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Masters Degrees (Film And Tv)

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-Film and TV degree production provides an exciting opportunity to learn advanced producing, directing and screenwriting techniques and to build professional links within the UK and international film and television industry. Read more
-Film and TV degree production provides an exciting opportunity to learn advanced producing, directing and screenwriting techniques and to build professional links within the UK and international film and television industry
-This postgraduate degree provides a practical and intensive study of filmmaking in an environment that encourages experimentation, professional development and cutting edge ideas. Students work with up to date professional equipment and facilities and, as part of their Masters Degree, produce, direct or write a major film project with an individually tailored marketing and distribution strategy
-The University of Hertfordshire film programmes and post-graduate school regularly host industry professionals who lecture and conduct workshops, seminars and tutorials. We work closely with the industry to enable students to connect directly with their future employers and mentors
-The combination of creative, technical, practical and management skills make this course unique and our graduates highly successful, as employees or as independent filmmakers

Why choose this course?

The MA Film and Television production programme offers an opportunity for students to initiate, develop and realise original film and television work in directing, producing and screenwriting. Students enhance their creative practice in film and television to professional levels, with the aim of pursuing a successful career in the industry. The programme commences with a series of taught modules, intended to augment the student's critical judgment and technical capability, before embarking on a major project, in the form of a substantial screenplay or digital film.

The project offers a setting in which the student can increase confidence in creative decision making, whilst expanding awareness of the requirements of film style and technology, finance, marketplace and audience. Students broaden their knowledge and experience to gain a better understanding of film and television production and its professional and commercial practices. They undertake a programme of screenings, master classes and seminars, to extend their knowledge of film and television histories, genres, aesthetics and narrative processes and to develop a range of research and communication skills. Students are encouraged to develop the aesthetic and conceptual awareness required to analyse and critically situate their work within current theoretical, cultural and commercial contexts, whether as a director, producer or scriptwriter.

The modules focus on script development, working with actors, camerawork, lighting, sound recording, post production techniques, funding, distribution and other relevant areas. You will benefit from the expertise and creative ideas of students working in specialised areas elsewhere in the School (eg Visual FX, Special FX, Animation or Music) whose input can enhance the professionalism of your major projects.

Careers

You will also have the opportunity to exhibit your work at the University and there are good opportunities to develop your teaching experience by mentoring undergraduate students in your subject area. When you successfully complete your MA, you will have made a very substantial addition to your CV and have a clear understanding of the next steps in the development of your career.

Teaching methods

You are taught in an intensive mix of lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials, masterclasses and industry guest sessions. Tutorial support is offered in small groups and one-to-one, with further support available online and by email.

All students on the PG Media programme engage in an interdisciplinary project as a part of their MA study, giving them an opportunity to work with students from other disciplines in an experimental and creative way.

Structure

Core Modules
-Creative Economies
-Discourse/Reflection: Professional Project Development
-Major Study: Film and Television Production
-Practice 1: Script Development
-Practice 2: Camera, Sound and Editing
-Research and Enquiry

Optional
-Creative Economies (Online)
-Research and Enquiry (Online)

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This practice-led MA offers the opportunity to advance your practical and theoretical understanding of media production processes in a professional and creative environment. Read more
This practice-led MA offers the opportunity to advance your practical and theoretical understanding of media production processes in a professional and creative environment.

The programme is informed by industry professionals and our academic team who are actively engaged in research, professional practice, film making and publishing. You will have the chance to develop the professional skills required by senior managers and professionals in the media and to cover the ethics, laws and regulatory frameworks that govern and affect the industry.

You will have the opportunity to develop your practical production skills in our Media Broadcast Centre. You will have the chance to tailor your learning to your interests and career aspirations by choosing to focus on the creative production of programmes in fiction, documentary or experimental forms across a wide range of media platforms.

How You Study

This course is designed to provide an educational context through practical workshops in production techniques, lectures and seminars, through which you will have the opportunity to develop an advanced level of creative, conceptual, technical, critical, organisational and research skills, all of which can be appropriate to employment in the media industries. Independent working engages with production projects, research and the completion of academic assignments.

Weekly contact hours on this programme may vary depending on the individual module options chosen and the stage of study.

Postgraduate level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

For more detailed information please contact the programme leader.

How You Are Assessed

Assessment is conducted using a range of strategies which include media productions, programme pitches, presentations, case studies and essays.

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

International students may require evidence of a media portfolio posted online.

Modules

-Final Project (MA Media, Film and Television Production)
-Human and Inhuman in the 21st Century (Option)
-Media Ecologies 1
-Media Ethics, Law and Regulation
-Media, Film and Television Production 1
-Media, Film and Television Production 2 & Final Project Pitch
-The Art and Craft of Film and Television

Special Features

Research
Media academics conduct internationally recognised research in a variety of topics, including Spielberg studies, film and medievalism, exploitation studies, and film and gender.

Industry Links
Many academic staff are current media practitioners who are engaged with professional bodies, such as the Royal Television Society, the British Society of Cinematographers and the British Association of Film, Television and Screen Studies, ensuring that course content is informed by the latest industry developments. BAFTA-winning television dramatist Neil McKay and documentary-maker Nick Gray are visiting professors in the School.

Visiting Speakers
Students on this course have the opportunity to hear from visiting guest speakers from many parts of the Film and TV industries. See here for details: http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/fm/abouttheschool/visitingspeakers/

Facilities
Students are based in our award-winning Media and Broadcast Production Centre, a specialist production environment with television and radio studios, video and audio editing suites, digital imaging, design and multimedia suites, a sound dubbing theatre, writers’ room, green screen room, colour finishing facility and photography studio.

Career and Personal Development

This programme aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop the high-level technical skills and knowledge required to establish careers in the media, film and television industries in roles including programme making, post-production and project management. Some students may choose to pursue careers in teaching or undertake a research degree at doctoral level.

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing your course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual and website resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities.
The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

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The MA Film & TV is a flexible, student driven course designed to fit in with learners’ professional and personal commitments. Delivered online by guiding practice, the curriculum is adaptable to student needs and accommodates current media industry developments. Read more

Overview

The MA Film & TV is a flexible, student driven course designed to fit in with learners’ professional and personal commitments. Delivered online by guiding practice, the curriculum is adaptable to student needs and accommodates current media industry developments.

Why choose this course?

Students negotiate their own learning from the first module onwards, defining aims and approaches that are relevant and feasible within their individual context. They review and adapt these plans along with their emerging expertise to develop projects that can be applied to their local context. Student negotiated modules accommodate rapid technology-driven, creative and increasingly globalised business changes with ease.

Emerging filmmakers who enter the course with a clear sense of direction can make their project funding applications and development plans more coherent and their career plans more feasible. More established participants can enhance their digital and management skills to future proof their interactions with emerging technologies and institutions. All participants can grow their management and leadership skills by reflecting on the implementation of their plans within their specific environment.

The course is led by award-winning film and TV producer Carl Schoenfeld. Carl has over two decades’ producing experience in the film & TV industries, laying the groundwork for fresh approaches across filmmaking procedures and talent development initiatives. His ventures with the BBC, Channel4/Film4 and BFI, among others, have embraced emerging technology, explored new workflows and kick-started the international careers of the talent involved.

What will I learn?

Students apply to the course specifying their unique combination of ambitions and accomplishments. Their statement serves as a foundation for the My Learning Trajectory Assignment, detailing attainable course goals (aligned with employers’ agendas, where applicable, or industry research), outlining the strategies the student adopts to achieve them. The module My Film & TV Knowledge Base enables students to deepen their understanding of, and widen their range of practical, conceptual and theoretical investigations at postgraduate level. Following these introductory modules, students embark on their very own learning journey structured through four negotiated modules towards their personal stated - and regularly reviewed – attainment goals.

How will this course be taught?

Students will receive individual mentoring by both a postgraduate mentor and an experienced professional, who is usually working in the film or TV industries in a leading capacity. Students can also participate in regular web conferences together with peers led by a module leader, as well as optional face-to-face events coinciding with key industry networking opportunities such as international conferences and film festivals.

The course is designed for global delivery in a world where cameras and edit computers including smartphones are widely available - but expertise in using these devices in an effective way is hard to come by. Accordingly, we expect students with a professional background and ambitions to have access to their own equipment relevant to their chosen specialism, and would be able to complete practical course work submissions (which students negotiate themselves) using a recent smartphone. The course adopts a ‘Bring Your Own Device’ ethos, and students are being guided to plan practical work that they can complete relying on accessible equipment only.

How will I be assessed?

The journey starts with formative assessment of student blogs detailing the films, programmes and people that influence their plans and build towards both oral and written presentations of their plans, working towards the production of creative work and relevant business structures. As assessment on this course is highly integrative, these assignments look forward to later, student negotiated modules, and engage learners in evaluating and supporting the feasibility of their plans (whilst the evaluative parts of later assignments ask students to reflect on these earlier plans and the journey in between). Moreover, establishing a constant cycle of observing, theorising, planning and film TV programme making encourages students to experience the connections and synergy between all these stages and to develop habits that enable lifelong learning.

Screenwriters may use some of the earlier and smaller negotiated modules to lay out their story in an industry style ‘treatment’ or ‘step outline’, analyse ‘successful’ screenplays in their genre or made by intended collaborators, research future industry collaborators in depth before writing a full-length feature screenplay for their Major Project.

Directors can relate their aims, past work and approaches to industry practice, pursue a work placement if they are early in their career, or investigate and experiment with different ways to develop a visual strategy for a project, rewrite screenplays, look at performance and directing styles, or research successful case studies and potential collaborators.

Producers may evaluate a variety of past, ground breaking or potential future projects, research potential markets, audiences and finance sources including standard industry investors and crowd funding to build a detailed business case e.g. for their Major Project. Students focusing on technical grades may choose work placements (which they in the first instance identify, approach and negotiate as part of earlier negotiated course work), support practical work with in depth research including history and context, or experiment with new workflows.

Entry requirements

Those with relevant experience are encouraged to apply for admission with advanced standing through Accreditation of Prior Learning or Prior Experiential Learning, where appropriate. Students entering with advanced standing will be advised of the procedure for claiming accreditation of prior experience or learning, and of the regulations governing the amount of credit that can be claimed (see below). Advice will also be given on the extent of the match between their experience/learning and the relevant course outcomes.

Applicants have to meet their own equipment needs on this course. This includes a recent computer (laptop, desktop or versatile tablet, less than 5 years old, including software relevant to their specialism) and a broadband connection, as well as access to filmmaking equipment (e.g. camera, sound recording, postproduction facilities and other relevant resources) that may be required to produce practical course work to the technical standard that they specify in the early modules.

Each application will be required to include a ‘statement of intent’ (500 words for applicants meeting all admission criteria, 1500 words for applicants using APL/APEL), and applicants may be required to provide other supporting material, e.g. full marks/results records, or examples of their practical, professional or academic work. Eligible applicants will be interviewed by videoconferencing (e.g. Skype).

Overseas students may apply directly to the University. Students for whom English is not their first language should meet the appropriate English language standards. This course requires IELTS 6.5 or above. If you don’t have the required level of English then view our range of Pre-Sessional English courses.

How to apply

To find out more about how to apply, click on the Apply For This Course button above. Many of our courses offer a part-time study option. Note that the part-time mode of study is not applicable to international students, unless you hold a relevant visa – please check with the international office.

Please note: we have a range of taught postgraduate awards to suit your needs, from Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma to a full Master's Degree (MA, MBA, MSc, LLM). In most cases you can decide to exit at Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma level, without carrying onto the full Master's qualification.

Further information

If you click on the Order a Prospectus button above, we will send you a printed Postgraduate Prospectus; alternatively you can download a pdf prospectus.

To find out more information about Postgraduate Study at Coventry University, including finance and funding and the benefits of further study, see our Postgraduate Study pages.

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This course is currently under suspension for the current academic session. However, it may return. Please see the website for updates. Read more
This course is currently under suspension for the current academic session. However, it may return. Please see the website for updates: https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/

Aberystwyth University’s MA in Film Studies focuses upon the advanced study of cinema. Normally, you will already have attained a degree of expertise in film studies or in a cognate area before starting the course and you will be ready to study film at a more advanced level by mastering theoretical, historical and empirical approaches to the subject.

This MA in Film Studies course is designed to give you a comprehensive overview of the development of film and film theory, taking in the development and intersections of both Hollywood and European cinemas and popular and 'alternative' cinemas. You will also have the opportunity to study specific movements within cinema, such as the changing manifestations of German Expressionism, American film noir and avant-garde movements; you will do so by studying philosophical, aesthetic, social and cultural influences.

This course will enable you to interrogate a wide range of factors which inform the production, distribution and reception of film, including a range of cultural and aesthetic contexts, the representation of class, ethnicity and gender, changing and shifting film marketing and distribution practices, and the study of a range of film fans and audiences. You will also receive a thorough grounding in key theoretical traditions and research methods within film studies which will prepare you for the production of a 15,000 word dissertation (on a topic of your choice) at the end of the course.

The MA in Film Studies will provide you with essential research, historical and analytical skills designed to support your future career progression either in the cultural and critical industries or in academia. Throughout the MA, staff will be happy to advise you on potential progression, after your MA, to PhD study. For profiles of previous MA Film Studies students, which outline their experiences on the MA and their subsequent career progression, see: http://www.aber.ac.uk/en/tfts/study-with-us/masters/former-ma-profiles/

The Department of Theatre, Film and Television Studies at Aberystwyth is the highest rated Arts and Humanities Department in Wales, according to the results of the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, with 60% of research submitted being rated world-leading.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/film-studies-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you wish to engage in the advanced study of cinema.
- If you are ready to take on the subject in theoretical, historical and empirical terms;
- If you aim to pursue a career in film journalism, criticism or analysis, film historical work or arts administration, or if you wish to progress to PhD study;
- If you wish to sharpen your academic rigour and develop a cache of critical evaluative, communication, and time and project management skills.

Course detail

The MA in Film Studies focuses on the importance of film within an ever-changing global environment. As a student, you will be encouraged to investigate the ways in which technologies and social changes have impacted, and continue to impact upon different aspects of film, including filmic representation and the ways in which film has been taken up within broader cultural contexts. You will also receive a thorough grounding in key theoretical traditions and research methods within film studies, and will be alerted to the historical developments that have marked film as a medium, focusing on historical case studies in order to think about changes and continuities throughout film history. While you will be introduced to a broad array of filmmaking traditions, you will focus particularly on the interrelations between Hollywood and European cinemas.

The MA will introduce you to different ways of understanding film: as entertainment, as art, as an industry, and as a cultural medium through which identities, histories and ideologies are both represented and negotiated. You will be taught by active researchers in the field of film studies, with a broad array of expertise and knowledge particularly in British, French, Russian and Hollywood cinemas, avant-garde, experimental and cult film, film history and representation, film genre and star studies, and fan, audience and reception studies. As such, the MA aims to enrich your knowledge of film’s importance through different methodological and theoretical approaches to the subject, and to sharpen your own research and study skills in the process.

The MA in Film Studies is run by the Department of Theatre, Film and Television Studies, one of the largest and most significant departments of its kind in the UK, and has a particularly vibrant postgraduate and research culture (including an annual postgraduate conference). Based in Aberystwyth University’s Parry-Williams Building, the Department boasts superb facilities including: 36 digital and HD editing suites; over 40 industry standard HD and digital cameras: a new HD, digital television studio; three fully-equipped theatre spaces (seating approximately 100 people each); and much more. We also maintain close links with Aberystwyth Arts Centre's digital 3D cinema. The cinema has a vibrant and lively film programme including the annual Abertoir horror film festival of Wales.

Format

The course is taught over one year (if taken full time), and three years (if taken part time). The MA encompasses a total of six (out of a choice of seven) taught modules (120 credits in total) covering film theory, research methods, film history, film representation, documentary and avant-garde film, film marketing and distribution, and film audiences. In order to complete your MA, you will then apply your learning in the individual dissertation worth an additional 60 credits. The dissertation is a substantial piece of scholarly research totalling no more than 15,000 words. It will be on a subject of your own choice, informed by discussions with your designated dissertation supervisor in the Department.

Assessment

The taught part of the course is delivered and assessed through lectures, seminars, oral presentations and essays. Successful completion of your dissertation leads to the award of an MA.

Employability

Every aspect of the Aberystwyth Master’s in Film Studies programme is designed to enhance your employability. The benefits of the course for employment are twofold: not only will you possess first-rate, subject-specific knowledge of film history and theory, but you will also be equipped with widely applicable skills and abilities that will suit many employment contexts.

Alongside the development of your subject-specific knowledge, an especially noteworthy strength of this course is its emphasis on group discussion and individual student presentations (which will enable you to develop your team work and communication skills). As an emerging film academic your strengthened research and critical faculties will make you a strong candidate for any post where ideas and topics need research, analysis, discussion, expansion and classification. The pattern of research and analysis you will undertake in this course creates highly marketable skills which will, upon graduation, stand you in excellent stead for entry into employment. The course will also provide you with the training and skills you will need if you decide to progress to PhD study.

The dissertation element of the course will enable you to develop and demonstrate an array of professional qualities and skills. You will do this by reflecting on the methods and approaches you have encountered in the study programme and then identifying and creating appropriate methodologies for your own research work. Success in this area of study proves to prospective employers that you take the initiative to develop and improve your research and project management skills.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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PLEASE NOTE. This course will run in September 2016. This is an innovative course, taught over four, week-long residential retreats over one year (full time) and will commence in September - some of these are in Central London, others in beautiful Egham Campus near Windsor. Read more
PLEASE NOTE: This course will run in September 2016

This is an innovative course, taught over four, week-long residential retreats over one year (full time) and will commence in September - some of these are in Central London, others in beautiful Egham Campus near Windsor.

Between retreats the course is run via distance-learning with a website, chat room and e-tutorials. This makes it possible for those living outside the UK, and those with busy working lives, for instance freelancers and those in the film and TV industries, to take time out to attend. We have a wide variety of students on the course including established actors, comedy writers, editors, producers, novelists and many others.

During the MASTFiR course (MA in Screenwriting for Televion and Film - Retreat) you will cover writing for feature film and television as well as new developments such as web drama. You will develop a range of ideas, then go on to write film and television outlines, and several drafts of a feature film screenplay, a TV single drama, or a TV series or serial bible and sample episodes. You will be immersed in a creative atmosphere conducive to concentrated learning and group interaction; a core unit is the Development Lab, where you will present your work in progress to the group for criticism and feedback, and experiment with co-writing.

You will also meet and work with industry and independent producers, directors, agents, writers and actors to provide a production context. We have recently had guests from Working Title, Channel Four, the BBC, Script Factory, Blake Friedmann Agency and many others.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/mascreenwritingfortelevisionandfilmretreat.aspx

Why choose this course?

- in the fast-changing world of digital drama, new media and new film markets, you will become skilled in producing strong and original fiction writing.

- the course director is Ivan Levene, a practising screenwriter and script editor with over 15 years of experience in the industry. He currently has two produced feature films, and has been involved in the development of numerous other film and TV projects, including a recent major international release. Before this he worked in acquisitions and development, advancing over £15m of film and TV production from inception to marketplace. Current commissions include a supernatural thriller with Matthew Rhys, and a biopic set in Gilded Age New York about Harriet Hubbard Ayer - socialite, proto-feminist, and the first person to create an international cosmetics business.

- teaching television is screenwriting lecturer Adam Ganz, whose TV credits include Pillow Talk and Murder Without Motive; and guest lecturing in television are Gillian Gordon and Jonathan Powell.

- despite the first students only graduating in 2008, we have already had a host of successes with many of our students finding success in the industry.

- you will meet and work with industry and independent producers, directors, agents, writers and actors to provide a production context. We have recently had guests from Working Title, Channel Four, the BBC, Script Factory, Blake Friedmann Agency and many others.

Department research and industry highlights

- the MA Screenwriting for Television and Film Retreat course (MASTFiR) only began graduating students in 2008 but already we have had a host of successes - Janice Hallett's feature screenplay Retreat is now being shot in Canada with a star cast; Olivia Wakeford has a writing credit on the feature film Baseline (2009) and several writers have gained agents and development commissions. Kay Stonham has work commissioned by the BBC and two of our younger writers are working on a C5 youth drama series. Adam Rolston has had a highly successful musical on Doris Day's life performed at a variety of London venues. Many students have won festival awards for their short films.

Course content and structure

You will study four core course units.

Core course units:
Script Craft
This unit will focus on the acquisition of basic writing skills, and is a gateway to the ‘Story and Theme’ unit. You will explore the specifics of scene and dialogue construction, formatting and issues around research and around adaptation from source materials – e.g. plays, novels and news stories.

Story and Theme
This unit teaches the essential components of story and structure, the specific language of film storytelling and genre. It will include lectures, screenings of films and extracts, and individual and group analysis of films. You will produce ideas, formal outlines and a feature-length screenplay or TV series bibles and episode.

Development Lab
This is a discussion forum to which you bring the work above, where it is critiqued and debated from a number of points of view including aesthetic, generic, marketing, audience and budget. Development Lab is interactive and is at the core of the course; it replicates many of the development processes you will face in the film and television industry.

Contexts: Current British Film and TV Practice
This unit covers current aesthetic and generic trends in British film and television. There will also be lectures and seminars on budget, schedule, commissioning, finance, contracts, casting and marketing, and you will explore the production and marketing implications of your own screenplay projects.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- the ability to discriminate between project ideas, present ideas and drafts to others effectively, and both give and receive constructive criticism

- the understanding of the aesthetic and economic conditions of the marketplace, how their work may be viewed in terms of budget and audience, and the stages a screenplay will go through in development and production

- a broad and detailed understanding of the nature of the film and television screenplay- how it signifies, how it communicates meaning to the film producer, director, actor and to the audience

- advanced understanding of the processes of writing a screenplay, from initial concept to final draft

- advanced understanding of the various stages of script development and how each is documented- outlines, treatments, pitch documents and so on

- critical knowledge of the current genres and trends in film and television and how they have evolved in recent years, particularly in the context of economic and market developments in these industries

- an understanding of the UK film and television industries, including their structure, institutions and working practices

- a broad understanding of the group nature of writing and development, and how the roles played by the various parties- producer, script editor, director and so on- shape and influence the screenplay.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including script outlines and scenes, a completed feature film screenplay and/or TV series episode and ‘bible’, and marketing and pitch documents.

Employability & career opportunities

On graduating, you will be well prepared for careers in television and feature film screenwriting and script development.

Our recent graduate successes include:

Janice Hallett's feature screenplay Retreat is now being shot in Canada with a star cast; Olivia Wakeford has a writing credit on the feature film Baseline (2009) and several writers have gained agents and development commissions. Kay Stonham has work commissioned by the BBC and two of our younger writers are working on a C5 youth drama series. Adam Rolston has had a highly successful musical on Doris Day's life performed at a variety of London venues. Many students have won festival awards for their short films.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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From start to finish, producers are the driving force behind the film and television industry; they generate new projects and ideas, secure finance, manage production and strategically market the project. Read more
From start to finish, producers are the driving force behind the film and television industry; they generate new projects and ideas, secure finance, manage production and strategically market the project. The producer’s role has been transformed by the advent of globalization, digital technology and the multi-channel environment.

This course offers aspiring producers an opportunity to acquire the creative entrepreneurial skills required to enter a rapidly changing film and television universe. The course concentrates on developing creative, managerial, financial and legal capabilities for a successful career in production.

This Master’s degree reflects the global nature of the contemporary media marketplace but its main focus is UK film and television fiction, rather than factual production. It is targeted at those who want to follow a career path as producers, rather than as directors.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/maproducingfilmandtelevision.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The course benefits enormously from close links with the film and television industry. Tony Garnett (producer of Cathy Come Home and This Life), whose company World Productions has built up a reputation for challenging and innovative drama, was a guiding force in designing the course and has played a great part in the course's success.

- Professor Jonathan Powell (former Controller of BBC 1, Head of Drama for the BBC and Controller of Drama at Carlton TV), one of this country's most respected and experienced drama producers, now delivers the 'Role of the Producer' and ‘Script Development’ lectures as well as providing you with support and advice.

- You will normally undertake a full-time internship in a production company. In most cases this internship lasts about four weeks. You will be offered guidance and assistance in an effort to obtain industry internships.

- Students who have graduated from the course are working successfully in independent television and film production, for broadcasters such as the BBC and ITV, and for distributors, exhibitors, talent agencies and entertainment lawyers.

- Regular networking events are arranged where former alumni can make contact with each other and with the current group of students.

Department research and industry highlights

- TRENT is an exciting and innovative collaborative project between the British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC) and Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL) and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Led by John Ellis the project brings together the nine existing online databases hosted and curated by the BUFVC which provide important film, radio and television material along with accompanying metadata and contextual information for academics, students, teachers and researchers. This project brings together all the material contained in these databases, yet Trent is not simply a master database. Instead it foregrounds creative searching through a common interactive interface using real-time ‘intelligent’ filtering to bringing disparate databases into a single search and discovery environment whilst maintaining the integrity and individual provenance of each.

- The EUscreen project is major funded EU project which aims to digitise and provide access to European’s audio-visual heritage. This innovative and ambitious three year project began in October 2009 and the project consortium is made up of 28 partners from 19 European countries and is a best practice network within the eContentplus programme of the European Commission. The Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway’s is responsible for the content selection policy for EUscreen and those involved include John Ellis, Rob Turnock and Sian Barber.

- Video Active is a major EU-funded project aiming to create access to digitised television programme content from archives around Europe. It involves collaboration between the Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway and Utrecht University, and eleven European archives including the BBC, to provide access to content and supporting contextual materials via a specially designed web portal. The team from the Department of Media Arts, who are John Ellis, Cathy Johnson and Rob Turnock, are responsible for developing content selection strategy and policy for the project.

- Migrant and Diasporic Cinema in Contemporary Europe is an AHRC-funded international Research Network, led by Daniela Berghahn, which brings together researchers from ten UK and European universities, filmmakers, policy makers and representatives from the cultural sector. The Research Network explores how the films of migrant and diasporic filmmakers have redefined our understanding of European identity as constructed and narrated in European cinema. The project seeks to identify the numerous ways in which multi-cultural and multi-ethnic presences and themes have revitalised contemporary European cinema by introducing an eclectic mix of non-Western traditions and new genres.

- Lina Khatib was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete a book on the representation of Lebanese politics and society in Lebanese cinema over the last thirty years. The study focuses on cinema’s relationship with national identity in the context of the Civil War and the post-war period in Lebanon.

- Gideon Koppel was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete his feature-length documentary portrait of a rural community in Wales, The Library Van, which has been partly funded by the Arts Council of Wales.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- a broad and detailed understanding of the nature of film and television production; how the role of the producer impacts on the production as the creative and managerial driving force, and how the producer communicates meaning to the writer, director, film crew and to the audience

- advanced understanding of the process of producing a film and/or TV programme, from initial concept through distribution and sales

- advanced understanding of script development

- advanced understanding of the various stages of the production process and how to write a pitch, a treatment, business plan, make a deal, write a financial plan, re-coupment schedule and budget as well as all relevant production contracts and documents

- critical knowledge of the current genres and trends in film and television and how they have evolved in recent years

- an understanding of the UK film and television industries, including their structure, institutions and working practices

- a broad understanding of the group nature of film and television production and how the roles played by the key players shape and influence the creative as well as business outcomes of a project

- a clear understanding of management structure within the production company and film crew, hands-on experience of production in

- a professionally equipped television studio working with industry professionals as well as fellow students

- a broad understanding of health and safety, industry codes of ethics, best practice and legal undertakings

- an introduction to high quality industry software for budgeting and scheduling, and post production editing

- an understanding of film and television history

- an understanding of what creative and business skills are needed to be successful in the media industries.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including essays, script reports, treatments, pitching exercises, studio exercises, production papers, business reports and presentations.

Employability & career opportunities

Students who have graduated from the course are working successfully in independent television and film production, for broadcasters such as the BBC and ITV, and for distributors, exhibitors, talent agencies and entertainment lawyers.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Module outline.  . Compositional Techniques. Styles and Genres. You will focus on the acquisition of specialist compositional and orchestrational techniques, structures and processes across a broad range of historical and contemporary styles and genres. . Read more

Module outline:

 

Compositional Techniques: Styles and Genres

You will focus on the acquisition of specialist compositional and orchestrational techniques, structures and processes across a broad range of historical and contemporary styles and genres. 

 

Programming, Production and Studio Technologies

You will explore sampling and the programming of convincing hybrid orchestral ‘mock ups’. We also explore advanced productional, mixing and mastering techniques and investigate the complex technologies that allow the contemporary studio to operate.

 

Composing for the Moving Image: Film, TV and Games

This is a training module concerned with the practice of composing commercially viable music for the Film, TV and Games industries

 

Collaborative Project

You will work collaboratively with postgraduate directors, screenwriters, editors, animators and producers in the department and have the opportunity to contribute to both professional and postgraduate film projects.  

 

Research and the Industry

This module prepares you for the critical and analytical aspects of study at Master’s level, and lay the groundwork for further potential study at Doctoral level within the department.

 

Independent Study: Specialist Project or Research Project

In this independent, project driven module, you will pursue your own enthusiasms and developing specialisms. This will usually take the form of a portfolio of work, a short film or a substantial written research project.

OUR FACILITIES

MA Composition for Film, TV & Games will be delivered in the new £30m Engineering and Digital Technology Park being constructed at the Bognor Regis campus.

Students will use industry standard equipment in CAD labs, edit suites, professional recording studios and a dedicated green screen stage.

Our commercial sound stage is one of three in the UK and will be used industry professionals including the London Metropolitian Orchestra. 

INDICATIVE MODULES

  • Compositional Techniques: Styles and Genres
  • Programming, Production and Studio Technologies
  • Composing for the Moving Image: Film, TV and Games
  • Collaborative Project
  • Research and the Industry
  • Independent Study: Specialist Project OR Research Project


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Why choose this course?. This course provides the opportunity for you to develop as a thinking practitioner of film-making or television programme-making, someone who is able to innovate while questioning and interrogating existing values and traditions. Read more

Why choose this course?

This course provides the opportunity for you to develop as a thinking practitioner of film-making or television programme-making, someone who is able to innovate while questioning and interrogating existing values and traditions. The emphasis is firmly on practical film-making and television production work, underpinned with contextual theory throughout, engaging with contemporary issues and emerging trends in film and television production, as well as established film/television theories and practices.

The first two semesters of study provide a range of modules which will allow you to develop your film/television “craft skills” – this may include work with camera, lighting, sound, editing, directing and producing – while working on short film/TV projects of your own devising. There will be opportunities to collaborate with other students, and you will be encouraged to make contact with, and work with, contributors (e.g. interviewees, actors) from outside of the university. You will also develop your skills as an academic researcher by carrying out research which feeds directly into your film projects.

The course culminates in the Masters Project, where you will be the key creative leader of a film or television production, taking on the role of producer or director.

What happens on the course?

In a typical week, a full-time student on this course will have up to ten hours of class time which will be a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical workshop sessions. Most course modules will blend these different teaching methods within a given timetabled session, so there will be plenty of variety.

In lectures, you will typically be given ‘food for thought’ in relation to your own project ideas. In workshop sessions you will get to practice film-making techniques related to your own project work needs. In seminars you will share ideas and discuss with tutors and fellow students. In tutorials you will have one-to-one or small group discussion about your works in progress.

The general flow of the course for a full time student is to start with production skills, research skills and scriptwriting in the first semester. In the second semester you move on to a small personal project which will combine all that you have learned from these three areas. In the final semester, you bring it all together in a personal film/TV production project which is seen as the culmination of your studies.

Part-time students experience exactly the same course modules and course content, but necessarily broken down into smaller groups of modules.

Opportunities:

The course is built upon negotiated production work, which means you get to propose and develop your own ideas for film and television. The teaching staff are experienced with production across documentary, drama and social action production, and will guide you according to your ambitions, skills and needs.

There is always the opportunity to work on ‘live’ project briefs, which can be used as the basis of a module project, or alternatively as an extra-curricular experience which informs your development on the course and allows you to network with students on related courses.

Why Wolverhampton?

The course is taught in the School of Media, which houses a three-camera live television studio, fifteen editing suites with Premiere Pro, After Effects, Final Cut Pro X and other professional software packages, and a sound-recording/foley production suite. It also has an equipment store from which you can borrow all the camera, sound, lighting and other equipment you need to produce your work.

Who will teach you on this course?

The course teaching team includes four active doctoral or postdoctoral researchers – Adam Kossoff, Tracy McCoy, Phil Nichols and Gavin Wilson – whose interests include documentary film, social action video, screenwriting and adaptation, and cinematography. They are all qualified higher education teachers, and have many years of experience of teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate level. They are also experienced film and programme makers.

Our students and graduates have a track-record of success in competitions and festivals, such as the prestigious Royal Television Society Student Awards, the Midland Movies awards, and the Business Disability Forum's Technology Taskforce Film Festival.



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Build your creative post-production skills to make your mark in the film and television industry. Solent’s MA Post Production in Film and Television will see you working with some of the best industry-standard equipment in a fun and creative environment, surrounded by fellow creative people. Read more

Build your creative post-production skills to make your mark in the film and television industry. Solent’s MA Post Production in Film and Television will see you working with some of the best industry-standard equipment in a fun and creative environment, surrounded by fellow creative people.

You’ll begin by studying the fundamentals of post-production to gain a solid understanding of the core principles and techniques. You’ll then progress into other fields, such as creative editing for drama and for documentary. Here you’ll explore the creative process of editing, from story-telling and character focus for drama, to cutaways and building sequences in documentary. This is complemented by the sound and visual design unit where you’ll learn how to add aural and visual dimension to a production.

The research methods and major project units will give you the opportunity to demonstrate your research skills at master’s level and to work on a personal film or TV project that utilises the skills learnt throughout your studies.

You’ll also have the opportunity to gain professional qualifications alongside your degree studies. You’ll be encouraged sit the Avid Certified User exam - a certificate is recognised by post-production companies worldwide. You could also work towards gaining the Pro Tools Certified User certificate, if you wish to pursue a career in sound design or audio mixing.

The course team’s excellent industry links mean you’ll have access to a long-established and inspiring guest speaker programme. Students on our media technology programmes have had the chance to meet and question some of the country’s top industry professionals in film and television. Recent guest speakers include Sir Alan Parker (BAFTA winning director: Bugsy MaloneEvitaMississippi Burning), Mick Audsley (BAFTA winning editor: Harry Potter and the Goblet of FireEverestAlliedTwelve Monkeys), Eddy Joseph (BAFTA winning sound editor: Casino RoyaleUnited 93Charlie and the Chocolate Factory), Walter Murch (Oscar and BAFTA winning sound and film editor TomorrowlandApocalypse NowJarhead), Nick McPhee (editor: The DurrellsDownton AbbeyDoc Martin), Julian Unthank (screenwriter New TricksSword of Vengeance) and John Lloyd (producer: QIBlackadderNo Such Thing as the News). 

What does this course lead to?

Graduates can expect to pursue jobs in many areas of the TV and film post-production industry. Entry level jobs can include edit assistant, junior editor, or runner. From here, graduates can progress to roles such as picture editor, sound editor, dubbing mixer, grader, colourist, or facilities manager.

Who is this course for?

This course is ideal for anyone wishing to pursue a career in post-production. Candidates should have a first or second class degree in a related discipline. The programme would also suit those already working in the industry with relevant experience, looking to build on their existing knowledge and skills.

Facilities

We invest heavily in making sure our specialist equipment is right up to date.

Students have access to:

  • Over 70 fibre networked Adobe Premiere and FCP X edit workstations.
  • Over 30 Avid Media Composer edit workstations.
  • Post-production sound and colour grading suites.
  • A range of high-end cameras and ancillary equipment – all in HD or 4K.
  • 5.1 surround ADR /Foley dubbing suite.
  • Dolby Atmos cinema.

Your future

Graduates can expect to pursue jobs in many areas of the TV and film post-production industry. Entry level jobs can include edit assistant, junior editor, or runner. From here, graduates can progress to roles such as picture editor, sound editor, dubbing mixer, grader, colourist, or facilities manager.

There are also many post-production-related jobs outside of the broadcast industry. Opportunities within the charity sector, local and national government, emergency services, the financial sector, and the corporate and training video market are possible.

Industry links

The course team have excellent links with industry which has led to a guest speaker programme with talks from inspiring and leading industry experts, including:

  • Walter Murch - film and sound editor: Apocalypse NowTomorrowland
  • Anne V Coates - film editor: Lawrence of ArabiaOut of SightFifty Shades of Grey
  • Sir Alan Parker - director: Bugsy MaloneThe CommitmentsAngel HeartMississippi Burning
  • Mick Audsley - film editor: AlliedEverestHarry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
  • Eddie Joseph - supervising sound editor: Casino RoyaleQuantum of SolaceUnited 93Corpse Bride
  • John Wilson - editor: Downton AbbeyBilly ElliotMe Before You
  • Eddie Hamilton - film editor: Mission: Impossible V
  • Nick McPhee - editor: Doc MartinDownton Abbey
  • Frances Parker - editor: Game of Thrones

A number of Solent’s undergraduate media technology programmes are Skillset-approved, allowing access to a range of industry events, such as the RTS Masterclasses at the BFI in London. Close links with the Royal Television Society locally ensure students are able to attend their events, including ‘Meet the Professionals’.

Placements

Although work experience is not compulsory, you’ll be encouraged and supported to seek relevant placements wherever possible.

At Solent, we have a very strong focus on employability and work experience. Our extensive relationships with professional film and television editors, sound designers, colourists has meant that we have been able to offer unique placement and mentoring opportunities.

You’ll also have the opportunity to access some of the best work experience opportunities imaginable. We are the official university partner to the Glastonbury Festival and you will have the chance apply to work there. Likewise, our links with Bestival, Camp Bestival and Boardmasters mean you have great opportunities throughout the summer. We have close ties with some of the country’s top post-production houses and have been able to offer work experience opportunities with companies such as Envy, Halo and The Mill. Our alumni also offer work experience opportunities to current students.



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With a uniquely collaborative emphasis, this course offers opportunities for some of the scripts you develop over the course to be produced, through close collaboration with students from MA Producing for Film and TV, MA Directing for Film and TV and MA Radio Production. Read more

With a uniquely collaborative emphasis, this course offers opportunities for some of the scripts you develop over the course to be produced, through close collaboration with students from MA Producing for Film and TV, MA Directing for Film and TV and MA Radio Production. This equips you with the skills and attitudes required for successful script development processes in the industry. The course is busy, intensive and involves much teamwork alongside individual writing practice.

Throughout the course, you will develop your ideas from concept to industry standard final draft, with a development process that includes research, pitching, presentations, script reading and networking events, workshop groups, tutorials, script editing, and rewriting for production.

You will be encouraged to nurture and reflect on your creative process and originality of voice, and to explore the contexts – critical, creative and industrial that inform scriptwriting today.

The course is taught by scriptwriting professionals and theorists, alongside an exciting programme of industry guest speakers. The course is suitable for students who have previously developed their own creative writing projects within humanities or media production courses or with relevant professional experience. You may have an undergraduate qualification in a related subject or may be able to show your suitability for this programme of study through associated work-experience or evidence of and outputs from other related activities.

Successful participation in MA Scriptwriting will enable you to emerge from the course as a writer with a distinctive authorial voice, an industry standard portfolio of scripts, experience of writing in formats and genres, and a robust attitude to collaboration and development.



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This course is designed for composers aspiring to work in the media industry and wanting to learn more about techniques for composing and producing music for film and TV. Read more
This course is designed for composers aspiring to work in the media industry and wanting to learn more about techniques for composing and producing music for film and TV. Taught by experienced professional film/TV composers, it provides an opportunity to collaborate with filmmakers and animators, as well as the chance to write for ensembles.

Key features
-The curriculum is enriched by a broad view of musical styles and genres, exploiting the diversity of a repertoire that encompasses Western classical music, popular and world musics.
-The wide selection of option modules (see the course webpage) allows you to tailor the course to your interests. The major project also enables you to compose an extensive piece of music to picture and work with filmmakers, enhancing your research and project development skills.
-There is a wide range of music groups at Kingston University, ranging from a chamber choir to Javanese gamelan, and you will have the chance to write for a range of ensembles, including the professional ensemble in residence.
-There are many possibilities for collaboration with filmmaking and animation students.

What will you study?

You will compose music for moving image and work with filmmakers, screen designers and animators. You will analyse film and TV scores, exploring how music is used to create atmosphere, convey mood and depict setting, character and action. In addition, you will explore the relationships between composer and producer, directors and music editors. You will also study and practise the use of main themes, underscoring and the harmonic languages of soundtracks. There will be an opportunity to have your compositions performed by a professional ensemble, conducted to picture in a professional recording environment. You will also learn about the technology used to produce high-quality soundtracks for the music industry, as well as business and copyright issues.

Assessment

Compositions, soundtracks, essays, presentations, research projects, and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Major Project
-Professional and Live Aspects of Composing for Film and Television
-Researching Music
-Techniques and Technology for Composing for Film and Television

Optional modules
-Composing and Marketing Popular Music
-Constructing Music Education in the UK
-Critical Reflection on Musical Performance
-International Music Education: Psychology, Culture and Philosophy
-Special Study: Arranging and Scoring
-Advanced Production of Popular Music
-Current Debates in Music Education
-Jazz Studies
-Live Performance Technologies
-Performance Studies
-The Psychology of Music
-The Studio Musician

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MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment. Read more
MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment.

Our MA is distinguished from traditional courses in that it specifically addresses the diversity and crossover of today's film and television culture with the aim of producing adaptive thinkers and highly creative practitioners. Our academic focus engages and interrogates film and television's status in the 21st century, which is often defined in terms of the digital age and digital culture.

On the course you will be required to examine, interpret and contest the notion of digital culture historically, socially, politically and artistically through both your research and creative practice. You will interrogate the increasingly blurred boundaries between film and television, art and technology, production and consumption, with the outcome being a fracturing of traditional categorisations. We reflect an era in which screenwriters Aaron Sorkin (Newsroom, The West Wing) and Lena Dunham (Girls, Tiny Furniture) experiment with dialogue and narrative, while conceptual artists Sam Taylor-Wood (Nowhere Boy, Love You More) and Steve McQueen (12 Years a Slave, Shame) have shifted from the art gallery to the cinema. Directors such as Ben Wheatley (A Field in England, Sightseers) and companies such as Curzon and Film4 are making use of multi-platform release schedules, and brands including HBO, Amazon and Netflix are shaping the very nature of not only what, but how, we watch. MA Film & Television understands this fundamentally shifting zeitgeist.

In examining industrial structure and visual form you will theorise the shifting dynamics of an age where anyone with a phone and a laptop has the ability to record, edit and disseminate visual projects. Such 'democratisation' has arguably made both creative uniqueness and clear industry pathways less discernable, but has provided a new and fruitful framework for those who have the ideas, talent, dedication and adaptability to embrace such immense transitional potential. However, despite these multitudinous transformations attributed to digital culture, the ethos of our MA contends that fundamental skills remain the basis of both sound academic work and creative practice. Rather than being fearful of what is to come, or nostalgic for the past, this course gives you the confidence to look at film and television critically, and acquire cutting edge creative skills in order to produce intelligent, innovative and inspirational visual work.

Our philosophy is one of flexibility, so you'll shape the curriculum around your own interests, whether in theory, creative practice, or a combination of the two. Drawn from the fundamentals of history, theory and criticism, our theoretical strand develops tomorrow's cineastes, cultural commentators, journalists and academics. This also underpins our approach to practice. The most successful film and television makers are students of their chosen medium, highly knowledgeable of historical legacy and social-political context. You'll not only learn how to develop, write, produce, shoot, record, direct and edit well, but why, philosophically and creatively, your ideas are worth being made.

Visit the website https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/film-television-ma

How the course is taught

Our passion is reflected both in the teaching and research track record of our academics, our industry connections and visiting speakers, and the quality of our film and television professionals. Crossing disciplinary areas such as cultural studies, sociology, journalism, English, philosophy and, of course, film and television studies, our MA offers academically-minded students comprehensive supervision and guidance for moving onto PhD research.

Industry and academic links

We have a strong visiting lecturer programme with recent guests including critics Dr Mark Kermode, Professor Linda Ruth Williams and Dr Will Brooker. Our practice tutors are active writers, producers, directors, editors, sound designers and cinematographers who create substantive work across all screen media. We have a wide range of contacts and industry specialists who contribute to the course, including Tony Grisoni (writer of Southcliffe, Red Riding, and How I Live Now), Mary Burke (producer of For Those in Peril, Berberian Sound Studio and The Midnight Beast), and James Henry (writer for Campus and Green Wing).

Falmouth University also recently hosted the Channel 4 Talent Day and we are active in developing work placements and internships for our students. We have sent many of students to Warp Films and TwoFour since 2009, and regularly update our webpages with work experience opportunities and jobs. Our graduates have proceeded to further study and jobs across the film and television industry, for HBO, Sky, ITV, Disney and have worked on major feature films, most recently including About Time (Richard Curtis, 2013) The World's End (Edgar Wright, 2013), The Double (Richard Ayoade, 2014) and Disney's forthcoming Cinderella (Kenneth Branagh, 2015). Falmouth University's MA in Film & Television is for students who to place themselves at the cutting edge of screen culture.

Course outline

The course is divided into three semesters of 15 weeks. Each semester offers the fundamentals vital to every academic and practitioner, and elective choices so you can shape your own learning.

What you'll do

- Study block 1
Foundation
The first semester consists of three core units, offering a diverse entry point to all aspects of the study of film and television, and the interrelationship of theory and practice:

Theorising Contemporary Film & Television Culture (Theory)

In this module you will explore the theoretical conceptualisations of film and television in the context of contemporary academic thought and popular discourse around the concept of digital culture. We will start from a point of questioning the multi-layered and contested effects of digital culture on film and television as discrete forms. You will consider the interrelationship and fusion between media in terms of production, distribution and exhibition examining the advent of new forms of representation and interaction. But we will also look at how traditional notion of film and television are being preserved and even being popular as a reaction to the effects of the digital. The module will also assess and interrogate the economic and technological developments of a more integrated and interactive media environment in terms of the cross-pollination of form and content, and socio-cultural effects on contemporary audiences.

Film & Television Industry Case Study (Theory/Practice)

In this module you will explore the industrial parameters of contemporary film and television based around the experience and expertise of current professionals. The module will utilise the School of Film & Television's many industry links to bring in guest speakers from the BBC, Channel 4, Sky, TwoFour Broadcast, Warp Films, Sheffield Doc Fest, Cornwall Film Festival, Doc Heads, BFI, Pinewood Studios, Dogbite and EngineHouse VFX. You will then have an opportunity to question these professionals about their respective sectors as a basis for a case study. Alternatively, you can investigate the sector/practitioner of your own choosing, with tutor support. The module will also contain workshops on the fundamentals of creative industry research and methodology. The module is designed so that you learn both the challenges and values of networking, and researching specific job roles and industry backgrounds in order to effectively plot your own career trajectory.

Creative Practices (Practice)

This module will engage you in the production workflow, focusing on how creative, professional and technical roles shape a final film or television project. Your weekly seminars and workshops will guide you through pre-production, production and post-production processes, enabling you to devise, develop and produce a short filmed project as part of a small crew of four to six students. You will, therefore, develop your technical skills and production practices in order to devise and deploy modes of creative practice which may include, but are not limited to, research and development, screenwriting, production management, producing, directing, cinematography, lighting, editing and the recording and design of sound.

- Study block 2
Specialisms
The second semester gives you the opportunity to specialise, choosing from a ranging of theory, practice or combination modules. Assessment of combination modules is either through an academic essay or a practice project. Potential optional modules include:

- Cultural Studies to Digital Sociology (Theory/Practice)
- Screen Futures (Theory/Practice)
- Globalisation in Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Factual Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Screenwriting for Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Work Placement (Theory/Practice)

- Study block 3
Expertise
Depending on your chosen specialism, in the third semester you'll produce either:

- Dissertation (Theory)
- Film & Production Portfolio (Theory/Practice)
- Conceptual Project (Theory/Practice)

Facilities

The purpose-built film school facilities include:

- 116-seat cinema, with Christie M Series HD projection (as used in Vue cinemas) and 7.2 surround sound

- Equipment store with a range of Blackmagic, Red, Panasonic, JVC, GoPro, Canon DSLR and C100 cameras and lenses, jibs, tracks and dollies

- Digital production suites equipped with Final Draft (screenwriting), Movie Magic (production management) and a range of edit software, including Adobe Creative Cloud/Suite, Final Cut and AVID

- Avid Unity MediaNetwork Edit server

- Recording and sound edit studios equipped with Pro Tools audio editing and Foley traps

- 14x8m TV studio with three studio cameras, full gallery facility, Chromatte grey screen, blue/green screen and full lighting rig

- Centroid 3D (Pinewood-networked) Motion Capture studio/research lab

- Virtual Studio using the latest technology

- 23,500-title TV and film library

Experience you'll get

- Highly flexible, student-focused curriculum

- Mentoring with industry professionals

- Opportunities for placement and work experience

- Creative environment for collaboration

- Using industry-standard software

- A vibrant visiting speaker programme

- Student experience-centred ethos

Assessment

- Continuous assessment with no formal examinations
- Core theory based on written assignments
- Core practice assessed on visual project and accompanying portfolios
- Elective modules all with theory/practice options
- Dissertation and/or major project in final semester

Careers

- Research, teaching or postgraduate study in art/humanities subject areas

- All technical/creative roles linked with direction, production, cinematography, editing, sound, lighting; writing for the screen; film and television criticism; research for film and TV

- Film and TV marketing, distribution and sales – digital and social media content/distribution

- Film festival and arts curatorship – media-based project management

Find out how to apply here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/apply

Visiting Us

We hold open days throughout the year so you can meet current students and staff, view our campuses and facilities, and find out more about studying at Falmouth.

Find out more - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/open-days

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The Lincoln School of Film and Media offers a collaborative environment in which to undertake research at doctoral level, whether by thesis, practice portfolio plus commentary or by publication. Read more
The Lincoln School of Film and Media offers a collaborative environment in which to undertake research at doctoral level, whether by thesis, practice portfolio plus commentary or by publication.

As a researcher in the School, you will have the opportunity to engage in a structured programme of training with the aim of developing the practical and critical skills necessary for your study.

You can work with an experienced supervisory team who can offer support and guidance on your research and/or practice, funding opportunities, attending conferences, exhibitions and screening, and publishing or exhibiting your work in recognised journals and at events.

You can benefit from the School’s research expertise in a variety of media and culture-related topics, including digital culture, media ethics, Latin American cinemas, technological change and media practice.

You will join a vibrant research community where regular research seminars, such as the media research and the 21st Century Research Group seminars, provide the chance for you to advance your understanding and skills.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Specialist areas include:
-Film, media and cultural theory
-Digital cultures and media
-Latin American cinemas
-East Asian cinemas
-Television and history
-The epic and historical film
-Media ethics
-Photography, design and digital media practice
-Screenwriting practice
-Radio, film and TV practice
-Gender and culture in film and media in the context of East Central Europe
-European cinema
-Contemporary popular cinema
-Technological change
-Documentary film and TV

How You Study

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisor, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

A PhD is usually awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

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The Lincoln School of Film and Media offers a collaborative environment in which to undertake research at doctoral level. As a researcher in the School, you can engage in a structured programme of training which provides the opportunity to develop the practical and critical skills necessary for your study. Read more
The Lincoln School of Film and Media offers a collaborative environment in which to undertake research at doctoral level.

As a researcher in the School, you can engage in a structured programme of training which provides the opportunity to develop the practical and critical skills necessary for your study.

You can work with an experienced supervisory team who can offer support and guidance on your research, funding opportunities, attending conferences and publishing your work in recognised journals.

You can benefit from the School’s research expertise in a variety of media and culture-related topics, including digital culture, media ethics, Latin American cinemas, technological change and screenwriting practice.

You will join a vibrant research community where regular research seminars, such as the media research and the 21st Century Research Group seminars, provide the chance to advance your understanding and skills.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Specialist areas include:
-Film, media and cultural theory
-Digital cultures and media
-Latin American cinemas
-Television and history
-The epic and historical film
-Media ethics
-Photography, design and digital media practice
-Screenwriting practice
-Radio, film and TV practice
-Gender and culture in the context of East Central Europe
-European cinema
-Contemporary popular cinema
-Technological change
-Documentary film and TV

How You Study

Students receive regular supervisions from a Director of Studies, supported by second supervisor.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisor, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

A PhD is awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

Special Features

Regional and national film, newspaper and digital archives are held at the University for use by research students. The School also hosts research seminars at which students are encouraged to present their original work.

Career and Personal Development

Graduates may progress their careers in roles in the media and creative industries. A postgraduate research degree can be an important foundation for a career in academia or research.

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Introduction. The MA in Film Production is a 1 year full-time programme that begins in October of each year, and offers graduate students opportunities to undertake intensive study in production skills in 16mm film and video. Read more
Introduction
The MA in Film Production is a 1 year full-time programme that begins in October of each year, and offers graduate students opportunities to undertake intensive study in production skills in 16mm film and video.
The programme provides instruction in sound recording and design, camerawork, lighting, editing, scriptwriting, budgeting and directing.
The Department of Media is housed in a purpose built complex with professionally designed studios, cutting rooms and editing facilities.

Course Description
This MA Programme is aimed particularly at people who have a good first degree in a subject such as film, television, or media studies but who have limited practical experience. Good honours degrees in other subjects, together with evidence of a serious interest in film and video production outside a formal academic context, may also be appropriate.

This MA Programme will suit people who want a general introduction to all areas of pre-production, production and post-production within 16mm film and digital video. Although some degree of specialisation is possible this MA should be seen as a general introduction to all areas. One of the advantages of this approach is that all our MA students are encouraged to write and direct their own films.

During the first term of the programme (October - December) students undertake a number of familiarisation exercises in film and video, developing pre-production, production and post-production skills. These exercises include 4 short 16mm productions and a number of video productions. These are carried out in small teams and it should be noted that teamwork is a major focal point of this MA.
In the second term (January - March), the programme concentrates on the further development of skills in scriptwriting, cinematography, directing, sound design/dubbing with ProTools, editing with Avid and compositing with After Effects. During this term students carry out the pre-production for their assessed film/video.
This is then shot and edited in the final term (April - June). A budget of up to £500 is provided to cover the basic costs of production. Students receive support through individual tutorials, group seminars and studio classes.


The MA in Film Production is predominantly practical but it should not be seen only as a vocational preparation. Its important theoretical component is related to the practical side and a weekly two-hour session covers theoretical issues such as narrative style, representation or national identity. In addition, students are obliged to attend weekly screenings and playbacks in the final year undergraduate courses.
During July, August and September students research and write a 12000 word dissertation on the theory underpinning their assessed film.

Resources
The Department's video equipment includes DVC-PRO video cameras (equivalent to Digibeta), tracks, doorway dolly, jib, specialist lighting gear, editing on AVID Xpress Pro, sound dubbing in a digital dubbing suite using ProTools, and software such as Photoshop, After Effects and Flash. There is also a newly equipped 3 camera TV Studio using digital widescreen cameras, gallery with digital desk and sound room with 32 channel mixer.

Our film resources offer fully professional 16mm and Super 16 opportunities, using Arriflex, Aaton and Bolex cameras, Nagra sound recorders, solid state recorders, a fully equipped studio and portable lighting kits for location work.

Outside the Department there is a student run campus radio station, in which many students participate. BBC regional radio (Radio Kent) also operates a studio in the Media building and offers student involvement with professional broadcasting.

Student Destinations
Students who successfully complete the MA have gone onto a wide range of Media related careers often starting at the assistant level and moving up from there. A number of ex-students work within Camera Departments, Producing and Feature Film Editing. Lecturing within Further Education and Higher Education has also been a particularly successful employment route.

Funding
Significant funding may be available for UK and EU students who have a good academic background [e.g. a first class or 2.1 honours degree] from the Arts and Humanities Research Board (A.H.R.C.) Please see their website for application details (http://www.ahrb.ac.uk/) Please note that this application process takes some months with a completion deadline in April.

See our website http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/arts-humanities/media/courses/ma_media-production.asp for more details.

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