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This Masters degree is delivered in partnership between Edge Hill University and Liverpool Women’s Hospital. It bridges the theory of fertility and assisted conception with practice related to the assessment, investigation and treatment of the infertile/sub fertile couple. Read more
This Masters degree is delivered in partnership between Edge Hill University and Liverpool Women’s Hospital. It bridges the theory of fertility and assisted conception with practice related to the assessment, investigation and treatment of the infertile/sub fertile couple.

The programme is designed to ensure you will be able to plan and implement a treatment pathway for infertile couples, whilst providing opportunities to focus on areas such as ultrasound scanning for reproductive medicine, embryo transfer, oocyte retrieval and clinical andrology. There are practice competencies to achieve that will allow you to develop and enhance your clinical skills, underpinned by exploration of the evidence base that supports fertility practice.

The overall aim is to ensure that on completion of the programme you will meet and exceed the standards of an advanced practitioner in fertility and assisted conception.

What will I study?

You will study the clinical assessment and diagnostics that relate to practice within assisted conception. Modules cover topics centred round the anatomy, physiology and pathology of the male and female reproductive systems, alongside the therapeutic and pharmacological interventions aimed at assisting conception and the medico-legal aspects of fertility practice.

You will be able to choose from a range of clinical practice modules which are designed to develop specific clinical skills relating to embryo transfer, oocyte retrieval and ultrasound scanning in reproductive medicine. In addition, you may choose to complete a non-medical prescribing module or undertake negotiated learning around a specific topic of interest within reproductive medicine.

An introduction to research methods and approaches will engage you with the evidence base that supports practice and prepare you for the final dissertation. This is an advanced practice project that allows you to make use of your newly developed skills and immerse yourself in a specific area of fertility practice.

How will I study?

The theoretical component of the course is delivered 50% online (via the virtual learning environment) and 50% through attendance at taught sessions at Liverpool Women’s Hospital and Edge Hill University.

The taught sessions typically run on Saturdays so that attendance can be incorporated with clinical work. Online delivery includes podcasts and lectures by consultants working with reproductive medicine and also incorporates interactive sessions relating to anatomy, physiology and pathology.

Several modules contain practice competencies that need to be met so a significant amount of time for learning is allocated to this work in practice supported by a clinical mentor.

How will I be assessed?

There are a range of practice competencies to be met in clinical practice. Case studies, reflections and presentations will also be assessed to allow you to demonstrate your engagement with the evidence base that supports practice and the application of best practice guidance to your clinical work.

Who will be teaching me?

The programme will be delivered by consultant gynaecologists, obstetricians and andrologists from the field of reproductive medicine, together with specialist nurses, councillors and sonographers.

What are my career prospects?

This programme will develop and enhance your skills and knowledge in reproductive medicine and is designed to provide a strong foundation to progress your career within this discipline.

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This Masters degree has been designed to assist qualified doctors, working in obstetrics or gynaecology and seeking a career in fertility medicine, to enhance their knowledge and skills in relation to general subfertility problems. Read more
This Masters degree has been designed to assist qualified doctors, working in obstetrics or gynaecology and seeking a career in fertility medicine, to enhance their knowledge and skills in relation to general subfertility problems. The programme provides a strong link between theory and practice and is delivered in partnership with the Hewitt Fertility Centre at Liverpool Women’s Hospital.

A key aim is to enhance your ability to provide interventions suitable to individual patient’s needs. You will develop expertise in synthesising findings from an individual’s history, combined with the results of any patient examinations and investigations undertaken, to autonomously devise an appropriate, tailored and justified treatment plan. The programme will guide you in how to select and order clinical investigations, how to interpret their results, and how to evaluate the local, national and international drivers that impact upon the development of advanced reproductive medicine.

Consideration will also be given to the systems and approaches required to manage risk as well as the professional, legal and ethical demands of working within reproductive medicine. You will develop expertise in clinical reflection and be able to recognise potential professional limitations and challenges in practice, gain a systematic and critical understanding of research governance within reproductive medicine and demonstrate a critical understanding of pharmo-therapeutics related to fertility management.

What will I study?

You will gain a comprehensive working knowledge of best practice in reproductive medicine, develop the ability to interpret and synthesise clinical and investigative information, and discover how to formulate a treatment strategy for disorders of the male and female reproductive system.

Gaining clinical competency in the use of ultrasound scanning in the investigation, diagnosis and management of infertility, you will also develop an advanced understanding of clinical andrology and oocyte retrieval.

An introduction to research methods and approaches will engage you with the evidence base that supports practice. This will prepare you for the completion of a dissertation that will enable you to plan, manage and implement a significant piece of investigative enquiry related to your professional practice.

How will I study?

The programme uses a diverse array of teaching methods. Some modules are delivered via blended learning which is underpinned by the University’s Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) while other modules require face-to-face sessions.

Across the course as a whole, you will learn through a combination of lectures, workshops, seminars, individual tutorials, group work and critical debates. The aim is to provide a framework to underpin the development of critical thinking and encourage sharing in the learning process.

How will I be assessed?

Assessment methods vary according to the requirements of each module but can be through assignments, Objective Structured Clinical Examinations, portfolios, seminar presentations, work-based learning and a small investigative research.

Who will be teaching me?

The programme team is drawn from a wide range of clinical backgrounds relating to fertility practice. It includes consultant medics, sonographers, senior embryologists, senior fertility nurse specialists and counsellors.

Members of the programme team publish in international journals and present at national and international conferences on a regular basis.

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Diploma MSc is an award-winning provider of online medical education for Postgraduate Diploma and Masters courses. We are now pleased to add the Sexual and Reproductive Medicine Postgraduate Diploma and Masters online courses to our growing range. Read more
Diploma MSc is an award-winning provider of online medical education for Postgraduate Diploma and Masters courses. We are now pleased to add the Sexual and Reproductive Medicine Postgraduate Diploma and Masters online courses to our growing range. Our Health Economics courses are offered in conjunction with our partner, the University of South Wales, who have developed a strong reputation for delivering innovative learning.

With a dramatic increase in the demand for fertility services and IVF treatment in the hands of the specialist, there is an increasing need for knowledge in the treatment and management of fertility issues at primary care level. This includes conditions such as polycystic ovarian syndrome, which has a prevalence of 10% amongst females as well as low testosterone and erectile dysfunction amongst men. Similarly, with 10% of couples presenting to primary care with issues relating to fertility, this is a common primary care problem yet it is not covered adequately in training.

Our courses in sexual and reproduction medicine are applicable to GPs, doctors, nurses, physicians and pharmacists with an interest in sexual and reproduction medicine.

Postgraduate Diploma in Sexual and Reproductive Medicine

Our online 1 year Postgraduate Diploma in Sexual and Reproductive Medicine will focus on direct application to current topics, case studies and processes relevant to the student’s own remit and country of practice. The course is worth 120 credits and comprises 6 modules of 20 credits each.

On completion of the Sexual and Reproductive Medicine Diploma, you will be able to demonstrate:
An understanding of the care of patients in sexual and reproductive medicine.
A critical awareness of current issues affecting the care of patients undertaking treatments in sexual and reproductive medicine.
Advanced knowledge of sexual and reproductive medicine that will facilitate decision-making in unpredictable and/or complex situations.
An ability to use knowledge to adapt professional practice to meet the changing demands of healthcare systems.

Course Structure

Our 1 year course consists of 6 modules per year, each of 6 weeks duration.

Module 1 - The Reproductive System, Fertility and Pregnancy
Module 2 - Sexual Function
Module 3 - Male Subfertility and Infertility
Module 4 - Female Subfertility and Infertility
Module 5 - Initial Management of the Infertile Couple
Module 6 - Assisted Reproduction and Ethics

Assessment

The course puts assessment at the heart of learning by using clinical scenarios to facilitate problem-solving, critical analysis and evidence-based care. The scenarios act as both the focus for learning and assessment thus embedding assessment within the learning process.

Each of the 6 modules has the same assessment format. Due to the online nature of the course, students are expected to login and participate in the course regularly throughout the module (ideally on a daily basis).

Students use the skills gained during the lectures to engage with the different activities (see below).

Clinical case scenarios with case based discussion - 40%
Individual learning portfolio - 10%
Group/individual activity - 20%
Case based examination - 30%

Teaching Methods

Each module has the same format. Using an online platform and one tutor per 10-15 students, the self-directed distance learning is guided by tutor stimulated discussion based on clinically rich case scenarios. Group projects are undertaken alongside independent projects. Reflective practice is recorded in a reflective portfolio to help students consider how the learning can be translated into everyday work and practice. Teaching starts with 1 day of introductory lectures. Students may attend these lectures in the UK (Glyntaff campus, University of South Wales). The lecture series are delivered by the faculty and tutors, they are a pre-course organiser, giving students the tools required to undertake the online course such as:

Scientific writing.
Levels of evidence.
Harvard referencing.
Reflective writing.

The lectures series give an opportunity to meet face to face with tutors/other students prior to the online course.

MSc Sexual and Reproductive Medicine

The Sexual and Reproductive Medicine MSc course provides a progression route for the Postgraduate Diploma in Sexual and Reproductive Medicine course offered by the University, and has been developed for GPs, doctors, nurses, physicians, pharmacists, and other suitably qualified individuals with an interest in sexual and reproduction medicine.

Entry to the 1 year MSc in Sexual and Reproductive Medicine will require the successful completion of the Postgraduate Diploma in Sexual and Reproductive Medicine (120 credits) either from the University of South Wales or from another UK University.

Our 1 year Sexual and Reproductive Medicine MSc is the shortest route to MSc certificate available and is delivered online. You will be able to learn around existing work commitments.

On completion of the Sexual and Reproductive Medicine MSc, you will be able to demonstrate mastery and autonomous working in an extended area of sexual and reproductive medicine practice.

Course Structure

Research Methodologies and Critical Appraisal in Sexual and Reproductive Medicine.
Professional Project: Sexual and Reproductive Medicine.

Teaching Methods

Module 1: Research Methodologies and Critical Appraisal - MSc teaching methods for this module are similar to the PG Diploma course modules, however it is run over 12 weeks.
Module 2: Professional Project - To produce the professional project, students continue to use the online course; however much of the work is self-directed.

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This two year part-time master's level programme is known as the Diploma in Bovine Reproduction continuing the tradition started when the programme commenced in the 1980’s and reflects the academic comparability to Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) Diploma qualifications. Read more
This two year part-time master's level programme is known as the Diploma in Bovine Reproduction continuing the tradition started when the programme commenced in the 1980’s and reflects the academic comparability to Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) Diploma qualifications. The qualification is recognised by both the RCVS and European College of Animal Reproduction (ECAR). It provides postgraduate education in an important aspect of the bovine health. The overall aims of the programme are to enable veterinary surgeons in regular contact with cattle to:

achieve a widely-based and deep understanding of bovine reproduction, which will enable them to provide sound scientific advice to the cattle industry;
develop appropriate skills; and
maintain a critical approach to their own work.

The programme is modular in structure, with eight residential weeks spaced over two years. Learning methods include lectures, demonstrations, videos, practical work, discussions, field visits and directed reading. Participants will be expected to satisfy essay and work based continual assessments for each module during the course; to pass written, practical and oral examinations of the final module at the end of the programme; and to present a dissertation, not exceeding 10,000 words, before the award of the Diploma.

Guidance is given by staff of the University of Liverpool and by invited contributors, each a recognised authority in a specialised field. Teaching takes place mainly at Leahurst, the University of Liverpool’s rural campus.

Although mainly restricted to the study of reproduction in cattle, the programme includes reference to other species to establish biological principles or to illustrate concepts for which information is not available in cattle and also covers key areas impinging on fertility such as nutrition and infectious disease.

Module Code Module Title Credits

Module DBRM611 Normal Non-Pregnant Female 15

Module DBRM612 Nutrition and Fertility 15

Module DBRM613 Fertility in Post-Partum Period 15

Module DBRM614 The Male 15

Module DBRM615 Genetics 15

Module DBRM616 Early Pregnancy 15

Module DBRM617 Late Pregnancy and Parturition 5

Module DBRM618 Synopsis and the Future 15

Module DBRM621 Dissertation 60

Key Facts

RAE 2008
In the latest Research Assessment Exercise, 45% of the School’s research activity was deemed world-leading or internationally excellent and a further 45% internationally recognised.

Facilities
The School has two bases: the University’s main campus in Liverpool and the Leahurst campus in Wirral. Leahurst has highly equipped research laboratories, which are shared with the research institutes of the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, as well as being home to the Philip Leverhulme Equine Hospital, the Farm Animal Practice and the Small Animal Teaching Hospital.

Our clinics provide numerous cases for clinical investigation, as do our co-operating veterinary surgeons in private practice. The School also has excellent relationships with farming enterprises and Chester Zoo.

Individual topics within the DBR are also offered as CPD for those who do not wish to attend the whole programme.
Why School of Veterinary Science?

Excellent reputation

The DBR has been successfully completed by over 100 vets whilst working in full time clinical practice. It has an academic and support structure proven to achieve a high completion rate whilst maintaining academic rigour validated by RCVS and ECAR external observers.

Many leading cattle clinicians have obtained the qualification and feedback from past students is excellent.

Consistently strong League Table and National Student Survey performance

Veterinary Science at Liverpool is consistently highly rated in The Times Good University Guide (rated 2nd in the UK in 2011), the Complete University Guide (rated 1st in the UK 2011), and in the National Student Survey (rated first or second for several years).

Collaboration across academic disciplines

Our staff work closely with colleagues from medicine, life sciences, and the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, not only on animal disease and welfare, but on human health too – taking a ‘one health’ approach from long before the phrase was invented. We also collaborate with colleagues from social sciences to exploit fully the comparative nature of veterinary science. This greatly extends the postgraduate study and research opportunities at Liverpool.

Wide coverage across the postgraduate programmes

The School of Veterinary Science at the University of Liverpool provides excellent postgraduate scientific and clinical training, from population to whole animal studies to the molecular level.

Recognised by the European College of Animal Reproduction

Successful reproduction is the cornerstone of the dairy industry. The DBR has been rin for nearly 30 years and has been completed by some of the leading farm animal vets practicing in the U.K. They have also contributed back into the course to maintain its relevance to modern Cattle Practice.

The DBR is recognised as a Diploma level qualification by RCVS and a recognised training course by the European College of Animal Reproduction.

Career prospects

Course participants are in employment as veterinary surgeons and most become employed in specialist private practice. Some have moved to academia internationally.

Many practices are using the fact they have DBR holders and support such study when advertising for new staff and to gain farmer clients. Candidates use the qualification as a springboard to specialisation.

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The Organic food and farming sector within Europe is continuing to develp in response to governmental Action Plans and CAP policy development. Read more
The Organic food and farming sector within Europe is continuing to develp in response to governmental Action Plans and CAP policy development. The organic sector requires highly trained individuals to work as certification officers, advisers, agronomists, farmers, farm managers and livestock specialists. SRUC offers this programme to enable students with a variety of academic and working experiences to gain a fast-track understanding of the key technical production, marketing and management aspects of organic farming and food.

This enables students to build on their existing expertise and aspirations, and to give them enhanced career opportunities as practitioners, promoters and facilitators within the sector.

The organic farming courses are offered on a part-time distance learning basis to allow those in continuing employment or with family commitments to be able to participate. Course participants come from a wide range of backgrounds, including farmers, growers, vets and other agricultural and food sector workers who wish to develop their career and businesses in the organic food and farming sector, as well as those from unrelated backgrounds wishing to increase their knowledge and understanding of organic systems.

Specific course objectives are to provide graduates with:
- An ability to critically appraise organic farming as an agricultural system
- A good understanding of the organic sector
- A sound knowledge of the science underpinning organic farming
- An understanding of the marketing, business & quality assurance requirements for organic produce
- Work placement experience
- Research skills (MSc only)

The course is accessible through its delivery by part-time on-line distance learning.

Course Content

The course modules comprise of a mix of technical production, marketing and management, and skill development modules.

Organic Forage and Livestock Production

This module will provide an understanding of the role of forage legumes in organic systems and describe grassland management systems that maximise the contribution of legumes. Students will also be given an understanding of the organic approach to livestock production, particularly in terms of animal welfare, preventative health management and nutrition.

Soils and Nutrient Cycling

This module will aim to provide the students with the tools for optimal management of their soils. Ultimately, they should be able to describe soil properties, evaluate soil fertility and assess management requirements in the context of organic farming. The module provides an understanding of the chemical, physical and biological features of soil fertility and nutrient cycling and develops practical skills in soil assessment and whole farm nutrient budgeting.

Organic Crop Production

This module will provide an understanding of methods of crop production for arable and vegetable field crops, with particular reference to organic farming in the UK. The module will develop an understanding of breeding, establishment, nutrition, protection, harvesting and storage in the context of organic crop production of field crops.

Organic Farming Case Study

This module will improve the student's ability to undertake whole farm analysis and in particular organic conversion planning. Whole farm analysis involves a range of skills and examination of a wide range of issues: technical, financial, marketing and environmental. The module will require the student to integrate the knowledge gained in other modules, to provide an evaluation and plan for the conversion to organic production of an actual farm example.

Organic Farming Profession

This module will provide an overview of the philosophy, principles, history and development of the organic farming industry. The organic standards will be introduced and the ways in which they are used to regulate the organic food and farming industry at UK, European and world levels will be covered. The roles of the main UK organisations that influence the development of the organic sector will also be explored.

Organic Farming Work Placement

This module will allow students to become familiar with an organisation or business in the organic food and farming sector during a 6-week (or equivalent) work placement. The student will gather relevant and unique material to enable them to carry out a technical and business analysis and make recommendations for future development of the organisation or business in question. The material will also be used in class discussion and to contribute to group learning.

Issues in Organic Farming

This module explores the public goods delivered by organic farming. It develops an understanding of food quality and the role and application of Quality Assurance (QA) Schemes in the organic food sector to meet the needs of relevant legislation and consumer concerns. The module also provides an overview of the principles of environmental management in the context of organic agriculture, helping students gain an appreciation of the potential impacts of agricultural enterprises on the environment, measures for minimising such impacts, and opportunities for incorporating positive environmental management measures into farm business plans.

Marketing and Business Management in the Organic Farming Sector

This module will provide an understanding of the concepts, principles and techniques involved in marketing management and how they are applied in the context of the organic farming sector. Financial accounts are one source of information regarding an organic business, and aid the process of planning and control. This module will provide an understanding of accounts to assist in the process of setting goals within a business and assessing the financial consequences of alternatives.

Course Format

This course is studied part time through on-line distance learning. This allows those in continuing employment or with family commitments to participate. With the exception of several weekend schools and a short study tour, the learning is carried out in the student's home or work place.

The MSc Project (taken following successful completion of taught modules)
Provides an opportunity for in-depth individual research on a topic related to organic farming.

Postgraduate Diploma

The PgDip is a high level learning course taught at university post-graduate level for students who opt not to progress to the Masters. Students are required to complete all taught modules detailed above. Typically a student will study 4 modules per year and complete the PgDip in two years. This would normally take an average of 12 to 15 hours study time a week.

Study Tour

The study tour is used to visit a range of organic and conventional farms as well as businesses operating in the organic food supply and distribution chain. In the taught modules an element of student choice is often built in through the use of essay and other course work topics that cover areas of potential interest. There is also a Work Placement module. Students following the distance learning course may gain exemption from the practical element of the placement but will require to complete a report of their work experience.

The study weekends and short study tour are an integral part of teaching delivery and students are strongly recommended to attend these if they are to succeed in this course.

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This vocational training programme has been developed to appeal to recent biology, biomedical, biochemistry and medical graduates who aspire to develop a career in the field of clinical embryology and assisted reproductive technology (ART) and/or the associated reproductive sciences. Read more

Introduction and Course Objectives

This vocational training programme has been developed to appeal to recent biology, biomedical, biochemistry and medical graduates who aspire to develop a career in the field of clinical embryology and assisted reproductive technology (ART) and/or the associated reproductive sciences. The programme has been developed by the Division of Reproduction and Early Development within the Leeds Institute of Genetics, Health and Therapeutics in association with the clinicians and embryologists working at the Leeds Centre of Reproductive Medicine in the Leeds NHS Trust. The programme leaders have over 20 years of experience of training clinical embryologists, reproductive medicine practitioners and reproductive scientists.

This is a laboratory-based science degree not a clinically- based infertility treatment course. The programme will provide students with a detailed knowledge of the theory and practices that underpin human clinical embryology and ART. The curriculum covers: the cell and molecular biology of human reproduction, fertility, andrology and embryology; the management and efficient running of an ART laboratory; the practices, genetic and epigenetic concepts of micromanipulation and techniques such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD); advances in cryobiology and its application to gamete and embryo freezing and fertility preservation. It will also provide graduates with valuable insights into the theory underpinning clinical treatments and the ethical and legal controversies surrounding assisted reproduction in humans. The programme will equip graduates to pursue a career in human assisted reproduction (e.g. clinical embryology, infertility treatment) and/or research in the reproductive sciences.

The programme places a strong emphasis on all aspects of practical training for clinical embryology and assisted reproduction technology. Masters students will be tutored in research methods. They will receive hands-on training from specialist practitioners in andrology, gamete handling, IVF, ICSI, embryo culture, gamete and embryo freezing, vitrification, biopsy. Students will interact with established, clinical embryologists and reproductive medicine specialists.

Course Content:

The course will comprise the following compulsory modules:

• Fundamentals of Clinical Embryology;
• IVF and Embryo Culture;
• Micromanipulation;
• Cryobiology and Cryopreservation;
• Ethics and Law for Embryologists;
• Research in Reproduction, Embryology and Assisted Reproduction Technology

Course Delivery

This programme is delivered using a blended learning approach which combines lectures, seminars, tutorials, interactive group discussions, presentations and problem based learning sessions /case studies with self directed learning. The theoretical training is complimented by the conduct of original research and by laboratory-based practical sessions. The course content is further enhanced by an extensive array of online resources and by the provision of printed versions of all module workbooks. Course assessments will include essays, presentations, projects, practical log books, a research dissertation and examinations.

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This module is for those with an interest in fertility who wish to improve their understanding of the principles and practices of assisted reproduction technology. Read more
This module is for those with an interest in fertility who wish to improve their understanding of the principles and practices of assisted reproduction technology. Students will gain an understanding of the complex issues surrounding modern infertility treatments and current management strategies for infertile couples.

Suitable for specialist nurse practitioners, hospital doctors, clinicians, GPs and related scientist/health professionals, teaching will be through a combination of lectures, seminars, case studies and small group work. The module is conducted at the Centre for Reproductive Medicine, University Hospital of Coventry & Warwickshire, Coventry

Topics covered include

-Definition & diagnosis of infertility.
-Hormonal control of the menstrual cycle.
-Andrology.
-Embryology & blastocyst culture.
-Initiating pregnancy.
-Micromanipulation.
-Fertility preservation.
-PCOS & OHSS.
-Male factor infertility.
-Patient support including management of recurrent miscarriage.
-Donated sperm & eggs.
-Follow up of pregnancies & children born.
-Regulation & the law.
-Ethics.
-Treatment pathways.
-Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD).
-Gamete & tissue cryopreservation.
-Role of the infertility nurse.

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Course description. The MA in Healthcare Ethics & Law is provided by The School of Law. Students complete 5 course units and an independent research dissertation. Read more
Course description
The MA in Healthcare Ethics & Law is provided by The School of Law.
Students complete 5 course units and an independent research dissertation.
This programme aims to provide the highest quality training in healthcare ethics and health law.
Students will gain an expert knowledge and understanding of ethical and medico-legal theories, and the skills needed to apply them to real world scenarios in a diverse range of contexts. You will cover a wide variety of ethical and legal subjects including autonomy, consent, refusal of treatment, confidentiality, the moral status of the foetus, resource allocation, genetic testing, HIV testing, medical malpractice, clinical negligence, organ and tissue transplantation, fertility treatment, genetic manipulation, research ethics, stem cell research and euthanasia.
Although no attendance at the University is required for this programme, we do encourage all students to attend Study Days that are held each year, as a way of meeting both staff and fellow students involved in the programme. Students are also encouraged to participate in online discussion groups.
Students are also provided with one-to-one tutorial support from staff at the Centre via email, telephone or on campus throughout the programme.

Coursework and assessment
At the end of each of the course units for our distance learning courses, students are required to submit an essay of 4,000 words (for course units to the value of 15 credits) or 7,000 words (for course units to the value of 30 credits).
MA students are also required to submit a dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words on a subject of their choice.

Course unit details
The MA in Healthcare Ethics & Law is comprised of 5 course units and an independent research dissertation. The delivery of these course units is via interactive learning texts which guide you through the areas of study and point you in the direction of further reading.
Students complete one course unit at a time so that they can focus on the issues in hand. You get around 3.5 months to complete each 30 credit course and 2.5 months for the 15 credit courses allowing plenty of time to complete the work while working full time, for instance. Each course unit is made up of 10-15 sections, which represent the equivalent of (approximately) an hour-and-a-half lecture with reading (usually around 2-3 papers or chapters).

PG Dip available upon enquiry

English language
Students whose first language is not English are required to hold one of the following English language qualifications:
- IELTS: minimum overall score of 7.0, with 7.0 in Writing and 6.5 in all other sub categories;
- TOEFL (Internet-Based Test): minimum overall score of 100, with 25 in Writing and 22 in all other sub categories;
- Cambridge Proficiency: minimum grade of C;
- Pearson English: minimum overall score of 66, with 66 in Writing and 59 in all other sub categories.

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This course provides students with interdisciplinary study skills in the field of population science and the analysis of demographic phenomena; students… Read more

Summary

This course provides students with interdisciplinary study skills in the field of population science and the analysis of demographic phenomena; students learn about population change, its relationship to policy, and how to analyse population dynamics; it is a general course and provides vocational training for those wishing to enhance their demographic skills and as preparation for an applied or research career.

Modules

Demographic methods 1 and 2; introducing qualitative methods; population, poverty and policy; population projections; research skills strategy and design; survey data analysis; understanding population change; plus optional modules from: ageing and globalisation; demographic change; migration; modelling multilevel data; population and fertility; reproductive health; social science data, sources and measurement.

Visit our website for further information...



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This a one year (academic) full time course which, upon completion of a course of study leads to an M.Med.Sci Degree in Assisted Reproduction Technology. Read more

Overview

This a one year (academic) full time course which, upon completion of a course of study leads to an M.Med.Sci Degree in Assisted Reproduction Technology. This course provides an avenue for both scientists and clinicians to enter the field of reproductive biology; and for those already familiar with this area, an opportunity to gain greater appreciation of the biological processes of mammalian reproduction that are relevant to the manipulation of fertility and the treatment of reproductive disease.

The course was established in 1993, making it the longest running taught masters in the UK providing full-time training in human ART, and aims to furnish graduates with the theoretical and practical training within this highly specialised discipline. Designed to broaden knowledge of the underlying scientific principles and to enhance appreciation of the clinical management of infertility, it aims to encourage independent thought and a research oriented approach to the practice of assisted conception.

A major feature and strength of this course is that the primary components, in terms of reproductive physiology, research methods, clinical embryology, and clinical medicine are all provided by experts who are highly active within their own areas of expertise, giving the information provided to the students an immediacy and relevance that it would be impossible to achieve using a more static and established teaching base.

The course is studied over a period of one year, full time, and has three basic components:
1) Theoretical and Practical Training modules (95 Credits)
2) Development of Research and Presentation skills and Observation (25 Credits)
3) Research project & dissertation (60 Credits)

Delivery method

The taught component of the course is delivered in the Autumn and Spring semesters through a combination of lectures, practicals, seminars, tutorials and other associated activities, such as journal club and guest speakers.

Approximately one third of the total course duration is dedicated to the construction, preparation and investigation of a laboratory-based research project of up to 15,000 words. This is written up in thesis presentation form.

IMPORTANT NOTE

ALL applicants, especially those from a predominantly clinical background, please note:

• This is a laboratory-based, science degree course and not a clinically based infertility treatment course.
• There is no direct contact with patients or tuition in gynaecological/surgical procedures.
• That although training is given in all laboratory aspects of assisted conception (including semen evaluation, IVF, IVM, ICSI and cryopreservation) in the time available, this training can only represent an introduction to these techniques and those graduates wishing to become clinical embryologists will need further training to become competent in those highly specialised techniques.

Course aims

• To encourage independent thought and a research oriented approach to the practice of assisted conception
• To provide theoretical and practical training in Assisted Reproduction Technology
• To broaden the students knowledge of the underlying scientific basis of ART and clinical management of infertility
• To equip graduates with the ability to pursue a career in assisted conception (e.g. clinical embryology, infertility treatment) and/or research in reproductive biology

Course objectives

• To provide successful candidates with a career path within one of the many disciplines that encompass modern assisted reproduction technology and to this end, students are taught by and given the opportunity to interact with, both full-time reproductive biologists and the consultants, clinical embryologists, andrologists and counsellors.

Requirements

Candidates must normally be graduates of an approved university, or other institution of higher education in medicine, nursing or the biological sciences. Normally the minimum requirement for entry is a 2(ii) degree or equivalent, although candidates with a third class degree may be considered at the Course Directors discretion in special circumstances. If you are not sure if you qualify, please do not hesitate to contact the Course Administrator

Candidates will be required to follow a prescribed course of study for one academic year (two 15-week semesters and summer period)

All candidates will be required to undertake a theoretical and practical training programme. Candidates will also be required to submit a dissertation of not more that 15,000 words on a topic relating to an aspect of Assisted Reproduction agreed by the Director of the Course.

English Language Requirements

International students whose first language is not English must achieve an appropriate level in an approved test in English before they can register.

The requirements for this course are above the University minimum standards and are as follows:

• IELTS minimum score of 6.5 (with no less than 6.0 in any element)
or
• TOEFL iBT 87 (minimum 19 in listening, 20 in speaking and 21 in reading and writing)

Examinations should be taken within two years of registering to study at Nottingham. Completion of a previous degree studied in the English language does not exempt applicants from requiring one of the above English qualifications, unless the degree was taken in a country where the first language is English.

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This one year, residential, taught M.Sc. Read more
This one year, residential, taught M.Sc. provides graduate students, scientists and clinicians with highly advanced theoretical and practical understanding of human reproductive biology, embryology, infertility and assisted reproductive technology (ART) along with intensive ‘hands-on’ practical training in essential laboratory skills and the sophisticated gamete micromanipulation techniques associated with ART. The MSc course is based alongside Oxford Fertility in purpose-built premises, the Institute of Reproductive Sciences, with dedicated state-of-the-art teaching and research facilities.

Course Aims

Our broad intention is to inspire, motivate and train a network of future leaders in clinical embryology throughout the world. Additionally, our students benefit from intensive training in a range of laboratory skills highly suitable for a research career in reproductive science.

Course Structure

The course runs over a period of one year, from October to September, incorporating the three University terms: Michaelmas, Hilary and Trinity. Fundamental reproductive science and laboratory methods/practical skills are taught in the first term (Michaelmas) over five discrete modules. Applied and clinical aspects are delivered in the second term (Hilary) over a further set of five modules. Each module is delivered over a period of one to three weeks and together, the ten modules comprise the ‘core content’ of the course. The third term (Trinity) is extended to allow sufficient time for a high quality research project.

Application Deadline

We are still accepting applications for the MSc in Clinical Embryology course starting in October 2017. Please see our Graduate Admissions page for further details: http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/courses/msc-clinical-embryology

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Bespoke postgraduate research degrees tailored to individual’s needs and interests in the areas of. * Applied Biology. * Horticulture. Read more

Overview

Bespoke postgraduate research degrees tailored to individual’s needs and interests in the areas of:
* Applied Biology
* Horticulture
* Agriculture
* Conservation Management

Candidates undertake one year (twelve months) of full-time study and research (or two years part-time) and present a dissertation, which sets out the results of investigational work carried out during the period of study.

In the Centre of Equine and Animal Science, research interests:

• Fertility and reproductive performance
• Health and Nutrition
• Behaviour and Welfare
• Complementary Therapies and Ethnoveterinary Medicine
• Sports Performance

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This course is designed to provide students with an overview of historical and current issues and debates in the area of sexual and reproductive health, with special attention to power relations, gender and a global economic perspective. Read more

Sexual & Reproductive Health - Short Course

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of historical and current issues and debates in the area of sexual and reproductive health, with special attention to power relations, gender and a global economic perspective. In addition, it will equip students with insight into rights-based approaches and skills to critically analyse and develop sexual and reproductive policies, services and interventions.

Potential participants note that this is not a clinical course.

Course participants explore the socio-economic, political and organizational dimensions of reproductive health.

Content includes:

-constructions of sexuality
-conferences and contestation: historical development of conceptualisations of sexual and reproductive health
-rights-based approaches
-theories about the relationships between development, population growth and reproductive health and how these inform SRH programmes
-politics and economics of sexual and reproductive health interventions (eg concerning assisted reproductive technologies)
-current sexual health (eg STIs) and reproductive health issues (infertility, abortions, maternal mortality, FGM)
-gender-based violence (including medical violence, eg forced sterilisations, forced abortions, harmful treatments of fertility)
-sexual and reproductive health across the life cycle (special attention for youth and elderly)
-sexual and reproductive health and men
-sexual and reproductive health promotion

Credit Rating: 15 SCOTCAT/5 ECTS

Participants of the professional development courses will receive a certificate of attendance from the Institute.

However, participants wishing to gain an award may register for a post graduate certificate. The modules are then taken for credit on a part-time basis each year. A PG Cert requires 60 credits and a post graduate diploma requires 120 credits. If you do a dissertation in addition to the short courses, you will gain 180 credits.

If you register for an award, you can have up to 4 years for a PG Cert, 5 years for a PG Dip and 7 years for a MSc to complete in part-time mode.

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This new Masters is designed to bridge the gap between economics and development, providing strong training in quantitative and policy analysis in development economics. Read more
This new Masters is designed to bridge the gap between economics and development, providing strong training in quantitative and policy analysis in development economics.

Who is it for?

The Development Economics MSc course at City is designed for those looking to gain an understanding of key issues in economic development and provide you with rigorous economic theory and statistical tools to be able to analyse policies and assess their impact on economic and human development.

Objectives

The aim of this course is to develop your critical and analytical abilities in economics, with particular reference to development. By the time you graduate, you should be able to:
-Demonstrate that modern economic theory is relevant to development economics.
-Critically interpret current research in development economics and evaluate its relevance to development practice and policy analysis.
-Understand the enduring determinants of poverty.
-Analyse the issues of fertility, education, health, work, migration and microfinance and their contribution to economic development.
-Develop microeconomic models to explain how people make such decisions and how policy is likely to affect their choices.
-Assess policies designed towards helping the poor by taking into account how people react to policy interventions, and statistically assess the success of such policies.
-Undertake empirical investigations in development economics, using appropriate quantitative methods.

Academic facilities

You will benefit from City's London location, and our proximity to the centres of decision-making in development economics. (We are six tube stops away from the Department for International Development, for example.).

Teaching and learning

The Development Economics MSc course is designed to be flexible in the range of teaching methods used. You learn through a mixture of lecturing, discussions, analysis of case studies, student presentations and particularly for the quantitative elements of the course, interactive computer-based exercises. You are encouraged to participate actively in the classes.

The taught modules usually run for a term and have three hours of teaching each week. This time may include workshops and tutorials as well as lectures.

Outside your timetabled hours you have access to City’s library and computing facilities for independent study. Your independent study will include reading recommended books and papers, and “reading around” the field to develop a deeper understanding.

In your third term we organise for experts from outside City to come in and present current research on both methodological and applied topics.

For the dissertation or literature survey, each student is allocated a supervisor, who will guide you in your research and writing for this module. We also offer pre-sessional induction courses covering topics such as probability, microeconomics and the Stata software.

Assessment

For each taught module in the Department of Economics, you are assessed through a combination of coursework and one final examination. For most modules the coursework contributes 30% of the overall mark and the examination contributes 70%. The nature of the coursework which the lecturer assigns varies according to the module, for example essays, presentations or computer-based data analysis and calculations. Modules taught in the Department of International Politics are usually assessed solely by coursework.

Overall assessment is based on your performance in the taught modules and a dissertation or literature survey. Students require 180 credits to pass the MSc. The weighting of each module within the overall mark is determined by the credit value assigned to that module.

Modules

You will complete 180 credits. This includes taught modules worth 120 credits plus 60 credits through either of the below paths.
-Literature Survey: two extra elective taught modules of 15 credits each and a Literature Survey worth 30 credits
-Dissertation: a 60 credit Economics Research Project.

Each module typically has a weekly two-hour lecture and a one-hour tutorial, but this may vary.

Note: It is not possible to give exact hours per week because these can vary from one term to the other, depending on which electives you choose.

Dissertation Path
Core modules
-The Economics of Micro-Finance (15 credits)
-Development Economics (15 credits)
-Microeconomic Theory (30 credits)
-Econometrics (30 credits)
-Dissertation (60 credits)
Elective modules
-Asset Pricing (15 credits)
-Macroeconomics (15 credits)

Literature Survey Path
Core modules
-The Economics of Micro-Finance (15 credits)
-Development Economics (15 credits)
-Microeconomic Analysis (30 credits)
-Quantitative Methods (30 credits)
-Literature Survey (30 credits)
Elective modules
-Welfare Economics (15 credits)

Elective modules for both paths
-International Macroeconomics (15 credits)
-Economics of Regulation and Competition (15 credits)
-Health Economics (15 credits)
-History of Economic Thought (15 credits)
-Corporate Finance (15 credits)
-Experimental Economics and Game Theory (15 credits)
-Development and World Politics (15 credits)*
-Political Economy of Global Finance (15 credits)*
-The Politics of Forced Migration (15 credits)*

*Students on the Dissertation Path can take only 1 of these modules, which are taught in the Department of International Politics. Students on the Literature Survey Path can take up to 2 of these modules.

Career prospects

Upon completion of this course you will have the skills to work in:
-Consulting firms specialising in development.
-Governmental bodies such as the Department for International Development (DFID).
-Major international financial and development institutions such as World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, the United Nations or the Overseas Development Institute, which regularly recruits MSc graduates for overseas postings.

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The course helps you develop the skills to communicate science effectively to a general audience. We’ll teach you about the latest topics in science and how to communicate these to the media and beyond. Read more

About the course

The course helps you develop the skills to communicate science effectively to a general audience. We’ll teach you about the latest topics in science and how to communicate these to the media and beyond. A major part of your studies will be writing for the media. In our newsroom, you’ll learn the principles of clear, compelling and concise storytelling. You’ll also work on a group project to plan, organise and deliver your own science exhibition.

Your career

The MSc puts you in an enviable position. Employers in science and technology, the medical and pharmaceutical industries, cultural industries, the science policy sector, education and the media will see your potential.

If you decide on a research career in science, your masters will enable you to communicate your own research effectively.

The course is now five years old. Our graduates have already gone on to careers in the pharmaceutical industry, with medical and educational charities, in a variety of science communication roles.

About us

This course is taught by experts from the faculties of science, social science and medicine, giving you access to world-leading scientists and media practitioners in the field of science communication and journalism. They include fertility expert Professor Allan Pacey who has considerable experience of TV and film, and Dr Louise Robson, a biomedical scientist who works with schools.

Our combined experience covers science communication via newspapers and magazines, radio and television, websites and social networks as well as writing articles and books.

Facilities

You’ll be based in the Science Communication Lab on the main University campus. Much of the practical work is done there and in the Department of Journalism Studies where you’ll have access to all the latest equipment for print, web and broadcast journalism.

Our print facilities include networked computers with Adobe Indesign, Incopy and Photoshop. For broadcasting we have access to radio and TV studios, digital TV editing suites and DV and HD camcorders. We also have multimedia and web authoring software including Dreamweaver and Adobe Premiere.

Core modules

Developing Communication Skills; Topical Science; Dissertation; Ethics and Regulation; Writing for the Media; Communicating with the Media; Online Journalism Studies; Research Methods.

Teaching and assessment

Research in science and journalism informs our teaching. There are lectures, tutorials and seminars. You’ll also do project work, attend masterclasses and go on placements. You’re assessed on coursework, essays, a portfolio, practical exercises and a dissertation.

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