• New College of the Humanities Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • St Mary’s University, Twickenham Featured Masters Courses
  • Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
Middlesex University Featured Masters Courses
Cass Business School Featured Masters Courses
Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia Featured Masters Courses
Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
Bath Spa University Featured Masters Courses
"film" AND "making"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Film Making)

  • "film" AND "making" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 226
Order by 
This course will enable you to develop film production skills with both digital and analogue equipment, as well as knowledge of the theories of contemporary cinema. Read more
This course will enable you to develop film production skills with both digital and analogue equipment, as well as knowledge of the theories of contemporary cinema. The focus is placed firmly on developing clear and simple storytelling techniques that go beyond arbitrary formal categorisations of drama, documentary or genre. The course takes its inspiration from forms of cultural production that have challenged conformity, including the work of artists, musicians, painters and performers, and the movements of Italian neo-realism and the developing cinemas of Africa, Latin America, South Korea and Iran.

Key features
-This course encourages you to synthesise your personal experience, critical knowledge and craft skills to express yourself through moving pictures.
-Your studies will be split broadly into 75 per cent practice and 25 per cent theory.
-As well as the personal tutor scheme, we also run a pioneering peer-mentoring scheme in which recent MA graduates provide one-to-one assistance in the use of equipment and software.
-Staff on this course are practising filmmakers.
-The course is informed by practice and research in black music and cinema, neo-realist cinema, experimental filmmaking, performance and dance, storytelling, participative documentary and ghetto cinema.

What will you study?

You will study the basic principles of filmmaking, develop an understanding of the nature and potential of visual storytelling, and discover the importance of sound, lighting and the screenplay. You will also gain a sound knowledge of theories and ideas that can help in the interpretation of your own work and that of other filmmakers. You will produce a portfolio of moving-image projects to illustrate your technical ability in cinematography, sound recording, editing and writing/direction.

You will be able to use high-definition digital video camcorders, DSLRs and Macs running Final Cut Pro and Adobe Creative Cloud to apply classical and independent principles with contemporary technology; 8mm, super8 and 16mm film cameras are also available to explore analogue forms of filmmaking (students who wish to use our analogue cameras will have to cover their own stock and processing costs).

Assessment

Film production projects, critical journal, essays, and seminar presentations.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Film Making 1
-Film Making 2
-Film Making 3 (Dissertation)
-Film Writing
-Sound and Vision

Read less
The MA Film with Practice is a taught programme suitable for graduates in film, practitioners who want to advance their practice in an intellectually stimulating environment and non-film graduates with a passion for film practice demonstrated though amateur filmmaking. Read more
The MA Film with Practice is a taught programme suitable for graduates in film, practitioners who want to advance their practice in an intellectually stimulating environment and non-film graduates with a passion for film practice demonstrated though amateur filmmaking.

The programme is taught by award-winning filmmakers, internationally recognised film scholars and includes masterclasses from film industry professionals.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/343/film-with-practice

About the Department of Film

The Film Department at the University of Kent is known for its excellence in research and teaching. Arts at Kent (including Film) was ranked 1st in the UK for research power in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF). One of the largest European centres for the study of film, it has an established reputation going back 35 years. Approaching film as a dynamic part of our cultural experience, we encourage thinking about film as it emerges at the intersections of art, document and entertainment. Through theory and practice, individual research, student-led seminars and visiting speakers, we promote an environment in which postgraduate students are able to engage with the continuing vibrancy of cinema.

Studying film as a postgraduate at the University of Kent will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise, library facilities and a campus-based film culture. We currently offer expertise in North American, European and Latin American cinemas. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives, as well as with digital media and practice by research.

In 2014, the University opened a new 62-seat cinema named after the pioneering female film director Ida Lupino, which students can enjoy as part of their experience during their studies. The Lupino has state-of-the-art digital projection and sound, and has been created to provide an intimate atmosphere for film viewing.

Course structure

This programme includes two dedicated film practice modules and a dissertation by Film Practice that includes the making of a fiction film. You also choose two modules from the existing Film MA to create a practice-theory mix that accommodates your own interests.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

FI819 - Digital Film Practice: Key Skills (30 credits)
FI820 - Independent Project Development (30 credits)
FI812 - Advanced Film Theory (30 credits)
FI813 - Film History (30 credits)
FI815 - Film and Modernity (30 credits)
FI811 - Conceptualising Film (30 credits)
FI899 - Dissertation by Film Practice (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment at MA level is 100% course work: that means you will be assessed through essays, treatments, project proposals, seminar participation and a dissertation by film practice.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- Develop the understanding and skills possessed by students entering the programme to a notably higher level of sophistication and achievement (appropriate to an M-level award) than would be expected at degree level, such that all leave the programme with a substantial analytic, critical and practice-based understanding of Film.

- Develop the ability of students to think independently, argue with clarity and force, initiate and complete creative work and to discern areas of research and practice-led research within the field.

- Provoke reflection on practical, critical and theoretical approaches to Film and its context.

- Nurture intellectual and creative skills through written work (essays, dissertations, treatments, scripts), creative practice (DV films) as well as in the context of interpersonal interaction (seminars, research papers, supervision, filmmaking processes).

- Develop existing and new areas of teaching informed by and in response to developments in film practice, research and scholarship.

- Provide an excellent quality of higher education

- Attract outstanding students irrespective of race, background, gender, and physical disability, from both within the UK and from overseas.

- Support national and regional economic success by producing graduates in possession of key knowledge and skills, with the capacity to learn.

- Provide opportunities for the development of personal, communication and research skills and other key skills appropriate for both graduate employment in industry or further study.

- Provide learning opportunities that are enjoyable experiences and involve realistic workloads, based within a combined research and practice-led framework

- Offer appropriate support for students from a diverse range of backgrounds

- Provide high quality teaching in a supportive environment with appropriately qualified and trained staff?

Research areas

Research in both theory and practice is currently centred in five broad areas:

- national cinemas – form and history: North American, European, Latin American
- the moving image in a digital context
- documentary film
- film aesthetics
- avant-garde and experimental cinema.

Centre for the Interdisciplinary Study of Film and the Moving Image
The Centre draws together scholars from across the University who use film and the moving image as an integral part of their research. We are open to ideas that extend the reach of the Centre and seek to support projects that promote collaboration between individuals and other research centres. Our aim is to produce a more proactive engagement with other disciplines, to open new lines of communication and to produce innovative knowledge formations through the activity of pioneering research projects.

Careers

Arts graduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to film journalists and theatre technicians. Our graduates have found work at Universal Pictures, the London Film Festival and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations, as well as in film production, as editorial assistants and as web designers.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less
MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment. Read more
MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment.

Our MA is distinguished from traditional courses in that it specifically addresses the diversity and crossover of today's film and television culture with the aim of producing adaptive thinkers and highly creative practitioners. Our academic focus engages and interrogates film and television's status in the 21st century, which is often defined in terms of the digital age and digital culture.

On the course you will be required to examine, interpret and contest the notion of digital culture historically, socially, politically and artistically through both your research and creative practice. You will interrogate the increasingly blurred boundaries between film and television, art and technology, production and consumption, with the outcome being a fracturing of traditional categorisations. We reflect an era in which screenwriters Aaron Sorkin (Newsroom, The West Wing) and Lena Dunham (Girls, Tiny Furniture) experiment with dialogue and narrative, while conceptual artists Sam Taylor-Wood (Nowhere Boy, Love You More) and Steve McQueen (12 Years a Slave, Shame) have shifted from the art gallery to the cinema. Directors such as Ben Wheatley (A Field in England, Sightseers) and companies such as Curzon and Film4 are making use of multi-platform release schedules, and brands including HBO, Amazon and Netflix are shaping the very nature of not only what, but how, we watch. MA Film & Television understands this fundamentally shifting zeitgeist.

In examining industrial structure and visual form you will theorise the shifting dynamics of an age where anyone with a phone and a laptop has the ability to record, edit and disseminate visual projects. Such 'democratisation' has arguably made both creative uniqueness and clear industry pathways less discernable, but has provided a new and fruitful framework for those who have the ideas, talent, dedication and adaptability to embrace such immense transitional potential. However, despite these multitudinous transformations attributed to digital culture, the ethos of our MA contends that fundamental skills remain the basis of both sound academic work and creative practice. Rather than being fearful of what is to come, or nostalgic for the past, this course gives you the confidence to look at film and television critically, and acquire cutting edge creative skills in order to produce intelligent, innovative and inspirational visual work.

Our philosophy is one of flexibility, so you'll shape the curriculum around your own interests, whether in theory, creative practice, or a combination of the two. Drawn from the fundamentals of history, theory and criticism, our theoretical strand develops tomorrow's cineastes, cultural commentators, journalists and academics. This also underpins our approach to practice. The most successful film and television makers are students of their chosen medium, highly knowledgeable of historical legacy and social-political context. You'll not only learn how to develop, write, produce, shoot, record, direct and edit well, but why, philosophically and creatively, your ideas are worth being made.

Visit the website https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/film-television-ma

How the course is taught

Our passion is reflected both in the teaching and research track record of our academics, our industry connections and visiting speakers, and the quality of our film and television professionals. Crossing disciplinary areas such as cultural studies, sociology, journalism, English, philosophy and, of course, film and television studies, our MA offers academically-minded students comprehensive supervision and guidance for moving onto PhD research.

Industry and academic links

We have a strong visiting lecturer programme with recent guests including critics Dr Mark Kermode, Professor Linda Ruth Williams and Dr Will Brooker. Our practice tutors are active writers, producers, directors, editors, sound designers and cinematographers who create substantive work across all screen media. We have a wide range of contacts and industry specialists who contribute to the course, including Tony Grisoni (writer of Southcliffe, Red Riding, and How I Live Now), Mary Burke (producer of For Those in Peril, Berberian Sound Studio and The Midnight Beast), and James Henry (writer for Campus and Green Wing).

Falmouth University also recently hosted the Channel 4 Talent Day and we are active in developing work placements and internships for our students. We have sent many of students to Warp Films and TwoFour since 2009, and regularly update our webpages with work experience opportunities and jobs. Our graduates have proceeded to further study and jobs across the film and television industry, for HBO, Sky, ITV, Disney and have worked on major feature films, most recently including About Time (Richard Curtis, 2013) The World's End (Edgar Wright, 2013), The Double (Richard Ayoade, 2014) and Disney's forthcoming Cinderella (Kenneth Branagh, 2015). Falmouth University's MA in Film & Television is for students who to place themselves at the cutting edge of screen culture.

Course outline

The course is divided into three semesters of 15 weeks. Each semester offers the fundamentals vital to every academic and practitioner, and elective choices so you can shape your own learning.

What you'll do

- Study block 1
Foundation
The first semester consists of three core units, offering a diverse entry point to all aspects of the study of film and television, and the interrelationship of theory and practice:

Theorising Contemporary Film & Television Culture (Theory)

In this module you will explore the theoretical conceptualisations of film and television in the context of contemporary academic thought and popular discourse around the concept of digital culture. We will start from a point of questioning the multi-layered and contested effects of digital culture on film and television as discrete forms. You will consider the interrelationship and fusion between media in terms of production, distribution and exhibition examining the advent of new forms of representation and interaction. But we will also look at how traditional notion of film and television are being preserved and even being popular as a reaction to the effects of the digital. The module will also assess and interrogate the economic and technological developments of a more integrated and interactive media environment in terms of the cross-pollination of form and content, and socio-cultural effects on contemporary audiences.

Film & Television Industry Case Study (Theory/Practice)

In this module you will explore the industrial parameters of contemporary film and television based around the experience and expertise of current professionals. The module will utilise the School of Film & Television's many industry links to bring in guest speakers from the BBC, Channel 4, Sky, TwoFour Broadcast, Warp Films, Sheffield Doc Fest, Cornwall Film Festival, Doc Heads, BFI, Pinewood Studios, Dogbite and EngineHouse VFX. You will then have an opportunity to question these professionals about their respective sectors as a basis for a case study. Alternatively, you can investigate the sector/practitioner of your own choosing, with tutor support. The module will also contain workshops on the fundamentals of creative industry research and methodology. The module is designed so that you learn both the challenges and values of networking, and researching specific job roles and industry backgrounds in order to effectively plot your own career trajectory.

Creative Practices (Practice)

This module will engage you in the production workflow, focusing on how creative, professional and technical roles shape a final film or television project. Your weekly seminars and workshops will guide you through pre-production, production and post-production processes, enabling you to devise, develop and produce a short filmed project as part of a small crew of four to six students. You will, therefore, develop your technical skills and production practices in order to devise and deploy modes of creative practice which may include, but are not limited to, research and development, screenwriting, production management, producing, directing, cinematography, lighting, editing and the recording and design of sound.

- Study block 2
Specialisms
The second semester gives you the opportunity to specialise, choosing from a ranging of theory, practice or combination modules. Assessment of combination modules is either through an academic essay or a practice project. Potential optional modules include:

- Cultural Studies to Digital Sociology (Theory/Practice)
- Screen Futures (Theory/Practice)
- Globalisation in Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Factual Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Screenwriting for Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Work Placement (Theory/Practice)

- Study block 3
Expertise
Depending on your chosen specialism, in the third semester you'll produce either:

- Dissertation (Theory)
- Film & Production Portfolio (Theory/Practice)
- Conceptual Project (Theory/Practice)

Facilities

The purpose-built film school facilities include:

- 116-seat cinema, with Christie M Series HD projection (as used in Vue cinemas) and 7.2 surround sound

- Equipment store with a range of Blackmagic, Red, Panasonic, JVC, GoPro, Canon DSLR and C100 cameras and lenses, jibs, tracks and dollies

- Digital production suites equipped with Final Draft (screenwriting), Movie Magic (production management) and a range of edit software, including Adobe Creative Cloud/Suite, Final Cut and AVID

- Avid Unity MediaNetwork Edit server

- Recording and sound edit studios equipped with Pro Tools audio editing and Foley traps

- 14x8m TV studio with three studio cameras, full gallery facility, Chromatte grey screen, blue/green screen and full lighting rig

- Centroid 3D (Pinewood-networked) Motion Capture studio/research lab

- Virtual Studio using the latest technology

- 23,500-title TV and film library

Experience you'll get

- Highly flexible, student-focused curriculum

- Mentoring with industry professionals

- Opportunities for placement and work experience

- Creative environment for collaboration

- Using industry-standard software

- A vibrant visiting speaker programme

- Student experience-centred ethos

Assessment

- Continuous assessment with no formal examinations
- Core theory based on written assignments
- Core practice assessed on visual project and accompanying portfolios
- Elective modules all with theory/practice options
- Dissertation and/or major project in final semester

Careers

- Research, teaching or postgraduate study in art/humanities subject areas

- All technical/creative roles linked with direction, production, cinematography, editing, sound, lighting; writing for the screen; film and television criticism; research for film and TV

- Film and TV marketing, distribution and sales – digital and social media content/distribution

- Film festival and arts curatorship – media-based project management

Find out how to apply here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/apply

Visiting Us

We hold open days throughout the year so you can meet current students and staff, view our campuses and facilities, and find out more about studying at Falmouth.

Find out more - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/open-days

Read less
The programme offers a thorough grounding in postgraduate-level film and is suitable both for graduates in the subject and those new to it. Read more
The programme offers a thorough grounding in postgraduate-level film and is suitable both for graduates in the subject and those new to it.

It is taught by experts in Film and seeks to engage you with the key elements that make up the diverse nature of film and moving images.

The programme allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent academic and recreational facilities, before relocating to our Paris centre for the spring term, studying in the heart of historic Montparnasse.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/19/film-paris

About the Department of Film

The Film Department at the University of Kent is known for its excellence in research and teaching. It was ranked second in the UK for research power in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). One of the largest European centres for the study of film, it has an established reputation going back 35 years. Approaching film as a dynamic part of our cultural experience, we encourage thinking about film as it emerges at the intersections of art, document and entertainment. Through theory and practice, individual research, student-led seminars and visiting speakers, we promote an environment in which postgraduate students are able to engage with the continuing vibrancy of cinema.

Studying film as a postgraduate at the University of Kent will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise, library facilities and a campusbased film culture. We currently offer expertise in North American, European and Latin American cinemas. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives, as well as with digital media and practice by research.

In 2014, the University opened a new 62-seat cinema named after the pioneering female film director Ida Lupino, which students can enjoy as part of their experience during their studies. The Lupino has state-of-the-art digital projection and sound, and has been created to provide an intimate atmosphere for film viewing.

Studying film as a postgraduate at the University of Kent in Paris will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise, library facilities and a campus-based film culture. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives.

Modules

During the first term, you take two 30-credit taught-course modules from your chosen MA pathway. You then spend the second term in Paris, studying two modules from a choice which varies from year to year.

Modules available on this programme may include:
FI812 - Advanced Film Theory (30 credits)
FI813 - Film History: Research Methods (30 credits)
FI821 - Film and Modernity (Paris) (30 credits)
FI998 - Dissertation:GPMS (60 credits)

During the spring term you are free to construct your own programme from across the range of modules available, making it as focussed or as inter-disciplinary as you like. You have plenty of time during the autumn term to make informed decisions about your programme of studies in Paris.

You are encouraged to make full use of the city’s cultural resources and to integrate these into your studies which means you will be able to explore and discover connections between history, literature, the visual arts and other media.

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework and the dissertation.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- develop your understanding and skills to a notably higher level of sophistication and achievement (appropriate to an Master’s level award) than would be expected at degree level, such that you leave the programme with a substantial analytic and critical understanding of film and film studies

- develop your understanding and skills to the level necessary for entry into a research programme in film

- develop your ability to think independently, argue with clarity and force, to discern areas of research interest within the field and be able to frame viable research questions

- allow you to spend your first term in Canterbury, studying modules in film, and to spend your second term in Paris developing your interest in cinema within the context of city often seen to be central to the aesthetic developments of filmmaking and critical approaches central to the history of the discipline

- consider the impact of French critics and filmmakers on the wider discipline of film

- provoke reflection on areas of critical and theoretical approaches to French cinema and its context

- nurture the intellectual skills cited above in the context of written work (essays and dissertations) as well as in the context of interpersonal interaction (seminars, research papers, supervision)

- provide access to enhanced intercultural awareness and understanding through the opportunity to study in Paris

- provide opportunities for the development of personal, communication and research skills and other key skills appropriate for graduate employment both in industry and in the public sector.

Research areas

Research in both theory and practice is currently centred in five broad areas:

- national cinemas – form and history: North American, European, Latin American
- the moving image in a digital context
- documentary film
- film aesthetics
- avant-garde and experimental cinema.

Centre for the Interdisciplinary Study of Film and the Moving Image
The Centre draws together scholars from across the University who use film and the moving image as an integral part of their research. We are open to ideas that extend the reach of the Centre and seek to support projects that promote collaboration between individuals and other research centres. Our aim is to produce a more proactive engagement with other disciplines, to open new lines of communication and to produce innovative knowledge formations through the activity of pioneering research projects.

Careers

Arts graduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to film journalists and theatre technicians. Our graduates have found work at Universal Pictures, the London Film Festival and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations, as well as in film production, as editorial assistants and as web designers.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less
The Film. Theory and Practice MA provides you with a sophisticated understanding of films as systems of meaning. Your study covers areas such as film-making, historical cinema, screenwriting and narrative. Read more
The Film: Theory and Practice MA provides you with a sophisticated understanding of films as systems of meaning. Your study covers areas such as film-making, historical cinema, screenwriting and narrative.

The course will advance your knowledge of the musculature of cinematography and editing, and the nerve system of narrative conventions, authorship, genre, power, aesthetics, stardom and nationality. You can specialise in areas of film theory, or in film practice; the latter including screenwriting, film-making and cinema management.

You will develop your own scholarly approaches to film through exploring a range of positions in film studies, and a range of historical periods and national/transnational cinemas.

By the end of the course you will have acquired knowledge of a range of analytical and theoretical principles in film studies and an array of national/transnational cinemas, including:
-British
-Chinese
-French
-American
-North African
-Spanish and Latin American

If you choose to work in film production you will usually have a finished film within 12 weeks.

Our graduates have progressed into a variety of careers, including: academia, media and journalism, cinema management, and film production. Many of our MA students go on to PhD research.

The study of film has a long history at Newcastle. Our community of film scholars shares specialisms in:
-Film genre
-Film stardom
-Gender and ethnic identities in cinema
-Writing on film

Our research interests also range widely in Anglophone, French, Hispanic, East Asian and Middle Eastern cinemas.

Award-winning film-makers, Tina Gharavi and Ian MacDonald, bring a wealth of professional experience to the teaching of film production. We collaborate with the Tyneside Cinema to provide work experience opportunities and in-depth knowledge in film exhibition and distribution.

We have a thriving research culture in film. The Research Centre in Film and Digital Media organises a diverse range of activities such as visiting speaker series, student or staff-oriented conferences and symposiums, and Chinese and Spanish film festivals.

Work experience

In two optional modules: Exhibition Culture and Professional Placement, we collaborate with the Tyneside Cinema in providing opportunities for work experience.

You will also have the opportunity to get involved in the organisation of conferences and film festivals.

Facilities

You will have the opportunity to use Culture Lab, a complex for creative practice which includes a stock of film cameras and editing suites, as well as motion-capture, animation and sound-mixing technology.

The Language Resource Centre and Robinson Library hold large collections of international films and film magazines. You will also have access to a dedicated postgraduate suite including computers, workspaces, a kitchen and showers.

There are fantastic local film facilities including the Tyneside Cinema and British Film Institute Mediatheque. You will also have guided access to Tyne and Wear Archives.

Read less
Programme description. This programme takes a project-led, practice-based approach to studying for an MA in Film Directing (Documentary) which integrates practical film making with analysis of contemporary film practice. Read more

Programme description

This programme takes a project-led, practice-based approach to studying for an MA in Film Directing (Documentary) which integrates practical film making with analysis of contemporary film practice. Students choose to make a creative documentary or a non -fiction film which defies genre definition and pushes the boundaries of narrative. We develop these through workshops and tutorials. Our students work within an integrated framework that helps them question the form of their films and enables them to find the right language for their storytelling.

The programme encourages ways of working as a film community that foster the important exchange of ideas, with inspiration from international visiting film makers through Scottish Documentary Institute and support from our team of documentary practicioners. All tutors are top professionals currently working within the industry as directors, producers, editors, cinematographers or sound designers. A newly built Avid edit teaching space, and a new screening space helps us encourage a fresh approach to emerging technologies.

Graduate films do well internationally regularly winning BAFTAs, RTS Awards and awards at international festivals. Over the last five years students have received an Oscar nomination for an MA film made here and an Oscar shortlist for a film made by a recent graduate. We work closely with the Scottish Documentary Institute, the University’s internationally-acclaimed research centre in documentary film making.

The aim of the Film Directing programmes at ECA is to:

challenge boundaries, encourage original thought, and develop intellectual and critical approaches to making films

combine the contemporary energy and discipline of current creative approaches to film practices with the professionalism of industry practices, in order to produce innovative and grounded work

facilitate the interrelationship between different cultural traditions, traditional and emerging screen technologies, and classical and non-traditional cinematic genres and conventions.

provide postgraduate education in film making that constitutes a clear progression from undergraduate education whilst maintaining distinctiveness from industrial training- that gives scope for taking risks

foster filmmakers able to work and compete internationally

Programme structure

This programme is project-led and delivered through workshops and regular individual tutorials. It integrates practical studio work with theoretical and written studies from the Screen cultures course (see separate description) which is run independently from the Film Department.

The first semester, Design Studio is organised round a series of micro-films which lead to a growing awareness of film language and enhancement of technical skills to creatively support filmic vision. Cinematography and sound workshops are delivered by visiting lecturers. Directorial voice is built up also through tutorials in which an idea for a graduating film is developed and evolved. Awareness of current international documentary practice is built through regular seminars and screenings, collaborations with Film Festivals such as Take One Action and also supported by Scottish Documentary Institute. This is also to inspire students to push boundaries in their approach to narrative structure and visual language and not to get locked in conventional approaches. We want to encourage bold work that takes risks. At the end of the first semester all students pitch their films using a trailer or short excerpt from their research material. They also develop a treatment with feedback from tutorials.

Semester two is spent preparing and shooting the graduate film and is backed up with edit tutorials as well as project support from weekly meetings with a tutor. Students also receive seminars in production process including contracts.

Semester three is when the film is edited and finished with input from group crits, tutorials. Students also attend or often volunteer with Edinburgh Film Festival and the Edinburgh Pitch in order to observe and engage with key players from the international documentary world through hearing feedback from commissioning editors.

Alongside the ECA learning structure, students also have a pool of potential collaborators from Screen Academy Napier including the possibility of working with cinematographers, editors and producers.

Career opportunities

Our students go on to a wide range of roles, including producer, director, writer, production or location manager, researcher, editor, assistant director, cinematographer, or journalist. Graduates have found work directing for the BBC and making work internationally for top broadcasters and film funds. Related fields include advertising, community films, academia or film development agencies.

Creative Skillset

MA/MFA Film Directing has been awarded the Creative Skillset Tick, the industry kitemark of quality, following a rigorous assessment process by experts working in the Creative Industries. The Creative Skillset Tick is awarded to practice-based courses which best prepare students for a career in the industry. Screen Academy Scotland is one of only 3 Screen Academies in the UK along with National Film School and London Film School.



Read less
Develop your creativity and prepare for a career in film while gaining hands-on experience at Screen Academy Scotland on this Creative Skillset accredited course. Read more
Develop your creativity and prepare for a career in film while gaining hands-on experience at Screen Academy Scotland on this Creative Skillset accredited course.

This course has been designed to help you embark on a career as a professional fiction film-maker in one of the following disciplines:

• directing
• cinematography
• editing
• sound
• producing

Teaching is through a combination of collaborative shared modules and modules that are geared to each individual discipline. You’ll spend about half your time focusing on your chosen discipline and the other half acquiring general film making skills.

The year culminates in a major project module in which you’ll work in your chosen discipline on one or more short fiction films.

See the website http://www.napier.ac.uk/en/Courses/MA-Film-Postgraduate-FullTime

What you'll learn

Coursework consists of a large number of practical exercises and projects that will deepen your technical, creative and professional film making skills.

As an Edinburgh Napier student, you’ll have access to Screen Academy Scotland, an active film-making hub in Edinburgh. It offers great scope for collaboration with some 200 or so students engaged in diverse film activities.

At the Screen Academy, you’ll have access to a complete range of professional production and post-production equipment, including Arri Alexa, HDCam, Super 16 mm, Avid, Final Cut Pro, Pro-Tools and a dubbing facility. You'll be supported by tutors who themselves have significant experience in the industry.

The Screen Academy is a professionally equipped facility and we expect student work to aspire to a level that is close to industry standard. It's one of only three Film Academies in the UK accredited by Creative Skillset, the film industry’s skills body, giving our graduates significant credibility in the industry.

In addition, Screen Academy students can buy an industry pass at a heavily-discounted rate to attend screenings, master classes and networking events at the Edinburgh International Film Festival in June.

This course will advance your knowledge of your chosen specialist area as well as giving you a rounded understanding of other film making disciplines. The emphasis on professional skills will help maximise your chance of success.

Previous graduates have had their films screened at festivals around the world, including Venice, Beijing, Kolkata and Edinburgh. Many have gone on to win awards and commissions for TV and feature film projects.

This is a one year full-time course starting in September and is split up into three trimesters.

Modules

• Motion Graphics
• VFX
• Sound for Film 1
• Sound for Film 2
• Collaborative Techniques for Film 1
• Creative Practice for Film and TV
• Script Workshop 1
• Writing and Screen Project Development
• The Business of Screen Project Development
• Collaborative Techniques for Film 2
• Creative Practice for; Cinema
• Critical Film Study
• Masters Film Project

Study modules mentioned above are indicative only. Some changes may occur between now and the time that you study.

Careers

On completion of this course, we would expect graduates to be ready to take up an entry level job in the industry, or in the case of outstanding students, set themselves up as an independent practitioner as either a director, producer, cinematographer, editor or sound designer.

High achieving students on the programme who would like to continue their studies will have the opportunity to apply for the MFA Advanced Film Practice. This provides a further year of intense, project-based film-making.

How to apply

http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/how-to-apply

SAAS Funding

Nothing should get in the way of furthering your education. Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS) awards funding for postgraduate courses, and could provide the help you need to continue your studies. Find out more: http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/saas-funded-courses

Read less
This programme offers an exciting combination of both film-making practice and textual and historical approaches to the study of film and television. Read more
This programme offers an exciting combination of both film-making practice and textual and historical approaches to the study of film and television. As a student on this innovative programme, you will be taught the skills of film production, working intensively in small groups to explore aesthetic possibilities and gain insights into the craft and industry of screen media. You will also engage with critical perspectives and develop high-level research and analysis skills.

Optional units offer the chance to specialise in different areas of practical film-making and to gain a greater understanding of specific areas around the history and aesthetics of film and television. At the dissertation stage, you will have the opportunity to undertake a placement in creative industry, to undertake an in-depth study of film and television by means of a traditional dissertation, or to produce a mixed-mode investigation through film practice, either individually or in a team, supervised by one or more academic advisers.

The University of Bristol has more than 40 years of experience in this field and the programme draws on the expertise of world-leading scholars, expert practitioners and industry professionals. The Department of Film and Television hosts a series of research seminars and industry masterclasses that are targeted to enrich your studies. Facilities include a 200-seat cinema, production studio, animation and edit suites, seminar rooms and sound rooms.

Bristol is an excellent city in which to study film and television, with its varied cinema, television and digital media spaces, such as the Arnolfini, BBC Bristol, The Cube and Watershed Media Centre. Bristol's Harbourside is home to an array of film festivals, including the Encounters Short Film and Animation Festival, the Slapstick Festival, and the Afrika Eye Festival.

Programme structure

The programme has been designed to develop skills and knowledge cumulatively, while allowing you the opportunity to tailor your learning to your specific areas of interest.

In the first semester, you will be taught skills and techniques of formal analysis and practical film-making, providing the foundation for optional units across the year, such as Writing and Directing, Screen Histories, Television Forms and Making Short Fiction. Other options include Translation for Subtitling (Chinese-English), Screen Style and Aesthetics, and Making Short Fiction.

In the second semester, you will gain knowledge of research methods relevant to the dissertation stage, which includes the opportunity to undertake a placement in the film/TV industry, write an extended essay or produce a piece of practice (normally a short film) accompanied by individual written reflection.

Careers

Graduates of film and television at Bristol have taken up careers as film-makers, programme researchers, senior academics and broadcasting executives.

Read less
This interdisciplinary programme is taught by staff from a wide range of departments at UCL, all international experts in the field of film studies. Read more
This interdisciplinary programme is taught by staff from a wide range of departments at UCL, all international experts in the field of film studies. Linguistic and cultural expertise informs our teaching on the film-making traditions of Europe, the Americas, the Middle East, Asia and Southeast Asia.

Degree information

The programme covers the history of cinema and a wide variety of world cinemas. It is designed to provide students with advanced knowledge of both the history of cinema and its contemporary developments, and with the skills, concepts, methods and theories required for the study of cinema and media at graduate level.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits), three options (90 credits), a dissertation (60 credits) and a research methodology module (not credit bearing).

Core modules
-Moving Images: Technology, Forms, Receptions
-Reading and Research Films

Optional modules
-Ancient Rome on Film
-Film Exhibition
-Genre in Italian Cinema
-Hollywood Genres
-How to Make an 8-Minute Documentary
-New Argentine Cinema
-Nordic Cinema: Contextualising Dreyer, Bergman and Dogme
-Political Cinema
-Russian Cinema: Epochs and Genres
-Spanish Film
-The French New Wave
-The Idea of Documentary
-Theories and Practices of Film
-Global Cinemas
-Digital Media
-East and South Asian Cinemas

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, and film and video screenings. The core courses are assessed by essays and examinations, which together count for 20% of the final mark. Optional courses are assessed by essays (40%), and the dissertation makes up the final 40%.

Careers

Graduates from the MA in Film Studies have pursued various careers, including: academic research and teaching; careers within media arts (writing, directing, editing); print and media journalism; arts and museum management; multimedia authoring and digital design; film preservation and curating.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Lecturer, SOAS, University of London
-Communication Officer, Camera Lucida Productions
-Head of Development, Clcada Bellweather (CB Productions)
-Media and Film Studies Lecturer, City and Islington College
-Programme Assistant, ICA (Institute of Contemporary Arts)

Employability
Former students of this programme have gone on to careers in education and publishing and a wide variety of careers in the media arts, including film production, festival programming, and film curation with organisations that include the BBC, the Barbican Centre, the Athens International Film Festival, and the London Film School.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Each year, we welcome students from all over the world to our Film Studies MA. Under the aegis of UCL's Centre for Multidisciplinary and Intercultural Inquiry (CMII), students spend a year amongst a thriving, cross-disciplinary community of cinema scholars and research students.

We have particular research strengths in film history, film theory, and in an exceptionally broad range of national and regional cinemas.

UCL has made a major commitment to refurbishing its multimedia infrastructure for the study of film and related media. This includes building a significant collection of print and visual materials and new facilities for teaching and for film and media screenings.

Read less
Since 1984, UBC’s Department of Theatre and Film has granted MA degrees in Film Studies. The MA is a two year program with thesis. Read more

Film Studies

Since 1984, UBC’s Department of Theatre and Film has granted MA degrees in Film Studies. The MA is a two year program with thesis. We’re looking for recent and upcoming graduates of undergraduate film and media studies programs.

Moving pictures dominate today’s world. Whether accessed via the internet, home media systems, or the traditional theatre, the reach of the moving picture industry is truly global, and its impacts are felt on every level: locally, nationally, and internationally. The study of moving images provides a major way of thinking about our approach to reality. In this context, it is essential to analyze film forms, theories, aesthetics, receptions, and policies and to thoroughly understand cinema in relation to history and culture.

In our BA in Film Studies and MA in Film Studies programs, our mission is to educate students in the diversity of cinematic practices, and in their historical and contemporary formats. We aim to provide a supportive environment in which students can discuss the role that moving pictures play in various societies, and how they mediate our perceptions of the world. Our aim is to teach students in a liberal arts context that will help to prepare them for a wide range of careers, including teaching, curating, policy-making, programming and distribution, preservation, filmmaking, writing, consulting, and arts administration.

UBC Vancouver is a remarkable place to study film. In addition to the resources of the university, we benefit from the fact that the Vancouver region has the largest film industry activity in Canada, popularly known as “Hollywood North”. The city also hosts several high-profile festivals and dedicated institutions that program independent international and Canadian cinema.

The Film Studies Faculty members are renowned experts in the various specialties of film studies. They are actively engaged in researching and publishing on cinema in its diverse forms. They chair academic conferences, and they maintain a public profile as intellectuals concerned with the heritage and future of moving pictures. Their dedication provides a stimulating intellectual environment for students.

The Film Studies faculty founded and operates The Centre for Cinema Studies at UBC, which aims to advance the scholarly study of film and film culture. Graduate students in the MA in Film Studies Program edit and publish a freeʪournal of film studies, entitled Cinephile. Our Visual Resources Centre houses over 5,000 film titles in various formats, and is an essential research resource for students and faculty.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts
- Specialization: Film Studies
- Subject: Creative and Performing Arts
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts

Read less
MA in Film and Screen Studies offers a unique combination of critical and creative approaches to the past and the future of audiovisual media- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-film-screen-studies/. Read more
MA in Film and Screen Studies offers a unique combination of critical and creative approaches to the past and the future of audiovisual media- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-film-screen-studies/

The 21st century is when everything about the moving image changes.

MA Film and Screen Studies will equip you with skills and knowledge to address current transformations of moving image media in a globalised world, from the media in your pocket to architectural screens.

It explores both the old and the new, philosophy and history, theory and practice, to help you understand the challenges of the 21st century's culture of moving images, changing artistic and political contexts as well as ever developing technologies.

Innovative approach

What distinguishes the MA in Film and Screen Studies is its innovative approach to learning and research. It takes you well beyond the borders of traditional film studies. It encourages you to think critically and imaginatively, across media forms, disciplinary boundaries as well as conceptual and creative work.

You'll have the option of two pathways:

-Moving Image Studies Pathway
-Media Arts Pathway

Students taking the Media Arts pathway will have the opportunity to submit some work in non-traditional forms.

Globally renowned academics

Teaching and supervision draw on the diverse research strengths of the globally renowned academics at one of the world's leading media and communications departments, which also has strong traditions in audiovisual practice.

You'll be taught by scholars of international standing who have expertise in the interface between film criticism and creation; new screen technologies; in early cinema and the media archaeology of modernity; in artist’s film; and in non-fiction film (eg documentary and avant-garde).

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Rachel Moore.

Pathways

The MA offers two pathways:

MA Film and Screen Studies: Moving Image Studies Pathway:
The moving image media today are a concentrated form of culture, ideas, socialisation, wealth and power. 21st-century globalisation, ecology, migration and activism fight over and through them. How have the media built on, distorted and abandoned their past? How are they trying to destroy, deny or build the future? This pathway explores new critical approaches that address the currency of moving image media in today's global context – their aesthetics, technology and politics. It seeks to extend the boundaries for studying moving images by considering a wider range of media and introducing students to a wider range of approaches for investigating moving images' past and present.

MA Film and Screen Studies: Media Arts Pathway:
The most intense and extreme forms of media, experimental media arts, test to breaking point our established ideas and practices. From wild abstraction and surrealist visions to activist and community arts, they ask the profoundest questions about high art and popular culture, the individual and the social, meaning and beauty. This pathway explores these emerging experimental practices of image making and criticism. Students on this pathway are encouraged not just to study but to curate and critique past, present and future media arts by building exhibitions and visual essays of their own. Short practical workshops will enable students to make the most of the skills you bring into the course.

Structure

The MA consists of:

two core modules (60 credits in total) comprising one shared and one pathway-specific core module
option modules to the value of 60 credits
a dissertation (60 credits) on a topic agreed in conjuction with your supervisor (on the Media Arts pathway up to 50% of the dissertation can be submitted in audiovisual form)

Core modules

The core modules will give you a foundation to the subject. The shared core module in Archaeology of the Moving Image introduces current debates in film and screen studies through the key notion of media history.

Pathway-specific cores develop new ways of conceptualising the cinematic today, focusing respectively on the political aspects of media forms and styles in Politics of the Audiovisual (the Moving Image Studies pathway) and on artists' use of various screen media in Experimental Media (the Media Arts pathway).

Option modules

We offer a wide range of option modules each year. Below are some examples of modules that are currently running. For a full list, please contact the Media and Communications department.

Intercollegiate options

Students on the MA in Film and Screen Studies can also take one option from the MA Film & Media programmes at other University of London colleges. Please consult the Screen Studies Group website for further details of other programmes and the Film and Screen Studies Convenor at Goldsmiths for more details on how to take part in options at other colleges. Options taken under this scheme are deemed to count for 30 credits at Goldsmiths.

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills

You will develop skills enabling you to analyse, contextualise, historicise and theorise current and future developments in screen-based media and to communicate your ideas in written and, on the Media Arts pathway, in audiovisual form.

Careers

Possible careers include film and video distribution, film exhibition, museums, film and television criticism, new media criticism, new media art, and other jobs associated with screen culture, as well as further academic study.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

Read less
Do you have a desire to pursue a specific research project in film and video?. On this ResM you’ll receive a grounding in the research processes which are common to work generally in the arts, humanities, creative and cultural industrial fields. Read more
Do you have a desire to pursue a specific research project in film and video?

On this ResM you’ll receive a grounding in the research processes which are common to work generally in the arts, humanities, creative and cultural industrial fields. Explore research questions and methodologies specific to film and video and learn how these relate to both practice and/or theory.

Programme structure

You'll get to focus on practice or theory, in any combination of your choice, in one of the following areas:
-Artists’ film and video, experimental film and video (including fiction, documentary, drama documentary, animation)
-Histories of autobiographical, experimental, avant-garde film and video
-Contemporary theoretical discourses about independent film (including film practice as research, film as philosophy)
-The study and use of archive film (including home movies) in different contexts and practices; the relationship of film and video to new forms of dissemination (with particular reference to the digital)
-Collaborative projects involving different disciplines (for example, performance); and community-based and activist video.

Programme content

-Critical screenings: mapping out the interconnecting territories of independent film/video making
-Research in the arts and humanities: development of generic research skills and methods
-Masters thesis: presenting a substantial piece of work, either practice- or theory-based, chosen by you

The ResM in Film and Video leads to either a traditional written thesis or one that combines critical writing and creative/professional practice. You have the flexibility to submit your thesis any time between 24–36 months or, if you are making excellent progress, you may apply to transfer directly into our PhD programme after two years, rather than submitting a ResM thesis.

Choosing a ResM

The Research Masters (ResM) is classed as a postgraduate research programme – it enables you to engage in a focused, self-negotiated research project over the period of two years. As well as being a satisfying creative and professional endeavour in itself, it provides high-quality preparation for doctoral research, including practice as research, in the interdisciplinary field of independent film and video. You will study current debates and approaches, as well as the theories, skills and methodologies necessary for contemporary film and video research. Your thesis may be assessed entirely through written work or through written work in addition to a substantial practical project that addresses particular research questions.

The ResM is suitable for:
-People in employment in the cultural and creative industries or recent graduates who wish to proceed to doctoral (PhD) research
-Those in, or who wish to be employed in, the cultural and creative industries (such as publishing, teaching, design, the media, galleries and museums, the heritage industry, journalism, theatre, dance) who wish to gain a self-directed academic qualification to lead to further career enhancement
-Anybody who wishes to further develop academic skills, pursue particular subject enthusiasms, or carry out a cherished research project with specialist guidance.

Features of the ResM

-It focuses almost entirely on an individual research project of your own choice
-Largely self-directed with tutorial guidance and clear milestones and expectations
-Includes taught modules (60 credits) that must be passed to develop and evidence your research skills
-It prepares you specifically to be a researcher in the arts and humanities, to do an extended research project within a professional context, or to do a PhD.

What’s different about the ResM?

Because it’s classed as a postgraduate research programme:
-You’ll follow the same milestones and processes as MPhil/PhD candidates in the Doctoral Training Centre, including annual monitoring, the appointment of examiners, formal acceptance of your proposal by the University, and adherence to research ethics
-You’ll be able to attend any sessions within the University’s Graduate School Researcher Development Programme
-You’ll have a supervisory team (Director of Studies plus a second supervisor) assigned once your proposal has been accepted
-You may have the option to apply to transfer straight into our PhD programme, subject to certain conditions, rather than submitting for a ResM award.

The final thesis is examined in a different way:
-There’s a flexible submission date - between 24-36 months
-It’s assessed by an internal examiner, who is not your supervisor, and an external examiner from another institution
-You’ll need to attend a viva voce. This is an oral examination where you’ll discuss your thesis with your examiners. It usually takes place between one to three months following the submission of written elements
-You won’t receive a percentage grade for the ResM degree
-You may be asked to make corrections to your thesis before being allowed to submit a final electronic version of it and being awarded your degree.

The award title will be a ResM and the certificate will include the title of your thesis, with no grade classification.

Read less
Got a passion for filmmaking? Want to improve your professional showreel and boost your employability? Southampton Solent’s MA Film Production programme is ideally suited to students who want to learn advanced filmmaking techniques, working in professional studios and collaborating with expert tutors on a range of projects. Read more

Overview

Got a passion for filmmaking? Want to improve your professional showreel and boost your employability? Southampton Solent’s MA Film Production programme is ideally suited to students who want to learn advanced filmmaking techniques, working in professional studios and collaborating with expert tutors on a range of projects.

- Students study both fiction and non-fiction filmmaking techniques, developing their own unique style of cinematography.
- Southampton Solent’s media academy offers a comprehensive media loans scheme, giving students free access to a range of modern film-making equipment including high-definition (HD) video cameras and DSLR full-frame cameras. Students are also able to access a wide range of top-quality lenses and lighting kits.
- Students will work with Solent TV and Solent Productions, our on-campus production houses, to create work for their professional showreels.
- Investment into 4K technology has already begun, giving students access to the latest professional standards.
- Solent's media academy is home to three green screen studios, a large visual recording studio with capacity for 200 seated audience members and a range of industry standard post-production facilities.
- Southampton Solent University was voted for by students as one of the UK's top creative universities (Which? University student survey, 2014).
- Solent Creatives, our on-campus creative marketing agency, provides students with the opportunity to pitch for work on professional projects.
- Students will end the course by completing a master’s project, demonstrating the range of skills that they have learnt throughout the year.

The industry -

The UK film industry as a whole continues to go from strength to strength, with the number of companies involved in the film industry growing by 32% since 2009. As online video content becomes more and more popular, video production skills have become increasingly sought after by employers.

Many past students are running their own production businesses, working as in-house practitioners or securing budgets for creative projects through crowd-funding. This course will help students prepare for careers in video production, post-production, directing, producing and cinematography.

The programme -

This exciting course focuses on independent film-making and current practices in the film industry. Students will experiment with creative ideas from the outset, taking advantage of our industry-standard facilities, training and equipment.

Along the way students will be challenged to develop their own personal style of filmmaking, exploring new ideas and collaborating with other postgraduate students. Up-to-the-minute teaching and instruction help students to build on these skills and work towards their chosen career.

Students studying in the School of Media Arts and Technology benefit from a schedule of high calibre guest speakers and visiting fellows. Recent talks have been given by Anne V. Coates (Oscar winning editor), Paul Franklin (Oscar winner for visual effects on Inception), Brian Tufano (cinematographer on Trainspotting, Quadrophenia and Billy Elliot) and Sir Alan Parker (director of Fame, Evita, Bugsy Malone, The Commitments and Mississippi Burning).

Course Content

Programme specification document - http://mycourse.solent.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=6152

Teaching, learning and assessment -

The course is taught through workshops, individual tutorials, seminars and research sessions.

Work experience -

You’ll have the opportunity to gain work experience through our two production houses: Solent Productions and Solent Creatives, which work with a wide variety of clients and media organisations.

You could be involved in writing, researching and producing work, as well as in practical film production in the studio and on location.

Assessment -

Assessment is through practical production projects, group and individual research, pitches and portfolio work.

Our facilities -

Our facilities and equipment are cutting-edge. They include:

- Three fully equipped digital studios, including a full HD studio (with 200 seats)
- Extensive Final Cut Pro HD editing stations
- Fully equipped multi-track sound studios
- HD cameras.

Study abroad -

Field trips may involve visits to film festivals in Rotterdam, New York, Berlin, London and Sheffield, and to the British Film Institute.

Web-based learning -

Solent’s virtual learning environment provides quick online access to assignments, lecture notes, suggested reading and other course information.

Why Solent?

What do we offer?

From a vibrant city centre campus to our first class facilities, this is where you can find out why you should choose Solent.

Facilities - http://www.solent.ac.uk/about/facilities/facilities.aspx

City living - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/southampton/living-in-southampton.aspx

Accommodation - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/accommodation/accommodation.aspx

Career Potential

Our graduates pursue a wide range of careers. Suitable roles for graduates include:

- Production
- Publishing
- Journalism
- Marketing
- Teaching.

Links with industry -

We have well-established industry links with ITV, the BBC, Talent TV, Glastonbury and Creamfields, giving our students access to industry professionals and up-to-the-minute experience.
Past students have worked on projects for B&Q, Fat Face, Ikea, Glastonbury, Cowes Week and Camp Bestival.

We also welcome regular guest lecturers from industry. Previous speakers have included directors Michael Apted and Alan Parker, producers Claire Lewis (7 Up) and Nik Powell (The Crying Game), cinematographer Brian Tufano (Trainspotting), editors Alex Mackie (CSI and Downton Abbey) and David Gamble (Shakespeare in Love) and television and radio presenter Zoë Ball.
We host key events for Southampton Film Week, which gives students the chance to meet and network with other industry professionals.

Transferable skills -

During the course you’ll develop a range of skills, encompassing research, creative thinking and problem-solving, along with experience in teamwork and working individually.

Tuition fees

The tuition fees for the 2016/2017 academic year are:

UK and EU full-time fees: £6,695

International full-time fees: £11,260

UK and EU part-time fees: £3,350 per year

International part-time fees: £5,630 per year

Other Costs -

Film Production- £300

Graduation costs -

Graduation is the ceremony to celebrate the achievements of your studies. For graduates in 2015, there is no charge to attend graduation, but you will be required to pay for the rental of your academic gown (approximately £42 per graduate, depending on your award). You may also wish to purchase official photography packages, which range in price from £15 to £200+. Graduation is not compulsory, so if you prefer to have your award sent to you, there is no cost.
For more details, please visit: http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/graduation/home.aspx

Next steps

Think you’ve got what it takes to craft a career in film? With professional facilities, expert teachings teams and a strong focus on employability, Southampton Solent University’s MA Film Production programme could be the perfect next step towards your dream career.

Read less
This exciting course combines an in-depth study of leading-edge media technology with hands-on experience of film production and film-making. Read more
This exciting course combines an in-depth study of leading-edge media technology with hands-on experience of film production and film-making.

Whether you dream of being a cinematographer, studio camera operator or a film editor, this course will give you an excellent grounding in both the theory and the practice of media technology.

You will enjoy realistic opportunities to engage with the industry - during your studies you will be visiting leading post-production facilities in London in order to develop your professional network and gain first-hand experience of what life as a professional is really like.

Intermediate qualifications available:

• Postgraduate certificate – 60 credits at Masters level
• Postgraduate diploma – 120 credits at Masters level

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/digital-film-technologies-and-production-15month#entry

Course detail

• Study a specialist course in digital film technologies, taught by an experienced team of industry professionals including acclaimed film-makers and published scholars, which gives you the opportunity to focus on practical production and post-production techniques
• Explore production roles and the wider context of the contemporary film business through participating in media-related research seminars, events and conferences
• Develop your practical skills using our excellent media production facilities
• Gain in-depth knowledge of areas including: production roles and responsibilities; digital film production technologies; practical production techniques; insights and interviews; the film business; studio technologies and techniques; project development and practical post-production and digital effects
• Benefit from a degree that prepares you for roles in broadcasting, journalism, arts and the media, administration, governmental regulation of the media, research, marketing, sales and advertising, cinematography, editing, directing, and independent film production or allows you to continue to MPhil and PhD research degrees

Modules

• Production Roles and Responsibilities
• Digital Film Production Technologies
• Practical Production Techniques
• Insights and Interviews
• The Film Business: Current Issues and Debates
• Studio Technologies and Techniques
• Project Development
• Practical Post-Production and Digital Effects
• Digital Film Technology Project

Assessment

The core units contain both formative and summative assessments, and it is during these units that you should learn the range of competencies and knowledge necessary to succeed on the course.

For your project work you can undertake either an extended digital film technology project (working in groups or individually) or a dissertation on relevant theoretical topic. The course utilises: oral presentations of academic arguments; oral pitches of stories; essays; case study projects; self-reflective logs and a wide range of practical work.

The assessment philosophy of the MSc begins with understanding your individual starting position. Hence work will be diagnostic (often at the outset, as with proficiency in academic practice and writing), formative, summative and evaluative. The procedures used for the assessment of your achievements will correspond with the knowledge, abilities and skills developed through your degree programme.

Careers

You will be encouraged to identify your strengths, interests and development needs in relation to the practices and conventions of both the media industry and of scholarship and research.

You will also be encouraged to seek out active engagement with industry, which might lead to either freelance jobs or employment.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

Read less
-Film and TV degree production provides an exciting opportunity to learn advanced producing, directing and screenwriting techniques and to build professional links within the UK and international film and television industry. Read more
-Film and TV degree production provides an exciting opportunity to learn advanced producing, directing and screenwriting techniques and to build professional links within the UK and international film and television industry
-This postgraduate degree provides a practical and intensive study of filmmaking in an environment that encourages experimentation, professional development and cutting edge ideas. Students work with up to date professional equipment and facilities and, as part of their Masters Degree, produce, direct or write a major film project with an individually tailored marketing and distribution strategy
-The University of Hertfordshire film programmes and post-graduate school regularly host industry professionals who lecture and conduct workshops, seminars and tutorials. We work closely with the industry to enable students to connect directly with their future employers and mentors
-The combination of creative, technical, practical and management skills make this course unique and our graduates highly successful, as employees or as independent filmmakers

Why choose this course?

The MA Film and Television production programme offers an opportunity for students to initiate, develop and realise original film and television work in directing, producing and screenwriting. Students enhance their creative practice in film and television to professional levels, with the aim of pursuing a successful career in the industry. The programme commences with a series of taught modules, intended to augment the student's critical judgment and technical capability, before embarking on a major project, in the form of a substantial screenplay or digital film.

The project offers a setting in which the student can increase confidence in creative decision making, whilst expanding awareness of the requirements of film style and technology, finance, marketplace and audience. Students broaden their knowledge and experience to gain a better understanding of film and television production and its professional and commercial practices. They undertake a programme of screenings, master classes and seminars, to extend their knowledge of film and television histories, genres, aesthetics and narrative processes and to develop a range of research and communication skills. Students are encouraged to develop the aesthetic and conceptual awareness required to analyse and critically situate their work within current theoretical, cultural and commercial contexts, whether as a director, producer or scriptwriter.

The modules focus on script development, working with actors, camerawork, lighting, sound recording, post production techniques, funding, distribution and other relevant areas. You will benefit from the expertise and creative ideas of students working in specialised areas elsewhere in the School (eg Visual FX, Special FX, Animation or Music) whose input can enhance the professionalism of your major projects.

Careers

You will also have the opportunity to exhibit your work at the University and there are good opportunities to develop your teaching experience by mentoring undergraduate students in your subject area. When you successfully complete your MA, you will have made a very substantial addition to your CV and have a clear understanding of the next steps in the development of your career.

Teaching methods

You are taught in an intensive mix of lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials, masterclasses and industry guest sessions. Tutorial support is offered in small groups and one-to-one, with further support available online and by email.

All students on the PG Media programme engage in an interdisciplinary project as a part of their MA study, giving them an opportunity to work with students from other disciplines in an experimental and creative way.

Structure

Core Modules
-Creative Economies
-Discourse/Reflection: Professional Project Development
-Major Study: Film and Television Production
-Practice 1: Script Development
-Practice 2: Camera, Sound and Editing
-Research and Enquiry

Optional
-Creative Economies (Online)
-Research and Enquiry (Online)

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X