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Masters Degrees (Film Finance)

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PLEASE NOTE. This course will run in September 2016. This is an innovative course, taught over four, week-long residential retreats over one year (full time) and will commence in September - some of these are in Central London, others in beautiful Egham Campus near Windsor. Read more
PLEASE NOTE: This course will run in September 2016

This is an innovative course, taught over four, week-long residential retreats over one year (full time) and will commence in September - some of these are in Central London, others in beautiful Egham Campus near Windsor.

Between retreats the course is run via distance-learning with a website, chat room and e-tutorials. This makes it possible for those living outside the UK, and those with busy working lives, for instance freelancers and those in the film and TV industries, to take time out to attend. We have a wide variety of students on the course including established actors, comedy writers, editors, producers, novelists and many others.

During the MASTFiR course (MA in Screenwriting for Televion and Film - Retreat) you will cover writing for feature film and television as well as new developments such as web drama. You will develop a range of ideas, then go on to write film and television outlines, and several drafts of a feature film screenplay, a TV single drama, or a TV series or serial bible and sample episodes. You will be immersed in a creative atmosphere conducive to concentrated learning and group interaction; a core unit is the Development Lab, where you will present your work in progress to the group for criticism and feedback, and experiment with co-writing.

You will also meet and work with industry and independent producers, directors, agents, writers and actors to provide a production context. We have recently had guests from Working Title, Channel Four, the BBC, Script Factory, Blake Friedmann Agency and many others.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/mascreenwritingfortelevisionandfilmretreat.aspx

Why choose this course?

- in the fast-changing world of digital drama, new media and new film markets, you will become skilled in producing strong and original fiction writing.

- the course director is Ivan Levene, a practising screenwriter and script editor with over 15 years of experience in the industry. He currently has two produced feature films, and has been involved in the development of numerous other film and TV projects, including a recent major international release. Before this he worked in acquisitions and development, advancing over £15m of film and TV production from inception to marketplace. Current commissions include a supernatural thriller with Matthew Rhys, and a biopic set in Gilded Age New York about Harriet Hubbard Ayer - socialite, proto-feminist, and the first person to create an international cosmetics business.

- teaching television is screenwriting lecturer Adam Ganz, whose TV credits include Pillow Talk and Murder Without Motive; and guest lecturing in television are Gillian Gordon and Jonathan Powell.

- despite the first students only graduating in 2008, we have already had a host of successes with many of our students finding success in the industry.

- you will meet and work with industry and independent producers, directors, agents, writers and actors to provide a production context. We have recently had guests from Working Title, Channel Four, the BBC, Script Factory, Blake Friedmann Agency and many others.

Department research and industry highlights

- the MA Screenwriting for Television and Film Retreat course (MASTFiR) only began graduating students in 2008 but already we have had a host of successes - Janice Hallett's feature screenplay Retreat is now being shot in Canada with a star cast; Olivia Wakeford has a writing credit on the feature film Baseline (2009) and several writers have gained agents and development commissions. Kay Stonham has work commissioned by the BBC and two of our younger writers are working on a C5 youth drama series. Adam Rolston has had a highly successful musical on Doris Day's life performed at a variety of London venues. Many students have won festival awards for their short films.

Course content and structure

You will study four core course units.

Core course units:
Script Craft
This unit will focus on the acquisition of basic writing skills, and is a gateway to the ‘Story and Theme’ unit. You will explore the specifics of scene and dialogue construction, formatting and issues around research and around adaptation from source materials – e.g. plays, novels and news stories.

Story and Theme
This unit teaches the essential components of story and structure, the specific language of film storytelling and genre. It will include lectures, screenings of films and extracts, and individual and group analysis of films. You will produce ideas, formal outlines and a feature-length screenplay or TV series bibles and episode.

Development Lab
This is a discussion forum to which you bring the work above, where it is critiqued and debated from a number of points of view including aesthetic, generic, marketing, audience and budget. Development Lab is interactive and is at the core of the course; it replicates many of the development processes you will face in the film and television industry.

Contexts: Current British Film and TV Practice
This unit covers current aesthetic and generic trends in British film and television. There will also be lectures and seminars on budget, schedule, commissioning, finance, contracts, casting and marketing, and you will explore the production and marketing implications of your own screenplay projects.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- the ability to discriminate between project ideas, present ideas and drafts to others effectively, and both give and receive constructive criticism

- the understanding of the aesthetic and economic conditions of the marketplace, how their work may be viewed in terms of budget and audience, and the stages a screenplay will go through in development and production

- a broad and detailed understanding of the nature of the film and television screenplay- how it signifies, how it communicates meaning to the film producer, director, actor and to the audience

- advanced understanding of the processes of writing a screenplay, from initial concept to final draft

- advanced understanding of the various stages of script development and how each is documented- outlines, treatments, pitch documents and so on

- critical knowledge of the current genres and trends in film and television and how they have evolved in recent years, particularly in the context of economic and market developments in these industries

- an understanding of the UK film and television industries, including their structure, institutions and working practices

- a broad understanding of the group nature of writing and development, and how the roles played by the various parties- producer, script editor, director and so on- shape and influence the screenplay.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including script outlines and scenes, a completed feature film screenplay and/or TV series episode and ‘bible’, and marketing and pitch documents.

Employability & career opportunities

On graduating, you will be well prepared for careers in television and feature film screenwriting and script development.

Our recent graduate successes include:

Janice Hallett's feature screenplay Retreat is now being shot in Canada with a star cast; Olivia Wakeford has a writing credit on the feature film Baseline (2009) and several writers have gained agents and development commissions. Kay Stonham has work commissioned by the BBC and two of our younger writers are working on a C5 youth drama series. Adam Rolston has had a highly successful musical on Doris Day's life performed at a variety of London venues. Many students have won festival awards for their short films.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The MA in Feature Film Production is a new and innovative post graduate course in feature film production. The course offers exciting opportunities to engage in a host of jobs and roles associated with filmmaking. Read more
The MA in Feature Film Production is a new and innovative post graduate course in feature film production. The course offers exciting opportunities to engage in a host of jobs and roles associated with filmmaking.

The course aims to provide you with enhanced competency and creative proficiency to postgraduate level in digital feature film production. In other words, you will make a feature film during your post-graduate study – learning about production and the film business as you progress. As a production team you will take on the roles involved in creating a feature film from script development to packaging and distribution. Experienced industry experts will act as mentors throughout the process.

Course content

This course provides enhanced film production competency and creative proficiency to postgraduate level in digital feature film production.
-Develop advanced skills in feature film production, post-production and sound design.
-Deliver a critical and theoretical knowledge of micro budget digital feature film production.
-Address the skills required in budgeting and marketing of feature films.
-Develop advanced practical and theoretical skills in digital workflow implications, production logistics and production and post production technologies.
-Engender professional development skills and practices in relation to a career in the rapidly expanding and changing digital feature film industry.

Modules studied
-Feature Film Pre-Production
-Research Methods Seminar
-Negotiated Learning - Film Production
-Advanced Production
-Advanced Post Production
-Feature Film Production Project

Industry links

Taught by lecturers with feature film experience, the course benefits from links with leading film organisations such as Raindance and NOW Films. Students will work as a production team throughout the project, with finance in place to produce a feature film. You will also be supported by key mentors from the feature film industry. Our emphasis is on collaboration, working as a team and to develop a feature film project from script to screen. Your film will enter the marketplace alongside your graduation, acting as a springboard for your career.

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On this programme, students develop a practical and critical approach to the relationship between film production workflows, digital film technology, and creative practice. Read more
On this programme, students develop a practical and critical approach to the relationship between film production workflows, digital film technology, and creative practice. The programme seeks to develop students' creative abilities to a high professional standard, preparing them for employment in increasingly dynamic film and media sectors, and to facilitate film projects that foreground the importance of practice-based research, expertise and experimentation.

The MA route allows students to refine a critical approach to creativity in areas such as writing, directing, and producing; the MSc focuses on creative technological agendas in areas such as cinematography, editing, and VFX. To find out more about the MA/MSc in Film Production visit our blog at http://blogs.gre.ac.uk/filmproduction.

From October to April, you will attend three core courses (Cinematography 1, Production Practice, Film Research Workshop) and choose four courses from the following options: Cinematography 2, Film Screenwriting, VFX, Directing Screen Performance, Sound Design and Editing. From May to September you will undertake a final project.

You will use digital camera equipment current in the industry, including RED, Canon C300 and Arri Alexa systems. Teaching takes place in brand new film production facilities in the Stockwell Street building, which includes studios, post-production suites, and a sound studio.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/ft/filmprod

Film and Television

This subject offers students the chance to develop creatively and technically. It affords the opportunity to acquire both the latest techniques and traditional skills in working with digital media, in television and film production and post-production. This course allow for original and creative minds who want to explore specialist areas of these professions and develop their portfolio.

What you'll study

Core courses:

Film Research Workshop (30 credits)
Cinematography 1 (15 credits)
Production Practice (15 credits)
Major Project (60 credits)

Four options from:

Film Screenwriting - compulsory for MA (15 credits)
Directing Screen Performance - compulsory for MA (15 credits)
Cinematography 2 - compulsory for MSc (15 credits)
VFX - compulsory for MSc (15 credits)
Sound Design (15 credits)
Editing (15 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students are assessed on their film project work and creative portfolios.

Career options

This programme is aimed at students preparing to make the transition from education to employment in the film industry. The film sector needs graduates with specialist expertise, but also creative thinkers who are deadline-driven and project-minded; capable of managing digital workflows in an enterprising manner, and taking initiative. This is the kind of approach we encourage and help our students to develop.

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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From start to finish, producers are the driving force behind the film and television industry; they generate new projects and ideas, secure finance, manage production and strategically market the project. Read more
From start to finish, producers are the driving force behind the film and television industry; they generate new projects and ideas, secure finance, manage production and strategically market the project. The producer’s role has been transformed by the advent of globalization, digital technology and the multi-channel environment.

This course offers aspiring producers an opportunity to acquire the creative entrepreneurial skills required to enter a rapidly changing film and television universe. The course concentrates on developing creative, managerial, financial and legal capabilities for a successful career in production.

This Master’s degree reflects the global nature of the contemporary media marketplace but its main focus is UK film and television fiction, rather than factual production. It is targeted at those who want to follow a career path as producers, rather than as directors.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/maproducingfilmandtelevision.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The course benefits enormously from close links with the film and television industry. Tony Garnett (producer of Cathy Come Home and This Life), whose company World Productions has built up a reputation for challenging and innovative drama, was a guiding force in designing the course and has played a great part in the course's success.

- Professor Jonathan Powell (former Controller of BBC 1, Head of Drama for the BBC and Controller of Drama at Carlton TV), one of this country's most respected and experienced drama producers, now delivers the 'Role of the Producer' and ‘Script Development’ lectures as well as providing you with support and advice.

- You will normally undertake a full-time internship in a production company. In most cases this internship lasts about four weeks. You will be offered guidance and assistance in an effort to obtain industry internships.

- Students who have graduated from the course are working successfully in independent television and film production, for broadcasters such as the BBC and ITV, and for distributors, exhibitors, talent agencies and entertainment lawyers.

- Regular networking events are arranged where former alumni can make contact with each other and with the current group of students.

Department research and industry highlights

- TRENT is an exciting and innovative collaborative project between the British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC) and Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL) and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Led by John Ellis the project brings together the nine existing online databases hosted and curated by the BUFVC which provide important film, radio and television material along with accompanying metadata and contextual information for academics, students, teachers and researchers. This project brings together all the material contained in these databases, yet Trent is not simply a master database. Instead it foregrounds creative searching through a common interactive interface using real-time ‘intelligent’ filtering to bringing disparate databases into a single search and discovery environment whilst maintaining the integrity and individual provenance of each.

- The EUscreen project is major funded EU project which aims to digitise and provide access to European’s audio-visual heritage. This innovative and ambitious three year project began in October 2009 and the project consortium is made up of 28 partners from 19 European countries and is a best practice network within the eContentplus programme of the European Commission. The Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway’s is responsible for the content selection policy for EUscreen and those involved include John Ellis, Rob Turnock and Sian Barber.

- Video Active is a major EU-funded project aiming to create access to digitised television programme content from archives around Europe. It involves collaboration between the Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway and Utrecht University, and eleven European archives including the BBC, to provide access to content and supporting contextual materials via a specially designed web portal. The team from the Department of Media Arts, who are John Ellis, Cathy Johnson and Rob Turnock, are responsible for developing content selection strategy and policy for the project.

- Migrant and Diasporic Cinema in Contemporary Europe is an AHRC-funded international Research Network, led by Daniela Berghahn, which brings together researchers from ten UK and European universities, filmmakers, policy makers and representatives from the cultural sector. The Research Network explores how the films of migrant and diasporic filmmakers have redefined our understanding of European identity as constructed and narrated in European cinema. The project seeks to identify the numerous ways in which multi-cultural and multi-ethnic presences and themes have revitalised contemporary European cinema by introducing an eclectic mix of non-Western traditions and new genres.

- Lina Khatib was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete a book on the representation of Lebanese politics and society in Lebanese cinema over the last thirty years. The study focuses on cinema’s relationship with national identity in the context of the Civil War and the post-war period in Lebanon.

- Gideon Koppel was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete his feature-length documentary portrait of a rural community in Wales, The Library Van, which has been partly funded by the Arts Council of Wales.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- a broad and detailed understanding of the nature of film and television production; how the role of the producer impacts on the production as the creative and managerial driving force, and how the producer communicates meaning to the writer, director, film crew and to the audience

- advanced understanding of the process of producing a film and/or TV programme, from initial concept through distribution and sales

- advanced understanding of script development

- advanced understanding of the various stages of the production process and how to write a pitch, a treatment, business plan, make a deal, write a financial plan, re-coupment schedule and budget as well as all relevant production contracts and documents

- critical knowledge of the current genres and trends in film and television and how they have evolved in recent years

- an understanding of the UK film and television industries, including their structure, institutions and working practices

- a broad understanding of the group nature of film and television production and how the roles played by the key players shape and influence the creative as well as business outcomes of a project

- a clear understanding of management structure within the production company and film crew, hands-on experience of production in

- a professionally equipped television studio working with industry professionals as well as fellow students

- a broad understanding of health and safety, industry codes of ethics, best practice and legal undertakings

- an introduction to high quality industry software for budgeting and scheduling, and post production editing

- an understanding of film and television history

- an understanding of what creative and business skills are needed to be successful in the media industries.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including essays, script reports, treatments, pitching exercises, studio exercises, production papers, business reports and presentations.

Employability & career opportunities

Students who have graduated from the course are working successfully in independent television and film production, for broadcasters such as the BBC and ITV, and for distributors, exhibitors, talent agencies and entertainment lawyers.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Your programme of study. Read more

Your programme of study

Are you passionate about films and all things visual or on screen? Do you want to work in the arts or do you want to find a way to do this?  This programme gives you cultural contexts across a range of different genres and history of film to understand why films depicted what they did and how this contributed to the world around us and the way we live. It is well known that film has shaped other disciplines like fashion, the way we think, cultural identity, how we are able to express ourselves or understand something better we previously didn't know about. It is an opportunity to put the record straight on history and get to the root cause and effect of different periods in history through characters. Film is also about getting to the truth in documentary films.  Film also follows many other arts disciplines in interpreting them and bringing them to our attention in a way that theatre and performance cannot in terms of scale and reality. Much of what has been successful on the West End Stage, Opera, ballet, the life of a famous painter or other creative is often successfully depicted in film due to its ability to portray several art forms together successfully.

Film isn't the only art form to transform our lives but it probably reaches more people than any other art form around the world. It probably has more of a profound influence in people's lives around the world to change the course of their life in work, interests, style, imitation and more. Different ages of photography have been monumental in transforming our perceptions and getting us closer to reality such as old film and photography of the 19th century, war in the world and celebrities being the first fashion icons of the 50s, without the need for script.

You study and analyse film across the recent past and you look at animation and digital from the days of the Walt Disney team making up each frame to its evolution into digital animation and speed production. You also look at how changing tastes and cultural styles have changed the way in which we view film and by what method, plus you look at living overseas in the context of your own cultural identity.  From this you gain useful skills and knowledge to critique contemporary film, curate exhibitions work in museums, become and expert in a specific theme or age of film.

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

  • Introduction to Visual Culture and Theory
  • Introduction to Film Theory and Analysis
  • Psychoanalysis and Cinema
  • Cinema and Psychoanalysis

Semester 2

  • Media Archaeologies
  • The Animate
  • Minor Cinemas
  • Labour, Leisure and the Moving Image
  • Diaspora and Migration in Contemporary Visual Culture
  • Special Subject by Research
  • Narratives and Images of Deep Time in 19th Century
  • Curating and Exhibition

Semester 3

  • Dissertation

Find out more detail by visiting the https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/degree-programmes/332/film-and-visual-culture/" target="_blank">programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You are given advanced training in visual culture, engaging with wide ranging material in film and photography
  • You learn the key debates of the 20th Century whilst learning at a university dating from 1495
  • You can become an associate of the University Centre for Visual Culture
  • The city offers you wide ranging museums, theatres, garden and castle trails, architecture of note and a rural shire with some history

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • Full Time or Part Time
  • 12 Months or 24 Months
  • September or January

International Student Fees 2017/2018

 Find out about https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/tuition-fees-and-living-costs-287.php" target="_blank">fees

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our https://www.abdn.ac.uk/funding/" target="_blank">funding database via the https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/finance-funding-1599.php " target="_blank">programme page

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen:

Living costs

 



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-Film and TV degree production provides an exciting opportunity to learn advanced producing, directing and screenwriting techniques and to build professional links within the UK and international film and television industry. Read more
-Film and TV degree production provides an exciting opportunity to learn advanced producing, directing and screenwriting techniques and to build professional links within the UK and international film and television industry
-This postgraduate degree provides a practical and intensive study of filmmaking in an environment that encourages experimentation, professional development and cutting edge ideas. Students work with up to date professional equipment and facilities and, as part of their Masters Degree, produce, direct or write a major film project with an individually tailored marketing and distribution strategy
-The University of Hertfordshire film programmes and post-graduate school regularly host industry professionals who lecture and conduct workshops, seminars and tutorials. We work closely with the industry to enable students to connect directly with their future employers and mentors
-The combination of creative, technical, practical and management skills make this course unique and our graduates highly successful, as employees or as independent filmmakers

Why choose this course?

The MA Film and Television production programme offers an opportunity for students to initiate, develop and realise original film and television work in directing, producing and screenwriting. Students enhance their creative practice in film and television to professional levels, with the aim of pursuing a successful career in the industry. The programme commences with a series of taught modules, intended to augment the student's critical judgment and technical capability, before embarking on a major project, in the form of a substantial screenplay or digital film.

The project offers a setting in which the student can increase confidence in creative decision making, whilst expanding awareness of the requirements of film style and technology, finance, marketplace and audience. Students broaden their knowledge and experience to gain a better understanding of film and television production and its professional and commercial practices. They undertake a programme of screenings, master classes and seminars, to extend their knowledge of film and television histories, genres, aesthetics and narrative processes and to develop a range of research and communication skills. Students are encouraged to develop the aesthetic and conceptual awareness required to analyse and critically situate their work within current theoretical, cultural and commercial contexts, whether as a director, producer or scriptwriter.

The modules focus on script development, working with actors, camerawork, lighting, sound recording, post production techniques, funding, distribution and other relevant areas. You will benefit from the expertise and creative ideas of students working in specialised areas elsewhere in the School (eg Visual FX, Special FX, Animation or Music) whose input can enhance the professionalism of your major projects.

Careers

You will also have the opportunity to exhibit your work at the University and there are good opportunities to develop your teaching experience by mentoring undergraduate students in your subject area. When you successfully complete your MA, you will have made a very substantial addition to your CV and have a clear understanding of the next steps in the development of your career.

Teaching methods

You are taught in an intensive mix of lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials, masterclasses and industry guest sessions. Tutorial support is offered in small groups and one-to-one, with further support available online and by email.

All students on the PG Media programme engage in an interdisciplinary project as a part of their MA study, giving them an opportunity to work with students from other disciplines in an experimental and creative way.

Structure

Core Modules
-Creative Economies
-Discourse/Reflection: Professional Project Development
-Major Study: Film and Television Production
-Practice 1: Script Development
-Practice 2: Camera, Sound and Editing
-Research and Enquiry

Optional
-Creative Economies (Online)
-Research and Enquiry (Online)

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This unique 12 month part-time diploma course delivered in partnership with the Production Guild will equip students with the skills required to foster a successful future career as a Film or Television Production Accountant. Read more
This unique 12 month part-time diploma course delivered in partnership with the Production Guild will equip students with the skills required to foster a successful future career as a Film or Television Production Accountant.

-A unique course in partnership with Production Guild.
-Equips participants with specialist skills required to work as a Film and Television Production Accountant.
-Gain the expertise to succeed in this demanding role.
-Establish key contacts to move to a career in the film and television sector.
-Work experience placement.
-Access to NFTS's Masterclasses led by major creative figures from film, television and games.

We welcome EU/EEA Students. Course fees charged at UK rate.

COURSE OVERVIEW

The National Film and Television School Production Accounting Diploma is ideally suited for those already working in a finance / accountancy role and who are keen to move into the film and television sector.

This course begins in January each year.

Production Accountants calculate finances, work out the cost of a production, communicate with financiers (companies or individuals who provide the funding) and control the cash flow, or spending. This is a demanding role that requires a level head, self-confidence and strong communication skills.

In pre-production, Production Accountants help the Producers and Production Managers to prepare budgets and Estimated Final Cost Reports.

During production, they oversee all payments, manage payroll, petty cash and foreign currency and keep accurate financial records. They help monitor budgets, analyse spending and provide daily or weekly cost reports. They also produce cost forecasts to evaluate the impact of any production changes.

CURRICULUM

The diploma course is 12 months part-time and is delivered in London.

Specifically students will learn about:
-Production set up and implementation of systems
-Budgeting
-Sources of Finance and treatment of funds
-Completion Guarantors
-Cash flow, Forecasting and Cost reporting
-Working with inherited budgets
-Working with multi currency
-Running the project
-Contract and employment law
-Copyright and Licences
-Taxation and insurance.
-Pre production, Production and Post Production
-Production Audits
-Management Skills

PLACEMENT

To graduate each student will complete a minimum of 10 days work experience / production shadowing before the completion of the course.

NFTS BENEFITS

Production Accounting course participants will have full access to our creative masterclasses and clubs, including: Cinema Club, Screen Arts and NFTS Masterclasses - these strands see major creative figures from film, television and games screening their work and discussing with students in the campus cinema. Recent speakers include David Fincher (Director, Seven, Gone Girl), Graham Linehan (The IT Crowd, Father Ted), Abi Morgan (Suffragette, The Hour), Christopher Nolan (Interstellar, The Dark Knight) and Hamish Hamilton (Director, Super Bowl XLVIII).

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The MPhil in Film and Screen Studies at Cambridge provides advanced training in study of the theory and history of film and other screen media in a vibrant interdisciplinary context. Read more
The MPhil in Film and Screen Studies at Cambridge provides advanced training in study of the theory and history of film and other screen media in a vibrant interdisciplinary context. The moving image is explored in relation to the development of modern and contemporary culture, and to the history and theory of other media (literature, music, the visual arts, architecture, the digital). Students are immersed in a research environment that emphasises work on geopolitics, early cinema, art cinema and the avant garde, theory, aesthetics, and gender and sexuality. The programme consists of a core course, taken in the first term, which provides the foundation for further study; two optional modules, taken in the second term, which combine the analysis of film and screen media with the analysis of their social and cultural milieus, or else undertake the study of these forms in a comparative context; and a dissertation. Although not all students may wish to progress to higher research, this MPhil programme is designed to prepare for continuation to PhD work. This preparation includes the academic and research training provided by the course content itself but also advice and support with PhD applications, funding applications and the drafting of a research proposal.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/mmmmmpsmc

Course detail

By the end of the programme students will have:

1. developed a deeper knowledge of the history and theory of film and other screen media in cultural context;
2. developed an understanding of the debates which have shaped that field of study, and of current research methods;
3. acquired and consolidated intensive specialist knowledge of their chosen research areas and skills appropriate to advanced study in those areas;
4. demonstrated independent judgement, based on their own research
5. participated effectively in seminar discussions and research events;
6. learnt how to plan independent research in order to produce written work of a high standard to a clearly defined deadline.

Format

The Screen Media MPhil is a nine-month course that runs from October to June of any given academic year. It is classified as a research Master's. Students are expected to submit coursework and a thesis during the year, as follows:

Michaelmas Term: Core Course

During the first term of study, students attend weekly seminars and film screenings designed to give them a broad insight into moving image theory and culture. Half of the Core Course focuses on combining the study of classical and contemporary film and visual theory; the other half hones in on specialized historiographic and theoretical problems in the study of moving image media. The Course is, thus, both intensively grounding and intellectually expansive. At the end of this term, students submit one 4,500-word essay. The essay focuses on a specific theoretical framework or critical approach. Two hours of individual supervision are provided.

Lent Term: Modules

Screen Media students can choose from a range of module options. Some focus on the moving image, others are shared with different MPhils (e.g. European Literature & Culture, or Criticism and Culture) and other departments and Faculties within the University, such as Architecture & History of Art, Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, English, and Latin American Studies, among others. (The list of modules can change from year to year depending on the availability of academic staff.)

During Lent Term, students attend weekly group seminars led by the module covenor, lasting around 1.5 to 2 hours per week per module. In addition, two hours of individual supervision (per essay) will be provided as students draft their module essays. Essays are submitted at the end of Lent Term.

Lent term modules may include:

- Modern and Contemporary French and Francophone Culture: Articulations of the Real
- Avant Garde and Experimental Cinemas
- The Modern City
- New Commitments: Literature, Cinema and Culture in Italy, 1960 to present
- Urban Cinematics
- Deconstructing Film
- Online Video: Creation, Consumption, Revolution
- Surveillance
- Latin American Film and Visual Arts

Assessment - Easter Term

During this term, students write a thesis. Theses must, according to the criteria laid down by the Board of Graduate Studies, 'represent a contribution to learning'. Theses must be written in English. The arrangements for their preparation are similar to those for the essays. Titles are chosen by students, in consultation with module convenors and/or prospective supervisors, and then have to be approved by the Faculty Degree Committee.

Topics and precise thesis titles must be submitted by a specific deadline in Lent Term. Up to this point the Course Director is the titular supervisor of MPhil students, but once the thesis topics are approved, a specialist supervisor is appointed for each student. Students are entitled to up to four hour-long sessions with their supervisor. (In the event that a thesis is co-supervised, a candidate may expect two hours of individual teaching from each supervisor. Only one supervisor should comment on the full draft of the thesis.)

Research Events

Students are expected to take part in fortnightly research events that take place across the Michaelmas and Lent Terms. Leading scholars in film and screen studies will deliver lectures and also meet with students in master class seminars. Students are asked to compile an (unassessed) dossier of critical responses to these events. Participation in these events allows students to engage intensely but also informally with innovative researchers.

Continuing

For those applying to continue from the MPhil to PhD, the minimum academic standard is a distinction on the MPhil.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Funding may be available from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC).
Applications to the MPhil are automatically considered for AHRC funding, however you must apply by the relevant funding deadline.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MA Film & TV is a flexible, student driven course designed to fit in with learners’ professional and personal commitments. Delivered online by guiding practice, the curriculum is adaptable to student needs and accommodates current media industry developments. Read more

Overview

The MA Film & TV is a flexible, student driven course designed to fit in with learners’ professional and personal commitments. Delivered online by guiding practice, the curriculum is adaptable to student needs and accommodates current media industry developments.

Why choose this course?

Students negotiate their own learning from the first module onwards, defining aims and approaches that are relevant and feasible within their individual context. They review and adapt these plans along with their emerging expertise to develop projects that can be applied to their local context. Student negotiated modules accommodate rapid technology-driven, creative and increasingly globalised business changes with ease.

Emerging filmmakers who enter the course with a clear sense of direction can make their project funding applications and development plans more coherent and their career plans more feasible. More established participants can enhance their digital and management skills to future proof their interactions with emerging technologies and institutions. All participants can grow their management and leadership skills by reflecting on the implementation of their plans within their specific environment.

The course is led by award-winning film and TV producer Carl Schoenfeld. Carl has over two decades’ producing experience in the film & TV industries, laying the groundwork for fresh approaches across filmmaking procedures and talent development initiatives. His ventures with the BBC, Channel4/Film4 and BFI, among others, have embraced emerging technology, explored new workflows and kick-started the international careers of the talent involved.

What will I learn?

Students apply to the course specifying their unique combination of ambitions and accomplishments. Their statement serves as a foundation for the My Learning Trajectory Assignment, detailing attainable course goals (aligned with employers’ agendas, where applicable, or industry research), outlining the strategies the student adopts to achieve them. The module My Film & TV Knowledge Base enables students to deepen their understanding of, and widen their range of practical, conceptual and theoretical investigations at postgraduate level. Following these introductory modules, students embark on their very own learning journey structured through four negotiated modules towards their personal stated - and regularly reviewed – attainment goals.

How will this course be taught?

Students will receive individual mentoring by both a postgraduate mentor and an experienced professional, who is usually working in the film or TV industries in a leading capacity. Students can also participate in regular web conferences together with peers led by a module leader, as well as optional face-to-face events coinciding with key industry networking opportunities such as international conferences and film festivals.

The course is designed for global delivery in a world where cameras and edit computers including smartphones are widely available - but expertise in using these devices in an effective way is hard to come by. Accordingly, we expect students with a professional background and ambitions to have access to their own equipment relevant to their chosen specialism, and would be able to complete practical course work submissions (which students negotiate themselves) using a recent smartphone. The course adopts a ‘Bring Your Own Device’ ethos, and students are being guided to plan practical work that they can complete relying on accessible equipment only.

How will I be assessed?

The journey starts with formative assessment of student blogs detailing the films, programmes and people that influence their plans and build towards both oral and written presentations of their plans, working towards the production of creative work and relevant business structures. As assessment on this course is highly integrative, these assignments look forward to later, student negotiated modules, and engage learners in evaluating and supporting the feasibility of their plans (whilst the evaluative parts of later assignments ask students to reflect on these earlier plans and the journey in between). Moreover, establishing a constant cycle of observing, theorising, planning and film TV programme making encourages students to experience the connections and synergy between all these stages and to develop habits that enable lifelong learning.

Screenwriters may use some of the earlier and smaller negotiated modules to lay out their story in an industry style ‘treatment’ or ‘step outline’, analyse ‘successful’ screenplays in their genre or made by intended collaborators, research future industry collaborators in depth before writing a full-length feature screenplay for their Major Project.

Directors can relate their aims, past work and approaches to industry practice, pursue a work placement if they are early in their career, or investigate and experiment with different ways to develop a visual strategy for a project, rewrite screenplays, look at performance and directing styles, or research successful case studies and potential collaborators.

Producers may evaluate a variety of past, ground breaking or potential future projects, research potential markets, audiences and finance sources including standard industry investors and crowd funding to build a detailed business case e.g. for their Major Project. Students focusing on technical grades may choose work placements (which they in the first instance identify, approach and negotiate as part of earlier negotiated course work), support practical work with in depth research including history and context, or experiment with new workflows.

Entry requirements

Those with relevant experience are encouraged to apply for admission with advanced standing through Accreditation of Prior Learning or Prior Experiential Learning, where appropriate. Students entering with advanced standing will be advised of the procedure for claiming accreditation of prior experience or learning, and of the regulations governing the amount of credit that can be claimed (see below). Advice will also be given on the extent of the match between their experience/learning and the relevant course outcomes.

Applicants have to meet their own equipment needs on this course. This includes a recent computer (laptop, desktop or versatile tablet, less than 5 years old, including software relevant to their specialism) and a broadband connection, as well as access to filmmaking equipment (e.g. camera, sound recording, postproduction facilities and other relevant resources) that may be required to produce practical course work to the technical standard that they specify in the early modules.

Each application will be required to include a ‘statement of intent’ (500 words for applicants meeting all admission criteria, 1500 words for applicants using APL/APEL), and applicants may be required to provide other supporting material, e.g. full marks/results records, or examples of their practical, professional or academic work. Eligible applicants will be interviewed by videoconferencing (e.g. Skype).

Overseas students may apply directly to the University. Students for whom English is not their first language should meet the appropriate English language standards. This course requires IELTS 6.5 or above. If you don’t have the required level of English then view our range of Pre-Sessional English courses.

How to apply

To find out more about how to apply, click on the Apply For This Course button above. Many of our courses offer a part-time study option. Note that the part-time mode of study is not applicable to international students, unless you hold a relevant visa – please check with the international office.

Please note: we have a range of taught postgraduate awards to suit your needs, from Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma to a full Master's Degree (MA, MBA, MSc, LLM). In most cases you can decide to exit at Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma level, without carrying onto the full Master's qualification.

Further information

If you click on the Order a Prospectus button above, we will send you a printed Postgraduate Prospectus; alternatively you can download a pdf prospectus.

To find out more information about Postgraduate Study at Coventry University, including finance and funding and the benefits of further study, see our Postgraduate Study pages.

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Do you want to develop a broad range of skills that will be directly applicable within the film and television industries?. Are you looking to kick-start your career in media production or scholarly research?. Read more
Do you want to develop a broad range of skills that will be directly applicable within the film and television industries?

Are you looking to kick-start your career in media production or scholarly research?

The MA in Film and Television: Research and Production places employability at the heart of the programme. Utilising a combination of theoretical approaches, critical engagement, creative practice and hands-on technical training, this MA gives you the chance to work within a dynamic and innovative department. It combines rigorous academic training in research skills and methodology with technical and vocational training in designing, researching and editing audio-visual content. It also includes a work placement of up to 12 weeks in the media industry.

Excellent communication skills, with high standards of both written and spoken English, are essential for this MA.

Please note: There are specific application deadlines for this programme. Please see 'How to apply' in course details for more information on the university website.

This interdisciplinary masters programme is designed to help you take the specialist academic knowledge from your first degree and apply it in practical ways to kick-start your career in media production or scholarly research.

Combining academic and professional training, the programme provides hands-on skills with a core understanding about how the industry works, promoting both critical and creative thought.

You will study four core modules:

Development and Production Processes for Film and Television
Documentary Filmmaking
Research Skills in Film and Television
Guided Editing/Guided Reading

The MA also includes a Placement and Training module, allowing you to gain work experience in the media industry, and you will complete the programme with either a 20-25 minute documentary film or a 15,000-word dissertation.

This programme also offers the opportunity to gain an industry-recognised qualification in Health and Safety for productions, in addition to your MA, which is a great enhancement to your CV. This is part of the Production Safety Passport Scheme approved by Creative Skillset (the skills body for the creative industries in the UK).

About the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies

"Welcome to the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies, in the College of Arts and Law. This is one of the largest Schools in the College, and variety is our watchword. We offer one of the most extensive ranges of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in the country. Our research expertise is equally diverse, and we welcome students and researchers from all over the world." - Professor Andrzej Gasiorek, Head of School

We particularly encourage creative thinking, with a range of pioneering programmes including Masters opportunities in Creative Writing, Film and Television and Shakespeare and Creativity. Our creative offerings are also strengthened by the development of our Department of Film and Creative Writing – established in 2015 – which has opened up exciting new opportunities for postgraduates to benefit from synergies between the two fields.

Our well-established Departments also provide an excellent environment for postgraduate study. The Department of Drama and Theatre Arts has a highly respected national and international reputation for excellence in teaching and research. We are also one of the leading centres for the postgraduate study of English in the UK, spanning language and literature. The Department of English Language and Applied Linguistics is a world-leading centre of excellence for both teaching and research in this field.

We are also proud to be home to the world-renowned Shakespeare Institute, based in Stratford-upon-Avon. Situated within walking distance of Shakespeare’s birthplace, school and grave, and the theatres of the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC), the Shakespeare Institute offers postgraduate students and scholars an academic experience unrivalled by any other university.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The Departments of Film and Creative Writing and Modern Languages offer promising candidates the opportunity to carry out research in one of the most dynamic institutions in Britain. Read more
The Departments of Film and Creative Writing and Modern Languages offer promising candidates the opportunity to carry out research in one of the most dynamic institutions in Britain.

We give all possible support to our researchers, developing the resources available at the University and encouraging an active postgraduate environment for the exchange of information and ideas.

The Departments of Film and Creative Writing and Modern Languages share a vibrant and fast-growing postgraduate community that is closely associated with B-Film: The Birmingham Centre for Film Studies.

This offers an exciting and eventful research environment for postgraduate students.

The Departments draw on the research interests and projects of our staff in postgraduate teaching and on contributions from staff in allied Departments at the University of Birmingham.

The MA by Research programme requires you to prepare a dissertation of up to 40,000 words on a topic of your choice, for which an academic staff member will provide expert supervision.

The PhD – the most advanced research degree - leads to a dissertation of up to 80,000 words on a subject of your choice and under the expert supervision of an academic member of staff.

Distance learning

You can study an MA by Research or PhD programme on campus or by distance learning. Please note that if you are studying with us by distance learning, the programme includes a fully-funded annual visit to campus for each full year of your programme (every two years for part-time students).

For more information on distance learning including answers to frequently asked questions, student experiences and funding opportunities, please see our distance learning website.

We also offer an Audio-Visual PhD which allows suitable students to gain a doctorate by the production of a 30,000 word thesis and a 60 minute documentary film on a subject of their choice and under the expert supervision of academic staff.

About the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies

"Welcome to the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies, in the College of Arts and Law. This is one of the largest Schools in the College, and variety is our watchword. We offer one of the most extensive ranges of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in the country. Our research expertise is equally diverse, and we welcome students and researchers from all over the world." - Professor Andrzej Gasiorek, Head of School.

We particularly encourage creative thinking, with a range of pioneering programmes including Masters opportunities in Creative Writing, Film and Television and Shakespeare and Creativity. Our creative offerings are also strengthened by the development of our Department of Film and Creative Writing – established in 2015 – which has opened up exciting new opportunities for postgraduates to benefit from synergies between the two fields.

Our well-established Departments also provide an excellent environment for postgraduate study. The Department of Drama and Theatre Arts has a highly respected national and international reputation for excellence in teaching and research. We are also one of the leading centres for the postgraduate study of English in the UK, spanning language and literature. The Department of English Language and Applied Linguistics is a world-leading centre of excellence for both teaching and research in this field.

We are also proud to be home to the world-renowned Shakespeare Institute, based in Stratford-upon-Avon. Situated within walking distance of Shakespeare’s birthplace, school and grave, and the theatres of the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC), the Shakespeare Institute offers postgraduate students and scholars an academic experience unrivalled by any other university.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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MA Film is a practical course in the production of film drama, from development and finance to distribution and exhibition. It is designed for students who want a hands-on, industry-orientated course, in the creative, technical and practical aspects of digital film production. Read more
MA Film is a practical course in the production of film drama, from development and finance to distribution and exhibition.

It is designed for students who want a hands-on, industry-orientated course, in the creative, technical and practical aspects of digital film production.

Taught through a combination of tutorials, lectures, technical workshops, mentoring, masterclasses and work placements, the course allows you to focus on one key specialism and develop it at postgraduate level, while encouraging you to engage creatively with related disciplines and wider filmic processes.

Within the collaborative unit you have a choice of pathways where you can collaborate with external partners and other courses within UAL. These pathways could be realised through work placements, cross-disciplinary collaboration, initiatives towards the Major Project or a combination of activities.
The theoretical programme underscores all of the practical elements of the course and offers a shared process for students to explore both their own and each other’s work.
What to expect
The course aims to produce graduates who are self-reliant, highly motivated and able to successfully navigate this increasingly competitive industry.
Applicants must demonstrate developed skills and an understanding of their chosen specialism at application, with major and minor roles allocated accordingly.
STRUCTURE

Term One

Term one begins with the Statement of Intent, which is designed to prepare you for both the Dissertation and the Major Project, and helps you position your work within the wider filmic environment.

This unit combines guest lectures and student-led seminars on your specific discipline or field of practice. You will be encouraged to develop a strong dialogue within your groups and contribute shared and individual creative visions ahead of the Major Project.
Once the term is underway, you will begin the Major Project and undertake a Head of Department role, with a chosen specialism, on a fiction film of a prescribed length (max 30 minutes).
The Major Project provides an opportunity to sharpen your skills in one of six chosen specialisms (identified at application) on an ambitious production that spans the four terms of the course.

The specialism roles are:
Producer
Production Designer
Director
Director of Photography
Editor/VFX
Sound Mixer/ Designer
As a Head of Department, you will further develop team leadership skills, and balance individual and shared creative visions.

Term Two

In term two, the collaborative unit offers students the opportunity to engage in a specific collaboration with a related course at UAL or external partner, or in the form of a work placement.

UAL collaborations could provide opportunities to:
Work with LCC courses MA Documentary Film or MA Television in technical roles on documentary or television formats.
OR
Develop a funding and promotional strategy for the Major Project.
External collaborations could include:
Site-specific experimental work, developed in conjunction with a gallery or public body.
An agreed commission or campaign film for a charitable or commercial organisation.
A work placement in the relevant discipline.

Term Three

In term three, you will also undertake two Secondary Roles on course productions. These roles will enable you to explore associated aspects of your specialism, enhance your skillset and learn what it takes to effectively support a Head of Department.
The Secondary Roles are:
Production Manager
Locations Manager
Casting Director
Assistant Director
Set Dresser/Props
Camera Assistant
Gaffer
Script Supervisor
Sound Recordist/Boom Operator

Term Four

The Dissertation is a significant piece of research-based academic writing, designed to help students locate their work within the wider filmic environment.
Running throughout terms two and three, with a submission in term four, the 10,000 word Dissertation encourages you to reflect on your current practice/s, identify trends in the professional sphere and explore the production process.

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This Feature Filmmaking course will give you an industry-focused education in the business and practice of modern, low budget feature film production. Read more
This Feature Filmmaking course will give you an industry-focused education in the business and practice of modern, low budget feature film production.

Modern filmmaking is collaborative and we’ve tailored the course for aspiring writers, directors and producers. Throughout the process we’ll help you to develop your skills for a career working on feature length documentaries or fiction. We teach you how modern filmmakers make feature length projects, while offering you practical experience of trying to make them yourself.

COURSE STRUCTURE

We teach you how modern filmmakers make feature length projects, while offering you practical experience of trying to make them yourself.

You should graduate with:

• A range of professional contacts
• A showreel
• A fully developed feature film project
• The knowledge to get ahead in the film business.

This is an industry facing course; you’ll build and develop your creative and associated business skills. We believe filmmakers need a clear understanding of business and financial issues to achieve their full creative potential.

MODULES

This course consists of five modules:

Development introduces and explores practical and creative approaches to low budget feature production. It gives an overview of the issues and challenges, and develops key skills. Each student will refine their project during this module by learning and applying various strategies and techniques of feature film production.

The Finance module focuses on the historical development of business systems, procedures and models that influence the contemporary global film business. This module will also include contemporary analysis of the film funding policies and structures of European nations as well as distribution strategies and mechanisms.

In Pre-Production, students have the ability to further develop/rework/alter their main project in the light of the insights into low budget cinema techniques and how the international film business operates. Industry standard software such as Final Draft and Movie Magic will be taught during this module.

Audience will give students thorough grounding in the theory and practice of contemporary marketing as applied to film. The module will introduce traditional marketing theories and strategies regarding communications, consumer behaviour, direct and customer relations marketing.

In Production, students will turn greenlit projects into a feature length production, building on the insights they have learnt over the course. The projects will normally need to be completed to an ‘off-line’ standard. It is expected that most productions will involve a maximum 18 days for principal photography. The projects will then go into a period of editing of 10–12 weeks to arrive at a version of the film that is suitable for screening to distributors and agencies to seek further completion funding.

For more information on modules please visit our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-feature-filmmaking/

TEACHING METHODS

You’ll be taught through a combination of intensive workshops and seminars. You’ll build on the your previous filmmaking experience and current professional practice.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

You’ll be assessed in a variety of ways, including scriptwriting, production folders, audience building strategies and a feature film project. You’ll need to demonstrate, through coursework, a detailed understanding of how micro budget features are made. You’ll also submit a portfolio of project work that shows a creative mastery which matches your grasp of the film business. Your final mark for the feature component of the assessment will depend on the creativity of your work, your commitment to the project and demonstrated ability in your role.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

This experience may lead some producers and directors into work on other films, TV drama or drama documentaries. Other students may wish to pursue academic work as lecturers or practitioners.

Another potential career route open to graduates will be to use their subsequent project as part of a PhD. Other careers can involve working with arts organisations.

For more information on opportunities please visit our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-feature-filmmaking/

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Developed in consultation and partnership with film and television studios, industry organisations and leading filmmakers, this new masters programme is designed to ensure participants develop an in-depth working knowledge of the industry in all its key aspects. Read more
Developed in consultation and partnership with film and television studios, industry organisations and leading filmmakers, this new masters programme is designed to ensure participants develop an in-depth working knowledge of the industry in all its key aspects. These include; market and government regulations, audiences’ modes and means of consumption, the logistics of production development and the global network of finance, production, distribution and exhibition.

Students have access to in-house experts who are engaged in cutting-edge industry-related projects, and also to the expertise and insider knowledge provided by our industry partners. Unique to the UK, this MA also offers students the opportunity to apply for highly competitive internships in leading studios and organisations in Hollywood and the UK.

The programme places a strong emphasis on the global dimension of the film and television sector and related screen industries, including the US, China, the UK and other nations and regions.

This unique combination of expertise and industry links and opportunities makes the programme contemporary, relevant and an excellent primer for employment in this sector. The programme’s core aim is to help students develop a skillset that will allow them not simply to work in the industry, but to be an active part of it, developing as future leaders.

Students will have an opportunity to study in-depth topics such as audiences and consumption, production development and organisation, marketing and promotion, markets and regulation. Subjects are discussed within a framework that acknowledges the increasingly global nature of the industry, as well as the opportunities and challenges presented by new technologies and accompanying new entertainment formats (e.g. mobile viewing, second screens).

Alongside formal teaching and learning opportunities, the programme addresses the individual needs and aspirations of all students by ensuring all participants are be able to work on a year-long special project on an industry area/topic of specific interest to them. This will help each student develop materials and activities that will help them demonstrate to industry employers the skills and potential they can bring to their organisation and projects.

Part-time students complete the same components, but spread over two years.

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Our MA in International Film Business aims to train the next generation of innovative executives for the international film industry. Read more
Our MA in International Film Business aims to train the next generation of innovative executives for the international film industry. We will teach you about film finance and sales, distribution and marketing, creative management and development, digital strategy and festival curation and programming.

You will learn about the impact technology is having on the industry and gain insider access to a range of events including the Berlin Film Festival and European Film Market.

The London Film School is a world leading postgraduate filmmaking school and you will have the opportunity to access their extensive expertise, attend master-classes and industry events organised by the school as well as the opportunity to benefit from working with an industry mentor as part of the dissertation.

As you might expect from a ground breaking programme of study, assessment will be more than just essays. Instead you will give presentations, pitch ideas, and take on negotiation exercises. During your first term at the University of Exeter you will design, promote, and deliver a pop-up cinema event in the Bill Douglas Cinema Museum.

If you’re serious about pursuing a career in the film business this MA will give you the chance to develop the key business skills and networks you will need, and benefit from mentoring by leading UK and European industry professionals.

Learning and teaching

As an MA International Film Business student you will have access to the world-renowned expertise of the London Film School and the academic excellence and research resources of the University of Exeter.

Your first term will be taught by leading film and business academics at Exeter where you will undertake a global survey of international film production, distribution and exhibition strategies and trends, and study business strategy, accounting and finance, intellectual property and entertainment economics. You will have the opportunity to examine innovative business models and the rapidly changing digital landscape of independent film.

At the London Film School you will take part in talks, master classes and question and answer sessions with film makers, as a graduate of the MA you will have access to the knowledge and contacts few programmes can offer their alumni. You’ll study the entertainment value chain through seminars delivered by London Film School staff and industry professionals, and a further series of intensive full-day seminars exploring film business innovation.

While there is no requirement to make a film as part of the MA, you can take the initiative in the second and third term to work independently, outside of the programme, with other LFS students who are studying on the MA screenwriting or filmmaking.

Field trip

In your second term you will take part in our field trip to the Berlin International Film Festival, including access to the European Film Market, which is a business to business event not open to the public.

The Berlinale takes place in February and is one of the world's oldest and most important international film festivals. About 400 films from all around the world are screened each year at the festival, most of which are international or European premieres.

As well as the excitement of premieres and the films in competition, the Berlinale is an important place for film industry executives to do business. The Berlinale hosts both the European Film Market and the International co-production market, where around 400 companies are represented. The festival also organises a variety of workshops, panel discussions and film programmes.

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