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Masters Degrees (Field Work)

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Are you a solutions person who can meet a challenge? Do you function in crisis situations; are you resilient, flexible and a team player?. Read more
Are you a solutions person who can meet a challenge? Do you function in crisis situations; are you resilient, flexible and a team player?

Social workers advise and support people at times of difficulty and deal with a wide range of problems such as the effects of ill health, disability, family breakdown, bereavement, discrimination, poverty and disadvantage. Helping people in these situations is rewarding but complex and challenging and requires a high level of commitment and resilience.

The MA Social Work programme reflects changes in government policy and social work practice and is based on current knowledge and research. We have strong partnerships with local employers ensuring high quality practice placements and potential job opportunities on completion of the programme.

Innovative teaching and learning resources have been developed such as the use of drama and online resource access as student support and the student experience are our key priorities. Our teaching team is supported by practitioners, service users and carers and in addition there are close links between the social work programmes and the university's Centre for Applied Social Research. University of Greenwich has a strong track record of achievement and provides high quality education approved by the HCPC and endorsed by the College of Social Work.

Please note that the part-time route is employment based and only available to graduates sponsored/supported by their employer in partnership and through agreement with the programme.

The Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling is a trusted provider of excellent academic degrees and vocational training. Our teaching staff are research active and are experts in their respective field. The department is consistently rated highly in the National Student Survey. We pride ourselves on combining high-quality teaching with world-class research and a vibrant student experience. We have well-equipped facilities and laboratories to support our activities and we employ creative teaching methods and assessment techniques. All our programmes offer a wide choice of courses and we welcome and offer support to students from a range of backgrounds.

The aims of the programme are:

- To facilitate graduates to gain social work knowledge, skills and understanding and the ability to apply these to their practice and work with and support families and individuals who have challenging and complex needs

- To develop and enhance students ability to critically analyse the values which underpin social work, such as social justice, equality and fairness. Additionally, students will develop an understanding of social policy, current social work legislation and enhanced practice skills

- To develop critically reflective practitioners who can demonstrate excellent communication skills, creativity and emotional resilience and deal with the complexities and challenges of the social work task.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/hsc/hsc

Health and Social Care

With over 20 years’ experience as a trusted provider of health and social care training and education, we are committed to providing our students with the knowledge and skills to become valued members of the community and to the continuing professional development of qualified professionals.

We are at the forefront of research and innovation in the field of health and social care and our teaching staff have both practical know-how and academic expertise.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Law and Policy for Social Work (20 credits)
Human Growth and Development For Social Work Practice (20 credits)
Social Theories for Professional Practice (20 credits)
Skills, Methods and Models of Social Work Practice (20 credits)
Research Minded Evidence Based Practice (10 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Power, Politics and Change in Social Work Practice (10 credits)
Transition towards Professional Social Work Practice (10 credits)
Managing Complexity in Social Work Practice with Adults, Children and Families (20 credits)
Social Work Dissertation (60 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Law and Policy for Social Work (20 credits)
Human Growth and Development For Social Work Practice (20 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Social Theories for Professional Practice (20 credits)
Skills, Methods and Models of Social Work Practice (20 credits)
Research Minded Evidence Based Practice (10 credits)

- Year 3:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Power, Politics and Change in Social Work Practice (10 credits)
Transition towards Professional Social Work Practice (10 credits)
Managing Complexity in Social Work Practice with Adults, Children and Families (20 credits)
Social Work Dissertation (60 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Assessment methods will include essays, case studies, presentations, observation reports, portfolios and practice documentation.

Career options

Graduates will be prepared to work with and support families and individuals who have challenging and complex needs, in a range of settings.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0009/645462/Social-Work-PG-Dip-MA-P12654.pdf

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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The aim of this course is to enable you to become confident practitioners in the fast-changing world of social work. With an emphasis on professionalism, professional judgement, relationship focussed work and protection, you will develop the capability to work across all areas of the social work profession. Read more

Why take this course?

The aim of this course is to enable you to become confident practitioners in the fast-changing world of social work. With an emphasis on professionalism, professional judgement, relationship focussed work and protection, you will develop the capability to work across all areas of the social work profession.

We endeavour to recruit students to our health and social care courses who have the right values base and demonstrate appropriate behaviours. We embed the values of the NHS Constitution throughout our admissions processes and they are an essential part of the curricula. Find out more about the values we look for.

For further health information, please see our additional health information page.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Be taught by experts at the forefront of research and who are fully informed on developments within the social work field
Experience broad ranging teaching methods including simulation and workshops in preparation for, and during, two respective work placements
Work alongside service users and carers using creative and contemporary techniques in social work practice
Put your learning into action during your practice placements

What opportunities might it lead to?

This Master's course is a professional qualification for social work approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). It will provide you with the opportunity to acquire advanced knowledge, theory, values and skills to work with vulnerable individuals and groups in society.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Social work practice
Community healthcare practice
Practice teaching
Voluntary organisations

Module Details

This Master's degree is a professional qualification for social work approved by the Health Care Professions Council (HCPC). It will give you the chance to acquire the knowledge, theory, values and skills to work with vulnerable individuals and groups in society. It will also enable you to develop the flexibility to work in any sector of social work – children and families, mental health, disabilities, vulnerable adults, or within a wide range of voluntary and independent organisations providing services to people who are homeless, who misuse substances, who are in the criminal justice system or who have experience of the care system. You will study the following units:

Year One

Social Work Theory and Context
Evidence-based Practice and other approaches to research
Empowering service users and promoting inclusion
Practice Placement 1
Legal and Policy Frameworks for Social Work (1)

Year Two

Legal and Policy Frameworks for Social Work (2)
Project - Writing for a publication
Practice Placement 2
Critical Practice across Service User Groups

Programme Assessment

You will be allocated a personal tutor, who will support, advise and assist you throughout the course. We use a variety of teaching methods including lectures, group work and other classroom strategies, group and creative work with service users and carers, and simulation work and skills workshops. To see examples of how we work closely with service users, visit http://www.swig.uk.net.

Assessment is primarily based on written, oral or portfolio evidence and is measured against HCPC Standards of Proficiency and the Professional Capability Framework developed by the College of Social Work. There are no formal written examinations.

Student Destinations

On successful completion of the course you will be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC), enabling you to work as a professional social worker in a wide variety of statutory, voluntary and independent sector agencies. This course will enable you to develop the flexibility to work in any sector of social work – children and families, mental health, disabilities, vulnerable adults or in the wide range of voluntary and independent organisations providing services to people who are homeless, misuse substances, are in the criminal justice system or who have experience of the care system.

Roles our graduates have taken on include:

Social worker
Care manager
Persistent offender coordinator
Family support worker
Housing adviser

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This unique programme is aimed at international and UK students with an interest in international social work, community development, and comparative social policy. Read more

This unique programme is aimed at international and UK students with an interest in international social work, community development, and comparative social policy. The programme examines advanced knowledge about the theory and practice of social work and community development in an international context. You will be encouraged to develop a critical understanding of global social issues (such as social exclusion, poverty, environmental degradation, and disasters) and relate this knowledge to developments in their own country. You will be equipped with the skills to engage in research and to apply research findings effectively in practice. The programme includes a two-week field-based learning opportunity in a social work or community work agency. The dissertation provides space for you to carry out research on an aspect of social or community work in the UK. 

Durham University is a world leader in international social work and community development research, theory, and practice. Our social work team has edited the prestigious International Social Work journal and works closely with social work’s key international organisations - , the International Association of Schools of Social Work, .the International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW), and the International Council of Social Welfare (ICSW). Its Programme Director also represents social work at the UNFCCC and other UN bodies.

Course structure 

You will study in a small group of international students, and also alongside UK students on postgraduate social work and research degree programmes. This will give you plenty of opportunities to share knowledge and experience in addition to your learning through lectures, presentations and seminars.

The MA consists of five core modules, designed to give you an understanding of social work as it is practiced in the UK, and a thorough grounding in research methods and their application. You will also choose two specialist modules according to your particular professional interests. Finally, you will undertake a research project and write a dissertation. To achieve the Master's degree, you must accumulate a total of 180 credits, as listed below.

Core Modules

International Social Work (30 credits)

  • International social work: Debates and controversies.
  • The history of international social work.
  • International institutions and social work theories and practices.
  • Legislative underpinnings to international social work
  • Internationalised Social problems 

Social Work: Context and Practice (30 credits)

  • Contemporary social work and social welfare in a diverse society
  • Construction of social problems
  • Ethical frameworks for social practice
  • Contemporary social work theories and practice.

Community Development and Organising (15 credits)

  • Critical analysis of communities
  • Origins, history, and theoretical approaches to community development
  • Contemporary forms of community development practice
  • Community and public policy.

Practitioner Research and Dissertation (60 credits)

  • Uses of research in social welfare policy and practice
  • Approaches to social research
  • Ethical issues in research
  • Literature reviewing, sampling, data collection and analysis methods.

Field Based Learning (15 credits)

  • Social work practice
  • Comparative theory/practice approaches
  • Social and community work organisations
  • Practice based pedagogies

Note students are required to pay for travel costs to and from their fieldwork practice placement.

Optional Modules

These are subject to staff availability. In previous years, typical modules offered were:

Youth Policy and Practice (15 credits)

  • Youth policy in the UK
  • Origins, development, and theoretical underpinnings of youth work
  • Critical overview of contemporary youth work practice Key forms of intervention.

Management in Community Settings (30 credits)

  • Critical analysis of a range of perspectives which have informed the management oforganisations in community settings, including those relating to:
  • Development of understanding in effectively managing and developing these organisations in the current context to increase their effectiveness in achieving their aims in ways that are consistent with professional values
  • Personnel management
  • Physical resource management
  • Financial management
  • Strategic management
  • Change management.

Policy Related and Evaluation Research (15 credits)

  • Relationship between theory and empirical research in evaluation
  • Defining and measuring outcomes
  • Case study analysis
  • Poster presentation and participatory evaluation.

Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits)

  • Spreadsheets and data analysis
  • Populations, sample data and sampling distributions
  • Point estimates and confidence intervals
  • Significance tests, cress-tabulations, and Chi-Square tests
  • Correlation and linear regression.

Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

  • Sampling and sample design, questionnaire design
  • Numerical taxonomy and cluster analysis in practice
  • Methods for representing complex systems.

Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

  • Introduction to theory and research practice in qualitative methods
  • Ethnography and grounded theory
  • Group discussions
  • Data analysis and management processes.

Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice (30 credits)

  • Apply theories of crime and justice to topical issues
  • Theory and practice of criminal justice
  • Analysis of contemporary politics
  • Governance of criminal justice.

Crime, Violence and Abuse (30 credits)



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Summary. This course offers students knowledge, skills, understanding and reflective practice in the field of community youth work and an opportunity to gain a professional qualification in community youth work. Read more

Summary

This course offers students knowledge, skills, understanding and reflective practice in the field of community youth work and an opportunity to gain a professional qualification in community youth work. The programme has three main aims: 1. The development of effective professional practitioners in community youth work. 2. The delivery of a postgraduate programme that will challenge, develop and engage critically in issues that relate to the field of community youth work through informed and innovative methods of teaching and learning. 3. To enhance the professional skills and employability of community youth workers.

About

The programme will initially be studied in part-time mode. This is the second revalidation of this programme offering potential students a unique opportunity to gain a professional qualification, validated by the North South Education and Training Standards Committee for Youth Work (NSETS) and an academic award of the University of Ulster. Students will follow six modules for the postgraduate diploma in community youth work for the professional endorsement by the NSETS leading, if desired, to the award by dissertation of a MSc in Community Youth Work. Students will be required to have the postgraduate diploma before embarking on to the Masters level. The modules are arranged to meet the criteria set out by NSETS and to meet the needs of students training to become professional workers. All students will follow a placement module which is supervised by a University tutor and a practice teacher. The placement is an opportunity for CYW staff to assess at first hand the development of professional practice based on the monitoring student skills through reflective practice. The course maintains both academic and professional coherence through the use of modules that underpin fundamental concepts of community youth work, i.e. the context of youth. The module has been specifically designed to facilitate the needs of a postgraduate programme and will be taught exclusively for this cohort. Past experience suggests that it is important to build a strong collegial group early on in the programme. While it is envisaged that other modules will be taught alongside the undergraduate course the first module is explicitly designed to create a sense of belonging for the new intake.. This is followed by more applied modules, i.e. principles and practice of youth work; communities in focus and the in-situ/exigency placements at the beginning of year. After the placement students will follow the principles and practice of youth work: leadership, management and supervision module preparing them for management roles in youth work and the critical thinking and professional development module to consolidate their learning and to focus on areas that they may wish to research or develop further including inter-professional collaboration. The modules have been designed to facilitate the underpinning knowledge, skills and understanding needed to become a professional community youth worker. The modules are: (i) THE CONTEXT OF YOUTH WORK; (ii) PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF YOUTH WORK; (iii) COMMUNITIES IN FOCUS; (iv) IN-SITU AND EX-AGENCY REFLECTIVE PLACEMENTS; (v) PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF YOUTH WORK; SUPERVISION, LEARDERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT; (vi) CRITICAL THINKING AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT. Award of postgraduate diploma in community youth work with professional endorsement; (i) DISSERTATION Award of MSc in Community Youth Work.

Work placement / study abroad

This assessed practice period placement(s) focuses on youth and community work in the context of an agency. Students will build on learning from the taught modules and their own experience. They will use the placement to reflect and evaluate their practice in four disparate but inter-related areas: 1. The development of self; 2. Understanding individuals; 3. The role and function of the group; 4. The agency context within a given community. The students will therefore be offered opportunities to experience; a. Informal education work with young people and adults, individually and in groups, b. Youth service and community agencies, c. Different types of youth and community work provision. d. A reflective and evaluatory experience with supervisory support by a professionally qualified in-situ practice teacher.

Students are expected to: develop appropriate programmes of social education within the constraints of the agency. - develop their 'helping' and 'enabling' skills. - gain experience in terms of the management of practice. - gain an understanding of a specialist agency which focuses on a particular target group (ex-agency placement). - link the practice experiences with theoretical concepts. - record and evaluate their work.

Professional recognition

Endorsed by the North/South Education and Training Standards Committee for Youth Work (NSETS) (JNC Recognised) for the purpose of professional qualification.

Career options

Due to the nature of this postgraduate programme being initially about professional endorsement the career opportunities for students is already set, i.e. they are in employment. The development of a new module, ‘Critical thinking and professional development’ is an indication of the staff teams belief in enhancing the understanding of continuing professional development through evidence- based practice and the development of critical thinking. The students on the programme will benefit from reflecting on their profession and indeed looking at how it is viewed in relation to other professions. One can assume, if past history about the course is anything to go on, that those who gain the PGD in CYW will be highly skilled, knowledgeable and highly employable. For others the course itself if part of their professional development as many students have been working the in the field without professional training.



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1st in Scotland for social work in The Complete University Guide 2015. Do you want a career that is stimulating, rewarding and makes a positive contribution to society? If so a postgraduate diploma/MSc in social work could be for you. Read more

Introduction

1st in Scotland for social work in The Complete University Guide 2015.
Do you want a career that is stimulating, rewarding and makes a positive contribution to society? If so a postgraduate diploma/MSc in social work could be for you.
At Stirling University social work education is committed to progressive social change through teaching, research and an active involvement with practice. We believe in a social work profession defined not only by its function but also by its values and integrity.
We promote an understanding of social work which is informed by social justice and human rights, a profession that acknowledges the links between 'public issues' and 'private troubles' and seeks to address both. We value social work practice that has prevention at its heart and recognises the importance of collective approaches, actively engaging with and learning from user movements.
On the Postgraduate Diploma/MSc Social Work course at the University of Stirling you will be taught by a team of qualified social workers including world leaders in their research field and academics who continue to work in practice alongside their University role. You will enjoy the benefits of smaller class sizes (23-55) with creative approaches to teaching and assessment as well as detailed feedback on your progress. You will experience contributions to teaching by people who have used social work services and carers and on your practice placements, will be supported and assessed by accredited Practice Teachers and Educators. We will help you qualify as a social worker who is knowledgeable, skilled, analytical and ethical in your approach to working with individuals, families, groups and communities.

Accreditation

Successful completion of this course will mean students are then eligible to be registered, by the Scottish Social Services Council, as a qualified social worker.
The MSc is awarded on satisfactory completion of a dissertation undertaken at the end of the Diploma course. Both degrees are recognised throughout the UK.

Key information

- Degree type: Postgraduate Diploma, MSc
- Study methods: Full-time, Campus based
- Duration: 22 months
- Start date: JanuarySee
- Course Director: Joanne Westwood

Course objectives

This course provides you with an integrated academic and professional course which develops the intellectual and practice skills necessary for professional practice as a social worker.
Recent dissertation titles are: End of life assistance from a social work perspective; The use of communication tools when working with people with dementia: a practitioner perspective; Foster carers' experiences of support; Does employment have an impact upon the social inclusion of people with learning disabilities?

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20

For more information go to English language requirements http://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

REF2014

In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Careers and employability

- Career opportunities
Successful completion of the Postgraduate Diploma or the MSc provides the ‘licence to practise’ as a qualified social worker registered with the regulatory council of the country in which they work. The qualification is recognised throughout the UK and for work in community-based teams, hospitals, day and residential centres and voluntary agency projects. In Scotland and Northern Ireland it is also the qualification for social work in prisons and criminal justice teams.
The nature of the work is extremely varied and there is the capacity to move between different work settings throughout your career. Currently, over 80 percent of students find social work jobs within six months of graduating.
The nature of the work is extremely varied and there is the capacity to move between different work settings throughout your career. Currently, over 80 percent of students find social work jobs within six months of graduating.

- Employability
The MSc/PG Dip in Social Work Studies is a professional course which requires students to undertake along with their academic modules, two practice placements. It is in these placements that our students gain experience in direct work with service users and learn essential transferrable skills for their future employment within the social work profession. During the course they also gain experience of presentation skills, research methodology, as well as being taught specific and relevant skills to prepare them for employment in a variety of social work settings.

- Industry connections
We are fortunate to have strong connections with our partner agencies within a 60-mile radius of the University, who contribute to the teaching on the course and who also provide a range of placements across both statutory and voluntary social work services. Examples of these are: the local authorities in Forth Valley, Fife, and Perth & Kinross, and voluntary agencies such as Barnardos and Multi-Cultural Family Base.

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The Durham MSW is a 21 month programme engaging students with the knowledge, skills and values that underpin social work practice with individuals, groups and communities. Read more

The Durham MSW is a 21 month programme engaging students with the knowledge, skills and values that underpin social work practice with individuals, groups and communities. Academic study is complemented by two practice placements with different service user groups. Practice experience of statutory interventions with children and families or ‘vulnerable adults’ is complemented by opportunities for innovative practice in the voluntary and independent sectors in areas such as family justice, homelessness, substance use, domestic violence, sexual exploitation, community interventions and self-advocacy. With strong involvement of service users, carers and practice partners throughout the programme, the MSW provides strong foundations for practice in any field of social work.

Local and global perspectives 

Our approach to social work education reflects the connections between individuals, their families and communities. We offer you a broad foundation for social work practice underpinned by the global definition of social work and emphasise the connections between local and global issues in social work. Shared learning alongside postgraduate students studying International Social Work and Community Development, and Community and Youth Work, provides valuable opportunities for the exchange of ideas and experiences.

Excellent employment prospects  

There is very strong demand for Durham MSW graduates by employers in local authorities and non-government organisations regionally, nationally and internationally. Durham MSW graduates have been able to transfer their registration to other countries including Australia, Canada, Scotland and the USA. 

Course Structure

The MSW is structured around seven modules designed to meet the academic and practice learning requirements for a degree in social work.

Year 1 

  • Social Work in Practice (40 credits): Understanding perspectives of service users and carers; social exclusion; social policy and law for social work 
  • Social Work in Context (40 credits): Human growth and development through the life course, disability and mental health; social work theories and methods; working in organisations
  • Professional and Personal Development (30 credits): Principles, values and ethics; critical thinking and evidence-based practice; skills development; Interprofessional working 
  • Social Work Practice 1 (50 credits): 70-day practice placement in a partner agency.

Year 2

  • Research in Social Work (45 credits): Research and evaluation design and methods; ethical issues in social welfare research; dissertation
  • Advanced Social Work (30 credits): Advanced application of theories and methods; critical analysis of social work policy; protection and empowerment of vulnerable children, young people and adults
  • Social Work Practice 2 (70 credits): 100-day practice placement. 

Course Learning and Teaching

The MSW is full-time, starting in early October and continuing over 21 months. The programme does NOT run to university terms. There are approximately 12 weeks of vacation, including public holidays, during the course of the whole programme. In Year 1 the first four months are spent developing the necessary knowledge and skills to prepare you for your first practice placement of 70 days. In Year 2 you undertake a 100 day placement with a different service user group and in a contrasting setting where you will gain experience of statutory interventions in social work. Practice placements provide the opportunity to develop a range of skills set out in the Professional Capabilities Framework. You also extend your skills in linking theory, policy and practice, and undertake a research dissertation.

Assessment

A range of assessment methods is used including essays, observation studies, project reports, case studies, group and individual presentations. Knowledge and understanding of social work law and policy is assessed in a take away exercise. Before embarking on the first placement, you will undergo a practical assessment of your communication skills in readiness for direct practice. Practice placements are assessed by critically reflective accounts of work with individuals, groups or communities and by your practice educator who provides regular supervision and observes your practice. You are also expected to seek, and reflect on, feedback from service users and professional colleagues. Research in Social Work is assessed through a 10,000 word dissertation.

Practice Placements

Placements normally take place in the north east region and students are required to travel independently to these.



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The Master in Geography aims at analysing the spatial extent of natural resources and the processes that shape and change the landscape. Read more
The Master in Geography aims at analysing the spatial extent of natural resources and the processes that shape and change the landscape. The core of the programme concerns the environmental problems arising from the use of resources such as water, soil and minerals.
With a Master in Geography, you will be prepared to analyse environmental challenges. You will be able to participate and lead work at all organisational levels in relation to use, protection and planning of natural resources in a global context. The study programme integrates ecological understanding with fundamental understanding of the governing processes shaping resources of the Earth.

Studying Geography you will work with questions like:

How can we preserve our natural ressources?
How do climate changes affect our nature and our environment?
Which elements damage our ecosystem and how?

FIELD WORK

The study programme is characterised by laboratory work, relevant field work and excursions. During your studies, you have plenty of opportunity to experience field work as you get the possibility to go out in nature and collect data for your experiments and projects.

RATED FOR EXELLENCE

Aalborg University is rated for excellence in the QS-ranking system. Aalborg University has received five stars certifying the world-class position of the university based on cutting-edge facilities and internationally renowned research and teaching faculty.
Within Engineering and Technology, Aalborg University ranked as number 71 in the world in 2014.

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The Department of Social Work has a longstanding tradition of providing excellent social work education and training and has produced a wide range of research that has been highly influential in the development of social work practice. Read more
The Department of Social Work has a longstanding tradition of providing excellent social work education and training and has produced a wide range of research that has been highly influential in the development of social work practice.

The MSc Social Work is an accelerated programme for applicants who already have a first degree and want to embark on a career in social work; the course will fully prepare you for a professional career in the statutory or voluntary social care field.

This Masters degree runs in close partnership with local social care agencies and local authorities based in inner and outer London boroughs. The course is a combination of a taught and practice curriculum, where you will undertake two fieldwork placements in addition to the College-based teaching over the two years.

We welcome overseas and self-funding students.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/socialwork/coursefinder/mscsocialwork.aspx

Why choose this course?

Students have said the following about this course:
- “Lectures are delivered by experienced practitioners and leaders in the Health and Social Care field.”

- “The teaching is of a high standard and lectures are interactive with opportunities for small group activity.”

- “Staff are enthusiastic, knowledgeable and professional.”

- "There is excellent support for mature students, especially those with childcare and family commitments.”

- “I am a final year student and proud to be a postgraduate student at Royal Holloway.”

Department research and industry highlights

Since its inception, the department has developed a reputation for delivering high quality research across a range of areas by engaging with matters of public concern. In the Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) 2008 45% of the department’s quality profile was ranked 3-4*.

- A team of researchers in the department recently conducted a major study into leadership in health and social care services.

- Two members of staff are currently completing a small-scale study into decision-making in the field of child and family welfare.

- The department hosted the Centre for Trauma and Abuse studies and continues to maintain strong links with this centre.

- The department runs the most successful Graduate Diploma in Child and Family Studies in partnership with 28 London Boroughs and has been designated a Centre of Excellence.

Course content and structure

The MSc in Social Work is a two-year course that runs over two academic years, and is based at Royal Holloway’s Egham campus. The course is full time and students are expected to attend from 9am - 5pm, both in College and while on placement. The course integrates theory, research, policy and practice in social work, and the academic and practice programmes run concurrently.

- Course structure and organisation
In the first year you'll attend College four days a week during the first term. In the second term you are on placement (70 days) from Monday to Thursday and in College on Fridays. The placement continues in the third term. There are occasional block weeks on placement and Recall Days when you need to attend College.

In year two you'll attend College on Mondays and Tuesdays and are on placement (100 days) the rest of the time. Again there are occasional block weeks on placement and Recall Days when you need to attend College. Please see information about placements for more details regarding the practice element of the course.

- First year courses
Practice Learning 1: preparation for practice. .

Social Policy for Social Workers: gain an understanding of social policy issues related to social work.

Human behaviour in the social environment: gain knowledge about psychology in relation to working with service users.

Child observations: develop observation skills that are relevant to social work with all service user groups.

Theories and knowledge for Social Work practice: gain knowledge of theories and approaches used to understand how to work with service users.

Law for Social Work: learn about law relating to working with services users.

- Second year courses
Critical Social Work: issues relating to working with service users and about different service user groups e.g. adult and child safeguarding, assessments, working with asylum seekers, substance misuse, working with resistant service users.

Choose one of three optional seminars depending on your area of interest: mental health, child and family welfare or vulnerable adults.

Practice Learning 2 - critical reflection: students explore and reflect upon their practice in seminar groups.

Research methods: Students learn about research methods in preparation for their dissertation.

Understanding and working in organisations: learn about the legal obligations, structures and cultures within organisations and how these impact on policy, procedure and practice.

- Support
Students are provided with one to one support from: Academic Tutors, who'll support you throughout the course; Placement tutors and Practice Educators; Dissertation Supervisors in the second year.

Royal Holloway provides range of wider services that support students including the Educational Support Office, Student Financial Advisor, Counselling Services, Students’ Union and Careers Service.

On completion of the course graduates will have advanced knowledge of:
- sociology, psychology, social policy and law and their application to social work practice

- the contribution and application of social research to social work theories and practice

- the range of statutory, voluntary and private welfare organisations within social work agencies and in health, housing and educational environments

- the range of theories and methods needed for effective social work practice

- the social and individual origins of a typical range of problems presented to social care agencies

- values and ethics relevant to social work practice

- the significance of inequalities and difference in working with organisations and social service users

- the significance of cultural diversity and anti discriminatory practice in working with organisations and social service users.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations, presentations and a dissertation. Students are also required to successfully complete one 70-day and one 100-day practice-learning placement.

Employability & career opportunities

The MSc in Social Work qualifies graduates for careers in statutory and voluntary social work. Qualified social workers can continue their professional/academic development through taught post-qualifying programmes or research opportunities within the department. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

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This course focuses on the complex issues and challenges of 21st century social work. At Dundee, we have a range of expertise and experience, including interdisciplinarity (a specific and unique strength of the programme), leadership, research, values and social work practice. Read more
This course focuses on the complex issues and challenges of 21st century social work.

At Dundee, we have a range of expertise and experience, including interdisciplinarity (a specific and unique strength of the programme), leadership, research, values and social work practice. We are particularly keen to establish links between theory and practice. Our modules also draw on experienced and knowledgeable guest lecturers both from the field and from academic research.

Why study Advanced Social Work Studies at Dundee?

The MSc in Advanced Social Work Studies will allow you to engage with advanced level social work theory and develop the knowledge base and enquiry skills required to understand and contribute to 21st century social work.

The course curriculum will encompass taught modules which require you to engage with ethical issues and dilemmas relating to social work. You will have the opportunity to critically engage with the challenges and opportunities of inter-professional collaboration and the role that organisational culture and change plays in the way social work is shaped and delivered.

The course will require you to develop and apply research skills and methods to social work issues in order to produce a Master’s level dissertation. This will allow you to explore and examine social work issues and contexts in order to develop new ways of thinking and understanding, and in turn seek to be transformative and impactful.

Who should study this course?

If you do not require a qualification to practise social work, but wish to enhance and develop your social work skills and knowledge at Master's level, this course is for you. Without the requirement for practice placements, the qualification can be achieved within one year.

If you are a postgraduate student wishing to develop a research profile, or to further your career in terms of practice or leadership, this course is also suitable.

How you will be taught

At the University of Dundee, we emphasise the development of autonomous and self-directed learning, with support and guidance through structured personal tutor and module leaders. Our approaches include:

Lectures
Seminars
Group based discussions
Enquiry and action learning – collaborative research and problem solving.
Collaborative group inquiry activities (including inter-professional collaboration)
Online materials - discussion boards, academic activities, core materials and signposts to literature.
Independent and autonomous study and research which is supported and guided by module leaders and /or personal tutors.
Option for work based project to situate learning and research.

What you will study

Semester 1

Decision Making (30 credits) - which will provide a critical insight into contemporary social work issues around risk, values, ethics and social work law.

Research Methods for Professional Enquiry (30 credits) - which will provide students with a Master’s level knowledge of research skill.

Additionally students will have the opportunity to select one optional module from the MSc Social Work, MSc Community learning and Development or MSc Leadership and Innovation courses which will provide interdisciplinary learning and collaboration.


Semester 2

Research project (60 credits) relevant to Social Work which will be supported by a dissertation supervisor and ongoing collaboration with peers. This module will run the full length of the semester and the full dissertation will be completed during the summer.

Inter‐Professional Collaboration and Organisational change (30 credits) - joint module with Community Learning and Development and Leadership and Innovation students.

How you will be assessed

Assessment methods will include a combination of:

reflective and critical essays
oral presentations
research visualisations
research reports
Careers

Careers

The programme will prepare you for your chosen career in social work or a related field and gives you the flexibility and choice about how best to do this. The scope for applying advanced social work skills is vast - social workers are employed in a wide variety of settings, beyond what might traditionally be considered 'social work.'

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Our Master of Social Work (MSW) programme is a professional postgraduate qualification for those looking to practise as qualified social workers. Read more

Our Master of Social Work (MSW) programme is a professional postgraduate qualification for those looking to practise as qualified social workers.

The MSW qualification is recognised by the Scottish Social Services Council and The Health and Care Professions Council, and those who successfully complete the programme are eligible for registration as a social worker.

You’ll gain a fundamental understanding of the theory and practice that underpins all work in the field, splitting your time between theoretical learning on campus and practical work in various learning environments.

The programme is approved by the Scottish Social Services Council, complies with the Scottish Requirements for Social Work Training and enables you to meet the Standards in Social Work Education and the Key Capabilities in Child Care and Protection. It is also recognised as a professional qualification in social work across the world, including the United States and Canada.

Programme structure

You will study over two years, with periods of practice learning in both years. You will complete six courses in your first year and three in your second year, at the end of which you will present your dissertation.

First year courses:

  • Social Work in Communities
  • Social Work with Individuals and Families
  • Understanding Care and Control in Social Work
  • Working with Self and Others 1: Skills, Theories & Methods
  • Doing Social Work Research
  • Professional Social Work Practice 1

Second year courses:

  • Working with Risk, Trust and Complexity in Social Work
  • Professional Social Work Practice 2
  • Dissertation

Work placements/internships

You have periods of practice learning in both first year and second year.

Career opportunities

Successful completion of our MSW programme qualifies you to practise as a social worker.

For full details please see the MSW Accreditation information on School of Social and Political Science web site.

Many of our MSW graduates go on to work across a range of diverse settings in social work practice, training, research, government and in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

You will also develop a range of highly transferable skills, such as communication and project management, which can be applied to roles in any field.



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Professional Practice and Work Based Learning Studies courses are especially designed for those that want to develop their expertise within their current profession. Read more
Professional Practice and Work Based Learning Studies courses are especially designed for those that want to develop their expertise within their current profession. Your existing work will become the subject of your studies to enable you to work more effectively as a professional practitioner in your field. If you are self-employed or work in an organisation, paid or unpaid and in any employment sector, these work-based courses enable you to gain qualifications through your work.

Making use of Middlesex’s innovative work-based approach to learning your course of study will enable you to enhance your effectiveness in your current work role whilst simultaneously working towards your qualification. Middlesex work based learning courses are used by leading employers in the UK and internationally as they combine individual development with organisational and professional learning. Our courses in professional practice enable you to build upon existing higher education level study and professional qualifications to further your development and make an impact in your professional area. Our courses in Work Based Learning Studies take as the starting point your learning from experience and can be used to provide highly original and customised qualifications. The level of customisation is even reflected in the title of the qualification, e.g. MA Work Based Learning Studies (Leadership and Knowledge Management).

Our expertise is in supporting you to make the most of your potential in a rapidly changing and highly competitive knowledge driven economy. Professionals across a wide span of areas such as administration, construction, education, financial services, health, maritime, policing, retail, transport have already successfully used Middlesex work based learning. Take charge of your learning and career development by making Middlesex Work Based Learning work for you!
Depending upon your previous experience and learning, your course of study can be constructed to lead to MA/MSc Postgraduate Diploma or Certificate qualifications.

Professional Practice and Work Based Learning Studies courses are primarily supported through our on-line virtual learning environment, which means that you can gain your Masters degree or other qualification without having to find significant additional time to attend the University in person. However, there will be on-campus group based induction and workshop sessions available for all students to support your studies. In addition, on-line induction and workshop sessions will be held for those who cannot attend in person.


Benefits:

Enhance potential for career progression
Develop transferable work-based analytical and research skills
Develop expertise within your chosen field
Gain academic recognition for existing skills
Improve professional effectiveness
Use your existing work as the subject of your study
Flexible study that builds on your current work and/or professional practice

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Master of Social Work (MSW) programs prepare graduates for advanced professional practice in an area of concentration. Read more
Master of Social Work (MSW) programs prepare graduates for advanced professional practice in an area of concentration. The MSW program will prepare UAEU graduates to enter the job force as specialized practitioners, accepting leadership roles within the areas of health/mental health, criminal justice, applied research, policy analysis, community education, schools and in the planning and provision of social services in other areas. The Master of Social Work consists of 30 credit hours of specialized course-work and practicum for students with a Bachelor degree in Social Work (BSW). The MSW program also welcomes students with a bachelor degree in disciplines other than social work. However, for these students, the program of study will consist of foundation courses (30 credit hours) in year 1 and specialization courses (30 credit hours) in year 2 for a total of 60 credits hours.

Program Objectives

‌•Practice in accordance with social work values and ethics that acknowledge the history and laws of UAE society.
‌•Practice in a culturally competent manner that promotes quality of life and well-being, human rights and social and economic justice, with diverse Arab, Muslim and expatriate populations of the UAE and GCC.
‌•Use, produce and apply research knowledge to enhance their skills for practice with the diverse Arab/Muslim families, children, individuals, groups, organizations, communities, and societies of the UAE and GCC.

Program Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this program, students will be able to:
‌•Use communication/facilitation skills ethically in building empowering relationships with the diverse populations in the UAE, the Arab Gulf and internationally.
‌•Employ skills for influencing policy formulation and change in communities that advance social and economic justice.
‌•Apply knowledge and leadership skills in managing projects, and working with community groups and/or organizations to address populations at risk and engage in community resource development
‌•Demonstrate skills in quantitative/qualitative research design, data analysis, program evaluation, practice evaluation, community needs assessments, and knowledge dissemination.
‌•Apply the knowledge, values, ethical principles, and skills of a generalist social work perspective to practice with diverse social systems in the UAE, the Arab Gulf and internationally.
‌•Analyze social policies at a local, regional, national, and international level.
‌•Evaluate existing research studies and one’s own practice interventions.
‌•Function within the structure of organizations and service delivery systems and seek necessary organizational change.

Program Structure

Required Courses (21.00 hours)

‌•Models and Methods of Social Work Practice
‌•Leadership & Supervision
‌•Intermediate Social Work Research
‌•Field Practicum II
‌•Directed Readings

Elective Courses - 9CH (3 courses) from a specialization track

‌•Health/Mental Health
‌•Social Work Practice with At Risk Students
‌•Social Work & Traditional Help Seeking Behavior
‌•Social Work in Behavioral Health Settings

‌•Criminal Justice/Substance Abuse
‌•Social Work in Criminal Justice Settings
‌•Social Work & Addictions
‌•Techniques in Rehabilitation Counseling

Bridge Program

For Students without the BSW degree (30.00 hours)
‌•Social Welfare Policy and Services: A worldview
‌•Human Behavior and Social Environments I
‌•Human Behavior and Social Environments II
‌•Research Methods for Social Work Practice
‌•Integrative Seminar
‌•Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families
‌•Social Work Practice with Groups
‌•Social Work Practice with Communities and Organizations
‌•Field Education I

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Communication for Development is an interdisciplinary field of study and practice, combining studies on culture, communication and development and integrating them with practical fieldwork. Read more
Communication for Development is an interdisciplinary field of study and practice, combining studies on culture, communication and development and integrating them with practical fieldwork. It explores the use of communication – both as a tool and as a way of articulating processes of social change – within the contexts of globalisation.

In this programme, where the form of study strives to be conducive to the course content, progression lies in the group dynamic process as well as in the coursework itself. The multidisciplinary nature of the subject means that the same content should provide in-depth knowledge for students with different backgrounds. One major point of this pedagogical approach is to bring together different experiences. The group diversity should allow students to deepen their knowledge of their own major as well as gain a sufficient overview based on the academic backgrounds and practical experiences of other students. This will allow them to be able to work both interdisciplinary and transcultural in their future professions.

This is Communication for Development

What is the relationship between development communication and the emerging, influential nexus of communication for social change, and where does social communication fit in?

Regardless of what one calls it, communication and media strategies have been utilised in development cooperation for well over sixty years. From an early emphasis on mass media in agricultural extension work, communication for development has grown to encompass a wide array of approaches and methodologies, and has gradually increased in stature to become a key driver of contemporary debates in development. Initially, communication interventions were largely oriented around the use of mass media, and existed within a principally modernising, top-down and technocratic paradigm. Among other complex forces at play, the New World Information and Communication Order (NWICO) debates in the 70s and 80s and the rise of critical and alternative approaches to development stretched the definition of the field. In addition to mass media, practitioners began to evaluate the need for richer interpersonal communication approaches that highlight the importance of power and culture in the success of development initiatives.

Dialogue, participation and the sharing of knowledge

Some of the most significant changes to global development cooperation have come about as a result of this critical field of study. As a discipline, Communication for Development embraces a broad range of functions and practices which centre around dialogue, participation and the sharing of knowledge and information, all with a view to creating empowerment and sustainable social change. Development communication is no longer an emerging discipline but one which has established itself as an integral part of development planning. Labelled part science, part craft and part art, its multidisciplinary nature draws on aspects of anthropology, sociology, psychology and the behavioural sciences, and its implementation depends on flexibility, creativity and an understanding of communication processes. An awareness of the role media and communication have to play in development cooperation and diversity management have transformed the way development is perceived, mapped and implemented, and the field has pioneered some of the most ground-breaking improvements in global development undertakings. As the recent surge in new communications technologies demonstrates, it is not the tools themselves that make good communication, but rather a rich and theoretically informed understanding of the political, social and cultural contexts in which media and communications interventions occur.

Communication for Development as a Field of Study

Despite the fact that every year vast amounts of money are donated to developing countries, the chasm between the ‘haves’ and the ‘have-nots’ continues to widen as billions of people around the world continue to live without running water, sanitation, adequate nutrition or access to basic education.

While the poor and the marginalised have always been at the centre of development, they have been the subjects rather than the objects of communication as traditional development practices overlooked a fundamental truism: that the poor, themselves, are often the best experts on their needs. Marginalised communities, historically denied access to communication tools and channels, have traditionally been passive bystanders to their so-called development as top-down, one-sided mass communication programmes delivered information without taking into account the very important specificities of context – the cultural norms and beliefs, knowledge and folklore of target populations, and how these impact the uptake of information and the potential for social change. Due to this lack of participation by target communities, most development programmes failed to achieve their goals, and a dramatic shift in paradigm was necessary to improve the efficacy and sustainability of development cooperation methods.

Social processes rooted in the communities

This shift towards participatory social processes, rooted in the customs and traditions of communities themselves, is the most fundamental premise of communication for development. Participatory processes aim to utilise cultural specificity as a tool rather than an obstacle, starting at ‘grass-roots’ level and developing methods that are grounded in, and take local and indigenous knowledge seriously. These processes comprise an interchange of knowledge and information, empowering individuals to make choices for themselves, and place communication at the forefront of the planning process while at the same time feedback and consultative processes ensure that communication is on-going and efficacy is maximised. Through the creation of ‘bottom-up’ processes, individuals become fundamental initiates in development schemes, a factor which is strongly linked to their long-term sustainability.

ComDev addresses the gap

As the divide between the ‘connected’, developed world and developing countries grows, so does the need for new, innovative methods for addressing global inequality increase, and Communication for Development is the field devoted to the study and implementation of these processes. The power of media and the potential of Information Communication Technology (ICT) to educate and to address global crises such as the spread of HIV have led to exciting and creative innovations in development cooperation, and this dynamic field continues to grow and develop. As globalisation and the development of ICTs change world markets and pose an increasing threat to developing countries and their more vulnerable communities, practitioners schooled in contemporary mass communication theories and concepts have become a vital part of development across the globe.

Why choose Malmö University?

Despite the wider acceptance of community-driven and participatory approaches to development by large multilateral and bilateral development agencies, the field continues to struggle for institutionalisation, and to be granted sufficient resources by managers and funding agencies.

Paradoxically, the role of media and communication in development cooperation has seen a strange turn after the first World Congress on Communication for Development, held in Rome in 2006 and organized by FAO, the World Bank and the Communication Initiative, in partnership with a broad strand of important organisations in the field. The summit in Rome managed to mobilize almost a thousand participants from research and practice, government and non-government. It was supposed to mark the definite break-through of the science and practice of ComDev. Instead, what happened had more the character of an implosion of the ComDev field, which only recently is gaining a new momentum. Today, we are however actually seeing a long series of new institutional initiatives, in the world of ComDev, both in practice and university curricular development. At university level, new MAs in ComDev have developed in places like Albania, South Africa, Kenya, Spain, Paraguay, the UK and Colombia. The field is finally becoming more significantly institutionalised in the world of academia, although it is still grappling with finding its identity between media and communication studies on one side, and cultural studies, political science and not least development studies on some of the other sides. The interdisciplinarity embedded in ComDev, combined with the outlined processes of globalisation, mediatisation and the proliferation of bottom-up agency are all contributing to put ComDev at a cross-roads.

Internet-based distance-learning

Malmö University was the first to pioneer the use of an Internet-based distance-learning platform to make the education available to students globally. With its mix of online collaboration and discussion, paired with webcast seminars the entire programme can be conducted over the internet. This enables students from all corners of the globe to participate, work in their own time and attain the education. The use of the Live Lecture function in seminars makes students, equipped with microphones and webcams, able to participate in lectures and discussions online, resulting in a ‘virtual classroom’. This way, students in New Zealand and South Africa can communicate and work on projects with classmates in Fiji and India, sharing ideas and working together towards the common goal of improving development practices.

ComDev fosters teamwork

As a relatively new degree, students embarking on this specialised programme have the advantage of being schooled in the latest theories and philosophies, while being given the opportunity to apply these theories and concepts to real-life projects and problems in human development through individual assignments and group projects. Geared as it is towards individuals working in the fields of journalism, media and development, ComDev fosters teamwork and facilitates the exchange of knowledge and perspectives among participants.

Final project and field-work

The final project has always been an important element of the programme. Over the past 10 years, students of ComDev have had the opportunity to apply what they have learned theoretically to a broad range of contexts and scenarios in the process of completing their projects, and field-work has been conducted in India, South Africa, Mozambique, Kenya, Croatia and Sarajevo, to name but a few. During their project work, students have the opportunity to explore a particular research area or topic of concern at a deeper level, and the accompanying written dissertation provides a fantastic opportunity to consolidate and further the knowledge and skills gained during the education. This project work also demonstrates a solid foundation in research, which will aid those students who wish to continue into doctoral level studies. In choosing the topic for their projects, students are free to ‘think outside the box’, and employ innovativeness and creativity to their field-work endeavours, and project works have included documentaries, short films, photo essays, and a wide array of dissertations presented in interesting and original ways. Students are also encouraged to join forces and collaborate on projects, as teamwork is regarded as a vital part of effective development cooperation. For a list of all the Project Works to date, see the ComDev portal, under ‘History’.

Career opportunities

The global demand for media and communication skills continues to increase as organisations such as UNICEF have made it a policy to hire ComDev practitioners, not only for international development schemes, but for diversity management and other forms of transcultural cooperation.

The UN Inter-Agency Round Table of Communication for Development has played a big role in institutionalising the field by bringing together UN agencies and international partners to discuss and debate the broad, challenging and essential role of Development Communication has to play in worldwide development cooperation. The 12th United Nations Inter-Agency Roundtable on Communication for Development had as its theme “Advancing the Rights of Adolescent Girls through Communication for Development”. For example, UNICEF has recently revisited their C4D strategy and work, calling for a stronger linkage with the universities and building widespread capacity within their own global organisation. UNESCO equally recognises the importance of communication, and has included it as part of its mandate and vision, integrating communication in its policies, budget and hiring policy, reflecting the growing need for skilled communication professionals.

Former ComDev students end up working in a truly diverse variety of settings. Some of the UN agencies placing hiring ads seek ‘communication for development’ practitioners by name. More commonly, though, practitioners are working in positions such as information or communications officer, where their roles may include a variety of tasks, not all of which would be strictly considered ComDev. Some practitioners are able to make a living as consultants working on projects with NGOs and CSOs, bilateral aid programs (such as Sida or DFID), or with the UN and World Bank. Since skills, knowledge and aptitudes gained through an education in ComDev are relevant to a variety of job functions within the development sector, you may also find alumni working in a range of allied positions, such as conflict resolution positions or as a learning and outcomes coordinator, to name but a few.

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This course is designed to meet the requirements of the new regulatory frameworks of the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and The College of Social Work (TCSW). Read more

This course is designed to meet the requirements of the new regulatory frameworks of the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and The College of Social Work (TCSW).

Course details

The course has been approved by HCPC and has been endorsed by TCSW as having met the social work professional criteria. The TCSW kitemark of quality has been awarded to fewer than half of the qualifying social work degree programmes in England. The programme provides you with the skills and knowledge to meet the challenges and developments of the social work environment. The master’s route offers a rapid and challenging way of obtaining a sought after professional qualification as well as providing the enhanced academic achievement and status which comes with a postgraduate award. All students participate in the same core curriculum so that you are equipped to undertake any role suitable for a newly qualified social worker.

What you study

In Year 1 you are introduced to the core skills and values of social work and what it means to be a professional social worker. You are also introduced to the legal and policy background which governs how social work is carried out. 

You then learn important contextual information which social workers need including human development, how people react to difficult life events and life changes and more about the nature of social problems faced by different groups in society.

Year 1 and Year 2 contain modules called Think Family which give you essential learning in working with all adults and children and prepare you for your placements. You must demonstrate evidence of readiness for practice before you begin the first placement* of 70 days which takes place from June to September. 

You also study organisational issues and are challenged to think about how you can make the best issue of supervision and contribute to design and improvement of services. 

In your final year you undertake a further social work placement of 100 days in a different setting from the first and also write a dissertation, with support, based around a real practice issue. You use published literature and data to develop ideas for how practice can be improved in your chosen area. 

The strong organisational and service improvement dimension to the master’s programme helps you develop quickly in your field. 

*Some placement providers may require you to drive with access to your own vehicle. If you have any questions about this please contact us before applying.

Course structure

Core modules

  • Final Project
  • Introduction to Social Work
  • People, Environment, Welfare and the Law
  • Practice Placement 1
  • Practice Placement 2
  • Research for Practice
  • Think Family 1
  • Think Family 2
  • Working in Organisations and Management of the Self

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

Where you study

You study at Teesside University on our Middlesbrough campus. You undertake adult and children placements in the statutory and voluntary sectors across the region.

How you learn

Teaching methods include lectures, seminars, small group work, micro-teaching skills and professional/practice placements.

How you are assessed

Assessment approaches including essays, small group and individual presentations, dissertation based around service improvement, reports, and assessment of skills in interacting with service users and carers. The assessments have a strong focus on social work practice and preparing you for the workplace. You are also assessed on your practical social work skills in two placements.

Employability

Work placement

Achievement of MA in Social Work gives you eligibility to apply for registration as a social worker with the Health and Care Professions Council. The programme includes two assessed placements in social work settings. The placements will be in different settings with different service user groups and at least one placement will normally be in a statutory setting or in a placement where statutory work can be experienced

Career opportunities

A master’s degree in social work can lead to a long career as a professional social worker with adults or children. There are many job opportunities in local authority social work departments as well as voluntary sector organisations and increasingly new types of employers such as social enterprises and the private sector.

Master’s degree students are especially attractive to employers because of the skills which they have achieved as postgraduates. A master’s degree can help graduates to advance quickly in their careers. The degree provides graduates with transferable skills including report writing and interpersonal skills. These skills can be applied across a range of graduate employment opportunities.



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The track Work and Organizational Psychology concentrates on sciencebased solutions to human problems in work and organizational settings. Read more
The track Work and Organizational Psychology concentrates on sciencebased solutions to human problems in work and organizational settings. It aims to understand how to achieve each of the following objectives: optimizing performance, improving processes and relationships, enhancing fairness and equity, and increasing subjective well-being.

The European Network of Work and Organizational Psychology (ENOP) developed a reference model and standards for a curriculum in Work & Organizational Psychology. According to the ENOP model, the main areas to be considered are Work, Organizational and Personnel Psychology. The track Work and Organizational Psychology adheres to these standards as far as possible, and offers a study program that deals with the most important topics in Work & Organizational Psychology at the individual, task, group and organizational level.

The program

Work and Organizational Psychology is a field with both a strong scientific base and an applied orientation. Thus, the program connects psychological theory and application whereby theoretical concepts are shown to lead to useful interventions. In each of the areas of Work, Organizational and Personnel Psychology, the program seeks to develop two types of knowledge and skills: explanatory and intervention.

Explanatory refers to theory devoted to the explanation of (the context of) human behavior and to diagnostic skills in work, organization, and personnel fields. This will prepare you to assess, diagnose, explain, and interpret phenomena and processes in the areas of work, organizations and personnel.

Intervention refers to change theory and intervention skills in work, organizational and personnel settings. This will prepare you to plan, implement, monitor, and evaluate changes and interventions to improve behaviors, situations, and social processes in the fields of work, organizations, and personnel. This type of knowledge also prepares you to design new models, methods, and tools. The two types of knowledge and skills will be integrated as much as possible within the various courses.

Career Perspective Social Psychology

With an MSc in Social Psychology, you can work in positions at an academic level in research, communication, policy, consulting, human development and organization development in private, semi-private or governmental organizations. With this MSc, you are able to conduct theoretical and applied research to advance scientific knowledge in the areas of social, economic and work and organizational psychology. You are also able to contribute to many applied fields, because you will be able to develop tools and interventions to solve practical problems in the areas of social, economic and work and organizational psychology and to research the effectiveness thereof.

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