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Masters Degrees (Film Archiving)

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A ground-breaking new MA delivered in partnership with the BFI to prepare students to build successful careers in film exhibition, programming, criticism or archival work. Read more
A ground-breaking new MA delivered in partnership with the BFI to prepare students to build successful careers in film exhibition, programming, criticism or archival work.

Quick Facts:

2 Year Course
Full-time
Course runs Jan-Dec each year
Next intake: January 2017
NFTS Scholarships available for UK Students

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/masters/film-studies-programming-and-curation

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 08 SEP 2016

COURSE OVERVIEW

- The course is delivered in partnership with the BFI (the leading body for film in the UK) who will also provide hands-on placement opportunities across a range of curatorial and critical activities.
- The course is delivered by film professionals in film exhibition and distribution, festivals, archives and film criticism, alongside academics and film makers
- Students on the course will attend film festivals.
- Students learn how to conceptualise film work in terms of idea, form and style, as well as understanding the relationship between film and audience.
- Students will learn about the practicalities of film exhibition, distribution and preservation in the changing digital landscape.
- Students will study the practice of film criticism and comment, including reviewing and critical writing about films, filmmakers and the broader culture.
- Students have the opportunity to mount festivals, pop up screenings and other events.

This course commences at the end of January each year.

The National Film and Television School’s Film Studies Programming and Curation Masters delivered in partnership with the BFI is designed for students who wish to make a career in the wider film and media culture, whether in the fields of curation, exhibition, criticism, archives, preservation or restoration. The course provides a detailed understanding of the concepts, contexts and critical thought that have shaped the production and reception of film as a basis for engagement with rapidly changing contemporary film and moving image culture. A rigorous academic framework is combined with real world applications enabling each student to develop their own skills, knowledge and understanding to provide a strong basis for a career in film and media.

The philosophy of this course is to give students a theoretical, historical and critical understanding of film, which they will apply practically in the fields of film curating and programming, distribution and archiving.

With all the resources of the National Film and Television School available to them, students on this Master’s programme benefit from working alongside a new generation of filmmakers, encouraging creative dialogue between makers and curators/critics.

CURRICULUM

Students on this course gain a thorough understanding of the process by which a film moves from a creative idea to an audience experience. They will explore the history, theory and critical contexts of film. In addition they will look at a variety of critical writing on film, to give them access to the major ideas that inform film.

Optional units and a professional placement allow a more specialised focus on industry practices in programming, curation, archives and film criticism through project work and research portfolios.

1: Conceptualising Film: Idea, Form and Style

The unit provides an introduction to key ways of conceptualising film that underpin approaches to critical, theoretical and creative practice. The main topics include:

- The Evolution of the moving image – from scientific experiment to mass entertainment and beyond
- Ways of seeing: approaches to studying film
- The development of an industry and its audience. Film and Commerce
- Film and Realism: Cinema as a Mirror of Society?
- The Subconscious Art: Dream Cinema and the language of film
- Historical movements in Cinema: Influential developments, including the early avant-garde, Italian neo-realism, the Nouvelle Vague, Third Cinema
- Contemporary and British World Cinema: approaches development and trends
- Film Forum: the evolution of film criticism and comment
- Film and Digital Media (technology, and the impact on form and style)
- Expanded cinema: Film as a gallery experience, film as a live event

The unit draws on a wide range of illustrative film examples, and explores each concept with in-depth analysis of one or more key films. Each topic will be introduced by a film and media practitioner and/or an academic.

Students will write an essay in order to explore one of the key concepts.

2: Identifying the Audience: The Practice of Cinema from Idea to Exhibition

This unit looks at the changing sites and forms of film viewing, providing a detailed exploration of the cultural, economic and technological contexts that structure the processes and pathways by which films reach an audience. Whilst primary examples will largely be drawn from Europe and the USA, these will be considered in a global context.

- Audiences: bringing people together to watch films: who, why and how, from fairground attraction to movie palace to pop-up and online.
- The relationship between production and audiences: creativity, development journeys, film finance and funding.
- Contemporary patterns of distribution: buying and selling films in a multi-platform world; from conglomeration and globalisation to independence and self-distribution
- The business of contemporary exhibition: the ‘majors’ and the alternatives; the digital revolution
- Cultural cinema in the UK and Europe; the status of ‘specialised cinema’, including repertory and archive film
- Film Festivals and markets: cultural and economic impact; models of programming;
- Programming for diverse audiences
- Programming beyond the single screen: event cinema, alternative content, installation and on-line platforms
- Marketing and promotion: identifying, reaching and developing audiences
- Critics and criticism in the age of the internet and social media: continuity and change
- Reception: case studies

In addition to regular lectures and seminars by NFTS tutors, the teaching programme includes a wide range of talks by cinema and festival directors and programmers; industry executives working in exhibition, distribution, sales and marketing; venue and event managers; filmmakers and critics.

Students will prepare and present a case study one of the subject areas.

3: Programming Film & Cultural Events and Film Preservation and Restoration

This unit is broken into two strands with students participating in both.

Informed by the study in Parts A and B, there will be in-depth sessions on programming, including researching programme and event ideas, developing themes, selecting work to meet cultural and commercial imperatives, copywriting and devising marketing strategies. Practical issues regarding rights and availability, projection and technical presentation, producing publicity materials and on-stage introductions and Q&A hosting will all be covered.

The film preservation and restoration strand will cover understanding film materials, the impact of digitization on film preservation, and its limits; sessions will also explore issues of curatorial practice with regard both to collecting and exhibiting work and will consider the presentation and reception of archive material across a range of exhibition platforms. Students will also have the opportunity to visit archives, a specialised film collection, film laboratory or digital media centre.

During this part of the course students will attend the London Film Festival

4: Dissertation

As part of the dissertation module a number of specialised workshops will be arranged to enable students to explore a strand related to their dissertation in greater detail.

The dissertation may take the form of an extended piece of film criticism or an original exploration of aspects of film culture, genre or cinema history.

5: Graduation Project

The Graduation Project will be both a theoretical and practical exploration of their chosen subject and specialist areas. For example if a student wishes to explore sites and forms of cinema they will organise a pop-up cinema experience and deliver a written or video essay that explores the themes and concepts.

6: Professional Placement

During the process of developing the graduation portfolio each student will also undertake a 1-2 month professional placement.

7: Meet The Industry

A series of familiarisation visits to venues and projects with a variety of curatorial and critical approaches, to help provide students with a further sense of possible career options.

METHODS

In addition to a wide range of screenings and seminars, the course provides hands-on approach to teaching and learning through workshops, group projects, field trips, personal research, portfolio as well as professional placements (at Festivals, Cinemas etc). For example, students work in small groups to develop portfolios (e.g. promotional strategy for a film) and workshops (e.g. peer review in film criticism).

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

This course invites applications from students with a BA (Hons) degree (or equivalent) in arts, humanities or science. Film and media related degrees, while welcome, are not essential for admission.

Applicants without a first degree but with professional experience may also be considered for admission. In these cases an appropriate piece of written work will be required, along with details of professional qualifications. The application will then be referred to the NFTS concessions committee for consideration.

APPLY WITH

- Please submit a brief essay on either a) The preservation of film culture, through archiving, exhibition and restoration
Or b) Discuss the changing forms of cinema distribution and exhibition.

- Write a review of either: a) A contemporary film that has impressed you, or, b) an earlier film that you believe to be of artistic or historical importance. The review should not exceed 1,000 words.

- Choose a movement in cinema or one particular national cinema that is important to you. Briefly discuss your personal response to it. This should not exceed 1,000 words

- Discuss one author or film critic, or one book of critical writing on film that has influenced you. Discuss why you have found this author/book of value to you.

HOW TO APPLY

You can apply directly to us at the NFTS by clicking on the link below:

APPLY FOR FILM STUDIES PROGRAMMING & CURATION COURSE - https://nfts.co.uk/sign-me-up/apply-now/?nid=1857

You can apply online, or download a word document of the application form to submit via email
When selecting your course, please ensure that you have read the entry requirements and details of the supporting materials that should accompany your application.

TIMING YOUR APPLICATION

We are happy to receive applications 24/7 and 365 days a year up until the deadline. That said, there is no particular advantage to submitting your application very early. The important thing is that your application shows us your latest work and tell us about your most recent filmmaking experiences.

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Drawing on the internationally recognised expertise of our academics, primarily in the areas of Film and Television aesthetics, history and theory, this course enables you to familiarise yourself with key disciplinary issues and methodologies before focusing on an area of personal academic interest. Read more
Drawing on the internationally recognised expertise of our academics, primarily in the areas of Film and Television aesthetics, history and theory, this course enables you to familiarise yourself with key disciplinary issues and methodologies before focusing on an area of personal academic interest.

You will take a core module in Screen Cultures, in which academics will introduce selected screenings, and illuminate how an element of their own research can inform the methodology/theory under discussion. You then have the choice of three further optional modules taken over the first two terms. These currently include: The City in Film and Television; History and Memory in Italian Cinema; Journeys and Landscapes in Film and Television; Sound Cultures; Television History and Aesthetics;
and Textual Analysis and Film Style. Finally, you will have the opportunity to pursue your own thematic interests through a dissertation and research presentations.

The programme includes dedicated sessions in Graduate Skills that will equip you with the necessary academic skills to excel in Master’s assignments and PhD applications. Our postgraduates have progressed into diverse and often creative roles in film and television production, journalism, marketing, archiving education and publishing. They have also found employment in the voluntary sector, and in major arts and cultural organisations.

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This course is designed for students who have firm PhD study plans and feel that they need to develop their knowledge of fields which is not covered by our taught modules in order to prepare for their proposed PhD project. Read more
This course is designed for students who have firm PhD study plans and feel that they need to develop their knowledge of fields which is not covered by our taught modules in order to prepare for their proposed PhD project.

The MA for Research comprises of three taught modules, plus one independent study module designed in consultation with a supervisor and dissertation. In the past, a selection of the following option modules have been offered: The City in Film and Television; History and Memory in Italian Cinema; Journeys and Landscapes in Film and Television; Sound Cultures; Television History and Aesthetics; and Textual Analysis and Film Style.

The programme includes dedicated sessions in Graduate Skills that will equip you with the necessary academic skills to excel in Master’s assignments and PhD applications. Our postgraduates have progressed into diverse and often creative roles in film and television production, journalism, marketing, archiving education and publishing. They have also found employment in the voluntary sector, and in major arts and cultural organisations. We also have an outstanding record of MA students going on to doctoral study and employment in a number of prestigious HE institutions around the world.

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Our MA in Film Studies is one of the longest-established and most prestigious postgraduate degrees of its kind in the UK, drawing on the expertise of staff whose research has been assessed as world-leading. Read more
Our MA in Film Studies is one of the longest-established and most prestigious postgraduate degrees of its kind in the UK, drawing on the expertise of staff whose research has been assessed as world-leading.

This carefully-tailored degree programme enables students to explore the history, political significance and aesthetic qualities of a global range of cinema. It caters both to those who have previously studied media as well as those who are newer to the subject area.

Our research specialisms in gender studies and film, British cinema, genre, and audience studies, are reflected in the modules we offer.

Our thriving postgraduate community benefits from regular conferences on campus, use of the East Anglian Film Archive, as well as workshops from visiting media professionals.

Graduates from our MA programmes frequently progress to PhD study and have gone on to rewarding careers in various fields including archiving, academia, journalism, and in the film and television industries.

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Investigate fashion, dress and style in culture and society. Examine the evolving relationship between fashion and film. MA Fashion Cultures offers a unique experience in fashion education at postgraduate level. Read more

Introduction

Investigate fashion, dress and style in culture and society. Examine the evolving relationship between fashion and film.

Content

MA Fashion Cultures offers a unique experience in fashion education at postgraduate level.

The course has two specific but interrelated pathways: History and Culture; and Fashion / Film. On this course you will have the opportunity to study fashion and dress within its historical, social and cultural contexts. A dynamic in-depth exploration of theoretical and methodological perspectives will give you a grounding in the history of fashion and an underpinning of social and cultural theory for both pathways. You will then undertake more specialised study on your chosen pathway. On the History and Culture pathway you will investigate fashion as object, representation and practice through an interdisciplinary approach from both historical and contemporary perspectives. On Fashion/Film you will investigate the ongoing changing relationship between fashion, costume and forms of film as well as the relationship between cinema and consumption within a global context. While you will choose one pathway, you will have the opportunity to attend the lectures for the other pathway if you wish to, so you can gain the fullest possible understanding of a variety of disciplines and their impact upon visual and material cultures.

The pathways are led by renowned experts in their respective fields, and they are supported by research fellows, professors, authors, curators and historians who contribute to the course. Based in one of fashion’s most important cities, our students benefit from access to the special collections and archives of many leading institutions in London, including the V and A, Museum of London and the British Film Institute. You will also have the opportunity to work with other graduate students from the Culture and Curation Programme on some units of the course.

We attract students from a wide variety of academic and industry backgrounds, some of whom have completed theory-based first degrees, while others come with practice-based backgrounds. After completing their Masters studies, some students from both former courses have progressed to higher level research degrees, and others have established themselves in a number of related fields including curation, visual merchandising, styling, archiving, fashion buying, lecturing and research.

Structure

Block One September to January

Social and Cultural Theories (20 credits) (both pathways)
Fashion Histories (20 credits) (both pathways)
Research Methods (20 credits) (both pathways)

Block Two February to May:

Cycles of Fashion (20 units) (History and Culture pathway), or
Fashion, Stardom and Celebrity Culture (20 credits) (Fashion / Film pathway), or
Sustainability and Fashion (20 credits) (either pathway)

Gendering Fashion (20 credits) (History and Culture pathway), or
Film Concepts, Global Cinema (20 credits) (Fashion / Film pathway), or
Consumer Behaviour and Psychology (20 credits) (either pathway); Collaborative Unit (20 credits) (both pathways)

Block Three May to September: Masters Project (60 credits) (both pathways)

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This course develops skills in computer animation, computer games technology, film and television, or music technology. It is driven by the design and application of the latest hardware, software and techniques to produce creative and innovative media artefacts. Read more

Why take this course?

This course develops skills in computer animation, computer games technology, film and television, or music technology. It is driven by the design and application of the latest hardware, software and techniques to produce creative and innovative media artefacts. These could be focused on industry-related developments but equally you could test an idea or propose a new idea to address novel research problems.

MSc Creative Technologies is centred on a bespoke project chosen by you. This allows you to define the focus of your work and gain the hands-on experience of designing, creating and managing your media development or research programme.

You will be equipped with the technical, academic and professional skills required to pursue a career in your chosen industry. Your project will lead to an exit award of either:

MSc Computer Animation
MSc Computer Games Technology
MSc Film and Television
MSc Music Technology

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Focus on a problem to develop excellent portfolio work
Design and develop software, systems, 2D/3D assets, and innovative solutions
Use our sound/music studios and multimedia labs, accessing high-spec computing facilities
Utilise our industry-standard game content creation software, VR hardware, motion capture facilities and console development kits
Access the latest digital film equipment through our loan store, including the C300, EX3 and Canon 7D cameras and the Mix Pre-D portable sound mixer
Have the opportunity to engage in client-based research

What opportunities might it lead to?

Our course specialises in developing a wide range of analytical and problem-solving skills to support you in becoming a critically-reflective practitioner in a range of technology-related careers. In an age where media content providers are looking for cross-platform solutions to moving image digital design and production, the specialist knowledge our graduates attain leave them in a particularly strong position.

Depending on your project choice, you’ll be prepared to find employment internationally within the computer games industry, Virtual Reality, film or broadcast industries, training, healthcare and simulation or music industries. In addition, previous graduates have started their careers as freelancers, independent developers or continued onto PhD study.

Our students have pursued a wide range of project topics, including:

Computer games programming and technical design
Virtual Reality for healthcare
Education, training and simulation
3D modelling
Sound Design
Animation design
Motion capture
Cross platform film production
Online audio visual archiving

Module Details

Promoting careful planning, implementation and reflection on subject-related issues, this course will encourage you to build on your previous creative and technical expertise.

You will have the opportunity to research, design and develop a major artefact, prototype or study. In addition to one-to-one academic guidance from two project supervisors, the lifecycle of your project is also supported by self-directed taught units that take a project from start to finish:

Context and Definition: Identifying the background, scope and context of your project, and formulating a project plan.
Professional, Academic and Research Development: Identifying your own strengths, areas for development and refined career goals.
Project Design and Development: Shaping the project as it comes together and responding proactively to development issues.
Project Evaluation and Resolution: Acting upon feedback from the project to refine the outcome, before reflecting upon and evaluating your success.

Programme Assessment

This course encourages individual exploration and research along with opportunities to demonstrate this knowledge within your specialist area of interest. Particular emphasis is placed on your ability to define, implement, evaluate and reflect on subject related issues.

Formal assessment will include written materials, such as project proposals, research or development papers and reflective reports. This, along with completed artefacts, will form the assessment. In addition, presentations during the programme will allow the development of your ability to contextually justify your work.

Student Destinations

The rapid growth of the media industries, along with the advancing nature of technology, means that the demand for specialist skills in creative technologies is on the rise.

Depending on the focus of your self-directed project and your specific career plans, you can develop skills to work in the film and broadcast industries, games design, programming, art production and virtual reality development. The leisure and entertainment sector has an increasing number of opportunities in the field of music technology.

Other areas where you may find employment include education, health and business, which rely on audio specialists for the development of audio systems, software and interfaces, installation and monitoring, through to contextual acoustic research.

In addition, there is a growing demand for delivering cross-platform content as part of regional and international convergence projects, such as cross media solutions on TV, the web and social media, or across social venues, mobile phone devices and the home.

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Develop your individual, professional performance skills based on up-to-date practices and techniques of performing or presenting in front of a camera, in situations including fictional drama and factual programming. Read more

Course Summary

Develop your individual, professional performance skills based on up-to-date practices and techniques of performing or presenting in front of a camera, in situations including fictional drama and factual programming.

The course is designed for those with or without experience in acting and public speaking (eg actors, presenters, reporters, political figures, spokespersons and others), and you can tailor your studies around your individual needs through practice based research.

Your performance before the camera is an integral part of your research method and will enable you to produce your own professional show-reel.

Strong professional links embedded within the course provide opportunities to build professional contacts and experience from participation in master-classes run by experts working within television, film and other media/ professional industries.

Choose Performing Before the Camera PgCert at Bedfordshire and:

- Study on a course built around the requirements and demands of appearing before the camera in a professional capacity - constantly updated to reflect new developments and changes in professional and technical practices
- Explore a curriculum that anticipates the needs of the industry and opens up numerous career opportunities for postgraduates pursuing a professional career in acting and presenting for television, or film, or the internet
- Develop an understanding of professional procedures, requirements and challenges along with your ability to perform before the camera
- Gain experience of operating our recording and editing facilities to support your progressive development, archiving and final presentation of your show-reel
- Benefit from a course ideal for those pursuing careers in screen acting, presenting, journalism, politics and business who, in the course of their, work are frequently called upon to appear and present themselves and their ideas before a camera.

Why choose this course?

This course will help you perform of a professional standard before the camera. You will develop your individual performance skills based on up-to-date practices and techniques of working before the camera.

Career Management Skills

The content and structure of the course is built around the requirements and demands of appearing before the camera in a professional capacity. The content is constantly updated to reflect new developments and changes in professional and technical practices.

Visits and talks with those currently working successfully within the industry enable you to network and to develop an understanding of professional procedures, requirements and challenges.

You will develop the ability to perform before the camera in related to your future career path genres and monitor, as well as enhance your progression from documenting your practice in seminars, masterclasses and tutorials. You will also develop skills in researching and evaluating, as well as in critical thinking in diverse performance to camera related situations, enhancing your ability to take an enquiring and critical viewpoint on the material you encounter.

On this journey, you will be encouraged to become self-aware, critical reflective practitioner, through a series of teaching methods and assessments which will instil an autonomous approach to learning, expected at Masters level (see the University of Bedfordshire level M learner descriptors).

Career/Further study opportunities

The course opens up numerous career opportunities for postgraduates pursuing a professional career in acting and presenting for television, or film, or the Internet. It would also benefit those pursing careers in journalism, politics, and business who in the course of their work are frequently called upon to appear and present themselves and their ideas before a camera.

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Develop your individual, professional performance skills based on up-to-date practices and techniques of performing or presenting in front of a camera, in situations including fictional drama and factual programming. Read more
Develop your individual, professional performance skills based on up-to-date practices and techniques of performing or presenting in front of a camera, in situations including fictional drama and factual programming.

The course is designed for those with or without experience in acting and public speaking (eg actors, presenters, reporters, political figures, spokespersons and others), and you can tailor your studies around your individual needs through practice based research.

Your performance before the camera is an integral part of your research method and will enable you to produce your own professional show-reel.

Strong professional links embedded within the course provide opportunities to build professional contacts and experience from participation in master-classes run by experts working within television, film and other media/ professional industries.

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/performing-before-the-camera

Course detail

• Study on a course built around the requirements and demands of appearing before the camera in a professional capacity - constantly updated to reflect new developments and changes in professional and technical practices
• Explore a curriculum that anticipates the needs of the industry and opens up numerous career opportunities for postgraduates pursuing a professional career in acting and presenting for television, or film, or the internet
• Develop an understanding of professional procedures, requirements and challenges along with your ability to perform before the camera
• Gain experience of operating our recording and editing facilities to support your progressive development, archiving and final presentation of your show-reel
• Benefit from a course ideal for those pursuing careers in screen acting, presenting, journalism, politics and business who, in the course of their, work are frequently called upon to appear and present themselves and their ideas before a camera.

Modules

• Working before the Camera
• Practice-based Research Methods for Performance to Camera

Assessment

Throughout the course you will be encouraged to integrate assessment and the feedback from that assessment into your practice and critically evaluate your methodology and techniques, be it through your seminars, peer or self-assessed work to progress and develop your approach and value of your work.

You will develop professional practice through the presentation of your work to camera, working within tight schedules and having to deliver on time.

Assessment is primarily performance based, but you must also submit a written diary/report to demonstrate your research inquiry, plan, documentation of and ability to analyse your performance processes. For your assessment you will produce an individual performance show-reel in a specified genre (i.e. interview, acting or presenting).

Careers

The content and structure of the course is built around the requirements and demands of appearing before the camera in a professional capacity. The content is constantly updated to reflect new developments and changes in professional and technical practices.

Visits and talks with those currently working successfully within the industry enable you to network and to develop an understanding of professional procedures, requirements and challenges.

You will develop the ability to perform before the camera in related to your future career path genres and monitor, as well as enhance your progression from documenting your practice in seminars, masterclasses and tutorials.

You will also develop skills in researching and evaluating, as well as in critical thinking in diverse performance to camera related situations, enhancing your ability to take an enquiring and critical viewpoint on the material you encounter.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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MA/MSc Broadcast Futures aims to provide you with the advanced knowledge and skills to operate at a high level and innovate in new and emerging areas of the broadcasting industry. Read more
MA/MSc Broadcast Futures aims to provide you with the advanced knowledge and skills to operate at a high level and innovate in new and emerging areas of the broadcasting industry. Digital broadcast media lie at the heart of the course that aims to investigate, to understand and test contemporary theory and practice in the media industry.

The Ravensbourne MA/MSc Broadcast Futures pathway is a unique course that seeks out cutting-edge broadcast technology and innovation - collaborating with leading media technology companies and broadcasters – and defines broadcasting in its widest industrial, creative, cultural and commercial sense. The course will explore the application of new technologies, new platforms, new methodologies, and new business models and the opportunities that they offer the broadcast professional.

You will develop and challenge your understanding of key processes and will expand and push at the extreme edges of current knowledge in analogue and digital media, linear and non-linear broadcast, media content, production and intellectual property. You will also explore the impact of emerging technologies such as: S3D; ultra high definition (UHD) 4K; super high definition (SHD) 8K; pre-production; production and post-production workflows; global distribution; media acquisition; storage and archiving; meta-data, and changing broadcast paradigms.

You will be able to individualise your learning and develop, manage and realise an individual project, which will have a professional and industrial rationale, developed in your chosen area of study.

You will develop, through practice, strong management/project management skills, a range of key business skills (business planning, high level budgeting, schedule development, marketing, audience development, etc.) and how to implement them, and an understanding of the issues of entrepreneurship.

Course structure

- Technology Issues
- Business and Innovation
- Research Process
- Concept and Prototyping
- Major project

Within the Technology Issues unit, you will engage with three project cycles that will allow you to explore the technologies most relevant to your discipline area. Typical past projects have included an industry collaboration project with a camera technology support company (such as digital motion capture in a ‘live’ 3D environment); an individual project in which each student explained a ‘digital broadcast’ model (such as a short film or media-share environment); and a cross- disciplinary project with visual effects students.

In the Business Innovation unit, you will develop an understanding of business and innovative practices in the creative industries.

The Research Process unit will provide the grounding for research and development skills needed for your individual project.

The Concept and Prototyping unit allows you to further develop your skills to take a single line of inquiry, idea or theory embedded in broadcast futures and research and develop (investigate, challenge and test) the concept.

The Major Project represents the culmination of your investigation and the final stage of the research strategy. This is a substantial piece of self-managed work that is underpinned by advanced practice-based methodologies and processes.

Programme Aims

All postgraduate courses at Ravensbourne provide students with the opportunity to develop advanced skills in the conceptualisation and practical realisation of innovative creative projects in their discipline area and provide them with the entrepreneurial skills to realise their commercial potential. These courses share the following common aims:

- to develop advanced creative practitioners with the potential to originate, innovate or influence practice in their discipline area;

- to equip students with a comprehensive understanding of the core principles and technology underpinning their creative project and the theoretical frameworks within which to locate it;

- to underpin students’ creative practice with the entrepreneurial skills and business awareness necessary to turn concepts into commercially viable realities;

- to develop students’ skills in independent learning, self-reflection and research skills necessary to sustain advanced creative practice and scholarship;

- to offer a stimulating environment for postgraduate students which is both supportive and flexible in relation to their learning needs and a creative space in which to incubate their ideas.

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The Public History degree looks at how historical knowledge is produced, mediated and consumed in public spaces beyond the formal education sector. Read more
The Public History degree looks at how historical knowledge is produced, mediated and consumed in public spaces beyond the formal education sector.

Why study Public History?

Most people's sense of the past comes from public history, through film and television, fiction, museums, heritage sites and memory work.

This course looks at the kinds of pasts that are produced in these popular forms. It examines how they are made and the ways in which they are consumed and understood.

As part of your study you will be able to gain practical experience of working in a cultural heritage site, museum, gallery or archive.

The degree will help to prepare you for a career in public history related fields. It will also show you why the uses we make of the past are not just matters of academic interest.

Why St Mary's?

This is the only degree in the UK that is taught in partnership with The National Archives, which is a leading national and international site not just for archiving government documents, but also for engaging with the past in other forms.

You will attend workshops at The National Archives, delivered by their highly experienced staff and drawing on their wealth of original materials.

With the St Mary's campus located in South-West London, we also have excellent opportunities for field visits, and unrivalled links for volunteering and work experience with Hampton Court Palace, Strawberry Hill House, Turner's House, Sir John Soane Museum and Orleans House Gallery.

The degree is taught by historians with a strong record of publication and high-quality teaching.

Course Content

What you will study
› Public History
› Making Histories
› History: Spaces and Places
› Memory, History, Testimony
› Research Methods and Dissertation
› Professional Attachment

Please note: All information is correct at the time of publication. However, course content is regularly updated and this may result in some changes, which will be communicated to students before their programme begins.

Teaching and Assessment

Modules will be taught using a variety of modes – classroom-based discussions, field work, distance learning, work placements (where appropriate). You will write essays, produce project work, critique different types of source material, and learn to create work using a variety of digital tools. You will also design and deliver presentations about your work. In order to complete the MA, you will produce an extended, independent research project. This will either be a project based on your work placement or a text-based piece of academic research.

This course is designed to help you find a career in fields such as cultural heritage, archives, education and media. It can be used as part of your professional development if you are already employed in these sectors. It will also provide a critical and methodological platform for you if you wish to progress to doctoral level research.

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Exploring the past is exciting, thought-provoking and sometimes revelatory. Read more
Exploring the past is exciting, thought-provoking and sometimes revelatory. This postgraduate course in history will help you develop the skills needed to become a historian, with a taught foundation module in the first term that will acquaint you with the theory, tools, techniques and research skills of historical analysis. We will look at the varied primary sources through which we study the past, from laws and official reports to diaries, letters, memoirs, newspapers, oral testimony, paintings, cartoons, music, film, architecture, landscape, archaeological remains and the internet. We will consider how a secondary source differs from a primary one and the problems involved in interpreting a source and ascertaining its truthfulness and reliability.

Thereafter, the course offers 2 routes for you to choose between: the first route is research focused and will support you in producing a dissertation of 7000 words on the historical subject that most interests you; the taught route lets you select 1 module from any of the extensive range of option modules offered by the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology.

This programme is ideal for those who wish to pursue their passion for the past, those who want to experience postgraduate historical study without committing to a full Master’s degree, and those who are changing direction and moving to history from a different undergraduate subject.

Visit the website http://www.bbk.ac.uk/study/2016/postgraduate/programmes/GCGHISTO_C/

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/news/ref-results/), which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), History at Birkbeck was ranked 6th in the UK for the percentage of our research deemed world-leading or internationally excellent. 94% of our eligible staff submitted research and we achieved 100% for a research environment supporting world-leading and internationally excellent research.

Read about Birkbeck research that crosses disciplines and focuses on pressing questions within the social sciences and humanities (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/sshp/research).

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

- Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.

- This postgraduate course in history provides the opportunity to pursue your passion for history and undertake independent study and research in the time periods and subject areas that most interest you.

- If you have a degree in a subject other than history, but would like to study history at postgraduate level, this course is ideal for making the conversion between subjects.

- We are located 5 minutes' walk from the British Museum and the British Library, while the Museum of London is easily reachable. Other nearby specialist centres of research include the Institute of Archaeology, the Institute of Classical Studies and the Institute of Historical Research, all of which have internationally renowned library collections and run seminars that you can attend.

- Our Department of History, Classics and Archaeology (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/history/) is ranked in the top 20 nationally and is a world-renowned centre of original, influential research.

- Our academic staff are international authorities in their respective fields, delivering stimulating teaching.

- The department is home to thriving student societies and a number of affiliated research centres that actively run seminars, conferences and other events where some of the world's best scholars present their latest research.

- Find out more about why you should study with us (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/history/prospective-students/why-study-with-us).

- Birkbeck Library has an extensive history collection, including the major specialist journals, and access to online materials.

- Watch videos of our postgraduate students discussing their experience of studying at Birkbeck (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/get-ahead-stay-ahead/student-experience-videos).

Course structure

To gain the graduate certificate, you must successfully complete modules worth 60 credits.

You take the module Foundations of History: Sources and Debates (worth 30 credits), and then choose either the:
- Research route: work towards a dissertation of 7000 words (worth 30 credits), or the
- Taught route: take 1 undergraduate module from those on offer from the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology (worth 30 credits).

Module:
Foundations of History: Sources and Debates

Teaching and assessment

Teaching
This programme aims to encourage and support students in independent learning and original research. This will be facilitated through a mixture of seminars and one-to-one supervision supporting independent study.

Assessment
Assessment for Foundations of History: Sources and Debates consists of 1 essay of 2500-3000 words and either a second essay of 2500-3000 words or a literature review essay of 2500 words. Students on the research route submit a dissertation of 6000-7000 words.

Careers and employability

Graduates can pursue careers in research and archiving, education, the heritage industry, publication and the media, the charity sector, and journalism. Possible professions include historian, higher education lecturer, or archivist. This degree provides a range of transferable skills, which may be useful in becoming a journalist, heritage manager, politician’s assistant, academic librarian, or museum/gallery curator.

Find out more about these professions (http://www.prospects.ac.uk/options_with_your_subject.htm).

Find out more about the destinations of graduates in this subject (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/prospective/careers-and-employability/department-of-history-classics-and-archaeology).

We offer a comprehensive Careers and Employability Service to help you advance your career, while our in-house, professional recruitment consultancy, Birkbeck Talent, works with London’s top employers to help you gain work experience that fits in with your evening studies.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bbk.ac.uk/prospective/postgraduate/apply

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The Master’s programme in Literary Studies (research) at Leiden University includes the study of media, art history, literature and literary theory, since the study of cultural objects and cultural practices is founded on a shared theoretical and methodological framework. Read more
The Master’s programme in Literary Studies (research) at Leiden University includes the study of media, art history, literature and literary theory, since the study of cultural objects and cultural practices is founded on a shared theoretical and methodological framework. It is unique in offering a two-year programme that integrates literary studies, media studies, and theory.

Visit the website: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/programmes/literary-studies-research/en/introduction

Course detail

The main research themes of LUCAS, the Leiden Institute for the Arts in Society, guide the themes of the courses offered. These are:

- art, agency and rhetoric
- a global approach to texts, art and media
- intermediality

Specialisations

Topics in Arts and Culture:

- Architecture
- Art and Material Culture of Asia
- Art of the Late Middle Ages and Early Modern Period
- Decorative Arts, Industrial Design and the Domestic Interior
- Modern and Contemporary Art, and World Art Studies
- Museums and Collections

Topics in Media Studies:

- Comparative Literature and Literary Theory
- Film and Photographic Studies
- Book and Digital Media Studies
- Journalism and New Media Studies

Topics in Literary Studies:

- English Literature
- German Literature
- French Literature
- Italian Literature

Why choose Literary Studies (research) at Leiden University?

- Benefit from the programme’s intense collaboration with the MA in Media Studies and the MA in Literary Studies.

- Acquire a valuable range of skills and knowledge, both disciplinary and interdisciplinary, historical and theoretical.

- Enjoy the research master’s flexible programme, encouraging you to adopt a interdisciplinary perspective, while following courses within your ‘home discipline’ as well.

- Focus on a medium, discipline or genre, or a period (Middle Ages/Early Modern resp. Modern and Contemporary).

Careers

As a graduate of the Research Master’s in Literary Studies, you are prepared for a career in a wide variety of fields, for example within journalism, or as education-centre directors or librarians. Graduates also move into the fields of archiving, publishing and other media industries, while some can be found in management positions within the cultural public domain, in art trade, and in journalism and public relations. Furthermore, you have the very real possibility of moving into a research-oriented career.

Positions you could hold after your studies:

- Policy Officer at a university
- Desk Editor at SDU Publishers, a publisher of specialist information
- Consumer Marketing Manager at Philips
- Editorial Secretary & Editor at a publishing house
- Freelance copy editor
- PhD candidate at Leiden University
- Publishing Assistant at a publishing house
- Marketing Communications Writer at a telecoms company

How to apply: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/arrange/admission

Funding

For information regarding funding, please visit the website: http://prospectivestudents.leiden.edu/scholarships

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The MA Music is a taught postgraduate course for musicians interested in developing their music practice and increasing their profile as a professional artist. Read more
The MA Music is a taught postgraduate course for musicians interested in developing their music practice and increasing their profile as a professional artist.

The MA Music tests ways of taking existing practice in different directions and then carrying out projects in which this work is presented to the public. The course is a space to try out bold, new ideas and an opportunity to gain the real-world skills required by professional musicians.

Students on the course build a portfolio of music whilst developing skills of great use to a professional musician including project management, managing and archiving public events, self-promotion, and managing people and budgets. Creative work can be presented as part of Winter Sound, Future Sound and other events run by the music staff and students of UCLan but support is also given in seeking other opportunities to present music to a wider audience and in developing an online presence.

INDUSTRY LINKS

The course is taught by professional artists who are established leaders in their own field. The University has established good links with theatres and arts organisations across the North West including the New Continental in Preston, the Nuffield Theatre in Lancaster, hÅb in Manchester, the Blue Coat Gallery in Liverpool, and LANWest as well as other arts venues in the region. The School has in the past hosted a number of visiting artists and companies of national and international standing.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

All practical classes are delivered in the Media Factory which houses three fully equipped theatres as well as sound recording studios, film and photography studios and a range of music rehearsal rooms and seminar spaces. This building, as with the nearby university library, is available for use by students 24/7. Public events may also take place in St. Peters, a former church turned performance space, and the university’s PR1 Gallery. Lectures and seminars take place in purpose built suites which are equipped with digital projection facilities.

To facilitate access to the degree, students can opt to study in modes which are appropriate to their personal circumstance. Students may study three modules resulting in the award of PG Certificate, six modules with the award of PG Diploma or nine modules with the award of Master’s Degree. Each award can be studied in full or part-time modes. Study may be staged with students achieving the PG Cert or PG Dip and taking a study break before continuing with a higher award.

Full time study of PG Cert in Music will occur in Semesters 1 & 2; full-time study of PG Dip in Music will occur across Semesters 1, 2 and 3; full-time study of MA in Music will occur across Semesters 1, 2 and 3. Part-time study can be negotiated for each of the awards.

Assessment is continuous throughout and is based on a number of submissions including a music portfolio, public exhibitions/performances/installations, a seminar presentation and/or conference paper, and written essay work.

OPPORTUNITIES

The course supports students in obtaining public presentation opportunities to present their musical output. This has in the past led to performances and exhibitions locally, nationally and internationally.

Students can progress beyond the MA Music onto the DA in Creative Arts (equivalent to a PhD).

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