• St Mary’s University, Twickenham Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
  • New College of the Humanities Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
Ulster University Featured Masters Courses
Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
Queen Mary University of London Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
"field" AND "archaeology"…×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Field Archaeology)

  • "field" AND "archaeology" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 280
Order by 
Training the next generation of archaeological pioneers. Read more
Training the next generation of archaeological pioneers

Why choose this course?

The MA in Field Archaeology offers a perfect blend of theory and practice, equipping you with wide-ranging, advanced practical skills, while giving you a deep theoretical knowledge and understanding of the logistical challenges, legal requirements and ethics involved in archaeological fieldwork. It is both challenging and rewarding.

York has been called the ‘heritage capital of the UK’. Here, we have routine contact with local, national and international leaders in archaeology and heritage management. We work closely with our neighbours at the Council for British Archaeology, English Heritage and Natural England, as well as local commercial units including York Archaeological Trust. You will also meet visiting lecturers of national standing, including John Oxley, the most experienced Local Authority Archaeologist in the UK, and Patrick Ottaway, formerly Fieldwork Director of York Archaeological Trust and now a respected archaeological consultant. You will also:
-Develop wide-ranging advanced field skills
-Build a deeper understanding of the theoretical, legislative and ethical context of archaeological fieldwork
-Study among a community of practitioners that is unrivalled in the UK
-Gain work experience with nationally significant public and private organisations
-Develop skills and knowledge essential for varied archaeological careers and research
-Learn from leading figures in archaeological research and fieldwork
-Receive close personal mentoring from experienced, well-connected staff

The MA in Field Archaeology is a flexible course, devised to meet demand for professional training in the UK and worldwide. It will give you a thorough knowledge of how, and why, archaeological fieldwork has arrived at its current state and acquaint you with the key methods employed in modern fieldwork, analysis and dissemination. It will enable you to think strategically about project design and tactically about project implementation.

Who is it for?
The course aims to ground you in European, and particularly UK, archaeology, so it is well suited to graduates of Archaeology. However, graduates in History, Geography and related disciplines often bring complementary perspectives that are greatly valued by both teachers and students. Also lessons and perspectives from Europe are relevant to archaeological fieldwork contexts worldwide. Individuals with some practical experience who wish to develop their careers by advancing their appreciation of the wider context of archaeology will also benefit from this course.

What can it lead to?
The MA in Field Archaeology aims to turn out not just archaeological practitioners, but leaders and creative thinkers with the imagination to advance the discipline, as well as their own careers. Some of our graduates go on to become project officers, curators and managers in the heritage industry. Others progress to further study, including doctoral research.

Placement

MA Field Archaeology students have a unique opportunity to gain practical work experience in a professional field environment with one of the many leading archaeological organisations based in and around York. You will work alongside experienced professionals on projects that enable you to gain new skills, as well as put into use those skills gained during your taught courses.

Aims
-To provide experience of organising archaeological fieldwork and interpreting results within a professional environment.
-To consolidate knowledge and understanding of data gathering or analysis as developed in one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
During your placements you will get involved with one or more of the following:
-Develop a practical understanding of how archaeological fieldwork is planned and carried out in an integrated way.
-Gain detailed knowledge of how ecofactual or artefactual assemblages might be identified, quantified, analysed and interpreted.
-Become familiar with the ways in which field archaeology is organised and administered, and of the pressures it is subject to, working with a local government organisation or national organisation with offices in York.

Placement opportunities
Although the organisations providing placements vary from year to year, according to availability, those regularly offering such opportunities include City of York Council, the Portable Antiquities Scheme, the York Archaeological Trust, AOC Archaeology and various other commercial archaeology units.

Careers

By the end of your MA in Field Archaeology you will have:
-Developed an awareness of the organisational and legislative context within which fieldwork operates in the UK
gained a detailed knowledge of the varied techniques of site evaluation used today
-Become aware of the practicalities, and problems, of implementing archaeological projects and understood the implications of this for strategy and project design
-Grasped the processes of analysing stratigraphic, spatial, artefactual and palaeoecological material, the objectives of this work, and how it is managed
-Surveyed the range of mechanisms for synthesising, archiving and disseminating the evidence generated by fieldwork
-Developed your understanding of how the profession operates in “the real world”, through work placements and field visits
-Developed your ability to gather and organise information and arguments in a critical and independent manner, through writing essays and producing projects
-Undertaken a piece of independent research on a topic within field archaeology
-Developed your presentational skills through the delivery of seminar papers on a range of diverse topics

The practical skills and theoretical knowledge gained on the course are applicable to a wide range of archaeological careers, as well as further study and research.

Course postgraduates have gone on to pursue research degrees or take up managerial positions working for museum, conservation and archaeological services and for local councils, national authorities, field units and heritage bodies. Others have set up their own archaeological businesses, both within the UK and in other countries. Some of the organisations now employing our students include:
-Historic England
-English Heritage
-The National Trust
-Natural England
-Commercial archaeological units
-York Archaeological Trust
-The Council for British Archaeology
-National Park services
-UK and overseas museum services
-Local Authorities
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Portable Antiquities Scheme
-Churches Conservation Trust

Read less
The Core Archaeology course introduces current debates in archaeological theory and the history of archaeological thought, as well as archaeological methods (ranging from the study of prehistoric exchange to bio-archaeological techniques to artefact studies, quantitative analyses and dating methods). Read more
The Core Archaeology course introduces current debates in archaeological theory and the history of archaeological thought, as well as archaeological methods (ranging from the study of prehistoric exchange to bio-archaeological techniques to artefact studies, quantitative analyses and dating methods). Area option courses examine the archaeology of a particular region of the world (such as South Asia or Europe) in detail. Students are encouraged to choose a third module from the range of MPhil options on offer in the Division of Archaeology to complement their specific interests (e.g., heritage, science, material culture, etc). All module choices must have the approval of the module's instructor and the MPhil in Archaeology Coordinator.

Students may choose to specialise in any of the following options:

- Archaeological Heritage and Museums
- Archaeological Science
- Archaeology of the Americas
- Egyptian Archaeology
- European Prehistory
- Medieval Archaeology
- Mesopotamian Archaeology
- Palaeolithic and Mesolithic Archaeology
- South Asian Archaeology

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsarmpmar

Course detail

Students electing the Archaeological Heritage option will take three taught modules:
1. The Socio-politics of the Past
2. Museums: History, Theory, and Practice
3. Management of the Archaeological Heritage. This course concentrates on issues of differentiation of interpretation.

The topics are all of academic importance and the teaching focuses on a theoretical understanding of the issues involved, with practical examples used as case studies. The aim is to educate you within this expanding field and to activate further research.

Students choosing the Archaeological Science option will take:
1. Archaeological Science
2. Practical Application of Scientific Methods modules
3. One other module offered by the Division of Archaeology (chosen in consultation with the supervisor and MPhil Coordinator).

This course covers a broad range of scientific archaeological approaches with geo- and bioarchaeological foci, from theoretical, methodological and practical points of view. A series of recurrent case studies is used to introduce the questions, techniques and ideas applicable in each archaeological situation. In addition, this MPhil equips students with analytical skills in archaeological science.

Format

All MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology take a Research Skills Module and write a dissertation (15,000 words maximum). Students choosing Archaeology of the Americas, Archaeology of Egypt, European Archaeology, Medieval Archaeology, Mesopotamian Archaeology, Palaeolithic and Mesolithic Archaeology, or South Asian Archaeology take:

1. the Core Archaeology course
2. the appropriate area option course
3. any other module offered by the Division of Archaeology (in consultation with the supervisor and MPhil coordinator).

The assessed components of the three selected modules each represent 15% of the final mark. The assessed components of Research Skills module represents 5%, while the dissertation counts for 50% of the final mark.

Assessment

- The dissertation is an extended piece of independent, original research. Students work with their supervisor to formulate a dissertation project, carry out research and write it up. The topic of the dissertation has to be approved by the Faculty Degree Committee. The dissertation is of maximum 15,000 words (excluding bibliography and appendices) and is due at the end of August; it counts as 50% of the student’s final mark.

- Students taking the MPhil in Archaeology are usually required to produce between 3 and 6 assessed essays depending on their chosen course of study and the modules they select. The essays are between 3000 and 4000 words and are submitted in Michaelmas, Lent and Easter Terms.

- Students taking the MPhil in Archaeology are required to sit written examinations for some modules.

- Attendance at the relevant Research Skills Workshops is required of all MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology. MPhil students submit a 2000 word research proposal and give a presentation to teaching staff and peers which form the assessed part of the Research Skills module and are worth 5% of the overall MPhil degree.

Continuing

MPhil students wishing to continue to the PhD in Archaeology are required to achieve a High Pass mark of 68 overall and no less than 68 in their dissertation, and to obtain the support of an appropriate supervisor. In some circumstances additional academic conditions may be set to ensure appropriate skills, such as language competence, are in place prior to admittance on the PhD programme.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are many different sources of funding available to support UK/EU and international students at the Division of Archaeology but full scholarships for MPhil students are highly competitive. The Division of Archaeology enters exceptionally strong MPhil candidates for Gates Cambridge, CHESS and AHRC scholarships and scholarship schemes administered by the Cambridge Trust. The Division of Archaeology also administers several funds which aim to support Archaeological fieldwork, Egyptology and Assyriology at MPhil level and will endeavour to support students in obtaining funding from University and external sources. For further information about funding opportunities at the Division of Archaeology consult the Division website: http://www.arch.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate-funding or contact the Graduate Administrator: .

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
The Public Archaeology MA at UCL is a unique programme in a rapidly growing sector. Read more
The Public Archaeology MA at UCL is a unique programme in a rapidly growing sector. It provides students with an understanding of the different means of communicating archaeology to the public, and of the real-world political, educational, social, economic and moral/ethical dimensions of public archaeology from a global perspective.

Degree information

Students are introduced to the range of areas in which archaeology has relevance to the wider world, and develop an understanding of how archaeology is communicated, used (and misused) in the public arena. The flexible programme structure allows students to design a theoretically based or practically based degree depending on each individual's interests and needs.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of a core module (30 credits), optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core module - students are required to take the following module:
-Public Archaeology

Optional modules - you are then able to choose further optional modules to the value of 60 credits. At least one of these must be made up from the list below of modules recommended for this degree programme. The other 30 credits may also come from this list or can be chosen from amongst an outstanding range of other Master's programmes offered at the UCL Institute of Archaeology.
-Antiquities and the Law
-Applied Heritage Management
-Archaeology of Modern Conflict
-Archaeology and Education
-Art: Interpretation and Explanation
-British and European Prehistory: Neolithic to Iron Age
-Cultural Heritage and Development
-Experimental Archaeology
-Managing Archaeological Sites
-Managing Museums
-Museum and Site Interpretation
-Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Foundations
-Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Current Issues

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars discussions, practical demonstrations, and field trips to museums and archaeological sites and monuments around the UK. It features a series of distinguished guest lecturers with extensive first-hand experience in the archaeology, museum, cultural and heritage sectors. Assessment is through essays, project reports and the dissertation.

Careers

Some graduates of the programme go on to PhD studies while others pursue careers in professional organisations associated with the archaeology, museum, cultural and heritage sectors. Students benefit from the practical real-world insights and contacts within these sectors that the programme offers. Career paths in these sectors include the growing fields of education and interpretation in museums and heritage sites; policy and research jobs in key national organisations such as English Heritage and Arts Council England; and the growing interest in public archaeology by commercial archaeological units. The growth of Lottery-funded heritage projects also offers extensive opportunities for public archaeologists.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Curatorial and Collections Assistant, Ben Uri Gallery
-Executive Assistant, Watts Gallery
-Senior Archaeologist, Museum of London Archaeology
-Strategic Development Intern, National Museum Of the Royal Navy
-Archaeologist, Ministry of Culture and Sport

Employability
Graduates of the Public Archaeology MA have a distinct set of skills and knowledge that equips them for work across the archaeology, heritage and museum sector. This includes an in-depth understanding of the structure of the sector and its socio-economic, political and cultural contexts, but also a very practical appreciation of public understanding and engagement with the past. These strengths are reflected in the diversity of career paths amongst graduates of the Public Archaeology MA programme, in archaeology, museums, the heritage industry and academia.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study.

Its outstanding archaeological library is complemented by University College London's main library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries.

UCL is located in central London, within walking distance of the British Museum and the British Library. Students benefit from London's many museums, galleries and other archaeological spaces, but in particular have easy access to UCL's own museums and collections, which form a resource of international importance for academic research.

Read less
The Archaeology MA is an intensive induction programme on current archaeological theory and interpretive trends which equips students to undertake research in their chosen field. Read more
The Archaeology MA is an intensive induction programme on current archaeological theory and interpretive trends which equips students to undertake research in their chosen field. The flexible programme of study serves as an excellent expansion of undergraduate studies or as a self-designed foundation for further postgraduate and professional work.

Degree information

The programme provides a wide-ranging introduction to archaeology as a comparative, anthropologically-informed, and socially-situated discipline. Students develop critically aware perspectives on archaeological practice and research processes and gain an in-depth understanding of approaches to the collection, analysis and interpretation of archaeological data. The programme is extremely flexible, with a wide choice of options available allowing students to tailor the programme to their own interests.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules - all students are required to take the following:
-Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Foundations
-Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Current Issues

Optional modules - students choose to follow further optional modules up to the value of 60 credits from an outstanding range of Master's programme options available at the UCL Institute of archaeology. Some of the most popular choices include:
-Aegean Prehistory: major themes and current debates
-Ancient Italy in the Mediterranean
-Archaeologies of Modern Conflict
-Archaeology of Buddhism
-Archaeology and Education
-Archaeology of Hunter-Gatherers from the Emergence of Modern Humans
-Archaeometallurgy: Metallic Artefacts
-Aztec Archaeology: Codices and Ethnohistory
-Beyond Chiefdoms: Archaeologies of African political complexities
-British and European Prehistory: Neolithic to Iron Age
-Funerary Archaeology
-Interpreting Pottery
-Making and Meaning in Ancient Greek Art
-Making and Meaning in Ancient Roman Art
-Maya Art, Architecture and Archaeology
-Medieval Archaeology: Select Topics and Current Problems
-Prehistoric Stone Artefact Analysis
-Society and Culture in Ancient Egypt
-The Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of the Near East: The Emergence of Villages and Urban Societies
-Rock Art Studies: Theories, Methods and Management

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The core module is seminar based, and the sessions are interactive, with an emphasis on student participation and critical discussion. The optional modules are delivered through seminars, lectures, practicals, laboratory sessions, tutorials, and site and museum visits, as appropriate for specific modules. Assessment is through essays, oral examination and the dissertation.

Careers

Some recent graduates of the programme have gone on to PhD studies while others have pursued an incredibly wide range of professional careers both within and beyond archaeology. Recent graduate career destinations include: excavator for a private archaeological contractor, education officer, and intern at a national museum. Several students each year normally continue on to PhD studies at UCL.

Top career destinations for this degree
-Doctoral Researcher, Graduate School of Human Development in Landscape
-Head of Corporate Legal, Fidelity
-Freelance Archaeologist, Murray Archaeological Services
-MPhil/PhD Archaeology, University College London (UCL)
-Humanities Lecturer, Cirencester College and studying PTLLS (Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector), Cirencester College

Employability
As the most general of the MA/MSc programmes, the experience and skills acquired depends on the optional modules selected, and how those skills are developed through assessed work, developing experise in the archaeology of specific regions, periods or themes, or specific field, museum and analytical skills. All students acquire a detailed understanding of specific theoretical debates and the critical skills to evaluate existing arguments and interpretations and to develop their own research, develop a range of research skills, and design and carry through original research. Taught from a comparative anthropological perspective, understanding cultural differences, in the past and present, is fundamental.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and one of the most highly regarded centres for archaeology, archaeological science, cultural heritage and museum studies in Britain, highlighted by its top position in university assessments and National Student Survey results. It is one of the very few departments in the world undertaking research on a truly global scale. Its degrees offer an unrivalled variety of modules. The institute hosts events on many different aspects of archaeology and is linked to heritage organisations, museums and archaeological societies, providing an outstanding research environment for students.

It is truly international in outlook and membership, with students and staff from over 40 countries, and involvement in field research projects around the world.

UCL is located in central London, within walking distance of the British Museum and the British Library. UCL's own museums and collections constitute a resource of international importance for research.

Read less
The Archaeology MA. Cultural Archaeology pathway focuses on cultural interpretation in archaeology, both in relation to specific cultures/periods and current research themes. Read more
The Archaeology MA: Cultural Archaeology pathway focuses on cultural interpretation in archaeology, both in relation to specific cultures/periods and current research themes.

There are opportunities to specialise in a range of subjects, including material culture studies, funerary archaeology, British and European prehistory, and Greek and Roman archaeology.

It is an ideal foundation for doctoral research in all fields of cultural archaeology, as well as training in practical and research skills for careers in archaeology and heritage.

We offer the flexibility to upgrade from Certificate to Diploma level and from Diploma to Masters level during your programme as you develop your postgraduate studies. We also offer a Landscape Archaeology pathway on the Archaeology MA.

You will study three core modules:

Archaeological Theory, Method and Interpretation
Material Culture
Funerary Archaeology

In addition, MA and Diploma students choose three optional modules from a wide range of subjects including landscape archaeology, late prehistoric and early medieval Europe, Greek archaeology, ancient Egyptian society, empire and identity in the Roman world, Byzantine archaeology, GIS and spatial analysis, and field survey.

Research training is provided for all postgraduate students, and MA students put this into practice by researching a topic of your own choice for a supervised 15,000-word dissertation.

About the School of History and Culture

The programmes in the School of History and Cultures offer students enquiry based learning within a rich and diverse environment to stimulate debate and challenge conventional thinking.
The programmes derive from departments which are all excellently rated by the QAA both in teaching and research terms (Medieval History 5, Modern History 5 and African Studies 5*). Our staff publish widely, and we are developing and consolidating a strong, supportive research culture in the School.
We are extremely proud to announce in June 2016, that History at Birmingham was ranked the top research department in the country by the Research Excellence Framework (REF). The national REF exercise assessed research publications and the public impact of research carried out in all universities in the UK between 2008-2014. Our department had an impressive 45% of its research judged to be ‘world-leading’.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

Read less
Our MA in Aegean Archaeology offers a series of specialist modules on the archaeology of the Aegean and neighbouring regions, situated within a sophisticated and intellectually demanding theoretical context. Read more

About the course

Our MA in Aegean Archaeology offers a series of specialist modules on the archaeology of the Aegean and neighbouring regions, situated within a sophisticated and intellectually demanding theoretical context. We encourage a diachronic perspective and broad range of approaches and throughout the programme we will encourage and support you in the development of intellectual curiosity, critical thinking, problem-solving and independent judgement.

Your future

Each of our masters courses is designed to equip you with valuable employment skills and prepare you for your future career. If you’re seeking to move into an archaeology-related field from a different academic or employment background, our courses and supportive staff will help you to realise your ambitions and develop professionally.

Graduates from our MA and MSc courses successfully compete for some of the most sought-after archaeological posts in the world. Our courses help students to develop essential transferable skills, and upon graduation they are also in demand by a wide variety of employers outside of the sector.Many of our graduates decide to continue their studies, carrying out doctoral research in their chosen specialist field, equipped with a solid theoretical and practical grounding from which to develop their research.

World-leading expertise

The character and strength of research carried out by Sheffield’s Archaeology department is captured under the following broad themes. These reflect the range of our research and its cross-disciplinary, embedded nature:

Funerary Archaeology
Landscape Archaeology
Bioarchaeology
Medieval Archaeology
Cultural Materials
Mediterranean Archaeology

Specialist facilities

The Archaeology department is situated on the edge of the main campus, near to Sheffield’s city centre. The department houses world-class reference collections and facilities to support teaching, learning and research in a range of archaeological disciplines. Facilities include specialist lab space dedicated to teaching and research, dedicated study spaces, and a student common room.

Fieldwork opportunities

We offer you the opportunity to get involved in our research projects in the UK, Europe and further afield.

How we will teach and assess you

Our students come from all around the world and the content of our courses reflects this. You can expect a balanced timetable of lectures, seminars and practicals. Many of our masters courses also include a fieldwork or project work component. Our teaching staff are leading scholars in their field. Through their research and field projects they are active in generating new knowledge that feeds directly into their teaching.

Funding, scholarships and bursaries

If you accept a place on one of our courses, you may be eligible to apply for WRoCAH and University of Sheffield studentships. There are also a number of departmental and programme-specific scholarships available each year. See our website for details.

Core modules

Current Issues in Aegean Prehistory
Reinventing Archaeology
Research Design: Planning, Execution and Presentation
Dissertation

Indicative optional modules

Mediterranean Landscapes
Rethinking the Ancient Economy
Experimental Archaeology
The Archaeology of Cyprus
Introduction to Human Osteology
Ethnography in Archaeology: Materialising Culture: Agents, Things and Social Processes
Reconstructing Ancient Technologies: Ceramics
Archaeobotany
Archaeozoology

Read less
This programme offers a series of closely integrated core modules addressing key issues in medieval archaeology, enabling you to develop your experience and understanding of method and theory whilst developing your intellectual curiosity, critical thinking, problem solving and independent judgement. Read more

About the course

This programme offers a series of closely integrated core modules addressing key issues in medieval archaeology, enabling you to develop your experience and understanding of method and theory whilst developing your intellectual curiosity, critical thinking, problem solving and independent judgement. You will be encouraged to explore your own particular interests with a range of modules allowing you to focus on Anglo-Saxon, Scandinavian and later medieval, and Tudor archaeology in Europe.

Your future

Each of our masters courses is designed to equip you with valuable employment skills and prepare you for your future career. If you’re seeking to move into an archaeology-related field from a different academic or employment background, our courses and supportive staff will help you to realise your ambitions and develop professionally.

Graduates from our MA and MSc courses successfully compete for some of the most sought-after archaeological posts in the world. Our courses help students to develop essential transferable skills, and upon graduation they are also in demand by a wide variety of employers outside of the sector.Many of our graduates decide to continue their studies, carrying out doctoral research in their chosen specialist field, equipped with a solid theoretical and practical grounding from which to develop their research.

World-leading expertise

The character and strength of research carried out by Sheffield’s Archaeology department is captured under the following broad themes. These reflect the range of our research and its cross-disciplinary, embedded nature:

Funerary Archaeology
Landscape Archaeology
Bioarchaeology
Medieval Archaeology
Cultural Materials
Mediterranean Archaeology

Specialist facilities

The Archaeology department is situated on the edge of the main campus, near to Sheffield’s city centre. The department houses world-class reference collections and facilities to support teaching, learning and research in a range of archaeological disciplines. Facilities include specialist lab space dedicated to teaching and research, dedicated study spaces, and a student common room.

Fieldwork opportunities

We offer you the opportunity to get involved in our research projects in the UK, Europe and further afield.

How we will teach and assess you

Our students come from all around the world and the content of our courses reflects this. You can expect a balanced timetable of lectures, seminars and practicals. Many of our masters courses also include a fieldwork or project work component. Our teaching staff are leading scholars in their field. Through their research and field projects they are active in generating new knowledge that feeds directly into their teaching.

Funding, scholarships and bursaries

If you accept a place on one of our courses, you may be eligible to apply for WRoCAH and University of Sheffield studentships. There are also a number of departmental and programme-specific scholarships available each year. See our website for details.

Core modules

Heritage, Museum and Field: Archaeology in Practice; Ethnicity and Identity in the Early Middle Ages; Society and Culture in the Later Middle Ages; Reinventing Archaeology; Research Design: Planning, Execution and Presentation; Dissertation.

Indicative optional modules

Viking-Age Britain; Wars of the Roses to Elizabeth: The Archaeology of England 1455-1603; Introduction to Human Osteology; Archaeozoology; Two modules from the Department of History.

Read less
Study the field that brings past people to life. Past societies responded to and treated their dead in a huge diversity of ways, providing archaeologists with crucial insights into their workings. Read more
Study the field that brings past people to life

Why choose this course?

Past societies responded to and treated their dead in a huge diversity of ways, providing archaeologists with crucial insights into their workings. Funerary archaeology combines analysis of human remains with their archaeological context to take a truly interdisciplinary approach to studying both life and death in the past. The course at York offers the chance to develop skills in a range of different methods and techniques, but all centred on learning how to investigate death and burial in the past. The flexible nature of the course enables you to pursue your own particular period or methodological interests.
-Explore the varied archaeological and methodological approaches to funerary archaeology
-Work alongside internationally renowned specialists in a range of different periods and methodologies, by choosing either the MA or MSc route
-Gain ‘hands on’ experience of the analysis of human remains
-Learn through fieldtrips to local museums and relevant sites, e.g. the prehistoric monuments in the Yorkshire Wolds
-Choose modules to support your own research interests
-Use the latest techniques and equipment to build key practical skills
-Receive advice on developing your career and research interests from knowledgeable staff

What does the course cover?
The course focuses a range of topics from identity, landscape, social structure, commemoration and memory, ritual and belief, and the body. It covers attitudes and repsonses to death from the first evidence for the special treatment of human remains by homids up to the place of funeray rites in modern day societies, but with a particular focus on the interpretively challenging evidence from Prehistory. The analysis of human remains and their archaeological context are both taught in a flexible modular system, that allows you to tailor the course to your particular methodological or period interests.

The MA and MSc pathways offer a chance to specialise in different areas of Funerary Archaeology research. There is also an opportunity to learn valuable practical skills, which are essential for a wide range of archaeological and associated careers.

Who is it for?
This degree is for anyone interested in studying Funerary Archaeology from a range of perspectives, which are at the frontiers of both archaeological method and theoretical approach. It is primarily for students with previous experience in archaeology, anthropology, history, art history, biology or related fields, but students from a wide variety of academic backgrounds are encouraged.

What can it lead to?
The course provides a solid foundation for a wide range of careers and further studies. Postgraduate students at York have gone on to research degrees, academic or teaching careers, museum positions and archaeology posts at local councils, regional authorities, field units, and heritage bodies such as English Heritage.

Careers

By the end of the MA or MSc Funerary Archaeology course you will be able to:
-A thorough understanding of the history of research and the theoretical approaches to Funerary Archaeology
-A broad foundation in the key aspects of studying death and burial in the past
-Identify and record human bone assemblages
-Age, sex and assess pathologies from human bones
-Explore selected methods and periods in detail, through the option modules
-Critically evaluate published research and datasets
-Orally present knowledge and concepts
-Plan, design and undertake a piece of independent research

These skills and techniques are deployed widely in the field of archaeological research and exploration, but they are also valuable for a wide range of careers and further studies.

Many of York's Masters postgraduates go on to further research, academic or teaching careers, museum positions and archaeology posts at local councils, regional authorities, field units and heritage bodies. Some of the organisations our students now work for include:
-Archaeological field units
-Environmental archaeology
-Professional archaeologists – field and laboratory based
-Laboratory technicians
-Demonstrators
-University/research technicians
-Academia
-On-site osteoarchaeologists
-Medical humanities

Read less
Oxford is a wonderful place to study and it has unrivalled facilities. We have been running this part-time masters course successfully for thirteen years. Read more

Overview

Oxford is a wonderful place to study and it has unrivalled facilities. We have been running this part-time masters course successfully for thirteen years. The overwhelming response gained from our students is one of satisfaction, enjoyment and fulfilment. We have brought together a good balance of men and women, older and younger students, historic environment professionals and those with a personal or community interest in the subject. We have had some great field experiences and outstanding seminars. Although the coursework requires a solid commitment from you over two years, the course atmosphere is informal and friendly, and we aim to support every student with ideas, guidance and encouragement.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/msc-in-applied-landscape-archaeology

What the course offers

The MSc in Applied Landscape Archaeology is a part-time modular course over two years, leading to an Oxford University Postgraduate Degree in Archaeology. Students become fully matriculated members of Oxford University during their period of registration, and therefore also become a member of a college. The course is designed for the needs of students who wish to study part-time and this includes those who are in full-time employment. Those with a personal or professional interest in landscape archaeology are welcome to apply.

Landscape Archaeology is an increasingly popular and widely-understood concept. Using a multi-period systematic approach, it is concerned with understanding past human impacts on the resources, topography and environment of the whole landscape, from uplands to coasts, and from farmed landscapes to urban/industrial areas.

Many methods of research are being developed in landscape archaeology, including geophysical survey, digital mapping and remote-sensing techniques such as LiDAR. These take their place alongside fieldwalking, historic landscape analysis, aerial photography and selective excavation to provide an effective armoury of techniques for the researcher. Skills such as survey and resource assessment are becoming essential for anyone involved in the management of the historic environment. Effecive communication and presentation of the value and potential of the historic landscape is vital in the world of planning, tourism, outreach and education.

The course involves a combination of academic study and field practice - survey and geophysics form a central theme, and we enjoy the support of Bartington Instruments Ltd for this.

This course is designed to appeal to those who already have experience of studying archaeology (or a closely-related subject) at undergraduate degree or diploma level and who wish to expand their academic, practical and professional skills in landscape archaeology. With a strong (but not exclusive) emphasis on the archaeology of Britain, it focuses on the applications of research methods in varying landscape situations. The course format is flexible and enables students to pursue their own research interests leading to a 15,000 word dissertation.

College affiliation

All students studying for a degree (including the DPhil) must be a member of a college. A number of Oxford colleges accept applications from part-time postgraduates whereas others do not: please consult the graduate prospectus or enquire with individual colleges. The majority of part-time DPhil students in Archaeology have chosen to apply to Kellogg College and most of the tutors and lecturers are members of the College. Kellogg is dedicated to graduate part-time students and has developed a unique expertise in attending to the intellectual, social, IT and welfare needs of part-time, mature graduate students. If a college choice is not specified on your application, it will be automatically sent to Kellogg if places are still available there.

Course structure

The course is divided into two one-year modules, Year A and Year B, which are run in alternate academic years (from October to September):

Year B begins in October 2015
Year A begins in October 2016

All students attend both modules, but they may be done in any order depending on year of admission. Because the course is modular there is no advantage to one combination over the other. Students normally study two consecutive modules and this is regarded as the best way to experience the course. However, in exceptional cases, regulations permit a student to intermit between modules (by permission of the Board of Studies only).

Both one-year modules have one core paper and two advanced papers spread over three terms.

Year A:

- Core Paper: Method and Theory in Landscape Archaeology
- Advanced Paper (Artefacts and Ecofacts in the Landscape)
- Advanced Paper (Archaeological Prospection)

Year B:
- Core Paper: Managing Historic Landscapes in the 21st Century
- Advanced Paper (Digital Landscapes)
- Advanced Paper (Reading the Historic Landscape)
- Field Training Week

Instead of one advanced paper, students may choose to opt for a ‘flexi-placement’ comprising at least 14 days spread over approximately one year to be spent working at an organisation which is involved in an aspect of landscape archaeology. The Course Director will supply details of these.

The dissertation (15,000 words) is the student’s own project which develops throughout the course and is submitted at the end of the second module. It can be based on a piece of fieldwork, or a methodological or artefactual study. Each student will be assigned a tutor who will supervise their dissertation. A dissertation workshop is held each year to help students work together on this essential course element.

In addition, once every two years (in late June - early July of Year B) a compulsory field survey training week will take place. Each student will also have a series of tutorials with the course director and tutors; these may take place in person or on-line.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/courses/msc-applied-landscape-archaeology/

Read less
Study in the European heartland of medieval archaeology. The buildings, material culture and landscapes of York and the north of England offer unrivalled opportunities for the study and research of medieval archaeology. Read more
Study in the European heartland of medieval archaeology

Why choose this course?

The buildings, material culture and landscapes of York and the north of England offer unrivalled opportunities for the study and research of medieval archaeology. The Archaeology department in York was established as the first in the UK to specialise in medieval archaeology, and that legacy is evident today in the department’s concentration of medieval archaeologists. Their specialisms cover the entire medieval period, from the post-Roman era to early modern times.
-Study in the heartland of medieval archaeology in Europe
-Learn from leading archaeologists, specialising in every aspect of the Middle Ages
-Immerse yourself in the medieval community at the Centre for Medieval Studies
-Gain volunteering and work experience in the heritage sector
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including laboratories, archives and libraries
-Use the latest techniques and equipment to build key practical skills
-Receive careers advice from knowledgeable staff with valuable contacts in the academic and heritage sectors

What does the course cover?
The course focuses on the artefacts, landscapes, buildings and social, cultural and environmental contexts of medieval Britain and Western Europe. It covers the period from the end of the Roman Empire to the Reformation, and explores themes such settlement, trade and economy, religion, buildings and artefacts, social structure, ethnicity and identity, conquest and cultural contact, and methodological and theoretical approaches.

The flexible modular structure of the course means you can tailor your MA to suit your interests and goals. There is an opportunity to learn valuable practical skills, which are essential for a wide range of archaeological and associated careers.

Who is it for?
This degree is for anyone interested in studying the medieval period from a material perspective. It is primarily for students with previous experience in archaeology, history, art history or anthropology, but our students do come from a wide variety of academic backgrounds.

What can it lead to?
The course provides a solid foundation for a wide range of careers and further studies. Our students have gone on to research degrees, academic or teaching careers, museum positions and archaeology posts at local councils, regional authorities, field units, and heritage bodies such as English Heritage and the Portable Antiquities Scheme.

Careers

The MA in Medieval Archaeology enables you to:
-Study a broad range of issues in medieval archaeology at a general level
-Explore selected topics in detail, which may be drawn from both the early and later medieval periods
-Relate general research principles and skills to your studies of medieval archaeology in particular
-Develop an ability to gather and organise information and arguments in a critical and independent manner
-Undertake a piece of independent research on a topic within the field of medieval archaeology
-Develop written communication skills through essays and your dissertation
-Develop presentation skills through the delivery of seminar papers and a short lecture on your dissertation topic

The skills and knowledge gained on the course are applicable to wide range of archaeological careers, as well as further study and research.

Course postgraduates have gone on to pursue research degrees, academic or teaching careers, museum positions and archaeology posts at local councils, regional authorities, field units and heritage bodies. Some of the organisations our students now work for include:
-Historic England
-English Heritage
-The National Trust
-York Archaeological Trust
-The Council for British Archaeology
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Portable Antiquities Scheme
-British Museum
-Church of England
-Churches Conservation Trust
-Jorvik Viking Centre

Read less
This course is ideal if you want to deepen your understanding of the early history of the Mediterranean by systematically including the full range of archaeological data that sometimes complement and sometimes contradict the textual. Read more

About the course

This course is ideal if you want to deepen your understanding of the early history of the Mediterranean by systematically including the full range of archaeological data that sometimes complement and sometimes contradict the textual. It creates a strong platform for future doctoral research combining these approaches. You can specialise in early history (classical antiquity) or later prehistory (Late Bronze Age-Early Iron Age), but a diachronic perspective and broad range of approaches are encouraged.

Your future

Each of our masters courses is designed to equip you with valuable employment skills and prepare you for your future career. If you’re seeking to move into an archaeology-related field from a different academic or employment background, our courses and supportive staff will help you to realise your ambitions and develop professionally.

Graduates from our MA and MSc courses successfully compete for some of the most sought-after archaeological posts in the world. Our courses help students to develop essential transferable skills, and upon graduation they are also in demand by a wide variety of employers outside of the sector.Many of our graduates decide to continue their studies, carrying out doctoral research in their chosen specialist field, equipped with a solid theoretical and practical grounding from which to develop their research.

World-leading expertise

The character and strength of research carried out by Sheffield’s Archaeology department is captured under the following broad themes. These reflect the range of our research and its cross-disciplinary, embedded nature:

Funerary Archaeology
Landscape Archaeology
Bioarchaeology
Medieval Archaeology
Cultural Materials
Mediterranean Archaeology

Specialist facilities

The Archaeology department is situated on the edge of the main campus, near to Sheffield’s city centre. The department houses world-class reference collections and facilities to support teaching, learning and research in a range of archaeological disciplines. Facilities include specialist lab space dedicated to teaching and research, dedicated study spaces, and a student common room.

Fieldwork opportunities

We offer you the opportunity to get involved in our research projects in the UK, Europe and further afield.

How we will teach and assess you

Our students come from all around the world and the content of our courses reflects this. You can expect a balanced timetable of lectures, seminars and practicals. Many of our masters courses also include a fieldwork or project work component. Our teaching staff are leading scholars in their field. Through their research and field projects they are active in generating new knowledge that feeds directly into their teaching.

Funding, scholarships and bursaries

If you accept a place on one of our courses, you may be eligible to apply for WRoCAH and University of Sheffield studentships. There are also a number of departmental and programme-specific scholarships available each year. See our website for details.

Core modules

Greeks, Romans and ‘Others’ in the Ancient World; Rethinking the Ancient Economy; Reinventing Archaeology; Research Design: Planning, Execution and Presentation; Dissertation.

Indicative optional modules

Current Issues in Aegean Prehistory; Mediterranean Landscapes; Heritage, Museum and Field: Archaeology in Practise; Roman Italy and its Hinterland; The Archaeology of Cyprus; Funerary Archaeology; Archaeobotany; Advanced Archaeobotany; Archaeozoology; A module from the Department of History; Enhanced Languages Project (Modern Language Teaching).

Read less
This course gives you the opportunity to reflect on and investigate community archaeology in both theory and practice. During the course you will consider focussed case studies, theoretical perspectives and academic and applied research. Read more
This course gives you the opportunity to reflect on and investigate community archaeology in both theory and practice. During the course you will consider focussed case studies, theoretical perspectives and academic and applied research. You will be encouraged to engage with community archaeology in a range of local and national contexts, and to study a variety of archaeological projects and organisations. The course will help develop the knowledge, skills and networks that will assist you in your career.

Delivered flexibly through campus-based and online learning the course is designed for those already employed in the sector as well as those seeking to enter it. Studies are supported by a dedicated team of specialist tutors and a well-developed and resourced virtual learning environment. You will benefit from other facilities and resources, such as the University’s Archaeology Lab and our summer Archaeological Field School programme.

You will be studying at the cutting edge of community archaeology, gaining valuable practical experience via a range of case- or site-based studies. The course offers awards of Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or the full MA Degree in Community Archaeology.

By the end of the course, you will be fully equipped to progress onto a variety of careers in the field of community archaeology, or further study, having acquired an extensive repertoire of skills.

What you will study -

In your first year, you will study a Contemporary Issues module, followed by Archaeology and Communities, Professional Practice in Community Archaeology and Research Skills. Those studying part-time will take Contemporary Issues, and either Archaeology and Communities or Professional Practice in Community Archaeology.

During your second year, you will produce a Dissertation. Your Dissertation comprises the final module of the course for those completing the MA Degree. Students studying part-time move onto either Archaeology and Communities or Professional Practice in Community Archaeology, plus Research Skills.

If you are studying part-time students you will normally complete the MA Degree in your third year, undertaking the Dissertation module. This is the culmination of your studies and an opportunity to explore your interests in the heritage education field.

“So far, the course has been interesting and enjoyable. I especially like the fact that the course has been easy to fit around a full time job.” Claire, MA in Community Archaeology student

Assessment -

We use a wide range of different types of assessment throughout the course, including essays, impact reports, resource packs, research portfolios and a dissertation. We support you in this work through a mix of campus-based and at-a-distance teaching, with lectures, site visits and workshops, and also discussion and interaction via a virtual learning environment.

Please send your applications to the following address:

Admissions
Bishop Grosseteste University
Longdales Road
Lincoln
LN1 3DY

Read less
Through our Archaeology MPhil/ you will conduct original and advanced research into a specialist area of archaeology. Read more
Through our Archaeology MPhil/ you will conduct original and advanced research into a specialist area of archaeology. This is a perfect programme to advance your academic career in archaeology; you will also develop employability skills including project management, report writing, problem-solving, independent working, and research.

Our Archaeology MPhil programme research degree, conducted as supervised independent study, assessed through a single written document that is supported with a viva voce examination.

Both degrees involve the production of new knowledge through original research and advanced scholarship, exploring a field of academic study in detail. This involves detailed understanding of the methods, techniques and approaches needed to produce such knowledge, and the wider context of the subject of study.

These programmes are based in the School of History, Classics and Archaeology and cover a wide range of specialisms. Research supervision is available in the following periods and regions:

Later Prehistory

-Mesolithic/Neolithic transition in north-west Europe
-Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of Britain and north-west Europe
-Copper and Bronze Age in Italy and the Mediterranean
-Iron Age/Roman transition

Classical Archaeology

-Roman Britain
-Roman Europe and Mediterranean
-Roman urbanism
-Greek and Byzantine archaeology
-The Roman/medieval transition

Medieval and Post-Medieval Archaeology

-Early medieval Britain and Europe
-Byzantine archaeology
-Medieval and post-medieval landscapes
-Church archaeology, historic buildings
-Post-medieval archaeology, colonialism, slavery

Thematic research is also strong at Newcastle and research supervision is available in the following areas of enquiry:

Bodies and Identity

-Personhood and identity
-The archaeology of the body and mortuary archaeology
-Art and identity

Landscapes

-Landscape archaeology
-Ritual landscapes
-Historic landscape characterisation

Material Culture

-Ancient technology and economy
-Ancient metallurgy
-Artefact analysis and material culture studies

Read less
The Archaeology MA. Landscape Archaeology pathway will allow you to develop a thorough knowledge of current approaches to the investigation and interpretation of past landscapes. Read more
The Archaeology MA: Landscape Archaeology pathway will allow you to develop a thorough knowledge of current approaches to the investigation and interpretation of past landscapes.

There are opportunities to specialise in a range of practical techniques, digital landscape studies, and interpretative approaches in thematic and period/area landscape studies. This pathway is ideal for research preparation and as a basis for career development in archaeology and heritage.

We offer the flexibility to upgrade from Certificate to Diploma level and from Diploma to Masters level during your programme as you develop your postgraduate studies. We also offer a Cultural Archaeology pathway on the Archaeology MA.

You will study three core modules:

Archaeological Theory, Method and Interpretation
Landscape Archaeology
GIS and spatial analysis

In addition, MA and Diploma students select three optional modules from a wide range of choices. These can include field survey, virtual landscapes, digital cultures, funerary archaeology, material culture, and cultural studies ranging from European prehistory and Egyptology to Classical and Byzantine archaeology.

Research training is provided for all postgraduate students, and MA students put this into practice by researching a topic of your own choice for a supervised 15,000-word dissertation.

About the School of History and Culture

The programmes in the School of History and Cultures offer students enquiry based learning within a rich and diverse environment to stimulate debate and challenge conventional thinking.
The programmes derive from departments which are all excellently rated by the QAA both in teaching and research terms (Medieval History 5, Modern History 5 and African Studies 5*). Our staff publish widely, and we are developing and consolidating a strong, supportive research culture in the School.
We are extremely proud to announce in June 2016, that History at Birmingham was ranked the top research department in the country by the Research Excellence Framework (REF). The national REF exercise assessed research publications and the public impact of research carried out in all universities in the UK between 2008-2014. Our department had an impressive 45% of its research judged to be ‘world-leading’.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

Read less
The MA in Archaeology can be studied on a full-time and part-time basis. Read more
The MA in Archaeology can be studied on a full-time and part-time basis. Through sets of specialist modules, skills-oriented classes and workshops, and dissertation research it provides the opportunity to advance your skills and knowledge in archaeology with a view to progressing to doctoral level research, or to pick up vital transferable skills ready for working in commercial archaeology or in the wider employment market.

A unique feature of our MA is the provision of specialist strands within which students study, allowing them to gain breadth and depth in their understanding of particular periods, areas and topics. The current strands are:
-Prehistory
-Egypt / Ancient India / Near East (EAINE)
-The Classical World
-Medieval and Post Medieval Archaeology

By the end of this course, students will have had a chance to engage in advanced collection, management and analysis of archaeological data and materials; to develop a sound understanding of current archaeological approaches, concepts and practice; and to acquire specialist skills and knowledge related to their strand from our team of leading experts in the field.

Course Structure

The MA in Archaeology is a 180 credit course composed of several modules including two 15 credit modules aimed at imparting skills in archaeological research and practice, and two 30 credit specialist modules relating to the strands (usually one each, per term). A 20,000 word dissertation worth 90 credits is developed over the course of the second and third terms, and the summer, in consultation with an appointed supervisor, usually in the student’s strand.

In discussion with the department, students can take a 20 credit language module from the Centre for Foreign Language Study in lieu of the practical skills module. There is also the option of substituting a strand specialist module with another MA module on offer in the department, and in some instances, one offered by another department in the University. For example, in recent years students have substituted a strand specialist module with a full 30 credit course on Biomolecular and Isotopic Archaeology run by the department; and The Anglo-Saxon World, an interdisciplinary course run by English, History and Archaeology. The options available vary from year to year; students should consult with the department to check for updates periodically.

Part-time students are expected to complete the course in 2 years. Typically part time students complete the two 15 credit and two 30 credit modules in the first year and the dissertation in the second year.

Module Details

Research and Study Skills in Social Archaeology (RSSSA) – 15 credits
This module runs in Term 1 and aims to provide you with information and skills relevant to pursuing archaeological research for your MA dissertation and beyond. It combines thematic classes/seminars on key topics in archaeology with lectures and workshops introducing fundamental datasets and software applications for archaeology, and assisting the development of advanced visual and written communication skills.

Practical Research and Study Skills (PRSS) – 15 credits
This module runs in Term 2. Students select two from a range of options in hands-on ‘Master Classes’ led by professionals and academic experts, typically taught through short blocks of workshops. These classes provide the opportunity to develop professional capacity skills, assessed through ‘authentic’ assignments, such as reports one would be expected to produce as a professional in the fields of archaeology, museums and galleries or cultural heritage.

As noted above, it is possible to substitute PRSS with a 20 credit language module from the Centre for Foreign Language Study.

Research Topics – 30 credits
Research Topics are detailed courses focussing on particular periods, areas or themes, and are taught by the Department’s leading experts on their specialist topics. Teaching is typically delivered through a series of lectures and small group seminars/tutorials, usually over one term with sessions each week, but sometimes over the year with biweekly sessions.

Students typically chose two modules relevant to their strands, although in consultation with their academic advisor they may opt for a course which is not directly related to their strand. It is possible, as noted above, to substitute one of the Research Topic modules for another MA module run by the department. In consultation with the Department, it may also be possible to substitute a Research Topic for an MA module run by another department, or for a multi-departmental module.

Recent Research Topics can be found on the website: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=8407&title=Archaeology&code=F4K007&type=MA&year=2016#coursecontent

Dissertation
The dissertation (90 credits, c. 20,000 words) allows students to develop their own line of inquiry and in depth exploration of a topic of interest to them, with the guidance of a supervisor who is usually in their strand. This may be on a topic related to a Research Topic course they have followed, but may be drawn from previous or other interests. Support is available to guide students in designing their research projects and acquiring the skills necessary for carrying out research and analysis, both through the RSSSA programme and through academic advisors and dissertation supervisors

Learning and Teaching

A full summary of the programme's learning and teaching methods can be found on the website: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=8407&title=Archaeology&code=F4K007&type=MA&year=2016#learning

Other admission requirements

Applicants are requested to indicate their interest in the strand they wish to follow in the personal statement of their application. Prior knowledge of strand specific areas is not mandatory, but an ability to prove previous interest or experience in the strand area would be an advantage for your application.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X