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Masters Degrees (Film Journalism)

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The International Multimedia Journalism MA programme teaches multimedia journalism to graduates of universities outside the UK who aspire to pursue a career in the news industry. Read more
The International Multimedia Journalism MA programme teaches multimedia journalism to graduates of universities outside the UK who aspire to pursue a career in the news industry. You learn to report for newspapers, websites, radio and television in a live newsroom environment. Using state-of-the-art technology located in dedicated radio/television studios and multimedia newsrooms you work to real deadlines to make news programmes and upload your work to the internet. Your tutors are award-winning journalists with decades of front-line experience in national and international news. Every day starts with an editorial conference and the degree programme balances focus on journalism as practical reality with intense academic study and reflection.

This programme is especially designed for those students who do not intend to practise journalism in the United Kingdom.

About the Centre for Journalism

The Centre for Journalism is leading the development of journalism as an academic discipline rooted in professional newsroom practice. It was established in 2008 to achieve top standards in teaching and research.

A lively and welcoming community spirit exists within the Centre. There are regular social events, seminars and masterclasses. Recent visitors have included: Allan Little, BBC correspondent; Sarah Ivens founding Editor-in-Chief of OK! Magazine USA; Gavin Esler, former presenter of Newsnight; Jon Snow, presenter of Channel 4 News, Mark Thompson, former Director General of the BBC, Alex Crawford three times RTS TV journalist of the year, Stephanie Flanders former Economics Editor BBC and Stuart Ramsay Sky News chief Correspondent. Thanks to the range of research and professional interests in the Centre, we can offer wide scope for research supervision.

The Centre enjoys strong links with other academic departments including the School of History, Kent Law School and the School of Politics and International Relations. It encourages collaborative and interdisciplinary research and joint supervision.

Course structure

Compulsory modules in Reporting and Writing, Journalism and Free Expression and Practical Multimedia Journalism introduce you to the intellectual and professional challenges of reporting for newspapers, radio, television and the internet. You choose optional academic modules from a range including: History of Journalism; Reporting Conflict; Communication and Humanitarianism, Political Reporting and Propaganda - Media, Manipulation and Persuasion.

You may choose to complete a dissertation.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year.

JN800 - Reporting (45 credits)
JN802 - Practical Multimedia Journalism (45 credits)
JN804 - Dissertation in Multimedia Journalism (30 credits)
JN814 - Journalism and Free Expression (30 credits)
JN815 - Political Reporting (15 credits)
JN816 - Propaganda-Media, Manipulation and Persuasion (15 credits)
JN806 - Reporting Conflict (15 credits)
JN807 - Advanced Multimedia Storytelling (15 credits)
JN808 - Communication and Humanitarianism (15 credits)
JN813 - Sports Journalism (15 credits)

Assessment

The degree is taught by a combination of lectures, seminars, masterclasses, news days, tutorials and editorial conferences. Assessment is by coursework (including essays, reporting exercises and presentations) and examinations. The optional dissertation counts for a third of the final grade.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- teach the professional and academic skills required to practise multimedia journalism to those wishing to pursue a career in the news industry

- educate you to think critically about the ethics, duties and responsibilities of journalism in democratic societies and in emerging democracies and thus improve the quality of journalism as a profession

- produce graduates with a courageous and principled vision of the purpose of journalism and its constitutional value in contemporary democratic societies

- develop a detailed and systematic understanding of particular forms of journalism and their historic and contemporary role in the shaping of culture and society

- develop a systematic understanding and critical awareness of the impact of new technologies on journalism

- develop an appropriate range of cognitive, critical and intellectual skills and research skills

- foster lifelong learning skills that will enable you to work with self-direction and originality and to contribute to journalism and society

- bring scholarly and critical insights to bear on the subjects, activities and processes associated with multimedia journalism

- provide teaching and learning opportunities that are informed by high quality research and scholarship from within the Centre for Journalism and elsewhere.

Research areas

History of journalism, political reporting, environmental journalism, conflict reporting, documentary film, journalism technology, democracy, propaganda, global media

Study support

Postgraduate resources
The Centre is based in state-of-the-art multimedia newsrooms equipped with the latest audio and video-editing technology, a radio studio and broadcast-quality television facilities. A dedicated postgraduate newsroom opened in September 2010. Newsroom computers offer a wide range of software for teaching and research support. Students have access to Press Association news wires, Sky News Radio and Reuters World Television News feeds. They use the Centre’s dedicated multimedia website, http://www.centreforjournalism.co.uk which offers live publishing facilities in text, audio and video. The site is a forum for debate about issues in journalism and the news industry involving students and practitioners in Britain and abroad.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff regularly contribute to newspapers, magazines, journals and books. These have included: This is Today – a Biography of the Today Programme, The Phone Hacking Scandal: Journalism on Trial, Mirage in the Desert? Reporting the Arab Spring, Face the Future: Tools for the Modern Media Age and Afghanistan, War and the Media (Tim Luckhurst); What do We Mean by Local? (Ian Reeves), Specialist Journalism: Journalism Studies; Journalism: Theory, Practice & Criticism; Ethical Space; British Journalism Review; Parliamentary Affairs; Journal of Language and Politics; Environmental Communication; The Guardian; Media History; Political Quarterly; The Daily Telegraph; Independent; The Times; Sunday Telegraph; Toronto Globe and Mail; Los Angeles Times; The New Republic; The Word; Prospect.

Our students have obtained jobs at places such as Sky News, The Daily Mail, BBC Newsround and the Huffington Post.

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MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment. Read more
MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment.

Our MA is distinguished from traditional courses in that it specifically addresses the diversity and crossover of today's film and television culture with the aim of producing adaptive thinkers and highly creative practitioners. Our academic focus engages and interrogates film and television's status in the 21st century, which is often defined in terms of the digital age and digital culture.

On the course you will be required to examine, interpret and contest the notion of digital culture historically, socially, politically and artistically through both your research and creative practice. You will interrogate the increasingly blurred boundaries between film and television, art and technology, production and consumption, with the outcome being a fracturing of traditional categorisations. We reflect an era in which screenwriters Aaron Sorkin (Newsroom, The West Wing) and Lena Dunham (Girls, Tiny Furniture) experiment with dialogue and narrative, while conceptual artists Sam Taylor-Wood (Nowhere Boy, Love You More) and Steve McQueen (12 Years a Slave, Shame) have shifted from the art gallery to the cinema. Directors such as Ben Wheatley (A Field in England, Sightseers) and companies such as Curzon and Film4 are making use of multi-platform release schedules, and brands including HBO, Amazon and Netflix are shaping the very nature of not only what, but how, we watch. MA Film & Television understands this fundamentally shifting zeitgeist.

In examining industrial structure and visual form you will theorise the shifting dynamics of an age where anyone with a phone and a laptop has the ability to record, edit and disseminate visual projects. Such 'democratisation' has arguably made both creative uniqueness and clear industry pathways less discernable, but has provided a new and fruitful framework for those who have the ideas, talent, dedication and adaptability to embrace such immense transitional potential. However, despite these multitudinous transformations attributed to digital culture, the ethos of our MA contends that fundamental skills remain the basis of both sound academic work and creative practice. Rather than being fearful of what is to come, or nostalgic for the past, this course gives you the confidence to look at film and television critically, and acquire cutting edge creative skills in order to produce intelligent, innovative and inspirational visual work.

Our philosophy is one of flexibility, so you'll shape the curriculum around your own interests, whether in theory, creative practice, or a combination of the two. Drawn from the fundamentals of history, theory and criticism, our theoretical strand develops tomorrow's cineastes, cultural commentators, journalists and academics. This also underpins our approach to practice. The most successful film and television makers are students of their chosen medium, highly knowledgeable of historical legacy and social-political context. You'll not only learn how to develop, write, produce, shoot, record, direct and edit well, but why, philosophically and creatively, your ideas are worth being made.

Visit the website https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/film-television-ma

How the course is taught

Our passion is reflected both in the teaching and research track record of our academics, our industry connections and visiting speakers, and the quality of our film and television professionals. Crossing disciplinary areas such as cultural studies, sociology, journalism, English, philosophy and, of course, film and television studies, our MA offers academically-minded students comprehensive supervision and guidance for moving onto PhD research.

Industry and academic links

We have a strong visiting lecturer programme with recent guests including critics Dr Mark Kermode, Professor Linda Ruth Williams and Dr Will Brooker. Our practice tutors are active writers, producers, directors, editors, sound designers and cinematographers who create substantive work across all screen media. We have a wide range of contacts and industry specialists who contribute to the course, including Tony Grisoni (writer of Southcliffe, Red Riding, and How I Live Now), Mary Burke (producer of For Those in Peril, Berberian Sound Studio and The Midnight Beast), and James Henry (writer for Campus and Green Wing).

Falmouth University also recently hosted the Channel 4 Talent Day and we are active in developing work placements and internships for our students. We have sent many of students to Warp Films and TwoFour since 2009, and regularly update our webpages with work experience opportunities and jobs. Our graduates have proceeded to further study and jobs across the film and television industry, for HBO, Sky, ITV, Disney and have worked on major feature films, most recently including About Time (Richard Curtis, 2013) The World's End (Edgar Wright, 2013), The Double (Richard Ayoade, 2014) and Disney's forthcoming Cinderella (Kenneth Branagh, 2015). Falmouth University's MA in Film & Television is for students who to place themselves at the cutting edge of screen culture.

Course outline

The course is divided into three semesters of 15 weeks. Each semester offers the fundamentals vital to every academic and practitioner, and elective choices so you can shape your own learning.

What you'll do

- Study block 1
Foundation
The first semester consists of three core units, offering a diverse entry point to all aspects of the study of film and television, and the interrelationship of theory and practice:

Theorising Contemporary Film & Television Culture (Theory)

In this module you will explore the theoretical conceptualisations of film and television in the context of contemporary academic thought and popular discourse around the concept of digital culture. We will start from a point of questioning the multi-layered and contested effects of digital culture on film and television as discrete forms. You will consider the interrelationship and fusion between media in terms of production, distribution and exhibition examining the advent of new forms of representation and interaction. But we will also look at how traditional notion of film and television are being preserved and even being popular as a reaction to the effects of the digital. The module will also assess and interrogate the economic and technological developments of a more integrated and interactive media environment in terms of the cross-pollination of form and content, and socio-cultural effects on contemporary audiences.

Film & Television Industry Case Study (Theory/Practice)

In this module you will explore the industrial parameters of contemporary film and television based around the experience and expertise of current professionals. The module will utilise the School of Film & Television's many industry links to bring in guest speakers from the BBC, Channel 4, Sky, TwoFour Broadcast, Warp Films, Sheffield Doc Fest, Cornwall Film Festival, Doc Heads, BFI, Pinewood Studios, Dogbite and EngineHouse VFX. You will then have an opportunity to question these professionals about their respective sectors as a basis for a case study. Alternatively, you can investigate the sector/practitioner of your own choosing, with tutor support. The module will also contain workshops on the fundamentals of creative industry research and methodology. The module is designed so that you learn both the challenges and values of networking, and researching specific job roles and industry backgrounds in order to effectively plot your own career trajectory.

Creative Practices (Practice)

This module will engage you in the production workflow, focusing on how creative, professional and technical roles shape a final film or television project. Your weekly seminars and workshops will guide you through pre-production, production and post-production processes, enabling you to devise, develop and produce a short filmed project as part of a small crew of four to six students. You will, therefore, develop your technical skills and production practices in order to devise and deploy modes of creative practice which may include, but are not limited to, research and development, screenwriting, production management, producing, directing, cinematography, lighting, editing and the recording and design of sound.

- Study block 2
Specialisms
The second semester gives you the opportunity to specialise, choosing from a ranging of theory, practice or combination modules. Assessment of combination modules is either through an academic essay or a practice project. Potential optional modules include:

- Cultural Studies to Digital Sociology (Theory/Practice)
- Screen Futures (Theory/Practice)
- Globalisation in Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Factual Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Screenwriting for Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Work Placement (Theory/Practice)

- Study block 3
Expertise
Depending on your chosen specialism, in the third semester you'll produce either:

- Dissertation (Theory)
- Film & Production Portfolio (Theory/Practice)
- Conceptual Project (Theory/Practice)

Facilities

The purpose-built film school facilities include:

- 116-seat cinema, with Christie M Series HD projection (as used in Vue cinemas) and 7.2 surround sound

- Equipment store with a range of Blackmagic, Red, Panasonic, JVC, GoPro, Canon DSLR and C100 cameras and lenses, jibs, tracks and dollies

- Digital production suites equipped with Final Draft (screenwriting), Movie Magic (production management) and a range of edit software, including Adobe Creative Cloud/Suite, Final Cut and AVID

- Avid Unity MediaNetwork Edit server

- Recording and sound edit studios equipped with Pro Tools audio editing and Foley traps

- 14x8m TV studio with three studio cameras, full gallery facility, Chromatte grey screen, blue/green screen and full lighting rig

- Centroid 3D (Pinewood-networked) Motion Capture studio/research lab

- Virtual Studio using the latest technology

- 23,500-title TV and film library

Experience you'll get

- Highly flexible, student-focused curriculum

- Mentoring with industry professionals

- Opportunities for placement and work experience

- Creative environment for collaboration

- Using industry-standard software

- A vibrant visiting speaker programme

- Student experience-centred ethos

Assessment

- Continuous assessment with no formal examinations
- Core theory based on written assignments
- Core practice assessed on visual project and accompanying portfolios
- Elective modules all with theory/practice options
- Dissertation and/or major project in final semester

Careers

- Research, teaching or postgraduate study in art/humanities subject areas

- All technical/creative roles linked with direction, production, cinematography, editing, sound, lighting; writing for the screen; film and television criticism; research for film and TV

- Film and TV marketing, distribution and sales – digital and social media content/distribution

- Film festival and arts curatorship – media-based project management

Find out how to apply here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/apply

Visiting Us

We hold open days throughout the year so you can meet current students and staff, view our campuses and facilities, and find out more about studying at Falmouth.

Find out more - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/open-days

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The opportunity to study Film Studies at an advanced level. An emphasis on international and transnational cinemas. Both core and specialist modules are assessed by essay. Read more

MLitt in Film Studies

• The opportunity to study Film Studies at an advanced level.
• An emphasis on international and transnational cinemas.
• Both core and specialist modules are assessed by essay.
• Two specialist modules provide you with the opportunity to transfer and apply the theoretical knowledge and research skills acquired in the core module to a more concrete level of intellectual investigation, focusing on the creation of meaning and aesthetic value in the context of global dynamics of cultural production and distribution.
• The specialist modules vary annually and reflect current staff research interests. Emphasis throughout the year is placed on individual research.

Features

* Film Studies was ranked first in Scotland for world leading and internationally excellent research in the UK Research Excellence Framework 2014.

* Senior expertise of high profile scholars, such as Professor Robert Burgoyne, Professor Richard Dyer, Mr Jean Michel Frodon and Professor Dina Iordanova, all internationally known and respected leaders in the field .

* Regular visits from high-profile film critics, film. The most recent have been celebrated Chilean filmmaker Patricio Guzmán, who in April 2015 visited the Department and attended a screening of two of his films, followed by a Q&A session.

* The new programme in Global Cinema: Managing and Cultural Curation, is offered out of the Institute for Global Cinema and Creative Cultures (IGCCC: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/globalcinema ) which capitalise on achievements, global connections and on our reputational advantages as leaders in the study of global culture, film circulation and film festivals.

In learning and teaching, St Andrews sets the highest of standards and attracts students from all over the world with understandably high expectations. In its first five-yearly review in 2009, the Department’s teaching provision achieved the highest possible commendation. Teaching and research are closely co-related, and postgraduate teaching is informed by the staff’s research activity.

At St Andrews, we investigate cinema as a key form of cultural output and as the dominant type of creative expression. Focusing on the global dimension, our programmes cover key aspects of Film Studies through the lens of transnational cultural studies.

Film Studies at St Andrews is committed to questioning the traditional view of what is ‘normal’ cinema. We attempt to uncover the agendas (be they national, ‘western’, cultural, commercial, industrial, and so on) that define how we think about cinema, both in terms of the kinds of films we watch for pleasure, and those we study at university. There is much to be learned by studying what is produced at the margins of dominant societies, in addition to the canonical films of Hollywood and the European art house. We are interested in exploring the ways in which racial, ethnic, religious, and sexual subcultures conceptualise their identities. Similarly, we are keen to look at films produced at the periphery of established nations, co-productions between smaller players struggling to survive in the global marketplace and popular genre films often deemed unworthy of high-brow critical attention. Similarly, we
look at films that focus on transnational communities or appeal to international markets that deal with lesser-known histories and are made in foreign languages but are nonetheless worthy of critical examination and intellectual engagement.

Studying film at St Andrews will help you master a range of advanced research skills and acquire knowledge related to the construction and analysis of the moving image, the past and present day realities of various national and regional film traditions, the dynamics of the global film industry, and the theoretical approaches related to film.

Facilities and collections

The Department is housed in its own buildings, in North Street. They are within easy walking distance of the University Library, local cinema and town centre. The Department is well resourced with a dedicated teaching room. Recently the Department has started to use the wonderful facilities at the nearby Byre Theatre for most of our seminars, and for other film-related activities. MLitt classes are usually held at the Byre. A Film Studies Postgraduate Study Centre houses a DVD collection, postgraduate workspaces, viewing stations and off-air recording facilities.

At St Andrews you will be exposed to a rich and diverse film programme. Regular course-related film showings take place in a custom-built theatre. In addition, a range of screenings takes place across the University during term time, featuring films related to anthropology, international relations, and history.

St Andrews has excellent library provision, with book, journal and other information resources in Film Studies at a level consistent with an international centre of excellence. The Main Library hosts one of the best collections of international cinema on DVD and video (over 9,000 titles). The Library also holds over 1,000,000 print monographs, over 32,000 electronic books, and substantial journal title holdings in print and over 33,900 full-text electronic titles. Well over 2,000 monographs are classified under Film Studies and related subjects. There are holdings of approximately 100 film, television and media-related journals, of which about 65 are available electronically; there is also networked access to various databases, including Box of Broadcasts, Film Indexes Online and Film & Television Literature Index Full-Text.

Careers

In our media saturated culture, the opportunities for Film Studies graduates are remarkably diverse. Directly related are careers in academia, creative industries, development, distribution, film festival/cinema programming, and arts administration.

A Film Studies degree opens doors to many other spheres, including media management, film and TV research, journalism, publishing, advertising, cultural entrepreneurship, nongovernmental organisations, marketing, public relations and education. Recent destinations include: Junior Assistant Producer, European Tour Productions (IMG Media); Adjunct Instructor, SUNY (State University of New York) at Oswego; Consultant for Propel London Media.

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Interested in journalism and keen to gain qualifications that will make you stand out from others? This course leads to both an MA and NCTJ Diploma in Journalism. Read more
Interested in journalism and keen to gain qualifications that will make you stand out from others? This course leads to both an MA and NCTJ Diploma in Journalism.

Course overview

‌This Masters is one of the few postgraduate degrees in the UK to be accredited by the National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ). NCTJ accreditation is widely recognised as a gold standard for courses that turn out highly skilled, highly motivated and highly employable trainee journalists.

‌Previous study of journalism is not a requirement. If necessary, we may ask you to undertake a short course that covers essential skills and knowledge, before you join the main Masters course.

Journalism is an intensive course that trains, write and research like a journalist. It covers media ethics and law, reporting and public affairs, shorthand, sub-editing and production. You will develop your own specialist areas of interest such as crime, health or political journalism. In the final stage of the course you can produce your own newspaper or series of in-depth articles, with support from our professional journalists.

An important benefit of a Masters at Sunderland is the relevance of our research expertise, which includes sports and magazine journalism as well as web writing and social media. Sunderland hosts the Centre for Research in Media and Cultural Studies (CRMCS) and our Media Department has been recognised for producing some world-leading and internationally excellent research.

The Journalism Diversity Fund is aimed at people from diverse backgrounds who need help funding their journalism training. Candidates must be from a socially or ethnically diverse background, be able to demonstrate genuine commitment to becoming a successful journalist and have secured a place on an NCTJ-accredited course.

This course can also be taken part time - for more information, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/artsdesignandmedia/postgraduate/journalism-part-time/

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Modules on this course include:
Journalism – Stage 1 (60 Credits)
-News Journalism: Principles and Practice 1
-Essential Media Law
-Essential Public Affairs
-Shorthand

Journalism – Stage 2 (60 Credits)
-News Journalism: Principles and Practice 2
-Reporting
-Media Ethics and Society
-Shorthand

Journalism – Stage 3 (60 Credits)
-Dissertation

Teaching and assessment

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working. The course aims to stretch your creativity and maximise your sense of personal fulfilment.

In Stage 1 and Stage 2, you will have approx 22/23hrs teaching per week. This is arranged so that you have Friday off each week. The course is taught by respected academics and journalism professionals through a combination of newsroom workshops, seminars and tutorials. You will work on projects both on your own and with others, developing skills in communication and teamwork.

We encourage you to publish your work. The department has strong relationships with local and national media including Johnston Press, NCJ Media and Room 501 Publishing.

Facilities & location

The facilities at the David Puttnam Media Centre help you gain skills in areas such as writing, page design, online research, managing production, IT, and time management and presentation skills.

The mediaHUB
Throughout your time in Sunderland you will have an outlet for your creative talents in the mediaHUB, a bustling multimedia newsroom on the top floor of our David Puttnam Media Centre that will give you a real taste of life as a working journalist. The mediaHUB runs websites covering sport, news, entertainments and fashion, provides the content for news bulletins on our award-winning Spark Radio and is responsible for writing and editing Spark magazine.

Journalism/PR suites
We have four journalism suites, each with 18 Apple Mac workstations with design applications and video editing. There’s an additional open access project completion suite with 20 more workstations and colour laser printing.

Broadcast Journalism Newsroom
The Broadcast Journalism Newsroom has 20 workstations plus a Sky feed with two 40” plasma screens. Each workstation has industry-standard software including Newscutter, Burli and ENPS.

Technical support
The Journalism Newsroom has another 20 Mac workstations and offers drop-in sessions run by a rota of working journalists who can advise on projects, assignments and your personal portfolio. These sessions are available every day of the week during term time. In addition, technicians are available to help you use all the software and equipment.

Radio studios
We have six radio studios including a transmission suite for 107 Spark FM, our student-run community radio station and a city centre hub.

TV studios
We have two broadcast-quality TV studios complete with green room and changing facilities. Equipment includes four Steadicam rigs plus dolly, track and mini crane. We have over 40 full HD tapeless field camera systems.

Other media facilities
We have a live Sky feed and off-air recording facility, including DVD and Blu-ray recording, plus extensive footage archive/library. There is also a 203-seat cinema with full HD projection, 7.1 surround sound facility and the capability to play 3D feature films.

University Library Services
We’ve got a wide range of books, journals and e-books on relevant topics, with many more available through the inter-library loan service. Some useful resources for your studies include:
-Lexis, which provides full-text newspaper articles as well as access to legal information
-JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’), which provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences
-Archival Sound Recordings with over 12,000 hours of recordings
-British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC), which provides resources for the production, study and use of film and related media in higher education and research

Employment & careers

Postgraduates are highly employable and, on average, earn more than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree. On completing this course you will be equipped for roles throughout the PR and communications industries.

Recent Sunderland graduates are now working in PR consultancies as well as in the PR departments of organisations such as the Environment Agency, Tyne and Wear Sports and AA Press Office.

During the course we encourage you to gain industry experience which will enhance your skills, build up a valuable network of contacts and boost your employability.

A Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies.
As a professionally accredited centre for journalism education, we provide you with an opportunity to influence the future teaching of journalism. You can become an NCTJ student representative and attend a national council meeting once a year.

Read less
Interested in magazine journalism and keen to gain qualifications that will make you stand out from others? This course leads to both an MA and NCTJ Diploma. Read more
Interested in magazine journalism and keen to gain qualifications that will make you stand out from others? This course leads to both an MA and NCTJ Diploma.

Course overview

This Masters ‌is one of the few postgraduate degrees in the UK to be accredited by the National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ). NCTJ accreditation is widely recognised as a gold standard for courses that turn out highly skilled, highly motivated and highly employable trainee journalists. Our course is ranked 4th out of the 17 UK NCTJ postgraduate courses by performance.

Previous study of journalism is not a requirement. If necessary, we may ask you to undertake a short course that covers essential skills and knowledge, before you join the main Masters course. ‌

Magazine Journalism is an intensive course that trains you to think, write and research like a journalist. It covers media ethics and law, reporting, shorthand and public affairs. You will also learn how to design and produce magazine pages using software such as Adobe InDesign. In the final stage of the course you can produce your own magazine or website, with support from our professional journalists.

An important benefit of a Masters at Sunderland is the relevance of our research expertise, which includes magazine and sports journalism as well as web writing and social media. Sunderland hosts the Centre for Research in Media and Cultural Studies (CRMCS) and our Media Department has been recognised for producing some world-leading and internationally excellent research. The Journalism Diversity Fund is aimed at people from diverse backgrounds who need help funding their journalism training.

Candidates must be from a socially or ethnically diverse background, be able to demonstrate genuine commitment to becoming a successful journalist and have secured a place on an NCTJ-accredited course.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/artsdesignandmedia/postgraduate/magazine-journalism-part-time/

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors. Modules on this course include:
Magazine Journalism 1 (60 Credits)
-Magazine Journalism: Principles and Practice 1
-Essential Media Law and Public Affairs
-Business of Magazines
-Shorthand

Magazine Journalism 2 (60 Credits)
-Magazine Journalism: Principles and Practice 2
-Reporting
-Media Ethics and Society
-Shorthand

Magazine Journalism 3 (60 Credits)
-You will complete a supervised dissertation on a topic of your choice

Teaching and assessment

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working. The course aims to stretch your creativity and maximise your sense of personal fulfilment.

In Stage 1 and Stage 2, you will have approx 22/23hrs teaching per week. This is arranged so that you have Friday off each week.
The course is taught by respected academics and journalism professionals through a combination of newsroom workshops, seminars and tutorials. You will work on projects both on your own and with others, developing skills in communication and teamwork.

We encourage you to publish your work. The department has strong relationships with local and national media including Johnston Press, NCJ Media and Room 501 Publishing.

Facilities & location

The facilities at the David Puttnam Media Centre help you gain skills in areas such as writing, page design, online research, managing production, IT, and time management and presentation skills.

The mediaHUB
Throughout your time in Sunderland you will have an outlet for your creative talents in the mediaHUB, a bustling multimedia newsroom on the top floor of our David Puttnam Media Centre that will give you a real taste of life as a working journalist. The mediaHUB runs websites covering sport, news, entertainments and fashion, provides the content for news bulletins on our award-winning Spark Radio and is responsible for writing and editing Spark magazine.

Journalism/PR suites
We have four journalism suites, each with 18 Apple Mac workstations with design applications and video editing. There’s an additional open access project completion suite with 20 more workstations and colour laser printing.

Broadcast Journalism Newsroom
The Broadcast Journalism Newsroom has 20 workstations plus a Sky feed with two 40” plasma screens. Each workstation has industry-standard software including NewsCutter, Burli and ENPS.

Technical support
The Journalism Newsroom has another 20 Mac workstations and offers drop-in sessions run by a rota of working journalists who can advise on projects, assignments and your personal portfolio. These sessions are available every day of the week during term time. In addition, technicians are available to help you use all the software and equipment.

Radio studios
We have six radio studios including a transmission suite for 107 Spark FM, our student-run community radio station and a city centre hub.

TV studios
We have two broadcast-quality TV studios complete with green room and changing facilities. Equipment includes four Steadicam rigs plus dolly, track and mini crane. We have over 40 full HD tapeless field camera systems.

Other media facilities
We have a live Sky feed and off-air recording facility, including DVD and Blu-ray recording, plus extensive footage archive/library. There is also a 203-seat cinema with full HD projection, 7.1 surround sound facility and the capability to play 3D feature films.

University Library Services
We’ve got a wide range of books, journals and e-books on relevant topics, with many more available through the inter-library loan service. Some useful resources for your studies include:
-Lexis, which provides full-text newspaper articles as well as access to legal information
-JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’), which provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences
-Archival Sound Recordings with over 12,000 hours of recordings
-British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC), which provides resources for the production, study and use of film and related media in higher education and research

Employment & careers

On completing this course you will be equipped for employment at an advanced level, with opportunities in both print and digital media. Potential roles include working for consumer magazines, writing features in newspapers, and working in various positions across the communications, media and marketing industries.

The course’s accreditation by the National Council for Training of Journalists (NCTJ) will boost your employability within journalism. You can choose, at an additional cost, to gain the NCTJ’s Diploma in Journalism.

Recent Sunderland graduates are now working for employers such as NCJ Media, Johnston Press and Media Works. Some graduates have started up their own media organisations.

During the course we encourage you to gain industry experience which will enhance your skills, build up a valuable network of contacts and boost your employability. The Department has good links with regional media organisations and national organisations like IPC and Future plc.

A Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies.

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Interested in sports journalism and keen to gain qualifications that will make you stand out from others? This course leads to both an MA and NCTJ Diploma. Read more
Interested in sports journalism and keen to gain qualifications that will make you stand out from others? This course leads to both an MA and NCTJ Diploma.

Course overview

This Masters is one of the few postgraduate degrees in the UK to be accredited by the National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ). The combination of an MA and NCTJ Diploma will significantly boost your employability as a sports journalist. This course is ranked 6th out of the 17 UK NCTJ postgraduate courses by performance.

This is an intensive course that trains you to think, write and research like a journalist; previous study of journalism is not a requirement. You will learn how to write previews, match reports and sports features, and you will also cover media ethics and law, reporting and shorthand. In the final stage of the course, you will undertake a dissertation or a practical project, such as a sports journalism website or a series of in-depth articles.

We encourage you to publish your work and build up your portfolio. Opportunities for publication include SportsByte, our student-run website covering sport across Sunderland.

An important benefit of a Masters at Sunderland is the relevance of our research expertise, which includes sports and magazine journalism as well as web writing and social media. Sunderland hosts the Centre for Research in Media and Cultural Studies (CRMCS) and our Media Department has been recognised for producing some world-leading and internationally excellent research.

The Journalism Diversity Fund is aimed at people from diverse backgrounds who need help funding their journalism training.

Candidates must be from a socially or ethnically diverse background, be able to demonstrate genuine commitment to becoming a successful journalist and have secured a place on an NCTJ-accredited course.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/artsdesignandmedia/postgraduate/sports-journalism-part-time/

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors. Modules on this course include:
Sports Journalism 1 (60 Credits)
-Sports Journalism: Principles and Practice 1
-Essential Media Law
-Essential Public Affairs
-Shorthand

Sports Journalism 2 (60 Credits)
-Sports Journalism: Principles and Practice 2
-Reporting
-Media Ethics and Society
-Shorthand

Sports Journalism 3 (60 Credits)
-You will complete a supervised dissertation on a topic of your choice

Teaching and assessment

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of commitment and independent working. The course aims to stretch your creativity and maximise your sense of personal fulfilment.

In Stage 1 and Stage 2, you will have approx 22/23hrs teaching per week. This is arranged so that you have Friday off each week. We encourage you to publish your work. The department has strong relationships with local and national media including Johnston Press, NCJ Media and Room 501 Publishing.

Facilities & location

The facilities at the David Puttnam Media Centre help you gain skills in areas such as writing, page design, online research, managing production, IT, and time management and presentation skills.

The mediaHUB
Throughout your time in Sunderland you will have an outlet for your creative talents in the mediaHUB, a bustling multimedia newsroom on the top floor of our David Puttnam Media Centre that will give you a real taste of life as a working journalist. The mediaHUB runs websites covering sport, news, entertainments and fashion, provides the content for news bulletins on our award-winning Spark Radio and is responsible for writing and editing Spark magazine.

Journalism/PR suites
We have four journalism suites, each with 18 Apple Mac workstations with design applications and video editing. There’s an additional open access project completion suite with 20 more workstations and colour laser printing.

Broadcast Journalism Newsroom
The Broadcast Journalism Newsroom has 20 workstations plus a Sky feed with two 40” plasma screens. Each workstation has industry-standard software including Newscutter, Burli and ENPS.

Technical support
The Journalism Newsroom has another 20 Mac workstations and offers drop-in sessions run by a rota of working journalists who can advise on projects, assignments and your personal portfolio. These sessions are available every day of the week during term time. In addition, technicians are available to help you use all the software and equipment.

Radio studios
We have six radio studios including a transmission suite for 107 Spark FM, our student-run community radio station and a city centre hub.

TV studios
We have two broadcast-quality TV studios complete with green room and changing facilities. Equipment includes four Steadicam rigs plus dolly, track and mini crane. We have over 40 full HD tapeless field camera systems.

Other media facilities
We have a live Sky feed and off-air recording facility, including DVD and Blu-ray recording, plus extensive footage archive/library. There is also a 203-seat cinema with full HD projection, 7.1 surround sound facility and the capability to play 3D feature films.

University Library Services
We’ve got a wide range of books, journals and e-books on relevant topics, with many more available through the inter-library loan service. Some useful resources for your studies include:
-Lexis, which provides full-text newspaper articles as well as access to legal information
-JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’), which provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences
-Archival Sound Recordings with over 12,000 hours of recordings
-British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC), which provides resources for the production, study and use of film and related media in higher education and research

Employment & careers

On completing this course, you will be equipped for employment at an advanced level, with opportunities throughout the sports journalism industry. Potential roles include various positions across the communications, media, marketing and sports industries.

The course’s accreditation by the National Council for Training of Journalists (NCTJ) will boost your employability within journalism. You can choose, at an additional cost, to gain the NCTJ’s Diploma in Journalism.

Recent Sunderland graduates are now working with organisations such as Sky Tyne and Wear and Durham County Cricket Club.

During the course we encourage you to gain industry experience which will enhance your skills, build up a valuable network of contacts and boost your employability. The Department has close links with regional organisations including North East Press and NCJ Media. The North East is famous for its sport and you will have opportunities for match visits, press conferences and interviews at local clubs including Sunderland AFC, Newcastle United, Newcastle Falcons and Durham CCC.

A Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies.

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PLEASE NOTE. This course will run in September 2016. This is an innovative course, taught over four, week-long residential retreats over one year (full time) and will commence in September - some of these are in Central London, others in beautiful Egham Campus near Windsor. Read more
PLEASE NOTE: This course will run in September 2016

This is an innovative course, taught over four, week-long residential retreats over one year (full time) and will commence in September - some of these are in Central London, others in beautiful Egham Campus near Windsor.

Between retreats the course is run via distance-learning with a website, chat room and e-tutorials. This makes it possible for those living outside the UK, and those with busy working lives, for instance freelancers and those in the film and TV industries, to take time out to attend. We have a wide variety of students on the course including established actors, comedy writers, editors, producers, novelists and many others.

During the MASTFiR course (MA in Screenwriting for Televion and Film - Retreat) you will cover writing for feature film and television as well as new developments such as web drama. You will develop a range of ideas, then go on to write film and television outlines, and several drafts of a feature film screenplay, a TV single drama, or a TV series or serial bible and sample episodes. You will be immersed in a creative atmosphere conducive to concentrated learning and group interaction; a core unit is the Development Lab, where you will present your work in progress to the group for criticism and feedback, and experiment with co-writing.

You will also meet and work with industry and independent producers, directors, agents, writers and actors to provide a production context. We have recently had guests from Working Title, Channel Four, the BBC, Script Factory, Blake Friedmann Agency and many others.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/mascreenwritingfortelevisionandfilmretreat.aspx

Why choose this course?

- in the fast-changing world of digital drama, new media and new film markets, you will become skilled in producing strong and original fiction writing.

- the course director is Ivan Levene, a practising screenwriter and script editor with over 15 years of experience in the industry. He currently has two produced feature films, and has been involved in the development of numerous other film and TV projects, including a recent major international release. Before this he worked in acquisitions and development, advancing over £15m of film and TV production from inception to marketplace. Current commissions include a supernatural thriller with Matthew Rhys, and a biopic set in Gilded Age New York about Harriet Hubbard Ayer - socialite, proto-feminist, and the first person to create an international cosmetics business.

- teaching television is screenwriting lecturer Adam Ganz, whose TV credits include Pillow Talk and Murder Without Motive; and guest lecturing in television are Gillian Gordon and Jonathan Powell.

- despite the first students only graduating in 2008, we have already had a host of successes with many of our students finding success in the industry.

- you will meet and work with industry and independent producers, directors, agents, writers and actors to provide a production context. We have recently had guests from Working Title, Channel Four, the BBC, Script Factory, Blake Friedmann Agency and many others.

Department research and industry highlights

- the MA Screenwriting for Television and Film Retreat course (MASTFiR) only began graduating students in 2008 but already we have had a host of successes - Janice Hallett's feature screenplay Retreat is now being shot in Canada with a star cast; Olivia Wakeford has a writing credit on the feature film Baseline (2009) and several writers have gained agents and development commissions. Kay Stonham has work commissioned by the BBC and two of our younger writers are working on a C5 youth drama series. Adam Rolston has had a highly successful musical on Doris Day's life performed at a variety of London venues. Many students have won festival awards for their short films.

Course content and structure

You will study four core course units.

Core course units:
Script Craft
This unit will focus on the acquisition of basic writing skills, and is a gateway to the ‘Story and Theme’ unit. You will explore the specifics of scene and dialogue construction, formatting and issues around research and around adaptation from source materials – e.g. plays, novels and news stories.

Story and Theme
This unit teaches the essential components of story and structure, the specific language of film storytelling and genre. It will include lectures, screenings of films and extracts, and individual and group analysis of films. You will produce ideas, formal outlines and a feature-length screenplay or TV series bibles and episode.

Development Lab
This is a discussion forum to which you bring the work above, where it is critiqued and debated from a number of points of view including aesthetic, generic, marketing, audience and budget. Development Lab is interactive and is at the core of the course; it replicates many of the development processes you will face in the film and television industry.

Contexts: Current British Film and TV Practice
This unit covers current aesthetic and generic trends in British film and television. There will also be lectures and seminars on budget, schedule, commissioning, finance, contracts, casting and marketing, and you will explore the production and marketing implications of your own screenplay projects.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- the ability to discriminate between project ideas, present ideas and drafts to others effectively, and both give and receive constructive criticism

- the understanding of the aesthetic and economic conditions of the marketplace, how their work may be viewed in terms of budget and audience, and the stages a screenplay will go through in development and production

- a broad and detailed understanding of the nature of the film and television screenplay- how it signifies, how it communicates meaning to the film producer, director, actor and to the audience

- advanced understanding of the processes of writing a screenplay, from initial concept to final draft

- advanced understanding of the various stages of script development and how each is documented- outlines, treatments, pitch documents and so on

- critical knowledge of the current genres and trends in film and television and how they have evolved in recent years, particularly in the context of economic and market developments in these industries

- an understanding of the UK film and television industries, including their structure, institutions and working practices

- a broad understanding of the group nature of writing and development, and how the roles played by the various parties- producer, script editor, director and so on- shape and influence the screenplay.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including script outlines and scenes, a completed feature film screenplay and/or TV series episode and ‘bible’, and marketing and pitch documents.

Employability & career opportunities

On graduating, you will be well prepared for careers in television and feature film screenwriting and script development.

Our recent graduate successes include:

Janice Hallett's feature screenplay Retreat is now being shot in Canada with a star cast; Olivia Wakeford has a writing credit on the feature film Baseline (2009) and several writers have gained agents and development commissions. Kay Stonham has work commissioned by the BBC and two of our younger writers are working on a C5 youth drama series. Adam Rolston has had a highly successful musical on Doris Day's life performed at a variety of London venues. Many students have won festival awards for their short films.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This interdisciplinary programme is taught by staff from a wide range of departments at UCL, all international experts in the field of film studies. Read more
This interdisciplinary programme is taught by staff from a wide range of departments at UCL, all international experts in the field of film studies. Linguistic and cultural expertise informs our teaching on the film-making traditions of Europe, the Americas, the Middle East, Asia and Southeast Asia.

Degree information

The programme covers the history of cinema and a wide variety of world cinemas. It is designed to provide students with advanced knowledge of both the history of cinema and its contemporary developments, and with the skills, concepts, methods and theories required for the study of cinema and media at graduate level.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits), three options (90 credits), a dissertation (60 credits) and a research methodology module (not credit bearing).

Core modules
-Moving Images: Technology, Forms, Receptions
-Reading and Research Films

Optional modules
-Ancient Rome on Film
-Film Exhibition
-Genre in Italian Cinema
-Hollywood Genres
-How to Make an 8-Minute Documentary
-New Argentine Cinema
-Nordic Cinema: Contextualising Dreyer, Bergman and Dogme
-Political Cinema
-Russian Cinema: Epochs and Genres
-Spanish Film
-The French New Wave
-The Idea of Documentary
-Theories and Practices of Film
-Global Cinemas
-Digital Media
-East and South Asian Cinemas

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, and film and video screenings. The core courses are assessed by essays and examinations, which together count for 20% of the final mark. Optional courses are assessed by essays (40%), and the dissertation makes up the final 40%.

Careers

Graduates from the MA in Film Studies have pursued various careers, including: academic research and teaching; careers within media arts (writing, directing, editing); print and media journalism; arts and museum management; multimedia authoring and digital design; film preservation and curating.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Lecturer, SOAS, University of London
-Communication Officer, Camera Lucida Productions
-Head of Development, Clcada Bellweather (CB Productions)
-Media and Film Studies Lecturer, City and Islington College
-Programme Assistant, ICA (Institute of Contemporary Arts)

Employability
Former students of this programme have gone on to careers in education and publishing and a wide variety of careers in the media arts, including film production, festival programming, and film curation with organisations that include the BBC, the Barbican Centre, the Athens International Film Festival, and the London Film School.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Each year, we welcome students from all over the world to our Film Studies MA. Under the aegis of UCL's Centre for Multidisciplinary and Intercultural Inquiry (CMII), students spend a year amongst a thriving, cross-disciplinary community of cinema scholars and research students.

We have particular research strengths in film history, film theory, and in an exceptionally broad range of national and regional cinemas.

UCL has made a major commitment to refurbishing its multimedia infrastructure for the study of film and related media. This includes building a significant collection of print and visual materials and new facilities for teaching and for film and media screenings.

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On the MA in Film Studies. Popular Cinema you will develop a historically-informed and critically aware understanding of film as an industry, art form, and cultural product. Read more
On the MA in Film Studies: Popular Cinema you will develop a historically-informed and critically aware understanding of film as an industry, art form, and cultural product. Through this course, you will build a broad portfolio of writing and research skills by combining academic and professional writing projects. We cover the history and theory of popular cinema in the US (classical and contemporary Hollywood), Europe and East Asia (especially Japanese cinema). Through modules on story development and research methods you will sharpen your writing skills in preparation for your dissertation project.

You will develop skills central to a career in either academia or the media industries. You will be taught by a diverse team of film specialists with different national and cultural backgrounds, as well as by industry professional guest speakers.

Why choose this course?

The School of Arts offers a unified hub for the arts in the Richard Hamilton Building, with state-of-the-art technical facilities and 24-hour studio access. All Film Studies staff are active researchers publishing widely on subjects such as: Italian films and their audiences, puzzle films, film theory, film policy, film tourism, visual anthropology, and crime films.

You will have the opportunity to go on the annual field trip to the Cannes Film Festival. We have an advisory panel of film industry experts including leading directors, journalists, and producers and technical specialists who contribute to the programme and our annual series of Film Studies events, including an annual Careers Day. Research and teaching programmes linked to some of Oxford’s premier cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, the Ultimate Picture Palace, Oxford Contemporary Music, and locally held Film Festivals.

You will be part of a stimulating environment where creative practitioners and writers about the arts and culture work closely together to form specialist research units and interdisciplinary research clusters in diverse areas from videogaming to modernism.

This course in detail

Compulsory modules - Students studying for the MA in Film Studies are required to complete the following two compulsory modules:
-Narration in Classical Hollywood Cinema
-Research Methods in Film

Optional modules - MA students can then choose any two of the options below:
-Popular European Cinema
-Professional Film Cultures
-Story Development
-Popular Cinema in East Asia
-Independent Study
-Dissertation

Please note: As our courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, course content and module choices may change from the details given here.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is centred around film screenings, seminars, individual tutorials and, in the case of Story Development, intensive writing workshops.

Assessment activities include writing academic essays and a dissertation. Other assessments include professional writing activities - book reviews, feature articles, and screenplays.

Careers and professional development

Having a master's qualification helps you to stand out from the crowd, whether you are joining the MA straight after graduating or returning to study after a break of several years.

Our MA will provide you with the skills and knowledge to embark upon a career in the creative and media industries or to improve your current position. However, an MA in Film Studies can also lead to careers in many other sectors, including teaching, lecturing, publishing, arts administration, journalism, museum work, fundraising and higher education management.

The transferable skills you acquire through studying for an MA also open up wider opportunities in business and law. Many MA students continue onto further research and careers in academia, and our course provides the necessary research training required for doctoral work.

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This advanced course aims to fully prepare you for studying a postgraduate degree, so that you can go on to achieve success at university, in your professional career and in the world. Read more
This advanced course aims to fully prepare you for studying a postgraduate degree, so that you can go on to achieve success at university, in your professional career and in the world.

What you will learn

You will study a combination of core and subject-specific modules that focus on teaching you the English language, study skills, employability and academic areas most relevant to your chosen degree at Sussex.

Focus on your career

We know that you may already be thinking about your future career, which is why we have integrated a careers element into our academic courses at the ISC. CareerAhead will guide you towards making the right choices and give you the tools you need to stand out in the competitive graduate job market.

Your assessment

We will assess your progress regularly to ensure you are on track to complete your course successfully, so that you can go on to study your chosen degree at Sussex. You’ll participate in exams, seminar discussions, group projects, presentations and essays as part of your overall assessment.

Media, Journalism and Film Studies

You will study the core modules listed below, as well as some subject-specific modules.
-Academic English Skills
-Academic and Employability Skills for Media, Journalism and Film Studies*
-Approaches to Media and Film Studies†
-Media Critical Practice†
-Media Stories†
-Media Technology in Context‡
-Research Project (Practice) for Media, Journalism and Film
-Research Skills for Media, Journalism and Film Studies (Theory)

* Core module for one-semester course only.
† Subject-specific modules for both the one and two semester course.
‡ Subject-specific module for one semester course only.

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If you're interested in learning about how journalism is practised across the world and what threats and challenges it faces, and if you want to get some hands-on practical experience then the MA Global Journalism is for you. Read more
If you're interested in learning about how journalism is practised across the world and what threats and challenges it faces, and if you want to get some hands-on practical experience then the MA Global Journalism is for you.

The MA Global Journalism combines theoretical and practical concerns with regard to the principles of a free press and its relationship to political and civil institutions. It examines, compares and contrasts the diverse forms of regulation and restrictions – both legitimate and illegitimate – surrounding the practice of journalism around the world.

You'll engage in debates about the key issues facing news journalism in a comparative global context. The course will also give you hands-on practical experience in writing for various media platforms and communicating news in the contemporary global environment.

Teaching on Global Journalism extends beyond the classroom. You'll have the opportunity to visit BBC studios and attend conferences that give insights into the daily practice of news journalism across the world. We also host our own Global Journalism Film Festival and collaborate with the European Parliament in Brussels.

About us

Our teaching staff are professionals who have worked at the highest level in newspaper, magazine, radio, television and online journalism. This is a great place to learn practical skills. Three quarters of our research is rated world-leading or internationally excellent. The discussion of ideas about journalism, its past, present and future, is part of all our courses.

We have strong links with the industry. We send our masters students on a three-day field trip to London, visiting national news organisations for briefings on current developments with senior editors and meeting politicians and political journalists.

Guests from the media industries, regulators, campaigning groups and research institutes give lectures in the department. Broadcast editors run radio and television newsdays, and print and online production editors bring their expertise to newspaper, web and magazine exercises.

Work experience

If you’re taking one of our applied courses, we encourage you to go on a work placement of one to three weeks during vacation time. Employers regularly notify us as opportunities come up and we have a dedicated work placement administrator to help you find a placement that’s right for you. Our students often find a work placement leads to a job after graduation.

Professional accreditation

All our applied postgraduate courses are accredited by the main professional bodies representing the media industries: the National Council for the Training of Journalists, the Broadcast Journalism Training Council and the Professional Publishers Association. Our International Political Communication and Global Journalism programmes are not accredited and have limited practical content.

Real-world learning environment

The University has invested £3 million in a superb new home for the department in 2014, with four large newsrooms designed to simulate a real working environment. The print newsroom is equipped with 30 PCs, all of which have access to the latest print production software such as Adobe Indesign, Incopy and Photoshop. You’ll also have access to a Press Association newsfeed, telephones, daily newspapers and Sky TV.

The broadcast newsroom is equipped with industry-standard software for radio production. We have a state-of-the-art radio studio and digital audio recorders. Students on the applied MA courses learn how to create packages, put together live news bulletins, shoot professional news pieces on HD TV cameras, and use Apple Final Cut X to cut rushes together. They acquire the skills needed to prepare text, audio and video content for publication online. These degrees also show how to use audio recorders, video and stills cameras to gather content. In the web newsroom, students use audio, video and image editing software to create their own sites.

Studentships

There are a limited number of external bursaries for UK students on the Print, Magazine and Broadcast courses, from the AHRC, Scott Trust and Journalism Diversity Fund. Please see our web pages for details.

Core modules

The Principle of Publicity I, The Principle of Publicity II, Writing for the Media, Research Methods, Dissertation

Examples of optional modules

Journalism in Britain, Media, Politics and Publics, Global Communication: History, Theory and Practice, Reporting the European Union, Propaganda, Media and Conflict, Online Journalism Studies, Media Freedom: European, UK and US Perspectives, Media, State and Society in China, Researching Social Media, Digital Advocacy

Teaching and assessment

We teach through lectures, seminars, workshops and research exercises. You’re assessed by essays, examinations and a dissertation.

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This MA is a practical introduction to TV journalism, and aims to teach you the professional conventions of UK news and current affairs broadcast journalism and relevant production skills- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-tv-journalism/. Read more
This MA is a practical introduction to TV journalism, and aims to teach you the professional conventions of UK news and current affairs broadcast journalism and relevant production skills- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-tv-journalism/

The programme encourages a critical understanding of television journalistic practice, and an informed knowledge of the overall political and industrial contexts in which journalists are now working, including an introduction to multimedia journalism; it locates this understanding and creative development within a wider enquiry into the relationship between media practice and culture.

At the end of the programme you should be familiar with the techniques and practices of television journalism, and conversant with the wider ethical, legal and technological contexts of broadcast journalistic practice.

You will be able to describe the qualities of your own work and of its cultural significance, and have a professional standard portfolio of original television news, current affairs and online reports.

Hands-on experience

You'll be involved in all aspects of studio work, filmmaking and multimedia web journalism, including editorial experience on eastlondonlines.co.uk, our student-run independent news site. All teaching is workshop-based.

Where practicable and possible, you may undertake a placement of three to four weeks in a news or current affairs production company.

Winner of a Broadcast Journalism Training Council Award for Excellence in Teaching Broadcast Journalism 2007-8.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Linda Lewis.

Modules & Structure

The programme is a practical introduction to TV news journalism. Modules are practical and skills-based, but are taught within a theoretical framework which is only possible in an institution renowned for its research work.

You'll cover:

television journalism practice
practice theory
research methodologies
key media law and ethical issues in relation to UK and US media law
In the first term you are taught in lectures, small group seminars and practical workshops for a period of approximately 12-15 hours. During the rest of the week, you are expected to work on individual and joint projects without supervision.

In the second term, teaching time of 8-10 hours is usually concentrated on two or three days per week to allow more time for production.

In the third term you are expected to work, with support, on your production for assessment.

Core modules:

Core course Television Journalism Practice- 120 credits
Asking the Right Questions: Research and Practice- 15 credits
Journalism in Context- 15 credits
Media, Law and Ethics- 15 and 30 credits

Assessment

Essay; unseen examination; production portfolio comprising the research, planning, shooting and editing of original current affairs reports; coursework assessment.

Skills

You'll develop:

A critical understanding of television journalistic practice
an awareness of the techniques appropriate to television journalism
project management skills
multimedia journalism skills

Careers

Our graduates have gone on to pursue careers in:

television
radio
broadcasting
the press
the web
publishing
film-making
advertising
marketing
public relations

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This exciting course combines an in-depth study of leading-edge media technology with hands-on experience of film production and film-making. Read more
This exciting course combines an in-depth study of leading-edge media technology with hands-on experience of film production and film-making.

Whether you dream of being a cinematographer, studio camera operator or a film editor, this course will give you an excellent grounding in both the theory and the practice of media technology.

You will enjoy realistic opportunities to engage with the industry - during your studies you will be visiting leading post-production facilities in London in order to develop your professional network and gain first-hand experience of what life as a professional is really like.

Intermediate qualifications available:

• Postgraduate certificate – 60 credits at Masters level
• Postgraduate diploma – 120 credits at Masters level

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/digital-film-technologies-and-production-15month#entry

Course detail

• Study a specialist course in digital film technologies, taught by an experienced team of industry professionals including acclaimed film-makers and published scholars, which gives you the opportunity to focus on practical production and post-production techniques
• Explore production roles and the wider context of the contemporary film business through participating in media-related research seminars, events and conferences
• Develop your practical skills using our excellent media production facilities
• Gain in-depth knowledge of areas including: production roles and responsibilities; digital film production technologies; practical production techniques; insights and interviews; the film business; studio technologies and techniques; project development and practical post-production and digital effects
• Benefit from a degree that prepares you for roles in broadcasting, journalism, arts and the media, administration, governmental regulation of the media, research, marketing, sales and advertising, cinematography, editing, directing, and independent film production or allows you to continue to MPhil and PhD research degrees

Modules

• Production Roles and Responsibilities
• Digital Film Production Technologies
• Practical Production Techniques
• Insights and Interviews
• The Film Business: Current Issues and Debates
• Studio Technologies and Techniques
• Project Development
• Practical Post-Production and Digital Effects
• Digital Film Technology Project

Assessment

The core units contain both formative and summative assessments, and it is during these units that you should learn the range of competencies and knowledge necessary to succeed on the course.

For your project work you can undertake either an extended digital film technology project (working in groups or individually) or a dissertation on relevant theoretical topic. The course utilises: oral presentations of academic arguments; oral pitches of stories; essays; case study projects; self-reflective logs and a wide range of practical work.

The assessment philosophy of the MSc begins with understanding your individual starting position. Hence work will be diagnostic (often at the outset, as with proficiency in academic practice and writing), formative, summative and evaluative. The procedures used for the assessment of your achievements will correspond with the knowledge, abilities and skills developed through your degree programme.

Careers

You will be encouraged to identify your strengths, interests and development needs in relation to the practices and conventions of both the media industry and of scholarship and research.

You will also be encouraged to seek out active engagement with industry, which might lead to either freelance jobs or employment.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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Do you have a desire to pursue a specific research project in film and video?. On this ResM you’ll receive a grounding in the research processes which are common to work generally in the arts, humanities, creative and cultural industrial fields. Read more
Do you have a desire to pursue a specific research project in film and video?

On this ResM you’ll receive a grounding in the research processes which are common to work generally in the arts, humanities, creative and cultural industrial fields. Explore research questions and methodologies specific to film and video and learn how these relate to both practice and/or theory.

Programme structure

You'll get to focus on practice or theory, in any combination of your choice, in one of the following areas:
-Artists’ film and video, experimental film and video (including fiction, documentary, drama documentary, animation)
-Histories of autobiographical, experimental, avant-garde film and video
-Contemporary theoretical discourses about independent film (including film practice as research, film as philosophy)
-The study and use of archive film (including home movies) in different contexts and practices; the relationship of film and video to new forms of dissemination (with particular reference to the digital)
-Collaborative projects involving different disciplines (for example, performance); and community-based and activist video.

Programme content

-Critical screenings: mapping out the interconnecting territories of independent film/video making
-Research in the arts and humanities: development of generic research skills and methods
-Masters thesis: presenting a substantial piece of work, either practice- or theory-based, chosen by you

The ResM in Film and Video leads to either a traditional written thesis or one that combines critical writing and creative/professional practice. You have the flexibility to submit your thesis any time between 24–36 months or, if you are making excellent progress, you may apply to transfer directly into our PhD programme after two years, rather than submitting a ResM thesis.

Choosing a ResM

The Research Masters (ResM) is classed as a postgraduate research programme – it enables you to engage in a focused, self-negotiated research project over the period of two years. As well as being a satisfying creative and professional endeavour in itself, it provides high-quality preparation for doctoral research, including practice as research, in the interdisciplinary field of independent film and video. You will study current debates and approaches, as well as the theories, skills and methodologies necessary for contemporary film and video research. Your thesis may be assessed entirely through written work or through written work in addition to a substantial practical project that addresses particular research questions.

The ResM is suitable for:
-People in employment in the cultural and creative industries or recent graduates who wish to proceed to doctoral (PhD) research
-Those in, or who wish to be employed in, the cultural and creative industries (such as publishing, teaching, design, the media, galleries and museums, the heritage industry, journalism, theatre, dance) who wish to gain a self-directed academic qualification to lead to further career enhancement
-Anybody who wishes to further develop academic skills, pursue particular subject enthusiasms, or carry out a cherished research project with specialist guidance.

Features of the ResM

-It focuses almost entirely on an individual research project of your own choice
-Largely self-directed with tutorial guidance and clear milestones and expectations
-Includes taught modules (60 credits) that must be passed to develop and evidence your research skills
-It prepares you specifically to be a researcher in the arts and humanities, to do an extended research project within a professional context, or to do a PhD.

What’s different about the ResM?

Because it’s classed as a postgraduate research programme:
-You’ll follow the same milestones and processes as MPhil/PhD candidates in the Doctoral Training Centre, including annual monitoring, the appointment of examiners, formal acceptance of your proposal by the University, and adherence to research ethics
-You’ll be able to attend any sessions within the University’s Graduate School Researcher Development Programme
-You’ll have a supervisory team (Director of Studies plus a second supervisor) assigned once your proposal has been accepted
-You may have the option to apply to transfer straight into our PhD programme, subject to certain conditions, rather than submitting for a ResM award.

The final thesis is examined in a different way:
-There’s a flexible submission date - between 24-36 months
-It’s assessed by an internal examiner, who is not your supervisor, and an external examiner from another institution
-You’ll need to attend a viva voce. This is an oral examination where you’ll discuss your thesis with your examiners. It usually takes place between one to three months following the submission of written elements
-You won’t receive a percentage grade for the ResM degree
-You may be asked to make corrections to your thesis before being allowed to submit a final electronic version of it and being awarded your degree.

The award title will be a ResM and the certificate will include the title of your thesis, with no grade classification.

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Accredited by the Broadcast Journalism Training Council. Learn how to write for radio and television news. how to find your own stories and turn them into sharp and imaginative broadcast material. Read more

About the course

Accredited by the Broadcast Journalism Training Council.

Learn how to write for radio and television news: how to find your own stories and turn them into sharp and imaginative broadcast material. You’ll record and film material and edit it using a desktop software package. You’ll also learn media law and public administration, ethics and regulation.

We’ll prepare you for the multimedia environment by teaching you how to create audio and video for the web and how to use social media effectively.

Your career

A masters from Sheffield is the mark of someone who thinks differently. Graduates from our applied courses are creative, disciplined journalists.

They’re working in radio and television, newspapers and magazines, print and online, across the UK and internationally.

The BBC, Guardian, Daily Mail, Channel 4, Sky and Wall Street Journal all employ Sheffield journalists.

About us

Our teaching staff are professionals who have worked at the highest level in newspaper, magazine, radio, television and online journalism. This is a great place to learn practical skills. Three quarters of our research is rated world-leading or internationally excellent. The discussion of ideas about journalism, its past, present and future, is part of all our courses.

We have strong links with the industry. We send our masters students on a three-day field trip to London, visiting national news organisations for briefings on current developments with senior editors and meeting politicians and political journalists.

Guests from the media industries, regulators, campaigning groups and research institutes give lectures in the department. Broadcast editors run radio and television newsdays, and print and online production editors bring their expertise to newspaper, web and magazine exercises.

Work experience

If you’re taking one of our applied courses, we encourage you to go on a work placement of one to three weeks during vacation time. Employers regularly notify us as opportunities come up and we have a dedicated work placement administrator to help you find a placement that’s right for you. Our students often find a work placement leads to a job after graduation.

Professional accreditation

All our applied postgraduate courses are accredited by the main professional bodies representing the media industries: the National Council for the Training of Journalists, the Broadcast Journalism Training Council and the Professional Publishers Association. Our International Political Communication and Global Journalism programmes are not accredited and have limited practical content.

Real-world learning environment

The University has invested £3 million in a superb new home for the department in 2014, with four large newsrooms designed to simulate a real working environment. The print newsroom is equipped with 30 PCs, all of which have access to the latest print production software such as Adobe Indesign, Incopy and Photoshop. You’ll also have access to a Press Association newsfeed, telephones, daily newspapers and Sky TV.

The broadcast newsroom is equipped with industry-standard software for radio production. We have a state-of-the-art radio studio and digital audio recorders. Students on the applied MA courses learn how to create packages, put together live news bulletins, shoot professional news pieces on HD TV cameras, and use Apple Final Cut X to cut rushes together. They acquire the skills needed to prepare text, audio and video content for publication online. These degrees also show how to use audio recorders, video and stills cameras to gather content. In the web newsroom, students use audio, video and image editing software to create their own sites.

Studentships

There are a limited number of external bursaries for UK students on the Print, Magazine and Broadcast courses, from the AHRC, Scott Trust and Journalism Diversity Fund. Please see our web pages for details.

Core modules

Researching News; Law for Journalists; Ethics and Regulation; Power and Society; Broadcast News; Advanced Broadcast Journalism; Broadcast Journalism Dissertation/Portfolio (PGDip students don’t take this module).

Examples of optional modules

A range including: Global Journalism; Journalism, Globalisation and Development; Researching Social Media; Propaganda, Media and Conflict; News and Civil Society; Journalism Politics and Public Debate; Journalism in Britain.

Teaching and assessment

There are lectures, seminars, group workshops, individual and team assignments. You’re assessed on essays, examinations and practical broadcast journalism – producing news stories, radio and TV news items and features, web pages and portfolios.

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