject areas.

3: Programming Film & Cultural Events and Film Preservation and Restoration

This unit is broken into two strands with students participating in both.

Informed by the study in Parts A and B, there will be in-depth sessions on programming, including researching programme and event ideas, developing themes, selecting work to meet cultural and commercial imperatives, copywriting and devising marketing strategies. Practical issues regarding rights and availability, projection and technical presentation, producing publicity materials and on-stage introductions and Q&A hosting will all be covered.

The film preservation and restoration strand will cover understanding film materials, the impact of digitization on film preservation, and its limits; sessions will also explore issues of curatorial practice with regard both to collecting and exhibiting work and will consider the presentation and reception of archive material across a range of exhibition platforms. Students will also have the opportunity to visit archives, a specialised film collection, film laboratory or digital media centre.

During this part of the course students will attend the London Film Festival

4: Dissertation

As part of the dissertation module a number of specialised workshops will be arranged to enable students to explore a strand related to their dissertation in greater detail.

The dissertation may take the form of an extended piece of film criticism or an original exploration of aspects of film culture, genre or cinema history.

5: Graduation Project

The Graduation Project will be both a theoretical and practical exploration of their chosen subject and specialist areas. For example if a student wishes to explore sites and forms of cinema they will organise a pop-up cinema experience and deliver a written or video essay that explores the themes and concepts.

6: Professional Placement

During the process of developing the graduation portfolio each student will also undertake a 1-2 month professional placement.

7: Meet The Industry

A series of familiarisation visits to venues and projects with a variety of curatorial and critical approaches, to help provide students with a further sense of possible career options.

METHODS

In addition to a wide range of screenings and seminars, the course provides hands-on approach to teaching and learning through workshops, group projects, field trips, personal research, portfolio as well as professional placements (at Festivals, Cinemas etc). For example, students work in small groups to develop portfolios (e.g. promotional strategy for a film) and workshops (e.g. peer review in film criticism).

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

This course invites applications from students with a BA (Hons) degree (or equivalent) in arts, humanities or science. Film and media related degrees, while welcome, are not essential for admission.

Applicants without a first degree but with professional experience may also be considered for admission. In these cases an appropriate piece of written work will be required, along with details of professional qualifications. The application will then be referred to the NFTS concessions committee for consideration.

APPLY WITH

- Please submit a brief essay on either a) The preservation of film culture, through archiving, exhibition and restoration
Or b) Discuss the changing forms of cinema distribution and exhibition.

- Write a review of either: a) A contemporary film that has impressed you, or, b) an earlier film that you believe to be of artistic or historical importance. The review should not exceed 1,000 words.

- Choose a movement in cinema or one particular national cinema that is important to you. Briefly discuss your personal response to it. This should not exceed 1,000 words

- Discuss one author or film critic, or one book of critical writing on film that has influenced you. Discuss why you have found this author/book of value to you.

HOW TO APPLY

You can apply directly to us at the NFTS by clicking on the link below:

APPLY FOR FILM STUDIES PROGRAMMING & CURATION COURSE - https://nfts.co.uk/sign-me-up/apply-now/?nid=1857

You can apply online, or download a word document of the application form to submit via email
When selecting your course, please ensure that you have read the entry requirements and details of the supporting materials that should accompany your application.

TIMING YOUR APPLICATION

We are happy to receive applications 24/7 and 365 days a year up until the deadline. That said, there is no particular advantage to submitting your application very early. The important thing is that your application shows us your latest work and tell us about your most recent filmmaking experiences.

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The LFS MA Screenwriting course is an intense one-year programme with the emphasis on developing the writer's original voice through small group and one-to-one mentoring from industry professionals. Read more
The LFS MA Screenwriting course is an intense one-year programme with the emphasis on developing the writer's original voice through small group and one-to-one mentoring from industry professionals.

Our most recent Annual Report for the MA Screenwriting from External Examiner Max Kinnings commented: “...the standards of student performance are at the very top end of the scale of similar programmes in the UK. The MA in Screenwriting at LFS is an impressive programme. The quality of work that is produced is of a very high standard with some truly outstanding screenwriting and critical commentaries being produced. The way that the course is structured over the three terms – or units – is both academically rigorous and also industry facing.” (sic)

The MA Screenwriting course focuses on feature film screenwriting, in an international context and benefits from taking place in a film school where writing is a collaborative process involving actors, directors, musicians, editors and producers. Each student is matched into a mentoring relationship with a working writer and has frequent and detailed meetings with them. You can read more on the MA Screenwriting course curriculum here - http://lfs.org.uk/full-time-study/ma-screenwriting/curriculum

Minimum qualifications for an application to be considered are a three year university degree or equivalent professional experience in a relevant area. You may already have been working in a writing environment, though not necessarily in film. We actively support applicants who have a commitment to screenwriting and want to expand their skills and understanding. We are happy to take the right experience as equivalent to a first degree.

The need to follow and understand the intensive course of lectures, and the high pressure of group work make it imperative that all students must have a satisfactory knowledge of the English language. Read the requirements here - http://lfs.org.uk/full-time-study/ma-screenwriting/admissions/admission-requirements

The London Film School

Since 1956 the school has trained thousands of directors, cinematographers, editors and other film professionals now working across the globe. It is the most truly international school anywhere, with at least 60% of its students from outside Great Britain.
We have thousands of high profile alumni - http://lfs.org.uk/films-filmmakers/associates-london-film-school-alfs, including Michael Mann, Mike Leigh, Duncan Jones, Tak Fujimoto, Franc Roddam, Mark Goldblatt, Bill Douglas, Ho Yim, Anne Hui, Oliver Hermanus and Danny Huston.

LFS is based in Covent Garden two minutes’ walk from Soho, centre of the European entertainment industry. It is one of only three institutions accredited as a Creative Skillset Film Academy, recognised by the UK industry body as a Centre of Excellence.

We teach filmmaking, on stages, and in workshops rather than in classrooms - the building functions as a working studio. LFS is a living creative film community. The school is an independent non-profit establishment run by passionate and experienced filmmakers; full-time faculty and a varied and hugely talented group of visiting lecturers, technicians and artists.

Please get in touch for more information about our MA programmes in Filmmaking, Screenwriting, International Film Business, the Doctoral Programmes, as well as our expanding range of continuing professional development courses.

We have three intakes a year on May, September and January. We are currently operating a rolling process but please do apply as soon as you can for any intake. You can read more about the admissions process and deadlines here.

VISIT US

Choosing a film school is a big decision; you may want to visit us or talk to a student or a graduate. We have open afternoons every other Thursday during term time and we can show you around – please click here to sign up for a place - http://lfs.org.uk/full-time-study/book-tour. If you cannot attend any of those days, please do get in touch on to schedule an alternative time; our students are our priorities and as such the working studios are their space.

‘The beauty of a good film school is that it invites you to make mistakes, but never dampens your enthusiasm. At LFS I made plenty, and ignited a passion.’ Duncan Jones, Director of MOON (2009), SOURCE CODE (2011), WARCRAFT (2016)

Further Information

On our website you can view testimonials from recent LFS graduates (http://lfs.org.uk/films-and-filmmakers/testimonials), and we can put you in touch with one from your country. One recent alumni said of his experience: “I always speak very highly of the Screenwriting MA at LFS when prospective students email me. I learnt so much there and have it to thank for a lot, so thanks!” Ben Cleary, MA Screenwriting, 2016 Shorts Film Oscar Nominee for STUTTERER

Read less
Documentary filmmaking is constantly evolving and with the rise of internet and social media, there are countless places for filmmakers to publish their work. Read more
Documentary filmmaking is constantly evolving and with the rise of internet and social media, there are countless places for filmmakers to publish their work. This course will help you find an audience for your idea and support you in turning your vision into a bold and innovative film.

At the Northern Film School you will have the opportunity to explore and communicate a subject you are passionate about. We support all types of filmmaking from campaigning and issue-led films to observational and character pieces and experimental films to wildlife documentaries. You will develop and pitch your ideas and successful ones will be made into Masters Projects and given real production budgets.

Workshops will train you in the craft and technical aspects of filmmaking: producing and directing, camera, sound, and editing. Using our industry-standard facilities you will produce films of integrity and importance.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/documentary_filmmaking_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

This course will prepare you for the collaborative environment of documentary filmmaking. You will gain the experience and knowledge you need to interpret your ideas and give them exposure to new audiences. Your technical and creative skills will allow you to make films you care about, helping you to make your voice heard and paving the way for your future as a filmmaker.

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

As the first and only film school in the UK to receive JAMES accreditation, our Northern Film School (http://www.northernfilmschool.co.uk/) is the ideal environment to explore your ideas and creativity. Our industry-standard facilities and experienced staff will give you the support you need to make your passion a visual reality.

You will be joining a strong and successful group of graduates, many of whom have won Oscars and BAFTAs for their work. The prestige of the Northern Film School will set you up to achieve your ambitions and our reputation will provide you with the foundation to becoming a successful documentary filmmaker. We have contacts with the BBC, ITV and Channel Four and strong connections to Sheffield International Documentary Festival where you will have the opportunity to showcase your work.

Martin John Harris

Senior Lecturer

"The world of documentary is vast and it can often be difficult to decide the route you want to take as a filmmaker. What is most important is that you have an idea - with this starting point we can help you make the right type of documentary."

Martin is an award-winning film editor and documentary collaborator. He was a film editor at the BBC for seven years before working as a freelance editor on dramas and documentaries for major broadcasters. His work includes the BBC series 'Bombay Railway', winner of a Royal Television Society (RTS) award for Best Documentary in 2008, and feature length documentary 'Bloodshot: The Dreams and Nightmares of East Timor' which won the RTS award for Best Documentary in 2013.

Facilities

- Electric Press
Based at the Electric Press, our Northern Film School has dedicated facilities and equipment for you to use. These include studios, camera and grip equipment, lighting equipment, edit suites for post-production and a 75-seat HD viewing theatre.

- Film Studios
There are two production studios within our Electric Press building. The studios are of a significant size, giving you the opportunity to explore film set design and prop building.

- Sound recording & editing equipment
We have an extensive range of professional sound equipment from the likes of Sennheiser, Sound Devices and Tascam. All edit stations are equipped with ProTools software and AVID editing software.

There is a sound recording studio in Electric Press and access to larger facilities elsewhere in our University.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Embrace your interest in film, television and music by becoming a skilled professional in sound recording. We have an excellent reputation for teaching film and music, with many of our graduates going on to win BAFTA's and Oscars. Read more
Embrace your interest in film, television and music by becoming a skilled professional in sound recording.

We have an excellent reputation for teaching film and music, with many of our graduates going on to win BAFTA's and Oscars.

You might be a budding filmmaker, journalist, photographer or documentary director, or simply have a creative passion for recording sound. Whatever your motivation, we will teach you professional techniques in music recording and post production so that you can record high-quality sound for the moving image.

This short course - taught over four weekends in the year - is a fantastic opportunity to learn from experienced film and recording professionals in state-of-the-art studios. We?re dedicated to providing you with hands-on, practical experience by giving you opportunities to produce your own work and explore the creative possibilities in sound recording and mixing.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/soundrecording_apd

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

There is a strong demand for well-trained soundrecording professionals and we provide the skills to help you on your way tobecoming an expert in quality sound broadcasting. If you would like to continueyour studies in this area there are opportunities to move onto one of our masterscourses such as Music for the Moving Image or Sound Design.

- Audio Editor
- Audio Engineer
- Studio Manager
- Composer for Film and Television

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You'll be learning at our Northern Film School ? the first film school in the UK to receive JAMES accreditation. JAMES, a professional body that represents organisations across the media sector, described us as 'a benchmark against which all other film courses need to be measured'.

Taught over four weekends in the year - Saturday to Monday - we've designed this course so it fits easily into your lifestyle, requiring minimum time off work.

You'll have access to a suite of professional music studios, including recording rooms, audio booths, instruments, portable audio recorders and a lab with soundcard and mixer. You'll be able to access an impressive range of facilities at our Northern Film School, including production studios, edit suites, production offices, and film and script archive.

We also offer exciting short study opportunities in film, music and performing arts, taught during Easter and Summer. These creative workshops, ranging from two days to a week, are a great way to build your expertise for professional use, embrace a subject you're passionate about, or develop your skills before applying for one of our postgraduate qualifications.

Core Modules

Studio Skills
You will gain a strong understanding of the creative possibilities of the studio environment through the development of a musical product.

Studio and Sound Location
We will equip you with the theory and the techniques for recording and mixing sound for film, television and radio.

Laura Taylor

Senior Lecturer

"Our courses prepare you for an industry that is ever-changing, demanding and highly competitive. You will emerge with a strong understanding of your specialism, and with a focused approach towards personal development and career planning."

Specialist sound tutor Laura Taylor has worked for the BBC, Channel 5, ITV Yorkshire and Discovery Channel. She has experience in live television, post production sound and commercial and community radio, and has worked within the educational and community sector. Laura has very close links with community radio station ELFM and the Soundmill Studios in Leeds.

Facilities

- Sound recording & editing facilities
You'll have access to a suite of professional music studios, including film composition and audio post production rooms, instruments, together with portable field recording equipment and extensive computer workstation facilities.

A comprehensive range of audio editing, composition and sound processing software is available.

- Northern Film School
You will also be able to access an impressive range of facilities at our Northern Film School, including production studios, edit suites, production offices, and film and script archive.

- Library
Our Library is open 24/7, every day of the year. However you like to work, we have got you covered with group and silent study areas, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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The MA Filmmaking course is very practical. It includes two years of training in Directing, Cinematography, Editing , Sound , Production Design, Screenwriting and Production. Read more
The MA Filmmaking course is very practical. It includes two years of training in Directing, Cinematography, Editing , Sound , Production Design, Screenwriting and Production. Please click here to view the full course curriculum - http://lfs.org.uk/full-time-study/ma-filmmaking/curriculum. There are 5 exercise films and a graduation work in the MA Filmmaking programme, shot on film and digital. One film is prepared, shot, delivered and screened in every 12 weeks of your work. Students normally work on quite a few more depending on their time and specialty.

Students are taught by working UK filmmakers. Exercise films are made on built sets, shot on professional level film and digital cameras, recorded on Nagra V, edited on Avid Composer and given a professional dub in Soho.

Our 2-year postgraduate multi-discipline MA Filmmaking course requires that you have a 3-4 year degree which does not have to be media related, or a minimum of 3 years relevant work experience. Read more about admissions requirements here - http://lfs.org.uk/full-time-study/ma-filmmaking/admissions. We have students who not only come from various geographical locations but also with varying media knowledge. What they do have in common is their love, passion and genuine interest in film and filmmaking as a craft. We have had lawyers, doctors, engineers, illustrators enrol on our courses so having an unusual background is welcome here.

The London Film School (LFS)

Since 1956 the school has trained thousands of directors, cinematographers, editors and other film professionals now working across the globe. It is the most truly international school anywhere, with at least 60% of its students from outside Great Britain.
We have thousands of high profile alumni, including Michael Mann, Mike Leigh, Duncan Jones, Tak Fujimoto, Franc Roddam, Mark Goldblatt, Bill Douglas, Ho Yim, Anne Hui, Oliver Hermanus and Danny Huston.

LFS is based in Covent Garden two minutes’ walk from Soho, centre of the European entertainment industry. It is one of only three institutions accredited as a Creative Skillset Film Academy, recognised by the UK industry body as a Centre of Excellence.

We teach filmmaking, on stages, and in workshops rather than in classrooms - the building functions as a working studio. LFS is a living creative film community. The school is an independent non-profit establishment run by passionate and experienced filmmakers; full-time faculty and a varied and hugely talented group of visiting lecturers, technicians and artists.
Please get in touch for more information about our MA programmes in Filmmaking, Screenwriting, International Film Business, the Doctoral Programmes, as well as our expanding range of continuing professional development courses.
We have three intakes a year on May, September and January. We are currently operating a rolling process but please do apply as soon as you can for any intake. You can read more about the admissions process and deadlines here - http://lfs.org.uk/full-time-study/ma-filmmaking/admissions

VISIT US

Choosing a film school is a big decision; you may want to visit us or talk to a student or a graduate. We have open afternoons every other Thursday during term time and we can show you around – please click here to sign up for a place - http://lfs.org.uk/full-time-study/book-tour. If you cannot attend any of those days, please do get in touch on to schedule an alternative time; our students are our priorities and as such the working studios are their space.

‘The beauty of a good film school is that it invites you to make mistakes, but never dampens your enthusiasm. At LFS I made plenty, and ignited a passion.’ Duncan Jones, Director of MOON (2009), SOURCE CODE (2011), WARCRAFT (2016), MUTE (2017)

Further Information

The need to follow and understand the intensive course of lectures, and the high pressure of group work make it imperative that all students must have a satisfactory knowledge of the English language. Read the requirements here - http://lfs.org.uk/full-time-study/ma-screenwriting/admissions/admission-requirements

On our website you can view testimonials - http://lfs.org.uk/films-and-filmmakers/testimonials from recent LFS graduates, and we can put you in touch with one from your country. One recent alumni said of his experience: “I always speak very highly of the Screenwriting MA at LFS when prospective students email me. I learnt so much there and have it to thank for a lot, so thanks!” Ben Cleary, MA Screenwriting, 2016 Shorts Film Oscar Nominee for STUTTERER


The MA Filmmaking has three intake dates: January, May and September

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The MA Film with Practice is a taught programme suitable for graduates in film, practitioners who want to advance their practice in an intellectually stimulating environment and non-film graduates with a passion for film practice demonstrated though amateur filmmaking. Read more
The MA Film with Practice is a taught programme suitable for graduates in film, practitioners who want to advance their practice in an intellectually stimulating environment and non-film graduates with a passion for film practice demonstrated though amateur filmmaking.

The programme is taught by award-winning filmmakers, internationally recognised film scholars and includes masterclasses from film industry professionals.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/343/film-with-practice

About the Department of Film

The Film Department at the University of Kent is known for its excellence in research and teaching. Arts at Kent (including Film) was ranked 1st in the UK for research power in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF). One of the largest European centres for the study of film, it has an established reputation going back 35 years. Approaching film as a dynamic part of our cultural experience, we encourage thinking about film as it emerges at the intersections of art, document and entertainment. Through theory and practice, individual research, student-led seminars and visiting speakers, we promote an environment in which postgraduate students are able to engage with the continuing vibrancy of cinema.

Studying film as a postgraduate at the University of Kent will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise, library facilities and a campus-based film culture. We currently offer expertise in North American, European and Latin American cinemas. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives, as well as with digital media and practice by research.

In 2014, the University opened a new 62-seat cinema named after the pioneering female film director Ida Lupino, which students can enjoy as part of their experience during their studies. The Lupino has state-of-the-art digital projection and sound, and has been created to provide an intimate atmosphere for film viewing.

Course structure

This programme includes two dedicated film practice modules and a dissertation by Film Practice that includes the making of a fiction film. You also choose two modules from the existing Film MA to create a practice-theory mix that accommodates your own interests.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

FI819 - Digital Film Practice: Key Skills (30 credits)
FI820 - Independent Project Development (30 credits)
FI812 - Advanced Film Theory (30 credits)
FI813 - Film History (30 credits)
FI815 - Film and Modernity (30 credits)
FI811 - Conceptualising Film (30 credits)
FI899 - Dissertation by Film Practice (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment at MA level is 100% course work: that means you will be assessed through essays, treatments, project proposals, seminar participation and a dissertation by film practice.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- Develop the understanding and skills possessed by students entering the programme to a notably higher level of sophistication and achievement (appropriate to an M-level award) than would be expected at degree level, such that all leave the programme with a substantial analytic, critical and practice-based understanding of Film.

- Develop the ability of students to think independently, argue with clarity and force, initiate and complete creative work and to discern areas of research and practice-led research within the field.

- Provoke reflection on practical, critical and theoretical approaches to Film and its context.

- Nurture intellectual and creative skills through written work (essays, dissertations, treatments, scripts), creative practice (DV films) as well as in the context of interpersonal interaction (seminars, research papers, supervision, filmmaking processes).

- Develop existing and new areas of teaching informed by and in response to developments in film practice, research and scholarship.

- Provide an excellent quality of higher education

- Attract outstanding students irrespective of race, background, gender, and physical disability, from both within the UK and from overseas.

- Support national and regional economic success by producing graduates in possession of key knowledge and skills, with the capacity to learn.

- Provide opportunities for the development of personal, communication and research skills and other key skills appropriate for both graduate employment in industry or further study.

- Provide learning opportunities that are enjoyable experiences and involve realistic workloads, based within a combined research and practice-led framework

- Offer appropriate support for students from a diverse range of backgrounds

- Provide high quality teaching in a supportive environment with appropriately qualified and trained staff?

Research areas

Research in both theory and practice is currently centred in five broad areas:

- national cinemas – form and history: North American, European, Latin American
- the moving image in a digital context
- documentary film
- film aesthetics
- avant-garde and experimental cinema.

Centre for the Interdisciplinary Study of Film and the Moving Image
The Centre draws together scholars from across the University who use film and the moving image as an integral part of their research. We are open to ideas that extend the reach of the Centre and seek to support projects that promote collaboration between individuals and other research centres. Our aim is to produce a more proactive engagement with other disciplines, to open new lines of communication and to produce innovative knowledge formations through the activity of pioneering research projects.

Careers

Arts graduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to film journalists and theatre technicians. Our graduates have found work at Universal Pictures, the London Film Festival and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations, as well as in film production, as editorial assistants and as web designers.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Our MA in International Film Business aims to train the next generation of innovative executives for the international film industry. Read more
Our MA in International Film Business aims to train the next generation of innovative executives for the international film industry. We will teach you about film finance and sales, distribution and marketing, creative management and development, digital strategy and festival curation and programming.

You will learn about the impact technology is having on the industry and gain insider access to a range of events including the Berlin Film Festival and European Film Market.

The London Film School is a world leading postgraduate filmmaking school and you will have the opportunity to access their extensive expertise, attend master-classes and industry events organised by the school as well as the opportunity to benefit from working with an industry mentor as part of the dissertation.

As you might expect from a ground breaking programme of study, assessment will be more than just essays. Instead you will give presentations, pitch ideas, and take on negotiation exercises. During your first term at the University of Exeter you will design, promote, and deliver a pop-up cinema event in the Bill Douglas Cinema Museum.

If you’re serious about pursuing a career in the film business this MA will give you the chance to develop the key business skills and networks you will need, and benefit from mentoring by leading UK and European industry professionals.

Learning and teaching

As an MA International Film Business student you will have access to the world-renowned expertise of the London Film School and the academic excellence and research resources of the University of Exeter.

Your first term will be taught by leading film and business academics at Exeter where you will undertake a global survey of international film production, distribution and exhibition strategies and trends, and study business strategy, accounting and finance, intellectual property and entertainment economics. You will have the opportunity to examine innovative business models and the rapidly changing digital landscape of independent film.

At the London Film School you will take part in talks, master classes and question and answer sessions with film makers, as a graduate of the MA you will have access to the knowledge and contacts few programmes can offer their alumni. You’ll study the entertainment value chain through seminars delivered by London Film School staff and industry professionals, and a further series of intensive full-day seminars exploring film business innovation.

While there is no requirement to make a film as part of the MA, you can take the initiative in the second and third term to work independently, outside of the programme, with other LFS students who are studying on the MA screenwriting or filmmaking.

Field trip

In your second term you will take part in our field trip to the Berlin International Film Festival, including access to the European Film Market, which is a business to business event not open to the public.

The Berlinale takes place in February and is one of the world's oldest and most important international film festivals. About 400 films from all around the world are screened each year at the festival, most of which are international or European premieres.

As well as the excitement of premieres and the films in competition, the Berlinale is an important place for film industry executives to do business. The Berlinale hosts both the European Film Market and the International co-production market, where around 400 companies are represented. The festival also organises a variety of workshops, panel discussions and film programmes.

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Realise your ambitions and take the lead in the creation of a film project that showcases your individuality and talent. The first three semesters follow the MA Filmmaking course to give you a thorough grounding in collaborative filmmaking. Read more
Realise your ambitions and take the lead in the creation of a film project that showcases your individuality and talent. The first three semesters follow the MA Filmmaking course to give you a thorough grounding in collaborative filmmaking. Then, mentored over two semesters, you will make an extended piece that develops your own style as you become a confident and experienced filmmaker.

Working on your own project or taking a head of department role alongside a fellow MFA student, your expertise will be tested in a dedicated specialism such as directing, producing, cinematography, animation, screenwriting or editing.

Whether your ambitions lie in fiction, documentary, animation, experimental films or screenplays, this course will allow you to develop your idea into a professional piece of work. We will give you the independence and freedom to realise your project, complemented by the support of our expert tutors.

Visit the website https://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/filmmaking_mfa/

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

The MFA (Master of Fine Arts) is a highly respected qualification in the US and is growing in significance in the UK. More importantly, you will graduate with a fully realised film project that extends your portfolio and demonstrates who you are as a filmmaker. Your experiences on the course will prepare you for the collaborative nature of the filmmaking industry.

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

We will give you the independence to make the film you want to make. Our expert team will provide tutorial encouragement, supervision and advice, and you will have access to industry-standard equipment and resources at our Northern Film School.

From cinematographers to producers and editors to animators, our teaching team is made up of highly respected film and television professionals, many of whom are still active in their fields. We will aim to match you with a tutor who specialises in your area of interest so that we can provide you with bespoke advice and guidance.

As the first and only film school in the UK to receive JAMES accreditation in recognition of the expertise of our staff, the professional level of our facilities and the opportunities we provide for our students, the Northern Film School is one of the best schools in the UK to explore and develop your ideas as a filmmaker.

Keith Dando

Senior Lecturer

"The wonderful thing about the new MFA Filmmaking course is that it is just that - filmmaking, pure and simple. It’s a struggle to launch a film career and get to make the films which are important to you, that speak to an audience. This is what we’re aiming to achieve and we are eager to see the results."

Keith’s career has included work on short and feature films, television series and computer games in projects for the BBC, Channel Four, Channel Five and many independent film and TV companies. Keith has also co-written screenplays that have reached the finals in the prestigious Zoetrope and Final Draft screenwriting contests, and worked with up and coming, respected filmmakers such as Clio Barnard and Penny Woolcock.

Facilities

-Electric Press
Based at the Electric Press, our Northern Film School has dedicated facilities and equipment for you to use. These include studios, camera and grip equipment, lighting equipment, edit suites for post-production and a 75-seat HD viewing theatre.

-Film Studios
Based in the Electric Press, our two expansive production studios, East and West Side enable the building of substantial film sets. This affords film students the opportunity to fully explore set design and prop building.

-Sound recording & editing facilities
You'll have access to a suite of professional music studios, including film composition and audio post production rooms, instruments, together with portable field recording equipment and extensive computer workstation facilities.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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The programme offers a thorough grounding in postgraduate-level film and is suitable both for graduates in the subject and those new to it. Read more
The programme offers a thorough grounding in postgraduate-level film and is suitable both for graduates in the subject and those new to it.

It is taught by experts in Film and seeks to engage you with the key elements that make up the diverse nature of film and moving images.

The programme allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent academic and recreational facilities, before relocating to our Paris centre for the spring term, studying in the heart of historic Montparnasse.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/19/film-paris

About the Department of Film

The Film Department at the University of Kent is known for its excellence in research and teaching. It was ranked second in the UK for research power in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). One of the largest European centres for the study of film, it has an established reputation going back 35 years. Approaching film as a dynamic part of our cultural experience, we encourage thinking about film as it emerges at the intersections of art, document and entertainment. Through theory and practice, individual research, student-led seminars and visiting speakers, we promote an environment in which postgraduate students are able to engage with the continuing vibrancy of cinema.

Studying film as a postgraduate at the University of Kent will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise, library facilities and a campusbased film culture. We currently offer expertise in North American, European and Latin American cinemas. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives, as well as with digital media and practice by research.

In 2014, the University opened a new 62-seat cinema named after the pioneering female film director Ida Lupino, which students can enjoy as part of their experience during their studies. The Lupino has state-of-the-art digital projection and sound, and has been created to provide an intimate atmosphere for film viewing.

Studying film as a postgraduate at the University of Kent in Paris will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise, library facilities and a campus-based film culture. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives.

Modules

During the first term, you take two 30-credit taught-course modules from your chosen MA pathway. You then spend the second term in Paris, studying two modules from a choice which varies from year to year.

Modules available on this programme may include:
FI812 - Advanced Film Theory (30 credits)
FI813 - Film History: Research Methods (30 credits)
FI821 - Film and Modernity (Paris) (30 credits)
FI998 - Dissertation:GPMS (60 credits)

During the spring term you are free to construct your own programme from across the range of modules available, making it as focussed or as inter-disciplinary as you like. You have plenty of time during the autumn term to make informed decisions about your programme of studies in Paris.

You are encouraged to make full use of the city’s cultural resources and to integrate these into your studies which means you will be able to explore and discover connections between history, literature, the visual arts and other media.

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework and the dissertation.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- develop your understanding and skills to a notably higher level of sophistication and achievement (appropriate to an Master’s level award) than would be expected at degree level, such that you leave the programme with a substantial analytic and critical understanding of film and film studies

- develop your understanding and skills to the level necessary for entry into a research programme in film

- develop your ability to think independently, argue with clarity and force, to discern areas of research interest within the field and be able to frame viable research questions

- allow you to spend your first term in Canterbury, studying modules in film, and to spend your second term in Paris developing your interest in cinema within the context of city often seen to be central to the aesthetic developments of filmmaking and critical approaches central to the history of the discipline

- consider the impact of French critics and filmmakers on the wider discipline of film

- provoke reflection on areas of critical and theoretical approaches to French cinema and its context

- nurture the intellectual skills cited above in the context of written work (essays and dissertations) as well as in the context of interpersonal interaction (seminars, research papers, supervision)

- provide access to enhanced intercultural awareness and understanding through the opportunity to study in Paris

- provide opportunities for the development of personal, communication and research skills and other key skills appropriate for graduate employment both in industry and in the public sector.

Research areas

Research in both theory and practice is currently centred in five broad areas:

- national cinemas – form and history: North American, European, Latin American
- the moving image in a digital context
- documentary film
- film aesthetics
- avant-garde and experimental cinema.

Centre for the Interdisciplinary Study of Film and the Moving Image
The Centre draws together scholars from across the University who use film and the moving image as an integral part of their research. We are open to ideas that extend the reach of the Centre and seek to support projects that promote collaboration between individuals and other research centres. Our aim is to produce a more proactive engagement with other disciplines, to open new lines of communication and to produce innovative knowledge formations through the activity of pioneering research projects.

Careers

Arts graduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to film journalists and theatre technicians. Our graduates have found work at Universal Pictures, the London Film Festival and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations, as well as in film production, as editorial assistants and as web designers.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The programme offers a thorough grounding in postgraduate-level film. We will be pleased to consider applications from applicants with either a background in Film or a related humanities subject. Read more
The programme offers a thorough grounding in postgraduate-level film. We will be pleased to consider applications from applicants with either a background in Film or a related humanities subject.

It is taught by experts in Film and seeks to engage you with the key elements that make up the diverse nature of film and moving images.

The Film MA can also be studied between Canterbury and Paris, with the first term at our Canterbury campus and the spring term at our centre in Paris. It is also available in Paris only where you spend the entire year in the French capital.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/paris/programmes/index.html

About the Department of Film

The Film Department at the University of Kent is known for its excellence in research and teaching. It was ranked second in the UK for research power in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). One of the largest European centres for the study of film, it has an established reputation going back 35 years. Approaching film as a dynamic part of our cultural experience, we encourage thinking about film as it emerges at the intersections of art, document and entertainment. Through theory and practice, individual research, student-led seminars and visiting speakers, we promote an environment in which postgraduate students are able to engage with the continuing vibrancy of cinema.

Studying film as a postgraduate at the University of Kent will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise, library facilities and a campusbased film culture. We currently offer expertise in North American, European and Latin American cinemas. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives, as well as with digital media and practice by research.

In 2014, the University opened a new 62-seat cinema named after the pioneering female film director Ida Lupino, which students can enjoy as part of their experience during their studies. The Lupino has state-of-the-art digital projection and sound, and has been created to provide an intimate atmosphere for film viewing.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

FI811 - Conceptualising Film (30 credits)
FI812 - Advanced Film Theory (30 credits)
FI813 - Film History (30 credits)
FI815 - Film and Modernity (30 credits)
FI998 - Dissertation:GPMS (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework and the dissertation.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- develop your understanding and skills to a notably higher level of sophistication and achievement (appropriate to an Master’s level award) than would be expected at degree level, such that you leave the programme with a substantial analytic and critical understanding of film and film studies

- develop your understanding and skills to the level necessary for entry into a research programme in Film Studies

- develop your ability to think independently, argue with clarity and force, to discern areas of research interest within the field and be able to frame viable research questions

- provoke reflection on areas of critical and theoretical approaches to cinema and its context

- nurture the intellectual skills cited above in the context of written work (essays and dissertations) as well as in the context of interpersonal interaction (seminars, research papers, supervision)

- attract outstanding students irrespective of race, background, gender, and physical disability, from both within the UK and from overseas

- develop existing and new areas of teaching in response to the advance of research and scholarship within the subject, as well as new developments in filmmaking practice.

Research areas

Research in both theory and practice is currently centred in five broad areas:

- national cinemas – form and history: North American, European, Latin American
- the moving image in a digital context
- documentary film
- film aesthetics
- avant-garde and experimental cinema.

Centre for the Interdisciplinary Study of Film and the Moving Image
The Centre draws together scholars from across the University who use film and the moving image as an integral part of their research. We are open to ideas that extend the reach of the Centre and seek to support projects that promote collaboration between individuals and other research centres. Our aim is to produce a more proactive engagement with other disciplines, to open new lines of communication and to produce innovative knowledge formations through the activity of pioneering research projects.

Careers

Arts graduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to film journalists and theatre technicians. Our graduates have found work at Universal Pictures, the London Film Festival and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations, as well as in film production, as editorial assistants and as web designers.


Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Giving you a critical and evaluative understanding of film within an interdisciplinary context, this programme encourages you to understand the role of film and cinema within a range of socio-cultural arenas. Read more
Giving you a critical and evaluative understanding of film within an interdisciplinary context, this programme encourages you to understand the role of film and cinema within a range of socio-cultural arenas.

Exploring the links between film theory and film practices, cultural politics and state or foreign policy, it will also allow you to assess the notion of film as a social process engaging with issues of representation, production and consumption.

The programme is modular and offers a structured approach that includes taught core and optional modules such as Cold War Film, Death and the Moving Image, and Film and Television Authorship.

Alongside this you will undertake training in research skills, culminating in an independently researched 20,000-word thesis.

You will gain a firm grounding in different approaches to the analysis of film, a broad knowledge of the history of cinema and developments in film studies, and the ability to evaluate these in relation to films and film cultures.

You’ll also automatically become a member of - and contribute to - B-Film: The Birmingham Centre for Film Studies. This multidisciplinary hub for research activities on film at the University coordinates various events like visiting speakers, film screenings and international conferences.

We have internationally-recognised research expertise in the fields of European, American and World Cinema, film theory, ethics and aesthetics, queer theory, television studies, children’s media, film and television authorship, performance and audience studies, documentary, digital media, social action filmmaking, film festivals, film production and screenwriting.

The Department brings together the expertise of our Film Studies and Creative Writing staff, opening up exciting new opportunities for postgraduates to benefit from synergies between the two fields.

We enjoy excellent collaborative relationships with professional partners in film, television, theatre, literature and new media.

About the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies

"Welcome to the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies, in the College of Arts and Law. This is one of the largest Schools in the College, and variety is our watchword. We offer one of the most extensive ranges of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in the country. Our research expertise is equally diverse, and we welcome students and researchers from all over the world." - Professor Andrzej Gasiorek, Head of School.

We particularly encourage creative thinking, with a range of pioneering programmes including Masters opportunities in Creative Writing, Film and Television and Shakespeare and Creativity. Our creative offerings are also strengthened by the development of our Department of Film and Creative Writing – established in 2015 – which has opened up exciting new opportunities for postgraduates to benefit from synergies between the two fields.

Our well-established Departments also provide an excellent environment for postgraduate study. The Department of Drama and Theatre Arts has a highly respected national and international reputation for excellence in teaching and research. We are also one of the leading centres for the postgraduate study of English in the UK, spanning language and literature. The Department of English Language and Applied Linguistics is a world-leading centre of excellence for both teaching and research in this field.

We are also proud to be home to the world-renowned Shakespeare Institute, based in Stratford-upon-Avon. Situated within walking distance of Shakespeare’s birthplace, school and grave, and the theatres of the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC), the Shakespeare Institute offers postgraduate students and scholars an academic experience unrivalled by any other university.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The NFTS trains composers in both live and electro-acoustic music for the moving image in a production context closely modelled on Industry working practices. Read more
The NFTS trains composers in both live and electro-acoustic music for the moving image in a production context closely modelled on Industry working practices.

Quick Facts:

2 Year Course
Full-time
Course runs Jan-Dec each year
Next intake: January 2017
NFTS Scholarships available for UK Students

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/masters/composing-film-television

TO APPLY CONTACT REGISTRY - https://nfts.co.uk/contact-us

COURSE OVERVIEW

- Training in live and electro-acoustic music
- Students compose for wide variety of films
- Creative and technical skills developed
- Study in a collaborative, filmmaking environment
- Flexible curriculum adaptable to individual needs
- Individual music suites
- Professional standard post production facilities
- Recording sessions with live musicians Business, legal and professional skills taught
- Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School.

This course commences in January each year. Our emphasis on collaboration means that Composing students are informed and involved throughout the filmmaking process. In particular, composers work closely with other students in Editing and Sound Post Production, increasing their understanding of the relationship between audio and moving images.

Today’s language of screen music has shifted. While many scores still provide a musical commentary on the action, others find a way to integrate music into the fabric of the film itself, creating a seamless weave analogous to the camerawork or editing, to the assimilation of music into the sound world of the film as a whole. Sound design and music grow ever closer - in fact, the roles of sound designer and composer are becoming blurred to the extent that a close collaboration between the two processes is often essential.

The application of music to film - the choices inherent in the "when", "how" and "why" - all stem from an informed understanding of the intention of the film and the contribution music could make to it. Informed understanding, musical versatility and the fostering of an individual musical voice are the intentions of this course and these are determined by the practical and intellectual demands on composers working in the industry.

Composing graduates are qualified to take on all forms of work in film and television as well as productions in multimedia and interactive programming.

TUTORS

Acting Head of Composing is the BAFTA-nominated composer (and NFTS graduate) John Keane, whose credits include Hornblower,Mansfield Park, Tara Road, Inspector George Gently, Hideous Kinky.

ALUMNI

Recent graduate composing credits include Atonement which netted NFTS graduate Dario Marianelli an Oscar, Golden Globe and Ivor Novello in the Best Original Score category; Wallander, the television drama series, and feature film Endgame, both of which earned BAFTAs for Best Original Score for NFTS graduate Martin Phipps. Martin also received Emmy Award Nominations for his scores on Great Expectations and Sense and Sensibility. Composer Rob Lane also received Emmy nominations for his scores on Longford and HBO's John Adams, as well as winning a BAFTA for Elizabeth I (TV) and a nomination for Jane Eyre.

CURRICULUM

The Composing course is developmental and progressive. In year one, students are taught the techniques and contexts which inform writing music for the screen. The first term comprises an intensive process during which students compose to a variety of exercises, each one chosen to focus on a particular problem of film composition. These exercises are completed by each student and discussed in seminars and individually assessed. In term two, further exercises concentrate on issues having to do with scoring for live instruments, the combination of live and electro-acoustic elements and the integration a limited range of sound design into film scores. In addition, students will begin engaging with projects generated by other students at the NFTS. This process will continue and dominate the third term. Each student contribution to those films will also be assessed. Students will also participate in visits from industry professionals.

In year two, students’ activities will be dominated primarily by work generated from other parts of the school. However, lectures, seminars and the occasional workshop will be provided to clarify and expand issues arising from those projects. As in year 1, students will also participate in visits from industry professionals.

YEAR ONE

A series of composing workshops combining practical exercises and seminars:

- Basic narrative techniques
- Midi, sampling and audio
- Combining music and sound
- Narrative with dialogue
- Non-fiction scoring
- Instrumentation and orchestration
- Composing to script
- Improvisation

Ongoing analysis of feature film soundtracks and film structure Orchestration and recording with live musicians

Workshops with Sound Design and Editing students:

- Abstract Film Workshop
- Without Images - a sound-only project
- Animation exercises
- Dramaturgy Workshop – focusing on script and script analysis, blocking and cover, and performance
- Editing the Scene - editing drama rushes to learn the basics of scene structure

Productions

- Zen and Beyond - fiction workshop focusing on visual storytelling
- Documentary poetry exercise collaborating with Documentary Direction, Editing and Sound Design
- First Year Film – the major 1st year fiction production collaborating with all other departments
- Investigative Documentary - the major first year documentary production
- Cross Spec - an introduction to film language and storytelling involving all departments

YEAR TWO

- Orchestration and recording with live musicians
- Improvisation
- Continued analysis of films
- 2nd year short fiction production, shot on a digital format
- Co-composing a feature film Graduation films in documentary, fiction and animation

Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

The Composing MA course is part of the Post Production department, where we are looking to assemble a group of students with diverse and varied backgrounds. There is no 'typical' student or perfect candidate who conforms to a mandatory list of qualifications. You might have had some Industry experience in your chosen field, or a background in the arts or other media. You may now be looking for a further professional qualification, or wish to broaden your knowledge of composing for screen, taking you to a higher level of work.

Students normally have a degree in music but applicants with equivalent practical experience are also accepted; some composing experience is preferred. We look for composers with a strong personal style, a flexible approach and an intelligent feel for drama and narrative. Candidates should normally be able to notate the music they wish to be performed acoustically, have an understanding of the main historical styles and be able to communicate with others using non-musical terms. It is essential that applicants have a strong and demonstrable interest in film.

APPLY WITH

Application Criteria

On receipt of the application form, duly completed and signed, each applicant will be provided with a link and password to download two film clips. They will be asked to write music to each of these clips, and return their completed work as Quicktime video files with sound and music track, either as downloadable links or as DVD’s sent to the school.

On being accepted for interview by the school, the applicants will be invited to bring further material that may be of interest for examination at the discretion of the interviewers.

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Degree programme description. This MA offers you the opportunity to explore key aspects of film analysis, theory, history and practice. Read more
Degree programme description
This MA offers you the opportunity to explore key aspects of film analysis, theory, history and practice. If you have already studied film at undergraduate level, you will be able to deepen your knowledge here. If this is your first in-depth engagement with film, you will be introduced to some of the liveliest and most important chapters in the history of cinema. You will be able to pursue your own particular interests in a dissertation on a topic of your choice. The MA also includes an element of practical work and the study of production practices.

From the earliest days of British cinema, London was the location of most British studios and it remains the national focal point for studying film.
Our provision at Queen Mary is enhanced by our proximity to major cultural centres such as the British Film Institute, which includes the BFI Southbank, National Library and National Archive, the Institute of Contemporary Arts and the Ciné-Lumière at the French Institute. The MA attracts high numbers of well-qualified applicants from the UK and overseas each year. It is both a valuable qualification in its own right and particularly useful for applicants wishing to study subsequently for an MPhil or PhD in Film Studies.

Degree programme outline
The core module spans two semesters and provides an introduction to film analysis and theory, an overview of national and transnational cinemas (focusing on films from the USA, Britain, France, Germany, Spain, Italy, Russia and Latin America), and an outline of film history during the twentieth century. You will also be introduced to aspects of film production and practice, including the technology of photography and its use in the feature film, cinematography and the continuity system and its relationship to the development of directorial style.

You can also choose two single-semester optional modules from a range including:
• 9/11 and American Film
• Auteur Direction
• Comedies of Desire
• Films of Powell and Pressburger
• Film History: Hollywood and the Second World War
• Frame, Space, Time: Approaches to the Experiences of Film
• History, Fiction and Memory in French Cinema
• Hollywood’s Vietnam
• Introduction to Film Archives
• Married to the Mob?: Mafia representations in Hollywood and Italian Cinema
• Moving Landscapes: Film Geography and Contemporary European Cinema (subject to approval)
• Paris on the Screen
• Sighting Gender and Sexuality in Latin American Film.

You may be permitted to take one option offered as part of another MA programme in the School or within the Faculty of Arts, provided that the MA convenor agrees that this would be beneficial for your intellectual development and research plans. In the case of options outside the School, admission to such modules requires the further agreement of the module convenor. This arrangement is also extended to include an option offered as part of the MA in Global Cinema and the Transcultural at SOAS, the MA in Screen Studies at Goldsmiths, the MA in History of Film and Visual Media at Birkbeck, the MA in Film Studies at UCL, or the MA in Contemporary Cinema Cultures at KCL.

Assessment
You will submit three essays for the core module, one of 2,000 words and two of 3,000 words, and one 4,000-word essay for each of the two options. At the end of August you will submit a dissertation of 10,000 to 12,000 words.

Entry requirements
Applicants will normally be expected to have been awarded (by the time they are actually beginning the MA course) a first- or upper-second-class degree (or international equivalent) in a relevant field of study, for example in Literature, History, Film and Media, or Cultural Studies.

Career opportunities
Doing an MA is an essential prerequisite for an application to enrol for a PhD. If you are not interested in pursuing an academic degree, you will find that many varied opportunities may arise for which the MA in Film will be an appropriate training: media, teaching, PR, etc. There is no specific career for which the MA at Queen Mary is specifically designed to cater.

Further information
http://www.sllf.qmul.ac.uk/postgraduate/

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Immerse yourself in hands-on filmmaking and real production budgets on this unique course. Creativity and collaboration are at the heart of our teaching, which takes place in our very own Northern Film School (http://www.northernfilmschool.co.uk/), giving you access to state-of-the-art equipment and facilities. Read more
Immerse yourself in hands-on filmmaking and real production budgets on this unique course.

Creativity and collaboration are at the heart of our teaching, which takes place in our very own Northern Film School (http://www.northernfilmschool.co.uk/), giving you access to state-of-the-art equipment and facilities. Designed to mirror real international, independent film production, this course gives you the opportunity to gain specialist knowledge of seven main areas - producing, screenwriting, directing, cinematography, production design, sound and editing.

The course is driven by filmmaking itself, but you will also focus on theory - we want you to think, research, discuss and watch films. We encourage ideas based around independent filmmaking and look for inspired stories and concepts on which to base our productions. We will also supply funding for your masters' project.

Whether your passion lies in making fiction, documentaries or experimental films, you will have the support of a teaching team with ongoing and extensive industry experience.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: 38% of our research was judged to be world leading or internationally excellent in the Communication, Culture and Media Studies, Library and Information Management unit.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/filmmaking_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

Our course aims to give you a competitive edge in a challenging industry. We offer a route into film and television through working with tutors, mentors and visiting professionals and by developing your own creative abilities and work. We promote our graduation films on the international festival circuit, as well as giving you the opportunity to attend film festivals during the course.

- Creative Producer
- Cinematographer
- Screenwriter
- Director

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

As film financing, production and distribution move away from old models our course prepares you for an industry that expects you to be self reliant and self-employed.

You will be taught by practising filmmakers with experience across documentary and fiction, from cinematography to editing, some of whom can boast BAFTA and Oscar nominations. As a consequence of relationships between staff and the industry, you will have the opportunity to learn from visiting filmmakers during guest lectures and workshops. The Northern Film School (http://www.northernfilmschool.co.uk/) is also a member of The International Association of Film and Television Schools (CILECT), an organisation of only the best film schools worldwide.

The School is the first and only film school in the UK to receive JAMES accreditation, in recognition of the professional expertise of our staff, the professional level of our facilities and the opportunities for our students to crew on professional shoots. JAMES represents creative and technical organisations across the media industries sector such as the Association of Professional Recording Services (APRS), the Music Producers Guild (MPG), UK Screen and UK Drama. On our JAMES approved course, you will be studying the latest in industry practice and gain access to professional contacts and work experience opportunities. JAMES described us as 'a benchmark against which all other film courses need to be measured'.

At the Electric Press in Leeds city centre where the School is based, you will have access to an impressive range of facilities. These include both 16mm and digital production equipment, two production studios, professional level edit suites, production offices, screening facilities, a props store and film and script archive.

Keith Dando

Senior Lecturer

"Our course aims to empower you to not just get into the industry but to 'be' the industry on a creative as well as business level, and to leave the course having made long lasting collaborative relationships."

Keith’s career has included work on short and feature films, television series and computer games in projects for the BBC, Channel Four, Channel Five and many independent film and TV companies. Keith has also co-written screenplays that have reached the finals in the prestigious Zoetrope and Final Draft screenwriting contests, and worked with upcoming and respected filmmakers such as Clio Barnard and Penny Woolcock.

Facilities

- Film Studios
Based in the Electric Press, our two expansive production studios, East and West Side enable the building of substantial film sets. This affords film students the opportunity to fully explore set design and prop building.

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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This unique MA programme is based in a university but run by leading film practitioners, ensuring that you not only receive the highest-quality practice-based learning, but you do so in a university research environment where you learn to understand the world we live in. Read more
This unique MA programme is based in a university but run by leading film practitioners, ensuring that you not only receive the highest-quality practice-based learning, but you do so in a university research environment where you learn to understand the world we live in.

Degree information

Students will learn to devise a visual research project; to apply anthropological and social science approaches to documentary film work; to think critically about the relationship between form and content in ethnographic/documentary practice; to master the technical skills needed to produce different kinds of films of different lengths for varied audiences; and to critically view and review film material.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of 1/2 core module(s) (45/60 credits), 2/3 optional /elective modules (30/45 credits) and a project/diary (90 credits).

Core modules
-Practical Ethnographic and Documentary Filming and Editing
-Students without a social science background at either undergraduate or Master's level also take Social Anthropology or another social science foundational module in Term One as agreed with the tutor.

Optional modules - students choose two of the following:
-Anthropology and Photography
-Documentary Film and the Ethnographic Eye
-The Story and I - Finding the Form and/or Time and the Staged Index
-One of the practical film-related options offered as part of Film Studies MA according to provision.
-One of the film history modules taught in the School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES), or Departments of History or English, (for example, Russian Cinema in SSEES), details to be confirmed.
-An Anthropology or other social science module from the Faculties of Social & Historical Sciences, or Arts & Humanities.
-An Anthropology or other social science module from the Faculties of Social & Historical Sciences, or Arts & Humanities.

Dissertation/report
A major practical film project and diary allowing the students to demonstrate their mastery of the skills of documentary film-making in a film of 20–35 minutes.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of practical tutorials, seminars and masterclasses and assessed by camera and editing exercises and a written piece.

Placement
We facilitate two types of placements. Firstly, we will enable short-term internships at the film companies with whom we already have relationships through Open City Docs. Secondly, we will offer all our students the opportunity to work on the collaborative film-making projects linked to MyStreet Films, such as the Doc in a Day workshops that have proved so successful.

Careers

The programme equips students for careers in:
-Mass media including broadcast, cinematic and web-based moving image.
-Film and TV industry as camera operators, producers, directors, editors, researchers.
-Academia – ethnographic research, visual media and culture.
-Marketing and research.
-Communication and other media.
-Archives, as well as cultural heritage organisations.

Employability
The increasing demand for social and scientifically trained moving image specialists in the years ahead will continue, if not accelerate. Many of the graduates of our existing programmes now work in organisations such as Ipsos Mori film unit, BBC World Service and BBC Education.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA will allow you to benefit from UCL’s unique position in the heart of London, and from the many activities in film within the Department of Anthropology. The programme is unique in using professional film-makers to teach within a truly pan-disciplinary university research environment.

UCL now houses London’s Global Documentary Film Festival, Open City Docs Fest, created by Professor Michael Stewart. You can participate in the curation and delivery of this festival; gain experience in the delivery of a major public arts event; and benefit from established partnerships with world-famous institutions such as the the Science Museum and the British Film Institute.

This degree will from 2017 provide three strands: the existing non-fiction cinema and reportage based documentary will be joined by a 'Future Docs' strand (including VR and interactive documentary production).

Other admission requirements

Applicants with prior technical knowledge of film making are asked to send a video portfolio of up to 20’ duration (Vimeo link recommended). Applicants without a video portfolio are asked to complete a photo essay. Please see our guidelines on how to make a visual essay. You can submit either by post - a maximum of twenty 20cm x 25cm (8'x10”) stills – or by link to an external site.

All shortlisted applicants will be asked to submit a proposal for a film or video project - to consist of no more than four sides of A4, typed and double-spaced. This should include: an outline of what the film is about; the characters and other elements crucial to the narrative and the film structure/narrative. (You are not committed to the proposal for the final project.)

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