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Masters Degrees (Film And Television)

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MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment. Read more
MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment.

Our MA is distinguished from traditional courses in that it specifically addresses the diversity and crossover of today's film and television culture with the aim of producing adaptive thinkers and highly creative practitioners. Our academic focus engages and interrogates film and television's status in the 21st century, which is often defined in terms of the digital age and digital culture.

On the course you will be required to examine, interpret and contest the notion of digital culture historically, socially, politically and artistically through both your research and creative practice. You will interrogate the increasingly blurred boundaries between film and television, art and technology, production and consumption, with the outcome being a fracturing of traditional categorisations. We reflect an era in which screenwriters Aaron Sorkin (Newsroom, The West Wing) and Lena Dunham (Girls, Tiny Furniture) experiment with dialogue and narrative, while conceptual artists Sam Taylor-Wood (Nowhere Boy, Love You More) and Steve McQueen (12 Years a Slave, Shame) have shifted from the art gallery to the cinema. Directors such as Ben Wheatley (A Field in England, Sightseers) and companies such as Curzon and Film4 are making use of multi-platform release schedules, and brands including HBO, Amazon and Netflix are shaping the very nature of not only what, but how, we watch. MA Film & Television understands this fundamentally shifting zeitgeist.

In examining industrial structure and visual form you will theorise the shifting dynamics of an age where anyone with a phone and a laptop has the ability to record, edit and disseminate visual projects. Such 'democratisation' has arguably made both creative uniqueness and clear industry pathways less discernable, but has provided a new and fruitful framework for those who have the ideas, talent, dedication and adaptability to embrace such immense transitional potential. However, despite these multitudinous transformations attributed to digital culture, the ethos of our MA contends that fundamental skills remain the basis of both sound academic work and creative practice. Rather than being fearful of what is to come, or nostalgic for the past, this course gives you the confidence to look at film and television critically, and acquire cutting edge creative skills in order to produce intelligent, innovative and inspirational visual work.

Our philosophy is one of flexibility, so you'll shape the curriculum around your own interests, whether in theory, creative practice, or a combination of the two. Drawn from the fundamentals of history, theory and criticism, our theoretical strand develops tomorrow's cineastes, cultural commentators, journalists and academics. This also underpins our approach to practice. The most successful film and television makers are students of their chosen medium, highly knowledgeable of historical legacy and social-political context. You'll not only learn how to develop, write, produce, shoot, record, direct and edit well, but why, philosophically and creatively, your ideas are worth being made.

Visit the website https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/film-television-ma

How the course is taught

Our passion is reflected both in the teaching and research track record of our academics, our industry connections and visiting speakers, and the quality of our film and television professionals. Crossing disciplinary areas such as cultural studies, sociology, journalism, English, philosophy and, of course, film and television studies, our MA offers academically-minded students comprehensive supervision and guidance for moving onto PhD research.

Industry and academic links

We have a strong visiting lecturer programme with recent guests including critics Dr Mark Kermode, Professor Linda Ruth Williams and Dr Will Brooker. Our practice tutors are active writers, producers, directors, editors, sound designers and cinematographers who create substantive work across all screen media. We have a wide range of contacts and industry specialists who contribute to the course, including Tony Grisoni (writer of Southcliffe, Red Riding, and How I Live Now), Mary Burke (producer of For Those in Peril, Berberian Sound Studio and The Midnight Beast), and James Henry (writer for Campus and Green Wing).

Falmouth University also recently hosted the Channel 4 Talent Day and we are active in developing work placements and internships for our students. We have sent many of students to Warp Films and TwoFour since 2009, and regularly update our webpages with work experience opportunities and jobs. Our graduates have proceeded to further study and jobs across the film and television industry, for HBO, Sky, ITV, Disney and have worked on major feature films, most recently including About Time (Richard Curtis, 2013) The World's End (Edgar Wright, 2013), The Double (Richard Ayoade, 2014) and Disney's forthcoming Cinderella (Kenneth Branagh, 2015). Falmouth University's MA in Film & Television is for students who to place themselves at the cutting edge of screen culture.

Course outline

The course is divided into three semesters of 15 weeks. Each semester offers the fundamentals vital to every academic and practitioner, and elective choices so you can shape your own learning.

What you'll do

- Study block 1
Foundation
The first semester consists of three core units, offering a diverse entry point to all aspects of the study of film and television, and the interrelationship of theory and practice:

Theorising Contemporary Film & Television Culture (Theory)

In this module you will explore the theoretical conceptualisations of film and television in the context of contemporary academic thought and popular discourse around the concept of digital culture. We will start from a point of questioning the multi-layered and contested effects of digital culture on film and television as discrete forms. You will consider the interrelationship and fusion between media in terms of production, distribution and exhibition examining the advent of new forms of representation and interaction. But we will also look at how traditional notion of film and television are being preserved and even being popular as a reaction to the effects of the digital. The module will also assess and interrogate the economic and technological developments of a more integrated and interactive media environment in terms of the cross-pollination of form and content, and socio-cultural effects on contemporary audiences.

Film & Television Industry Case Study (Theory/Practice)

In this module you will explore the industrial parameters of contemporary film and television based around the experience and expertise of current professionals. The module will utilise the School of Film & Television's many industry links to bring in guest speakers from the BBC, Channel 4, Sky, TwoFour Broadcast, Warp Films, Sheffield Doc Fest, Cornwall Film Festival, Doc Heads, BFI, Pinewood Studios, Dogbite and EngineHouse VFX. You will then have an opportunity to question these professionals about their respective sectors as a basis for a case study. Alternatively, you can investigate the sector/practitioner of your own choosing, with tutor support. The module will also contain workshops on the fundamentals of creative industry research and methodology. The module is designed so that you learn both the challenges and values of networking, and researching specific job roles and industry backgrounds in order to effectively plot your own career trajectory.

Creative Practices (Practice)

This module will engage you in the production workflow, focusing on how creative, professional and technical roles shape a final film or television project. Your weekly seminars and workshops will guide you through pre-production, production and post-production processes, enabling you to devise, develop and produce a short filmed project as part of a small crew of four to six students. You will, therefore, develop your technical skills and production practices in order to devise and deploy modes of creative practice which may include, but are not limited to, research and development, screenwriting, production management, producing, directing, cinematography, lighting, editing and the recording and design of sound.

- Study block 2
Specialisms
The second semester gives you the opportunity to specialise, choosing from a ranging of theory, practice or combination modules. Assessment of combination modules is either through an academic essay or a practice project. Potential optional modules include:

- Cultural Studies to Digital Sociology (Theory/Practice)
- Screen Futures (Theory/Practice)
- Globalisation in Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Factual Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Screenwriting for Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Work Placement (Theory/Practice)

- Study block 3
Expertise
Depending on your chosen specialism, in the third semester you'll produce either:

- Dissertation (Theory)
- Film & Production Portfolio (Theory/Practice)
- Conceptual Project (Theory/Practice)

Facilities

The purpose-built film school facilities include:

- 116-seat cinema, with Christie M Series HD projection (as used in Vue cinemas) and 7.2 surround sound

- Equipment store with a range of Blackmagic, Red, Panasonic, JVC, GoPro, Canon DSLR and C100 cameras and lenses, jibs, tracks and dollies

- Digital production suites equipped with Final Draft (screenwriting), Movie Magic (production management) and a range of edit software, including Adobe Creative Cloud/Suite, Final Cut and AVID

- Avid Unity MediaNetwork Edit server

- Recording and sound edit studios equipped with Pro Tools audio editing and Foley traps

- 14x8m TV studio with three studio cameras, full gallery facility, Chromatte grey screen, blue/green screen and full lighting rig

- Centroid 3D (Pinewood-networked) Motion Capture studio/research lab

- Virtual Studio using the latest technology

- 23,500-title TV and film library

Experience you'll get

- Highly flexible, student-focused curriculum

- Mentoring with industry professionals

- Opportunities for placement and work experience

- Creative environment for collaboration

- Using industry-standard software

- A vibrant visiting speaker programme

- Student experience-centred ethos

Assessment

- Continuous assessment with no formal examinations
- Core theory based on written assignments
- Core practice assessed on visual project and accompanying portfolios
- Elective modules all with theory/practice options
- Dissertation and/or major project in final semester

Careers

- Research, teaching or postgraduate study in art/humanities subject areas

- All technical/creative roles linked with direction, production, cinematography, editing, sound, lighting; writing for the screen; film and television criticism; research for film and TV

- Film and TV marketing, distribution and sales – digital and social media content/distribution

- Film festival and arts curatorship – media-based project management

Find out how to apply here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/apply

Visiting Us

We hold open days throughout the year so you can meet current students and staff, view our campuses and facilities, and find out more about studying at Falmouth.

Find out more - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/open-days

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The new MA in Global Film and Television is an online course, offering a range of distinct critical and theoretical approaches. You will be asked to explore the dynamic relationship between visual style and social commentary in work of film and television from around the world. Read more
The new MA in Global Film and Television is an online course, offering a range of distinct critical and theoretical approaches. You will be asked to explore the dynamic relationship between visual style and social commentary in work of film and television from around the world. As the industries of film and television become increasingly interconnected, the course considers their shared stylistic and contextual relationships.

The MA in Global Film and Television is innovative in engaging with comparative close readings of US film beyond Hollywood, of World Cinema, and of contemporary television. The course leads the way in employing cutting-edge advancements in Film and Television Studies, such as the audio visual essay and digital curation. The course’s online delivery means that you will benefit from greater flexibility, innovative teaching and learning strategies via the latest developments in social media and digital technology.

Why choose this course?

With the University of Hertfordshire’s innovative online distance learning programme, you can study for a MA Global Film and Television at your own pace, without ever having to set foot on campus.

You will benefit from:
-Flexible study- fit your degree around your work and life commitments
-Support from experienced and well qualified tutors
-No campus-based exams – assessment is by coursework and online tests
-Pay as you study and possible tuition fee loan eligibility (UK/EU students only)
-Being part of a dynamic and supportive online community of like-minded students
-No travel or student accommodation costs

The degree is for those who wish to advance their skills and knowledge in the area of Film and Television Studies at postgraduate level. The course will provide the opportunity to develop an understanding of film analysis beyond Hollywood, and to engage in close readings of films and television programmes from around the world.

Careers

Graduates are equipped for a variety of careers including those traditionally open to Masters Graduates in the Arts and Humanities: teaching, the Civil Service, Local Government, journalism, marketing, film curation and exhibition, and publishing as well as for further study at postgraduate level.

Teaching methods

-Style and Meaning in Film and Television (30 credits)
-Screen Curation (30 credits)
-Global Screen Violence (15 credits)
-Thinking Images: Philosophy in Film and Television (30 credits)
-Research Methods 1: Critical and Theoretical Debates (15 credits)
-Research Methods 2: Advanced Research Skills (15 credits)
-Dissertation/Extended Project (60 credits)

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Our innovative MA in Film and Television builds on its prestigious heritage as the longest running degree programme of its kind in the UK. Read more

Our innovative MA in Film and Television builds on its prestigious heritage as the longest running degree programme of its kind in the UK. We aim to equip you with wide-ranging skills, knowledge and critical awareness to meet your career aspirations in sectors in which moving images play a central role. Our curriculum incorporates an exciting variety of learning and teaching activities designed to foster your capacity for researching and rigorously analysing different aspects of film, television and moving images. You will have the opportunity to develop key skills for communicating about and with moving images across a range of contexts and platforms. You can choose to have a broad-based learning experience in film, television and moving image, or you can specialise in moving image curation and screenwriting via our suggested pathways.

The core teaching team consists of members of the Westminster School of Media, Arts and Design. The course has close links with the Centre for Research and Education in Arts and Media (CREAM), the leading research centre in the UK for arts and design, whose members include internationally renowned filmmakers, film and television theorists and historians, and moving image artists and curators. We combine research-enhanced teaching with classes delivered by film and television industry and moving image art professionals, in order to make sure that you develop the skill sets and the full range of critical awareness that is in demand and to deliver an exciting learning experience for you.

The course combines core and optional taught modules. The design and delivery of our taught modules draw on CREAM’s research excellence in documentary, Asian and European cinema, moving image curation, and television history. The coursework requirements for some modules are research essays or a combination of research essays and research-informed blog posts and presentations. Other modules require a broad range of research-informed professional modes of writing such as a screenplay treatment, a curatorial proposal or an exhibition review. You will also undertake a substantial piece of independent research as a major part of your MA studies. In order to provide you with the flexibility to undertake a piece of independent research suited to your career aspiration, the final project module offers you the choice between writing a traditional dissertation or completing a theoretically-informed professional project such as a curating a film programme, writing and producing a series of themed blog posts, or writing a long-form screenplay.

Course structure

The course is taught in two modes: full-time and part-time.

Full-time Postgraduate students study 180 credits per year. For the award of MA in Film, Television and Moving Image, you must complete two core taught modules, four optional modules and a 60-credit final project module, for a total of 180 credits.

The course structure includes two suggested pathways for those wishing to specialise in film programming and moving image curation, or in screenwriting.

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course

Core modules

Core modules provide you with a set of key skills for the theoretical, critical and reflective understanding of moving images.

  • Final Project (core)
  • Key Concepts in Film, Television and Moving Image (core)
  • Contemporary Issues in Moving Image and Screen Studies (core)

Optional modules

Optional modules give you the freedom to choose areas of specialisation. The course leaders can advise on which modules best fit your interests. You have the choice to pursue specialised interests through your choice of optional modules and coursework assignments. If you are not sure which optional modules to choose or fit your interests best, or which types of final project work to produce to best develop your area of specialisation, you should discuss this question individually with the course leaders and you should aim to do so early on in the academic year.

The course structure includes two suggested pathways for those wishing to specialise in film programming and moving image curation, or in screenwriting.

  • Cinema Distribution and Exhibition
  • Documentary Aesthetics, Sites and Spectatorship
  • Film Programming and Moving Image Curation
  • Introduction to Scriptwriting
  • Longform Screenplay Preparation and Short Documents
  • Modern and Contemporary European Cinema
  • Researching Histories in Asian Cinema
  • Television Art: Aesthetics and Quality

Industry links

We have strongly developed links with key London exhibition and research venues such as the BFI SouthbankICALux and Close-Up, as well as key critics, theorists, curators and festivals. We offer field visits to these sites as well as festivals like the Rotterdam Film Festival.

Career path

Our graduates have found employment in small- and large-scale film and television companies as filmmakers, producers, distributors, and exhibitors. Others have gone on to organise film festivals, or to work in film-related magazines and journals as well as in international arts and culture sectors. Some of our recent graduates have gone on to pursue academic careers as researchers or doctoral students at the University of Westminster and elsewhere. As the UK’s longest-running postgraduate programme in film and television several of our alumni are pioneers of the discipline of film and television studies.



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To stay competitive in today’s market, film and television writers need to be able to work across platforms and genres. Designed with this in mind, our low-residency . Read more

To stay competitive in today’s market, film and television writers need to be able to work across platforms and genres. Designed with this in mind, our low-residency Master of Fine Arts in Writing for Film and Television emphasizes the art and business of film and television writing, as well as innovative writing for other emergent forms of media, from long- and short-form films to series television and webisodes. By graduation, students will have a complete portfolio of professional-caliber work.

Each semester begins with a six-day residency, alternating between our Boston and LA locations, where students engage in:

  • Master classes
  • Screenings 
  • Intensive workshops
  • Peer group workshops
  • Visits to film and television studios and sets
  • Guest lectures, staged readings, and pitch sessions

At the end of each residency, you will return home ready to begin writing, submitting your work in installments online, participating in online peer/advisor workshops, attending virtual meetings with your advisor, and enrolling in two online topics classes per semester. 

Low-Residency MFA 

Emerson’s MFA in Writing for Film and Television is a progressive two-year low residency program that brings together a community of students for focused, rigorous instruction. Building on Emerson’s long-standing Department of Visual and Media Arts, the low residency MFA program emphasizes practice in film and television writing as well as innovative writing for other emergent forms of media.

Each semester includes:

  • A six-day on-campus residency (alternating between Emerson's Boston campus and Emerson Los Angeles)
  • Online topics classes
  • Screenwriting workshops

Emerson’s campuses offer diverse environments where MFA students will have the opportunity to be closely connected to long-established communities of scriptwriters and filmmakers, as well as the feature film and television and cable industries.



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This programme offers an exciting combination of both film-making practice and textual and historical approaches to the study of film and television. Read more
This programme offers an exciting combination of both film-making practice and textual and historical approaches to the study of film and television. As a student on this innovative programme, you will be taught the skills of film production, working intensively in small groups to explore aesthetic possibilities and gain insights into the craft and industry of screen media. You will also engage with critical perspectives and develop high-level research and analysis skills.

Optional units offer the chance to specialise in different areas of practical film-making and to gain a greater understanding of specific areas around the history and aesthetics of film and television. At the dissertation stage, you will have the opportunity to undertake a placement in creative industry, to undertake an in-depth study of film and television by means of a traditional dissertation, or to produce a mixed-mode investigation through film practice, either individually or in a team, supervised by one or more academic advisers.

The University of Bristol has more than 40 years of experience in this field and the programme draws on the expertise of world-leading scholars, expert practitioners and industry professionals. The Department of Film and Television hosts a series of research seminars and industry masterclasses that are targeted to enrich your studies. Facilities include a 200-seat cinema, production studio, animation and edit suites, seminar rooms and sound rooms.

Bristol is an excellent city in which to study film and television, with its varied cinema, television and digital media spaces, such as the Arnolfini, BBC Bristol, The Cube and Watershed Media Centre. Bristol's Harbourside is home to an array of film festivals, including the Encounters Short Film and Animation Festival, the Slapstick Festival, and the Afrika Eye Festival.

Programme structure

The programme has been designed to develop skills and knowledge cumulatively, while allowing you the opportunity to tailor your learning to your specific areas of interest.

In the first semester, you will be taught skills and techniques of formal analysis and practical film-making, providing the foundation for optional units across the year, such as Writing and Directing, Screen Histories, Television Forms and Making Short Fiction. Other options include Translation for Subtitling (Chinese-English), Screen Style and Aesthetics, and Making Short Fiction.

In the second semester, you will gain knowledge of research methods relevant to the dissertation stage, which includes the opportunity to undertake a placement in the film/TV industry, write an extended essay or produce a piece of practice (normally a short film) accompanied by individual written reflection.

Careers

Graduates of film and television at Bristol have taken up careers as film-makers, programme researchers, senior academics and broadcasting executives.

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From start to finish producers are the driving force behind the film and television industry. They generate new projects and ideas, secure finance, manage production and strategically market the result. Read more

From start to finish producers are the driving force behind the film and television industry. They generate new projects and ideas, secure finance, manage production and strategically market the result. The producer’s role has been transformed by the advent of globalisation, digital technology and the multi-channel environment. Now more than ever, the entertainment industries need creative leadership.

Our Masters offers aspiring producers the opportunity to acquire the creative and entrepreneurial skills required to enter the rapidly changing universe of film and television. You will learn to create script ideas, work with writers and directors, manage a production thoroughly and market across platforms, we'll teach you how to navigate the financial and legal aspects of the industry, too.

The course is taught from our creative hub at Royal Holloway's central London campus, 11 Bedford Square. Our proximity to the media industry means that we can draw upon professionals for outstanding master classes, industry panels and careers events. Students are encouraged to attend The London Film Festival, MIPCOM, Berlin, and Cannes international festivals. You will also try out interning at a production company or work on the crew of a professional production.

You will learn from top talent and practice what you learn by making films, and TV programmes. The ‘Role of Producer’ and ‘Script Development’ courses are taught by Professor Jonathan Powell, one of the UK's most respected and experienced drama producers, having previously worked as Controller of BBC1 and Head of Drama for the BBC. The course leader is award winning producer and executive, Gillian Gordon who brings thirty years’ experience in Hollywood and the UK to teaching ‘Producing Workshop’.

Through master classes, industry internships and alumni partnerships, students are provided with opportunities to network with international talent and expertise, as well as building links with current Royal Holloway students and academic partners.

Course structure

Core modules

The Role of the Producer

In this module you will develop an understanding of the role of the producer as the driving force in creating, managing and selling film and television products. You will look at how the independent sector works, and consider how to programme and pitch ideas. You will also examine approaches to working with creative talent.

Script Development

In this module you will develop an understanding of how to write an industry standard script report. You will learn how to analyse both film and TV scripts, and produce reports that constructively engage writers with the process of script development. You will consider the analysis of structure, character, dialogue, genre, and how to transfer feedback verbally.

Producing Workshop

In this module you will develop an understanding of how to create and pitch ideas to film, television and new media executives and financiers. You will learn the basics of script development, set procedure, scheduling, camera work, audio equipment and post production. You will consider how to develop and identify viable fiction projects and lead and manage the production of a short video, . You will work with creative talent, writers, directors, casting agents, and key craft team members, and examine how to finance and market your short film. You will put together a viable presentation package and pitch to a panel of industry professionals.

International Media Business

In this module you will develop an understanding of the global film and TV business. You will learn how to plan and conceptualise the creation and management of a sustainable media enterprise. You will examine the critical issues affecting the success or failure of film and television businesses, considering the role of financial planning in the life-cycle of visual media projects. You will also explore the wider context of finance in the development, marketing and distribution of film and television to investors, partners and government bodies, with a focus on the challenges faced by business startups.

Production Management

In this module you will develop an understanding of basic production accounting and the line management skills needed for film, TV and transmedia production. You will learn how to set-up a production company and budget, schedule, manage cash flow, and supervise a quality fiction production. You will consider how to manage 'below-the line' deals on a drama production and identify financial issues and their implications for day-to-day management. You will also examine how to manage a film crew and supervise the daily operations of a production team, and manage production costs, equipment and facility deals.

Marketing and Media Law

In this module you will develop an understanding of media marketing and promotion in film and television distribution and exhibition. You will look at social media and new trends in the global marketing of films and media projects, including cross-platform marketing. You will consider the fundamental principles of media law, including contract and intellectual property law, and examine issues of content and regulation.

Dissertation

You will produce a 10,000 word dissertation or media project on topic of your choice. You will carry out an investigation that has a clearly defined aim of study and arrive at a carefully argued set of conclusions derived from original research covering print, internet and first hand interview sources.

Teaching & assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including essays, script reports, treatments, pitching exercises, studio exercises, production papers, practical film-making, business reports and presentations.

Your future career

Our close links to the film and TV production industry make this a practical course – and one that gives you building blocks for your future.

While you're on the course, we'll encourage and guide you into work placements and internships. Past students have secured placements with industry leading organisations including:

  • Disney studios
  • Heyday Films
  • West End Films
  • Paramount
  •  Universal
  • Channel 4
  • Company Pictures
  • Studio Canal
  • Lionsgate
  • Potboiler Productions
  • Sony Music
  • Warner Bros
  • Hanway Films
  • e-One Entertainment

Graduates from the Department of Media Arts have gone on to work in independent television and film production, for broadcasters like the BBC and ITV, for distributors, exhibitors, talent agencies and entertainment lawyers.



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Do you want to develop a broad range of skills that will be directly applicable within the film and television industries?. Are you looking to kick-start your career in media production or scholarly research?. Read more

Do you want to develop a broad range of skills that will be directly applicable within the film and television industries?

Are you looking to kick-start your career in media production or scholarly research?

The MA in Film and Television: Research and Production places employability at the heart of the programme. Utilising a combination of theoretical approaches, critical engagement, creative practice and hands-on technical training, this MA gives you the chance to work within a dynamic and innovative department. It combines rigorous academic training in research skills and methodology with technical and vocational training in designing, researching and editing audio-visual content. It also includes a work placement of up to 12 weeks in the media industry.

Excellent communication skills, with high standards of both written and spoken English, are essential for this MA.

Please note: There are specific application deadlines for this programme. Please see 'How to apply' in course details for more information.

Course details

This interdisciplinary masters programme is designed to help you take the specialist academic knowledge from your first degree and apply it in practical ways to kick-start your career in media production or scholarly research.

Combining academic and professional training, the programme provides hands-on skills with a core understanding about how the industry works, promoting both critical and creative thought. 

You will study four core modules (full descriptions available below):

  • Development and Production Processes for Film and Television
  • Documentary Filmmaking
  • Research Skills in Film and Television
  • Guided Editing/Guided Reading

The MA also includes a Placement and Training module, allowing you to gain work experience in the media industry. 

This programme also offers the opportunity to gain an industry-recognised qualification in Health and Safety for productions, in addition to your MA, which is a great enhancement to your CV. This is part of the Production Safety Passport Scheme approved by Creative Skillset (the skills body for the creative industries in the UK).

Assessment

Your modules are assessed through a combination of practical and written assignments. You will complete the programme with either a 20-25 minute documentary film or a 15,000-word dissertation.

Learning and teaching

Training in editing and filming is delivered as part of the MA and we have an on-site technician to give you as much guidance as you need.

All of the equipment is provided on the course and following training you will be able to borrow cameras for filming throughout the year. Students are encouraged to work together extensively in their modules, especially practical work, mimicking the collaboration that students will find as standard in the creative industries. To this end, students are also encouraged to undertake as many filmmaking opportunities as possible throughout the year, including taking advantage of the many extra-curricular filmmaking opportunities offered via the department.

Course delivery

Full-time

Full-time students will take three modules in the autumn semester: Research Skills in Film and Television, Documentary Filmmaking, and Development and Production Processes (DPP). This is alongside practical training, lectures from industry professionals and employability workshops.

Guided Editing or Guided Reading will then be completed ahead of a June deadline, alongside the placement module. Placement arrangements will be bespoke for each student, with the written component of the module due in July.

The dissertation will be due in late August, at the end of the year’s study.

Part-time

In their first year, part-time students work alongside full-time students for two modules in the autumn semester, Research Skills and Documentary Filmmaking. Part-time students will also attend practical training workshops, meaning they are fully equipped to participate in audio-visual production. They will then complete Guided Editing or Guided Reading in their first year, submitting in the summer.

In their second year, part-time students take Development and Production Processes in the autumn and work towards completion of their dissertation the following summer. It is possible for part-time students to undertake DPP in the autumn term of their first year, if they so wish.

The placement module is flexible across the two years, but the 4,000-word assignment will also be due in the summer of the second year.

The dissertation will be due in August, at the end of the second year of study.

Placements

The Placement Coordinator will work with all students on a 1:1 basis to identify suitable opportunities based on each individual’s interests and availability.

Support with academic writing

As a postgraduate student in the College of Arts and Law, you have access to the Academic Writing Advisory Service (AWAS) which aims to help your transition from undergraduate to taught Masters level, or back into academia after time away. The service offers guidance on writing assignments and dissertations for your MA/MSc programme with individual support from an academic writing advisor via tutorials, email and the provision of online materials.

International students can access support for English Language development and skills through the Birmingham International Academy (BIA).



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Drawing on the internationally recognised expertise of our academics, primarily in the areas of Film and Television aesthetics, history and theory, this course enables you to familiarise yourself with key disciplinary issues and methodologies before focusing on an area of personal academic interest. Read more
Drawing on the internationally recognised expertise of our academics, primarily in the areas of Film and Television aesthetics, history and theory, this course enables you to familiarise yourself with key disciplinary issues and methodologies before focusing on an area of personal academic interest.

You will take a core module in Screen Cultures, in which academics will introduce selected screenings, and illuminate how an element of their own research can inform the methodology/theory under discussion. You then have the choice of three further optional modules taken over the first two terms. These currently include: The City in Film and Television; History and Memory in Italian Cinema; Journeys and Landscapes in Film and Television; Sound Cultures; Television History and Aesthetics;
and Textual Analysis and Film Style. Finally, you will have the opportunity to pursue your own thematic interests through a dissertation and research presentations.

The programme includes dedicated sessions in Graduate Skills that will equip you with the necessary academic skills to excel in Master’s assignments and PhD applications. Our postgraduates have progressed into diverse and often creative roles in film and television production, journalism, marketing, archiving education and publishing. They have also found employment in the voluntary sector, and in major arts and cultural organisations.

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Build your creative post-production skills to make your mark in the film and television industry. Solent’s MA Post Production in Film and Television will see you working with some of the best industry-standard equipment in a fun and creative environment, surrounded by fellow creative people. Read more

Build your creative post-production skills to make your mark in the film and television industry. Solent’s MA Post Production in Film and Television will see you working with some of the best industry-standard equipment in a fun and creative environment, surrounded by fellow creative people.

You’ll begin by studying the fundamentals of post-production to gain a solid understanding of the core principles and techniques. You’ll then progress into other fields, such as creative editing for drama and for documentary. Here you’ll explore the creative process of editing, from story-telling and character focus for drama, to cutaways and building sequences in documentary. This is complemented by the sound and visual design unit where you’ll learn how to add aural and visual dimension to a production.

The research methods and major project units will give you the opportunity to demonstrate your research skills at master’s level and to work on a personal film or TV project that utilises the skills learnt throughout your studies.

You’ll also have the opportunity to gain professional qualifications alongside your degree studies. You’ll be encouraged sit the Avid Certified User exam - a certificate is recognised by post-production companies worldwide. You could also work towards gaining the Pro Tools Certified User certificate, if you wish to pursue a career in sound design or audio mixing.

The course team’s excellent industry links mean you’ll have access to a long-established and inspiring guest speaker programme. Students on our media technology programmes have had the chance to meet and question some of the country’s top industry professionals in film and television. Recent guest speakers include Sir Alan Parker (BAFTA winning director: Bugsy MaloneEvitaMississippi Burning), Mick Audsley (BAFTA winning editor: Harry Potter and the Goblet of FireEverestAlliedTwelve Monkeys), Eddy Joseph (BAFTA winning sound editor: Casino RoyaleUnited 93Charlie and the Chocolate Factory), Walter Murch (Oscar and BAFTA winning sound and film editor TomorrowlandApocalypse NowJarhead), Nick McPhee (editor: The DurrellsDownton AbbeyDoc Martin), Julian Unthank (screenwriter New TricksSword of Vengeance) and John Lloyd (producer: QIBlackadderNo Such Thing as the News). 

What does this course lead to?

Graduates can expect to pursue jobs in many areas of the TV and film post-production industry. Entry level jobs can include edit assistant, junior editor, or runner. From here, graduates can progress to roles such as picture editor, sound editor, dubbing mixer, grader, colourist, or facilities manager.

Who is this course for?

This course is ideal for anyone wishing to pursue a career in post-production. Candidates should have a first or second class degree in a related discipline. The programme would also suit those already working in the industry with relevant experience, looking to build on their existing knowledge and skills.

Facilities

We invest heavily in making sure our specialist equipment is right up to date.

Students have access to:

  • Over 70 fibre networked Adobe Premiere and FCP X edit workstations.
  • Over 30 Avid Media Composer edit workstations.
  • Post-production sound and colour grading suites.
  • A range of high-end cameras and ancillary equipment – all in HD or 4K.
  • 5.1 surround ADR /Foley dubbing suite.
  • Dolby Atmos cinema.

Your future

Graduates can expect to pursue jobs in many areas of the TV and film post-production industry. Entry level jobs can include edit assistant, junior editor, or runner. From here, graduates can progress to roles such as picture editor, sound editor, dubbing mixer, grader, colourist, or facilities manager.

There are also many post-production-related jobs outside of the broadcast industry. Opportunities within the charity sector, local and national government, emergency services, the financial sector, and the corporate and training video market are possible.

Industry links

The course team have excellent links with industry which has led to a guest speaker programme with talks from inspiring and leading industry experts, including:

  • Walter Murch - film and sound editor: Apocalypse NowTomorrowland
  • Anne V Coates - film editor: Lawrence of ArabiaOut of SightFifty Shades of Grey
  • Sir Alan Parker - director: Bugsy MaloneThe CommitmentsAngel HeartMississippi Burning
  • Mick Audsley - film editor: AlliedEverestHarry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
  • Eddie Joseph - supervising sound editor: Casino RoyaleQuantum of SolaceUnited 93Corpse Bride
  • John Wilson - editor: Downton AbbeyBilly ElliotMe Before You
  • Eddie Hamilton - film editor: Mission: Impossible V
  • Nick McPhee - editor: Doc MartinDownton Abbey
  • Frances Parker - editor: Game of Thrones

A number of Solent’s undergraduate media technology programmes are Skillset-approved, allowing access to a range of industry events, such as the RTS Masterclasses at the BFI in London. Close links with the Royal Television Society locally ensure students are able to attend their events, including ‘Meet the Professionals’.

Placements

Although work experience is not compulsory, you’ll be encouraged and supported to seek relevant placements wherever possible.

At Solent, we have a very strong focus on employability and work experience. Our extensive relationships with professional film and television editors, sound designers, colourists has meant that we have been able to offer unique placement and mentoring opportunities.

You’ll also have the opportunity to access some of the best work experience opportunities imaginable. We are the official university partner to the Glastonbury Festival and you will have the chance apply to work there. Likewise, our links with Bestival, Camp Bestival and Boardmasters mean you have great opportunities throughout the summer. We have close ties with some of the country’s top post-production houses and have been able to offer work experience opportunities with companies such as Envy, Halo and The Mill. Our alumni also offer work experience opportunities to current students.



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This course is designed for students who have firm PhD study plans and feel that they need to develop their knowledge of fields which is not covered by our taught modules in order to prepare for their proposed PhD project. Read more
This course is designed for students who have firm PhD study plans and feel that they need to develop their knowledge of fields which is not covered by our taught modules in order to prepare for their proposed PhD project.

The MA for Research comprises of three taught modules, plus one independent study module designed in consultation with a supervisor and dissertation. In the past, a selection of the following option modules have been offered: The City in Film and Television; History and Memory in Italian Cinema; Journeys and Landscapes in Film and Television; Sound Cultures; Television History and Aesthetics; and Textual Analysis and Film Style.

The programme includes dedicated sessions in Graduate Skills that will equip you with the necessary academic skills to excel in Master’s assignments and PhD applications. Our postgraduates have progressed into diverse and often creative roles in film and television production, journalism, marketing, archiving education and publishing. They have also found employment in the voluntary sector, and in major arts and cultural organisations. We also have an outstanding record of MA students going on to doctoral study and employment in a number of prestigious HE institutions around the world.

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Film and Television develops technical skills in compositional techniques and studio-based work. Designed for advanced composers, it provides an in-depth specialist training. Read more

Film and Television develops technical skills in compositional techniques and studio-based work. Designed for advanced composers, it provides an in-depth specialist training. Contextual knowledge of mainstream repertoire and significant previous experience of composition and orchestration are required.

Course detail

The MMus in Composition for Film and Television at London College of Music (LCM) is one of the longest-established qualifications of its kind. The course provides an ideal opportunity for in-depth examination of specific techniques (both historical and current) employed in the creation of music for modern media, and for drawing upon these procedures in a practical context by composing music for a diverse range of genres, including…

• television thrillers

• animation

• video game trailers

• science fiction

• dramatic cinema

• silent film

• costume drama

• documentary and…

• …horror!

In addition, you will hone and refine your skills as orchestrators by writing for a variety of specified ensembles. You will also expand your musical and dramatic vocabulary via an imaginative series of compositional pastiche exercises (an integral feature of the portfolio submission during Semester 1).

You will undertake further assessments in film score analysis (taking the form of an extended contextual essay, based upon a score/composer of your own choice) and in-studio ensemble conducting, working 'to click' with a group of 'live' performing musicians.

Modules

  • Practical Composition 1
  • Practical Composition 2
  • Orchestration and Arranging
  • Score Production
  • Combining Sounds
  • Developing Your Career

Format

The course is taught mainly through individual tutorials, but may include group work, workshops, seminars and lectures.

Assessment

We assess written portfolio work through portfolios of compositions responding to verbal briefs, and in the second semester (or second year for part-time students), composing direct to picture. There is also a practical assessment in the Film and Television Score Production module and an extended essay project for the Business of Music module. There is a viva voce exam as part of the portfolio submissions in both semesters (or both years for part-time students).

Career and study progression

Course alumni have gone on to compose music for an excitingly diverse range of projects and for an impressive list of clients, including the BBC, BBC Worldwide, BBC Three, The National Theatre, Youth Music Theatre UK, Projection Pictures, The National Theatre, Sky, Channel 4 and the British Film Institute.

Also, in addition to orchestrating their own music, many specialise in orchestrating and conducting the music of other (notable) film composers.

While most students progress directly into the industry after completing this course, graduates may alternatively choose to undertake a PhD or further their compositional studies with a DMus.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course.

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here.



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This course provides the opportunity for you to develop as a thinking practitioner of film-making or television programme-making, someone who is able to innovate while questioning and interrogating existing values and traditions. Read more

This course provides the opportunity for you to develop as a thinking practitioner of film-making or television programme-making, someone who is able to innovate while questioning and interrogating existing values and traditions. The emphasis is firmly on practical film-making and television production work, underpinned with contextual theory throughout, engaging with contemporary issues and emerging trends in film and television production, as well as established film/television theories and practices.

The first two semesters of study provide a range of modules which will allow you to develop your film/television “craft skills” – this may include work with camera, lighting, sound, editing, directing and producing – while working on short film/TV projects of your own devising. There will be opportunities to collaborate with other students, and you will be encouraged to make contact with, and work with, contributors (e.g. interviewees, actors) from outside of the university. You will also develop your skills as an academic researcher by carrying out research which feeds directly into your film projects.

The course culminates in the Masters Project, where you will be the key creative leader of a film or television production, taking on the role of producer or director.

What happens on the course?

In a typical week, a full-time student on this course will have up to ten hours of class time which will be a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical workshop sessions. Most course modules will blend these different teaching methods within a given timetabled session, so there will be plenty of variety.

In lectures, you will typically be given ‘food for thought’ in relation to your own project ideas. In workshop sessions you will get to practice film-making techniques related to your own project work needs. In seminars you will share ideas and discuss with tutors and fellow students. In tutorials you will have one-to-one or small group discussion about your works in progress.

The general flow of the course for a full time student is to start with production skills, research skills and scriptwriting in the first semester. In the second semester you move on to a small personal project which will combine all that you have learned from these three areas. In the final semester, you bring it all together in a personal film/TV production project which is seen as the culmination of your studies.

Part-time students experience exactly the same course modules and course content, but necessarily broken down into smaller groups of modules.

Opportunities:

The course is built upon negotiated production work, which means you get to propose and develop your own ideas for film and television. The teaching staff are experienced with production across documentary, drama and social action production, and will guide you according to your ambitions, skills and needs.

There is always the opportunity to work on ‘live’ project briefs, which can be used as the basis of a module project, or alternatively as an extra-curricular experience which informs your development on the course and allows you to network with students on related courses.

Why Wolverhampton?

The course is taught in the School of Media, which houses a three-camera live television studio, fifteen editing suites with Premiere Pro, After Effects, Final Cut Pro X and other professional software packages, and a sound-recording/foley production suite. It also has an equipment store from which you can borrow all the camera, sound, lighting and other equipment you need to produce your work.

Who will teach you on this course?

The course teaching team includes four active doctoral or postdoctoral researchers – Adam Kossoff, Tracy McCoy, Phil Nichols and Gavin Wilson – whose interests include documentary film, social action video, screenwriting and adaptation, and cinematography. They are all qualified higher education teachers, and have many years of experience of teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate level. They are also experienced film and programme makers.

Our students and graduates have a track-record of success in competitions and festivals, such as the prestigious Royal Television Society Student Awards, the Midland Movies awards, and the Business Disability Forum's Technology Taskforce Film Festival.

What our students think

Film-maker and editor Andrew Webber has had his films screened at international festivals in the UK, Jamaica and West Africa. He says, “The University has been extremely supportive, through my studies and after graduation.”

Niki Gandy has pursued a teaching career, and now teaches photography and art in a High School. Calling herself a “proud graduate” of our related undergraduate course, she says, “I chose it for its practical content and which helped furnish me with numerous transferable skills necessary to forge my career in teaching. Almost a decade on, my lecturers continue to provide me with support and guidance - I feel certain that my relationship with the university will continue for many years to come.”

Actor and director Brian Duffy, creator of TV series Small World – a comedy series about a group of deaf flatmates which has been shown on TV and online – says, “Studying at the University of Wolverhampton helped me with networking and organisation – especially as filmmakers came to Wolverhampton for Deaffest, the UK’s leading deaf film and arts festival. My lecturer could also sign which was a great help and a huge weight off my shoulders – I could talk to her one-to-one. That’s something I never had the pleasure of pre-university.”

Lauren Shinner has been working in media production ever since graduating. She says, “My time at the University was invaluable, I wouldn't be where I am today without it. The tutors were always helpful and push students to do their best with plenty of support and understanding and the course prepares you well for your prospective career. I've gone on to work as a video editor in education, ran my own media business and have done videos for high end charities and new bands, and am now working in media in another area. Without my degree, none of this would have been possible.”



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This programme provides professional training in composition for screen media. Taught by staff and guest composers from the professional world, you will develop a strong technological foundation in the subject, along with specialist understanding of television and screen scoring. Read more
This programme provides professional training in composition for screen media. Taught by staff and guest composers from the professional world, you will develop a strong technological foundation in the subject, along with specialist understanding of television and screen scoring.

The MA is taught within our high-specification composition and recording studios, which have full-time technical support. Students are actively encouraged to build opportunities and networks, within and beyond the University, for projects in film, animation, documentary and more.

In the first semester, you will study Professional Techniques, an introduction to working and recording in studios, and Media Composition, focusing on TV and documentary work. You will also take one elective unit. In the second semester, the programme moves on to Critical Analysis of Media Music and Film Scoring, with an emphasis on longer-term projects for film and TV work. This work feeds into original collaborations that you may choose to include in your final portfolio.

The vibrant musical life of the Department of Music provides opportunities for student and professional performance, and we are located at the heart of one of the UK’s leading cities for broadcast, commercial and creative screen media.

Programme structure

Core units
-Media Composition
-Professional Techniques
-Critical Analysis of Media Music
-Film Scoring

Optional units
Optional units can vary each year. You will be able to choose two units from a wide spectrum that address further compositional skills - such as orchestration, sound design or pastiche composition - research skills for musicians, writing and directing for film and television, and how film and television programmes work.

Media composition portfolio/dissertation
-Either a substantial portfolio of original music for new collaborative films and/or extracts (music totalling 15-25 minutes).
-Or music to one new collaborative film of 10-12 minutes and a critical dissertation of 10,000 words on an agreed film or topic.

Careers

Students who completed the MA programme in Composition of Music for Film and Television have taken up careers as music composers, recording managers and compositing supervisors within animation studios.

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In your first year you are introduced to facets of motion picture production within your chosen specialisation, in second year you assume responsibility for the creative and technical production of a major project at a professional level. Read more

In your first year you are introduced to facets of motion picture production within your chosen specialisation, in second year you assume responsibility for the creative and technical production of a major project at a professional level.

The Graduate Diploma of Film and Television is an exit qualification for students who have successfully completed the first 100 points of the course. Applicants holding a Graduate Diploma of Film and Television, or equivalent, may apply for direct entry to Year 2 of the equivalent stream within the course. 

This course can be undertaken in one of two specialised direction streams:

DOCUMENTARY

If you have an enquiring mind and a highly visual outlook then documentary filmmaking is an inspired choice of profession. Documentary at the VCA will challenge you to create critically reflective films that capture a distinct place and time in our society.

NARRATIVE

The Narrative specialisation emphasises the screenwriting, direction and editing of narrative film and television. You are encouraged to be innovative and experimental, explore ideas and develop the expertise to express them to an audience through a visual medium.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

  • Develop advanced, practical filmmaking skills including direction of actors, cinematography, sound recording and editing, production management, assistant directing and other fundamental principles of filmmaking
  • Learn how to research, develop, write and design a narrative or documentary short film
  • Acquire ability to critically and constructively critique your own and peers’ screen production work in the context of the broader history of screen culture
  • Graduate with an industry-standard, narrative or documentary short film.


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The new MA in Global Film and Television is an online course, offering a range of distinct critical and theoretical approaches. You will be asked to explore the dynamic relationship between visual style and social commentary in work of film and television from around the world. Read more
The new MA in Global Film and Television is an online course, offering a range of distinct critical and theoretical approaches. You will be asked to explore the dynamic relationship between visual style and social commentary in work of film and television from around the world. As the industries of film and television become increasingly interconnected, the course considers their shared stylistic and contextual relationships.

The MA in Global Film and Television is innovative in engaging with comparative close readings of US film beyond Hollywood, of World Cinema, and of contemporary television. The course leads the way in employing cutting-edge advancements in Film and Television Studies, such as the audio visual essay and digital curation. The course’s online delivery means that you will benefit from greater flexibility, innovative teaching and learning strategies via the latest developments in social media and digital technology.

Why choose this course?

With the University of Hertfordshire’s innovative online distance learning programme, you can study for a MA Global Film and Television at your own pace, without ever having to set foot on campus.

You will benefit from:
-Flexible study- fit your degree around your work and life commitments
-Support from experienced and well qualified tutors
-No campus-based exams – assessment is by coursework and online tests
-Pay as you study and possible tuition fee loan eligibility (UK/EU students only)
-Being part of a dynamic and supportive online community of like-minded students
-No travel or student accommodation costs

The degree is for those who wish to advance their skills and knowledge in the area of Film and Television Studies at postgraduate level. The course will provide the opportunity to develop an understanding of film analysis beyond Hollywood, and to engage in close readings of films and television programmes from around the world.

Careers

Graduates are equipped for a variety of careers including those traditionally open to Masters Graduates in the Arts and Humanities: teaching, the Civil Service, Local Government, journalism, marketing, film curation and exhibition, and publishing as well as for further study at postgraduate level.

Teaching methods

-Style and Meaning in Film and Television (30 credits)
-Screen Curation (30 credits)
-Global Screen Violence (15 credits)
-Thinking Images: Philosophy in Film and Television (30 credits)
-Research Methods 1: Critical and Theoretical Debates (15 credits)
-Research Methods 2: Advanced Research Skills (15 credits)
-Dissertation/Extended Project (60 credits)

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