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A ground-breaking new MA delivered in partnership with the BFI to prepare students to build successful careers in film exhibition, programming, criticism or archival work. Read more
A ground-breaking new MA delivered in partnership with the BFI to prepare students to build successful careers in film exhibition, programming, criticism or archival work.

Quick Facts:

2 Year Course
Full-time
Course runs Jan-Dec each year
Next intake: January 2017
NFTS Scholarships available for UK Students

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/masters/film-studies-programming-and-curation

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 08 SEP 2016

COURSE OVERVIEW

- The course is delivered in partnership with the BFI (the leading body for film in the UK) who will also provide hands-on placement opportunities across a range of curatorial and critical activities.
- The course is delivered by film professionals in film exhibition and distribution, festivals, archives and film criticism, alongside academics and film makers
- Students on the course will attend film festivals.
- Students learn how to conceptualise film work in terms of idea, form and style, as well as understanding the relationship between film and audience.
- Students will learn about the practicalities of film exhibition, distribution and preservation in the changing digital landscape.
- Students will study the practice of film criticism and comment, including reviewing and critical writing about films, filmmakers and the broader culture.
- Students have the opportunity to mount festivals, pop up screenings and other events.

This course commences at the end of January each year.

The National Film and Television School’s Film Studies Programming and Curation Masters delivered in partnership with the BFI is designed for students who wish to make a career in the wider film and media culture, whether in the fields of curation, exhibition, criticism, archives, preservation or restoration. The course provides a detailed understanding of the concepts, contexts and critical thought that have shaped the production and reception of film as a basis for engagement with rapidly changing contemporary film and moving image culture. A rigorous academic framework is combined with real world applications enabling each student to develop their own skills, knowledge and understanding to provide a strong basis for a career in film and media.

The philosophy of this course is to give students a theoretical, historical and critical understanding of film, which they will apply practically in the fields of film curating and programming, distribution and archiving.

With all the resources of the National Film and Television School available to them, students on this Master’s programme benefit from working alongside a new generation of filmmakers, encouraging creative dialogue between makers and curators/critics.

CURRICULUM

Students on this course gain a thorough understanding of the process by which a film moves from a creative idea to an audience experience. They will explore the history, theory and critical contexts of film. In addition they will look at a variety of critical writing on film, to give them access to the major ideas that inform film.

Optional units and a professional placement allow a more specialised focus on industry practices in programming, curation, archives and film criticism through project work and research portfolios.

1: Conceptualising Film: Idea, Form and Style

The unit provides an introduction to key ways of conceptualising film that underpin approaches to critical, theoretical and creative practice. The main topics include:

- The Evolution of the moving image – from scientific experiment to mass entertainment and beyond
- Ways of seeing: approaches to studying film
- The development of an industry and its audience. Film and Commerce
- Film and Realism: Cinema as a Mirror of Society?
- The Subconscious Art: Dream Cinema and the language of film
- Historical movements in Cinema: Influential developments, including the early avant-garde, Italian neo-realism, the Nouvelle Vague, Third Cinema
- Contemporary and British World Cinema: approaches development and trends
- Film Forum: the evolution of film criticism and comment
- Film and Digital Media (technology, and the impact on form and style)
- Expanded cinema: Film as a gallery experience, film as a live event

The unit draws on a wide range of illustrative film examples, and explores each concept with in-depth analysis of one or more key films. Each topic will be introduced by a film and media practitioner and/or an academic.

Students will write an essay in order to explore one of the key concepts.

2: Identifying the Audience: The Practice of Cinema from Idea to Exhibition

This unit looks at the changing sites and forms of film viewing, providing a detailed exploration of the cultural, economic and technological contexts that structure the processes and pathways by which films reach an audience. Whilst primary examples will largely be drawn from Europe and the USA, these will be considered in a global context.

- Audiences: bringing people together to watch films: who, why and how, from fairground attraction to movie palace to pop-up and online.
- The relationship between production and audiences: creativity, development journeys, film finance and funding.
- Contemporary patterns of distribution: buying and selling films in a multi-platform world; from conglomeration and globalisation to independence and self-distribution
- The business of contemporary exhibition: the ‘majors’ and the alternatives; the digital revolution
- Cultural cinema in the UK and Europe; the status of ‘specialised cinema’, including repertory and archive film
- Film Festivals and markets: cultural and economic impact; models of programming;
- Programming for diverse audiences
- Programming beyond the single screen: event cinema, alternative content, installation and on-line platforms
- Marketing and promotion: identifying, reaching and developing audiences
- Critics and criticism in the age of the internet and social media: continuity and change
- Reception: case studies

In addition to regular lectures and seminars by NFTS tutors, the teaching programme includes a wide range of talks by cinema and festival directors and programmers; industry executives working in exhibition, distribution, sales and marketing; venue and event managers; filmmakers and critics.

Students will prepare and present a case study one of the subject areas.

3: Programming Film & Cultural Events and Film Preservation and Restoration

This unit is broken into two strands with students participating in both.

Informed by the study in Parts A and B, there will be in-depth sessions on programming, including researching programme and event ideas, developing themes, selecting work to meet cultural and commercial imperatives, copywriting and devising marketing strategies. Practical issues regarding rights and availability, projection and technical presentation, producing publicity materials and on-stage introductions and Q&A hosting will all be covered.

The film preservation and restoration strand will cover understanding film materials, the impact of digitization on film preservation, and its limits; sessions will also explore issues of curatorial practice with regard both to collecting and exhibiting work and will consider the presentation and reception of archive material across a range of exhibition platforms. Students will also have the opportunity to visit archives, a specialised film collection, film laboratory or digital media centre.

During this part of the course students will attend the London Film Festival

4: Dissertation

As part of the dissertation module a number of specialised workshops will be arranged to enable students to explore a strand related to their dissertation in greater detail.

The dissertation may take the form of an extended piece of film criticism or an original exploration of aspects of film culture, genre or cinema history.

5: Graduation Project

The Graduation Project will be both a theoretical and practical exploration of their chosen subject and specialist areas. For example if a student wishes to explore sites and forms of cinema they will organise a pop-up cinema experience and deliver a written or video essay that explores the themes and concepts.

6: Professional Placement

During the process of developing the graduation portfolio each student will also undertake a 1-2 month professional placement.

7: Meet The Industry

A series of familiarisation visits to venues and projects with a variety of curatorial and critical approaches, to help provide students with a further sense of possible career options.

METHODS

In addition to a wide range of screenings and seminars, the course provides hands-on approach to teaching and learning through workshops, group projects, field trips, personal research, portfolio as well as professional placements (at Festivals, Cinemas etc). For example, students work in small groups to develop portfolios (e.g. promotional strategy for a film) and workshops (e.g. peer review in film criticism).

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

This course invites applications from students with a BA (Hons) degree (or equivalent) in arts, humanities or science. Film and media related degrees, while welcome, are not essential for admission.

Applicants without a first degree but with professional experience may also be considered for admission. In these cases an appropriate piece of written work will be required, along with details of professional qualifications. The application will then be referred to the NFTS concessions committee for consideration.

APPLY WITH

- Please submit a brief essay on either a) The preservation of film culture, through archiving, exhibition and restoration
Or b) Discuss the changing forms of cinema distribution and exhibition.

- Write a review of either: a) A contemporary film that has impressed you, or, b) an earlier film that you believe to be of artistic or historical importance. The review should not exceed 1,000 words.

- Choose a movement in cinema or one particular national cinema that is important to you. Briefly discuss your personal response to it. This should not exceed 1,000 words

- Discuss one author or film critic, or one book of critical writing on film that has influenced you. Discuss why you have found this author/book of value to you.

HOW TO APPLY

You can apply directly to us at the NFTS by clicking on the link below:

APPLY FOR FILM STUDIES PROGRAMMING & CURATION COURSE - https://nfts.co.uk/sign-me-up/apply-now/?nid=1857

You can apply online, or download a word document of the application form to submit via email
When selecting your course, please ensure that you have read the entry requirements and details of the supporting materials that should accompany your application.

TIMING YOUR APPLICATION

We are happy to receive applications 24/7 and 365 days a year up until the deadline. That said, there is no particular advantage to submitting your application very early. The important thing is that your application shows us your latest work and tell us about your most recent filmmaking experiences.

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Degree programme description. This MA offers you the opportunity to explore key aspects of film analysis, theory, history and practice. Read more
Degree programme description
This MA offers you the opportunity to explore key aspects of film analysis, theory, history and practice. If you have already studied film at undergraduate level, you will be able to deepen your knowledge here. If this is your first in-depth engagement with film, you will be introduced to some of the liveliest and most important chapters in the history of cinema. You will be able to pursue your own particular interests in a dissertation on a topic of your choice. The MA also includes an element of practical work and the study of production practices.

From the earliest days of British cinema, London was the location of most British studios and it remains the national focal point for studying film.
Our provision at Queen Mary is enhanced by our proximity to major cultural centres such as the British Film Institute, which includes the BFI Southbank, National Library and National Archive, the Institute of Contemporary Arts and the Ciné-Lumière at the French Institute. The MA attracts high numbers of well-qualified applicants from the UK and overseas each year. It is both a valuable qualification in its own right and particularly useful for applicants wishing to study subsequently for an MPhil or PhD in Film Studies.

Degree programme outline
The core module spans two semesters and provides an introduction to film analysis and theory, an overview of national and transnational cinemas (focusing on films from the USA, Britain, France, Germany, Spain, Italy, Russia and Latin America), and an outline of film history during the twentieth century. You will also be introduced to aspects of film production and practice, including the technology of photography and its use in the feature film, cinematography and the continuity system and its relationship to the development of directorial style.

You can also choose two single-semester optional modules from a range including:
• 9/11 and American Film
• Auteur Direction
• Comedies of Desire
• Films of Powell and Pressburger
• Film History: Hollywood and the Second World War
• Frame, Space, Time: Approaches to the Experiences of Film
• History, Fiction and Memory in French Cinema
• Hollywood’s Vietnam
• Introduction to Film Archives
• Married to the Mob?: Mafia representations in Hollywood and Italian Cinema
• Moving Landscapes: Film Geography and Contemporary European Cinema (subject to approval)
• Paris on the Screen
• Sighting Gender and Sexuality in Latin American Film.

You may be permitted to take one option offered as part of another MA programme in the School or within the Faculty of Arts, provided that the MA convenor agrees that this would be beneficial for your intellectual development and research plans. In the case of options outside the School, admission to such modules requires the further agreement of the module convenor. This arrangement is also extended to include an option offered as part of the MA in Global Cinema and the Transcultural at SOAS, the MA in Screen Studies at Goldsmiths, the MA in History of Film and Visual Media at Birkbeck, the MA in Film Studies at UCL, or the MA in Contemporary Cinema Cultures at KCL.

Assessment
You will submit three essays for the core module, one of 2,000 words and two of 3,000 words, and one 4,000-word essay for each of the two options. At the end of August you will submit a dissertation of 10,000 to 12,000 words.

Entry requirements
Applicants will normally be expected to have been awarded (by the time they are actually beginning the MA course) a first- or upper-second-class degree (or international equivalent) in a relevant field of study, for example in Literature, History, Film and Media, or Cultural Studies.

Career opportunities
Doing an MA is an essential prerequisite for an application to enrol for a PhD. If you are not interested in pursuing an academic degree, you will find that many varied opportunities may arise for which the MA in Film will be an appropriate training: media, teaching, PR, etc. There is no specific career for which the MA at Queen Mary is specifically designed to cater.

Further information
http://www.sllf.qmul.ac.uk/postgraduate/

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Embrace your interest in film, television and music by becoming a skilled professional in sound recording. We have an excellent reputation for teaching film and music, with many of our graduates going on to win BAFTA's and Oscars. Read more
Embrace your interest in film, television and music by becoming a skilled professional in sound recording.

We have an excellent reputation for teaching film and music, with many of our graduates going on to win BAFTA's and Oscars.

You might be a budding filmmaker, journalist, photographer or documentary director, or simply have a creative passion for recording sound. Whatever your motivation, we will teach you professional techniques in music recording and post production so that you can record high-quality sound for the moving image.

This short course - taught over four weekends in the year - is a fantastic opportunity to learn from experienced film and recording professionals in state-of-the-art studios. We?re dedicated to providing you with hands-on, practical experience by giving you opportunities to produce your own work and explore the creative possibilities in sound recording and mixing.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/soundrecording_apd

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

There is a strong demand for well-trained soundrecording professionals and we provide the skills to help you on your way tobecoming an expert in quality sound broadcasting. If you would like to continueyour studies in this area there are opportunities to move onto one of our masterscourses such as Music for the Moving Image or Sound Design.

- Audio Editor
- Audio Engineer
- Studio Manager
- Composer for Film and Television

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You'll be learning at our Northern Film School ? the first film school in the UK to receive JAMES accreditation. JAMES, a professional body that represents organisations across the media sector, described us as 'a benchmark against which all other film courses need to be measured'.

Taught over four weekends in the year - Saturday to Monday - we've designed this course so it fits easily into your lifestyle, requiring minimum time off work.

You'll have access to a suite of professional music studios, including recording rooms, audio booths, instruments, portable audio recorders and a lab with soundcard and mixer. You'll be able to access an impressive range of facilities at our Northern Film School, including production studios, edit suites, production offices, and film and script archive.

We also offer exciting short study opportunities in film, music and performing arts, taught during Easter and Summer. These creative workshops, ranging from two days to a week, are a great way to build your expertise for professional use, embrace a subject you're passionate about, or develop your skills before applying for one of our postgraduate qualifications.

Core Modules

Studio Skills
You will gain a strong understanding of the creative possibilities of the studio environment through the development of a musical product.

Studio and Sound Location
We will equip you with the theory and the techniques for recording and mixing sound for film, television and radio.

Laura Taylor

Senior Lecturer

"Our courses prepare you for an industry that is ever-changing, demanding and highly competitive. You will emerge with a strong understanding of your specialism, and with a focused approach towards personal development and career planning."

Specialist sound tutor Laura Taylor has worked for the BBC, Channel 5, ITV Yorkshire and Discovery Channel. She has experience in live television, post production sound and commercial and community radio, and has worked within the educational and community sector. Laura has very close links with community radio station ELFM and the Soundmill Studios in Leeds.

Facilities

- Sound recording & editing facilities
You'll have access to a suite of professional music studios, including film composition and audio post production rooms, instruments, together with portable field recording equipment and extensive computer workstation facilities.

A comprehensive range of audio editing, composition and sound processing software is available.

- Northern Film School
You will also be able to access an impressive range of facilities at our Northern Film School, including production studios, edit suites, production offices, and film and script archive.

- Library
Our Library is open 24/7, every day of the year. However you like to work, we have got you covered with group and silent study areas, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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This Masters in Film Curation focuses on the history and future of the audience’s engagement with film of all kinds. It investigates the material qualities of audio-visual media and explores the history and contemporary practice of projection and exhibition, in cinemas, galleries, festivals and online. Read more
This Masters in Film Curation focuses on the history and future of the audience’s engagement with film of all kinds. It investigates the material qualities of audio-visual media and explores the history and contemporary practice of projection and exhibition, in cinemas, galleries, festivals and online. The programme includes a mandatory work placement with one of our external partners as well as opportunities for creative practice.

Why this programme

-The city of Glasgow is a unique hub of international cultural and creative activity offering unparalleled access to galleries, museums, cinemas, music venues and film festivals.
-Collaborators who will offer work placements and visiting speakers include the National Library of Scotland’s Moving Image Archive, Glasgow Film Theatre, Lux Scotland, the Gallery of Modern Art, as well as film festivals such as Africa in Motion and Document.
Students will have access to the Collections Study Centre at the Kelvin Hall offering state of the art facilities and study space in close proximity to the Moving Image Archive.
-The programme will draw on the world leading research and teaching of staff in film and television studies at Glasgow and includes expert contributions from a variety of external cultural organisations.

Programme structure

Students will take:
-2 core courses
-1 mandatory special project/work placement course
-2 optional academic courses
-Dissertation or creative project.

Teaching methods will include lectures and seminars, visiting speakers will offer workshops and seminars, there will be field trips organised to archives and festivals, and students will be assessed through a variety of methods including practice based activities, oral presentations as well as different written assignments.

Core and optional courses

Core courses:
-The Material of Film Curation
-The Practice of Film Curation
-Work placement/creative project

Optional courses - Students are expected to take 2 academic options offered by Film and Television Studies and the School of Culture and Creative Arts. They will be encouraged to take MLitt/MSc level options but may select one Honours option with the agreement of the programme convenor. Optional courses may include:
-Festivals
-Film Tourism
-Experimental Media
-Audio Visual Criticism
-Animation
-Film History
-Film Authorship

Career prospects

This programme is designed to provide students with a range of skills that will allow them to develop as creative and cultural entrepreneurs; as outreach officers in museums, archives or galleries; in film festivals, as programmers or curators; researchers for the film and television industries; as creative practitioners; or prepare them for future academic research.

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This programme offers the opportunity to pursue an individual research project of your own choice (practice or theory) and engage with a wide range of approaches to independent and experimental film and video. Read more
This programme offers the opportunity to pursue an individual research project of your own choice (practice or theory) and engage with a wide range of approaches to independent and experimental film and video.

Designed for those who do not wish to take a taught MA and prefer to pursue a specific research project in film and video, this MRes addresses research issues and methods. It provides a grounding in research processes which are common to work generally in the arts, humanities, creative and cultural industries and related fields, and also explores research questions and methodologies which are specific to film and video – crucially as these relate to both practice and/or theory: students can decide to work in either a practice or theory mode or any permutation and combination of practice and theory.

The programme should particularly attract students who are interested in furthering their practice or theoretical knowledge in one of the following areas: artists’ film and video, experimental film and video (including fiction, documentary, drama documentary, animation); histories of autobiographical, experimental, avant-garde film and video; contemporary theoretical discourses about independent film (including film practice as research, film as philosophy); the study and use of archive film (including home movies) in different contexts and practices; the relationship of film and video to new forms of dissemination (with particular reference to the digital); collaborative projects involving different disciplines (eg performance); community-based and activist video.

Programme content
■ Critical screenings: mapping out the
interconnecting territories of independent
film/video making
■ Research in the arts and humanities:
development of generic research skills and
methods
■ Masters thesis: presenting a substantial
piece of work, either practice- or theorybased,
chosen by the student

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A first of its kind, this new MA in Film Curating explores both the traditional and the rapidly changing ways in which films are programmed by curators and received by spectators. Read more
A first of its kind, this new MA in Film Curating explores both the traditional and the rapidly changing ways in which films are programmed by curators and received by spectators. In film exhibition today, the old and the new coexist: audiences still watch films in cinemas, but digital technology and the internet have multiplied ways of consuming moving images. Digital technology has also transformed the relationship between film and art: galleries and museums now routinely exhibit film in shows and installations. Film festivals are flourishing in new formats and locations as never before. These changes have profoundly affected practices of curating and programming.

This intensive (1-year, full-time) MA includes in its curriculum: the old and the new aspects of programming and curating; theoretical considerations of audience; spectatorship and reception; and the changing spaces and temporalities of film exhibition. The MA combines these strong critical, theoretical and academic foundations with site visits and internships in London galleries and exhibition spaces, as well as screenings and programming in the Birkbeck Cinema. Students will be taught by internationally distinguished academics and cultural practitioners such as Professor Laura Mulvey. Lectures from industry professionals and experienced curators provide a first step towards possible careers in art and film or for further research into the cultures of curating.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
The award-winning Birkbeck Cinema is central to the course. The cinema is equipped with 35mm and state-of-the-art DVD projection, offering students the opportunity to experiment with programming and curating.
The Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image programmes conferences, screenings and film-related events of all kinds throughout the academic year.
The inaugural Essay Film Festival, jointly run by the Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image and the ICA, was held in March 2015.
Located in central London, in the heart of historic Bloomsbury, Birkbeck is within easy reach of cinemas and galleries, as well as facilities such as the British Film Institute and the British Library.
Editing workshops with the Derek Jarman Lab enable students to experiment with the compilation and assemblage of archive material.

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We offer a tailored, individual doctoral research programme within an area of expertise covered by a wide range of staff interests. Read more
We offer a tailored, individual doctoral research programme within an area of expertise covered by a wide range of staff interests. In addition to individual supervision, students participate in an extensive study skills programme; an ongoing series of international level seminars, symposia and conferences; the Department’s Postgraduate Methods Reading Group and an informal Postgraduate Research Group.

Research Interests

Film and television aesthetics, history and theory; classical and contemporary Hollywood cinema; European cinema (especially British, Italian, French, and Spanish); British and US television; documentary film and television; silent cinema; feminist film and television theory, history and criticism; world cinema; gay and lesbian film cultures; film and philosophy; experimental film and video; film and television genre; film and modernity; film technology and innovation; cities and landscapes in film and television; critical studies of the archive; transnational cinemas.

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This course allows you to explore a wide range of films, contextual studies and critical debates, as well as the politics and cultural power of other media forms and institutions. Read more
This course allows you to explore a wide range of films, contextual studies and critical debates, as well as the politics and cultural power of other media forms and institutions.

Course overview

This Masters is for people who want to study films and culture at an advanced level. There is a high level of engagement with theories and practices of film studies and cultural studies, as well as a strong emphasis on rigorous research skills.

Given the importance of theory, an important attraction of this Masters is Sunderland’s research specialisms. These include star studies, performance, distribution and national cinemas, as well as sexualities, identities and how technology changes the way we experience the world.

The course is taught at the David Puttnam Media Centre on our Sir Tom Cowie Campus at St Peter’s by staff from Sunderland’s Centre for Research in Media and Cultural Studies (CRMCS), which promotes a lively and inclusive research environment. As part of the course, you will have the opportunity to attend CRMCS’s regular research seminar series, which hosts both visiting and internal speakers discussing their latest research. You will also have the opportunity to benefit from the centre’s annual programme of national and international conferences, symposia and other research events.

You will focus on areas that you find particularly fascinating while contextualising your interests within the wider field of film, media and cultural studies. The course culminates in a dissertation on a topic that you negotiate with tutors.

Throughout the course, you will refine your powers of analysis, research and communication. These skills are highly valued by employers and will boost your employability. Postgraduates earn more, on average than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree.

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Modules on this course are:
-Film and Cultural Studies 1 (60 Credits)
-Engaging with Theory: Key Thinkers, Texts and Concepts (30 Credits)
-Research Methods in Film, Media and Cultural Studies (30 Credits)

Film and Cultural Studies 2 (60 Credits)
-Consumption and Everyday Life (30 Credits)
-Special Topic: Film, Media and/or Cultural Studies (30 Credits)

Film and Cultural Studies 3 (60 Credits)
-You will complete a supervised dissertation on a topic of your choice.

Teaching and assessment

All modules are team taught, drawing on the wide range of research specialisms of our staff.

Co-taught with MA Media and Cultural Studies, this MA enables you to contextualise your own work within the wider field of film, media and cultural studies, as well as pursue your own specific interest in film. This approach is excellent preparation if you are thinking of continuing on to PhD level. You will also be able to specialise and pursue your own specific interests film via choice of assignment questions on the taught modules and via negotiation of topics in the Special Topic and Dissertation modules.
Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working.

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, seminars, critiques and workshops. Via CRMCS’s research seminar programme, these are supported by a range of guest speakers from diverse academic and industry backgrounds. From stage 2 you will be expected to engage in a greater degree in self-directed study in preparation for the stage 3 dissertation. Your tutors will also give regular feedback and support.

Assessment methods include essays, projects, presentations, and a dissertation.

Facilities & location

Our David Puttnam Media Centre is home to the Centre for Research in Media and Cultural Studies (CRMCS), which engages in world leading research, as well as hosting international visiting scholars, conferences, external speakers and two international refereed research journals.

Teaching rooms
We have well-equipped lecture and seminar rooms, with overhead projection and full internet access.

Cinema
There is a 203-seat cinema with full HD projection, 7.1 surround sound facility and the capability to play 3D feature films. We have a live Sky feed and off-air recording facility, including DVD and Blu-ray recording, plus extensive footage archive/library.

University Library Services
We’ve got a wide range of books, journals and e-books on relevant topics, with many more available through the inter-library loan service. The library buildings provide a variety of study spaces, IT facilities and experience library staff during core hours, with online services and support available at any time off-campus. In addition, both the St Peter’s and Murray libraries offer 24/7 access during main teaching weeks.

TV studios
We have two TV studios complete with green rooms and control rooms. Equipment includes four Steadicam rigs plus dolly, track and mini crane. We also have over 40 full HD tapeless field camera systems, comprising Sony EX1 and EX3 models, with associated location kits, lighting, field monitors and audio mixers.

Digital editing
There are 70 workstations with state-of-the-art HD Edit systems, including Final Cut Pro, Avid and Media Composer. There is also a digital audio postproduction area with four voiceover booths.

Radio studios
We have five radio studios including a transmission suite for Spark FM, our student-run community radio station. It broadcasts 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, with a target audience of 15-24 year olds.

Employment & careers

Postgraduates are highly employable and, on average, earn more than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree. On completing this course, you will be equipped for a range of roles in the media and cultural industries. A Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies.

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Immerse yourself in hands-on filmmaking and real production budgets on this unique course. Creativity and collaboration are at the heart of our teaching, which takes place in our very own Northern Film School (http://www.northernfilmschool.co.uk/), giving you access to state-of-the-art equipment and facilities. Read more
Immerse yourself in hands-on filmmaking and real production budgets on this unique course.

Creativity and collaboration are at the heart of our teaching, which takes place in our very own Northern Film School (http://www.northernfilmschool.co.uk/), giving you access to state-of-the-art equipment and facilities. Designed to mirror real international, independent film production, this course gives you the opportunity to gain specialist knowledge of seven main areas - producing, screenwriting, directing, cinematography, production design, sound and editing.

The course is driven by filmmaking itself, but you will also focus on theory - we want you to think, research, discuss and watch films. We encourage ideas based around independent filmmaking and look for inspired stories and concepts on which to base our productions. We will also supply funding for your masters' project.

Whether your passion lies in making fiction, documentaries or experimental films, you will have the support of a teaching team with ongoing and extensive industry experience.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: 38% of our research was judged to be world leading or internationally excellent in the Communication, Culture and Media Studies, Library and Information Management unit.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/filmmaking_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

Our course aims to give you a competitive edge in a challenging industry. We offer a route into film and television through working with tutors, mentors and visiting professionals and by developing your own creative abilities and work. We promote our graduation films on the international festival circuit, as well as giving you the opportunity to attend film festivals during the course.

- Creative Producer
- Cinematographer
- Screenwriter
- Director

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

As film financing, production and distribution move away from old models our course prepares you for an industry that expects you to be self reliant and self-employed.

You will be taught by practising filmmakers with experience across documentary and fiction, from cinematography to editing, some of whom can boast BAFTA and Oscar nominations. As a consequence of relationships between staff and the industry, you will have the opportunity to learn from visiting filmmakers during guest lectures and workshops. The Northern Film School (http://www.northernfilmschool.co.uk/) is also a member of The International Association of Film and Television Schools (CILECT), an organisation of only the best film schools worldwide.

The School is the first and only film school in the UK to receive JAMES accreditation, in recognition of the professional expertise of our staff, the professional level of our facilities and the opportunities for our students to crew on professional shoots. JAMES represents creative and technical organisations across the media industries sector such as the Association of Professional Recording Services (APRS), the Music Producers Guild (MPG), UK Screen and UK Drama. On our JAMES approved course, you will be studying the latest in industry practice and gain access to professional contacts and work experience opportunities. JAMES described us as 'a benchmark against which all other film courses need to be measured'.

At the Electric Press in Leeds city centre where the School is based, you will have access to an impressive range of facilities. These include both 16mm and digital production equipment, two production studios, professional level edit suites, production offices, screening facilities, a props store and film and script archive.

Keith Dando

Senior Lecturer

"Our course aims to empower you to not just get into the industry but to 'be' the industry on a creative as well as business level, and to leave the course having made long lasting collaborative relationships."

Keith’s career has included work on short and feature films, television series and computer games in projects for the BBC, Channel Four, Channel Five and many independent film and TV companies. Keith has also co-written screenplays that have reached the finals in the prestigious Zoetrope and Final Draft screenwriting contests, and worked with upcoming and respected filmmakers such as Clio Barnard and Penny Woolcock.

Facilities

- Film Studios
Based in the Electric Press, our two expansive production studios, East and West Side enable the building of substantial film sets. This affords film students the opportunity to fully explore set design and prop building.

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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A research degree in international film and screen studies is a period of intensive, supervised investigative work in this area. It builds on your previous academic or professional experience and allows you to develop an original area of expertise. Read more
A research degree in international film and screen studies is a period of intensive, supervised investigative work in this area. It builds on your previous academic or professional experience and allows you to develop an original area of expertise.

You work closely with a director of studies and a supervisor who are specialists in your chosen field to produce an extended thesis of up to 80,000 words in the case of doctoral research.

There are regular research training events, PhD seminars and informal meetings where you can practise delivering conference papers in a supportive environment.

We have a lively research culture and a high proportion of research-active staff. We value and support all our research students who make a vital contribution to the intellectual life of the University.

We also have specialist film studies facilities for your research. For example, films are shown in our purpose-built film theatre The Void, which combines new technology, including DCP, Blu-ray and DVD projected through a 4K digital cinema projector, with older technology, including two 40-year-old Westrex 7000 35mm projectors. These projectors can show both recent and rare, culturally valuable films in their original cinema format, including silent films at the correct speed. We are one of the few universities in the country that have these capabilities. You can view films as they were originally meant to be seen, an experience that cannot be replicated through home viewing alone. The Dolby 5.1 surround-sound system enhances your viewing experience.

We also enjoy a close working relationship with the British Film Institute (BFI) and have privileged access to the BFI Archive, which contains more than 50,000 fiction films and over 100,000 non-fiction titles, most of which are not available on DVD or via the internet.
Funds are available to support you in attending conferences and we encourage you to deliver papers and publish your work. It may be possible to apply for Arts and Humanities Research Council studentships. Some part-time teaching may also be available.
This degree is hosted within the Faculty of Development and Society Graduate School. The Graduate School website provides a communication hub for students and staff engaged in research, information about our research work, and useful contact information.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/mphilphd-film-studies

Course structure

Full time – at least 35 hours a week on average over 3 years.
Part time – at least 12 hours a week on average for up to 7 years.
There is a split mode available for international students who want to study in their own country. Various start dates

This course can be developed into a PhD. For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/mphilphd-film-studies

Course design
Your study depends on your chosen area of research but includes a compulsory research methods module for students without prior research qualifications at postgraduate level.

Assessment: research programme submitted for approval by our research degrees committee, report and oral presentation for the confirmation of PhD stage, submission of thesis and viva.

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From television, film and radio, to gaming, digital and online advertising, the demand for specialists who can use sound creatively has never been higher. Read more
From television, film and radio, to gaming, digital and online advertising, the demand for specialists who can use sound creatively has never been higher. This course will give you an understanding of the innovation and technology behind studio sound production and design.

You'll study the relationship between sound, music and image, and build your skills in sound production technology and music editing techniques. You'll develop the ability to produce original sounds and audio-visual media so you can create professional audio across a variety of media formats.

Our short course is a fantastic opportunity to learn from experienced music and film professionals in state-of-the-art studios. We're dedicated to providing you with hands-on, practical experience so you can produce your own work, developing your ability to deliver professional sound content to a specific brief.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/creativesound_apd

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

We believe a short course can make a big difference.Employment opportunities could be open to you in sound engineering,performance, digital media, gaming, music for film and television, production,radio, composition, sonic art, and music marketing and PR. If you would like tocontinue your studies, we offer a range of masters courses, such as AudioEngineering or Sound Design.

- Sound Designer
- Composer for Media
- Studio Engineer/Producer
- Audio Producer (Film, TV, Gaming)

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You might have just finished your degree, or be working in industry looking to acquire new skills for your professional development. Taught over four weekends in the year - Saturday to Monday - we've designed this course so that it fits around your lifestyle, requiring minimum time off work.

You'll have access to a suite of professional music studios, including recording rooms, audio booths, instruments, portable audio recorders, lab with soundcard and mixer, and computer workstations with software such as Sibelius, Pro Tools and SynthMaker, and music analysis tools.

You will access an impressive range of facilities at our Northern Film School, including production studios, edit suites, production offices, and film and script archive.

We also offer exciting short study opportunities in film, music and performing arts, taught during Easter and Summer. These creative workshops, ranging from two days to a week, are a great way to build your expertise for professional use, embrace a subject you're passionate about, or develop your skills before applying for one of our postgraduate qualifications.

Core Modules

Sound, Music & Image
Evaluate the relationships between sound, music and image, and create examples of audio-visual media to a professional standard.

Creative Sound Design
We will equip you with the expertise to develop audio-based artefacts in the fields of electro-acoustic music, sonic art and sound design.

Martin Briggs

Senior Lecturer, Music & Sound

"We believe the particular combination of staff experience and expertise, first class facilities, real world practical assignments, guest lecturers and industry networks, contacts and accreditation make our specialist courses in sound second to none."

Originally training in music and media, Martin has worked as both a performer and producer in music, sound recording, video production and live events. His current research is concerned with collaborative partnerships and working practices in music and sound creation. Whilst still working as a musician and arranger, he is also involved in the promotion of local community music workshops, performances and events.

Facilities

- Sound recording & editing equipment
A comprehensive range of audio editing, composition and sound processing software is available.

You'll have access to a suite of professional music studios, including film composition and audio post production rooms, instruments, together with portable field recording equipment and extensive computer workstation facilities.

- Northern Film School
You will also be able to access an impressive range of facilities at our Northern Film School, including production studios, edit suites, production offices, and film and script archive.

- Library
Our Library is open 24/7, every day of the year. However you like to work, we have got you covered with group and silent study areas, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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The state-of-the-art facilities at our David Puttnam Media Centre make Sunderland a compelling choice for media production. This course is for people who want a Masters with a focus on practical skills in media production. Read more
The state-of-the-art facilities at our David Puttnam Media Centre make Sunderland a compelling choice for media production.

Course overview

This course is for people who want a Masters with a focus on practical skills in media production. For a stronger emphasis on theory, please see MA Media and Cultural Studies.

If you want to improve your knowledge, build your resume and be involved in high-quality media content, with technical skills that are in demand across the TV and Film industries, then this Masters will give you an edge over people with an honours degree. You will cover areas of 360 commissioning, workflow, moving camera, advanced editing techniques and production management.

If your first degree is not directly related to media production, we may ask you to undertake a short course that covers essential skills and knowledge, before you join the main Masters course. This ensures that everyone on the course can fully participate in group projects.

‌‌‌‌Media Production (Film and Television) MA has been awarded the Creative Skillset Tick, the industry kitemark of quality, following a rigorous assessment process by experts working in the Creative Industries. The Creative Skillset Tick is awarded to practice-based courses which best prepare students for a career in the industry.‌

‌Sunderland’s Media Department has been recognised for producing some world-leading and internationally excellent research. The University hosts the Centre for Research in Media and Cultural Studies (CRMCS). Our research expertise includes multi-platform production, music and moving image collaborations, independent production, and television aesthetics.

‌‌‌‌Students on this course are elgible to apply for a BAFTA scholarship. Find out more on the BAFTA website.

Sunderland is an accredited training provider for AVID software, which is the industry-leading editing system. We are also part of Avid’s worldwide network of Learning Partners, and as an MA student you will have an option to take an AVID certification that boosts your employability. ‌

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/artsdesignandmedia/postgraduate/media-production-television-video-part-time/

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors. Modules on this course include:
Media Production 1 (60 Credits)
-Media Craft Skills – these include elements of scriptwriting, editing, camera and lighting and sound techniques
-Deconstruction and reconstruction of advertisements and music videos

Media Production 2 (60 Credits)
-Production Management
-Video for New Media
-Mini Practical Project

Media Production 3 (60 Credits)
-Major Media Project

Teaching and assessment

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working. The course aims to stretch your creativity and maximise your sense of personal fulfilment.

You will work on group production projects which will be supported by workshops, studio sessions, tutorials and seminars, as well as master classes led by industry professionals.

Facilities & location

Our David Puttnam Media Centre is a centre for excellence in training students, with continual investment in industry-standard equipment.

TV studios
We have two TV studios complete with green rooms and control rooms. Equipment includes multiple Steadicam rigs plus dolly, track and mini crane. We also have over 40 full HD tapeless field camera systems, comprising Blackmagic, Sony EX1 and EX3, with associated location DIT kits, lighting, field monitors and audio mixers.

Digital editing
There are 70 workstations Edit systems, including Avid Media Composer, Protools, Adobe Master Collection, four Colour Grading rooms running DaVinci Resolve. There is also a digital audio postproduction area running the Avid S6 desk with four voiceover booths.

Radio studios
We have five radio studios including a transmission suite for Spark FM, our student-run community radio station. It broadcasts 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, with a target audience of 15-24 year olds.

Other media facilities
There is a 203-seat cinema with full HD projection, 7.1 surround sound facility. We have a live Sky feed and off-air recording facility, including DVD and Blu-ray recording, plus extensive footage archive/library.

University Library Services
We’ve got a wide range of books, journals and e-books on relevant topics, with many more available through the inter-library loan service. Useful resources for your studies include:
-Archival Sound Recordings with over 12,000 hours of recordings
-British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC), which provides resources for the production, study and use of film and related media in higher education and research

Employment & careers

Postgraduates are highly employable and, on average, earn more than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree. On completing this course, you will be equipped for roles in production, media management, marketing, legal and media business.

A Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies.

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The MSc in Filmmaking and Media Arts is designed to deliver a portfolio of skills required in contemporary screen-based production contexts. Read more
The MSc in Filmmaking and Media Arts is designed to deliver a portfolio of skills required in contemporary screen-based production contexts. If you are a filmmaker, freelance media producer, or an independent media artist seeking to develop advanced skills and learn key industry practices for building your career, the MSc in Filmmaking and Media Arts has been specifically designed for you. Through practical workshops, industry master classes, and history and theory courses you will have the opportunity to learn from industry professionals, media artists, and world leading academics in film, television and digital media theory.

Why this programme

-Through practical workshops, industry master classes, and history and theory courses you will have the opportunity to learn from industry professionals, media artists, and academics in film, television and digital media theory.
-Glasgow offers a vibrant context for filmmaking and media arts practice. Key cultural events include the Glasgow Film Festival and Glasgow International(a biennial international festival of contemporary art).
-This broad-based and flexible programme allows you to work across a variety of platforms.
-Recognising that the programme will attract a diverse range of creative individuals, we offer a variety of software and hardware options. Our purpose designed Media Lab is equipped with Avid, Adobe Creative Cloud (including Premiere Pro, After Effects, Photoshop, Dreamweaver) and Final Cut Pro. We are able to equip students for projects with a range of cameras and sound and lighting equipment.
-The city is the home of BBC Scotland, STV and a lively community of independent media producers (television companies, sound studios and design companies) and numerous micro-businesses in the creative industries. It is also home to the internationally significant Glasgow Museum of Modern Art as well as venues renowned for exhibitions of emerging and established screen-based artists such as Tramway, The Centre for Contemporary Art and The Arches. In addition, the city is famous for its live music venues, galleries and artist run studio spaces offering an excellent and supportive environment for creative artists.
-The programme is taught in the Gilmorehill Centre which offers a purpose built Media Lab, its own cinema as well as a Media Archive which has more than 6,000 holdings, complementing the Library’s extensive collection of film, television and media art books and periodicals. The Centre is home to the international journal Screen and hosts the journal’s annual conference every summer, attracting leading names in film and television studies from across the world. You will have the opportunity to participate in the conference as well as to engage with guest speakers from the academy and media industries throughout the year.

Programme structure

The programme will offer a combination of formal lectures, practitioner led workshops, seminar discussions, screenings and one-on-one tutorials.

The practical elements of the course will feature high levels of support and direction in relation to pre-production materials, including developing pitches and storyboards as well as hands on support in relation to delivery of the individual film/media art projects.

Industry workshops are designed to give you the skills and knowledge needed in contemporary screen-based media contexts, while history and theory courses are offered to link industry practice with cutting edge theory in the field.

The programme has 4 components:
-Two core practical workshops: Running in Semester 1 and Semester 2, these are led by a practitioner in our purpose built Media Lab and are designed to provide hands on support in the production of your film or media art projects. They also incorporate sessions led by industry professional that are designed to pass on key industry experiences and skills vital to a successful career in the industry.
-The core academic option Experimental Art and Media: This course covers the history and theory of experimental art and filmmaking, including the topic of practice-as-research. It is designed to provide a critical foundation for your filmmaking and/or media arts practice.
-You will also choose one course, selected from a range of academic options that draw on the research expertise of the subject team.
-A practice-based dissertation, where you have the opportunity to develop, with support from technical and academic supervisors, a large-scale film or media arts self-directed project.

Career prospects

The programme will equip you with the ability to develop a career as a media producer, with a particular focus on low-budget productions for film and television. You will have the opportunity to explore and develop freelance industry practices and a portfolio of skills enabling you to work as an independent practitioner in today’s creative industries.

It is an innovative programme that teaches artistic, technical and professional skills and is designed to support graduates that are interested in working for large media companies or who may wish to pursue their own independent filmmaking and/or media arts practice. The programme also offers the research preparation necessary to successfully pursue a practice-based PhD.

You will learn things such as how to make films or media art pieces on low-budgets, how to take an idea from pitch to production, how to manage and sustain workflows, the processes involved in applying for arts funding, how to enhance your public profile and the processes involved in administering a start-up company.

Read less
The MSc in Filmmaking and Media Arts is designed to deliver a portfolio of skills required in contemporary screen-based production contexts. Read more
The MSc in Filmmaking and Media Arts is designed to deliver a portfolio of skills required in contemporary screen-based production contexts. If you are a filmmaker, freelance media producer, or an independent media artist seeking to develop advanced skills and learn key industry practices for building your career, the MSc in Filmmaking and Media Arts has been specifically designed for you. Through practical workshops, industry master classes, and history and theory courses you will have the opportunity to learn from industry professionals, media artists, and world leading academics in film, television and digital media theory.

Why this programme

-Through practical workshops, industry master classes, and history and theory courses you will have the opportunity to learn from industry professionals, media artists, and academics in film, television and digital media theory.
-Glasgow offers a vibrant context for filmmaking and media arts practice. Key cultural events include the Glasgow Film Festival and Glasgow International(a biennial international festival of contemporary art).
-This broad-based and flexible programme allows you to work across a variety of platforms.
-Recognising that the programme will attract a diverse range of creative individuals, we offer a variety of software and hardware options. Our purpose designed Media Lab is equipped with Avid, Adobe Creative Cloud (including Premiere Pro, After Effects, Photoshop, Dreamweaver) and Final Cut Pro. We are able to equip students for projects with a range of cameras and sound and lighting equipment.
-The city is the home of BBC Scotland, STV and a lively community of independent media producers (television companies, sound studios and design companies) and numerous micro-businesses in the creative industries. It is also home to the internationally significant Glasgow Museum of Modern Art as well as venues renowned for exhibitions of emerging and established screen-based artists such as Tramway, The Centre for Contemporary Art and The Arches. In addition, the city is famous for its live music venues, galleries and artist run studio spaces offering an excellent and supportive environment for creative artists.
-The programme is taught in the Gilmorehill Centre which offers a purpose built Media Lab, its own cinema as well as a Media Archive which has more than 6,000 holdings, complementing the Library’s extensive collection of film, television and media art books and periodicals. The Centre is home to the international journal Screen and hosts the journal’s annual conference every summer, attracting leading names in film and television studies from across the world. You will have the opportunity to participate in the conference as well as to engage with guest speakers from the academy and media industries throughout the year.

Programme structure

The programme will offer a combination of formal lectures, practitioner led workshops, seminar discussions, screenings and one-on-one tutorials.

The practical elements of the course will feature high levels of support and direction in relation to pre-production materials, including developing pitches and storyboards as well as hands on support in relation to delivery of the individual film/media art projects.

Industry workshops are designed to give you the skills and knowledge needed in contemporary screen-based media contexts, while history and theory courses are offered to link industry practice with cutting edge theory in the field.

The programme has 4 components:
-Two core practical workshops: Running in Semester 1 and Semester 2, these are led by a practitioner in our purpose built Media Lab and are designed to provide hands on support in the production of your film or media art projects. They also incorporate sessions led by industry professional that are designed to pass on key industry experiences and skills vital to a successful career in the industry.
-The core academic option Experimental Art and Media: This course covers the history and theory of experimental art and filmmaking, including the topic of practice-as-research. It is designed to provide a critical foundation for your filmmaking and/or media arts practice.
-You will also choose one course, selected from a range of academic options that draw on the research expertise of the subject team.
-A practice-based dissertation, where you have the opportunity to develop, with support from technical and academic supervisors, a large-scale film or media arts self-directed project.

Career prospects

The programme will equip you with the ability to develop a career as a media producer, with a particular focus on low-budget productions for film and television. You will have the opportunity to explore and develop freelance industry practices and a portfolio of skills enabling you to work as an independent practitioner in today’s creative industries.

It is an innovative programme that teaches artistic, technical and professional skills and is designed to support graduates that are interested in working for large media companies or who may wish to pursue their own independent filmmaking and/or media arts practice. The programme also offers the research preparation necessary to successfully pursue a practice-based PhD.

You will learn things such as how to make films or media art pieces on low-budgets, how to take an idea from pitch to production, how to manage and sustain workflows, the processes involved in applying for arts funding, how to enhance your public profile and the processes involved in administering a start-up company.

Read less
Some of the most exciting work in contemporary film exists at the margins. Dare to be different. Challenge preconceptions about how films should be made and stretch the boundaries of your own practice. Read more
Some of the most exciting work in contemporary film exists at the margins. Dare to be different. Challenge preconceptions about how films should be made and stretch the boundaries of your own practice. Explore a range of idioms from documentary to animation within a supportive environment that will help you to sustain and develop your ideas through experimentation with images, sounds and texts. You'll learn by doing while you deepen your critical engagement with film-making.

Key features

Choose to study full time (one year) or part time (over two years) to fit in with your career plans or other commitments.

Benefit from the practical bias of this programme, giving you the time to develop further as a film-maker. You’ll have the freedom and scope to explore varied forms including documentary, fiction, animation and other experimental and innovative styles of film-making.
Hone and expand your practice with our impressive range of facilities including video resources, sound studios, editing suites, a 360 degree immersive theatre and cinema.

Join a lively interdisciplinary arts and research community where you’ll mix with staff and students from across the arts faculty, creating opportunities for collaborative work and multidisciplinary research. This includes students and staff in the areas of music, theatre, dance and creative writing.

Learn from highly skilled practitioners and scholars who are passionate about their subjects.

Take advantage of our stunning location in the South West. This natural resource will inspire your creative practice and provide varied settings for film-making with its rural and city landscapes, brooding moors and dramatic coastline.

Course details

Explore and exploit the imaginative energy and intellectual buzz surrounding the growth of low-budget and no-budget film-making. You’ll engage in practice-centred projects and produce a range of work in different forms from documentaries to animations. You’ll also consider how experimental film-makers address new audiences and create new constituencies, and how we talk about those practices that do not fit into existing exhibition venues and environments.

Modules provide a supportive context for working on your practical MA project. You’ll participate in critical screenings and discussions, work collaboratively with exterior organisations such as the South West Film Archive and production companies, and undertake two pre-production and development modules examining the relationships between ideas and technologies and how to generate creative ideas. In all modules there is an emphasis on tracing the relationship between theory, research, thinking and making.

Applying

The University aims to make the application procedure as simple and efficient as possible. Our Postgraduate Admissions and Enquiries team are on hand to offer help and can put you in touch with the appropriate faculty if you wish to discuss any programme in detail. If you have a disability and would like further information about the support provided by Plymouth University, please visit our Disability Assist Services website. Support is also available to overseas students applying to the University from our International Office via our how to apply webpage or email .

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