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Masters Degrees (Feminist)

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This MA introduces you to recent debates on gender in the disciplines of sociology and media and communications studies, and to the interdisciplinary domains of feminist social and cultural theory. Read more

This MA introduces you to recent debates on gender in the disciplines of sociology and media and communications studies, and to the interdisciplinary domains of feminist social and cultural theory.

Drawing on the internationally recognised and pioneering expertise of staff in the Department of Sociology and Department of Media and Communications, as well as the Centre for Feminist Research (CFR), the programme offers you the opportunity to develop cutting-edge critical skills in relation to cultural approaches to gender formation and gender theory.

As well as these theoretical and analytical points of orientation, the MA in Gender, Media and Culture aims to help you grasp the importance of epistemology and methodology for the evaluation of empirical investigations of gender formations.

The programme therefore introduces you to, and offers training in, the key socio-cultural methods for the study of gender in the contemporary world, including methods for the study of visual culture; the body and affect; and memory.

These two elements of the programme are brought together in a dissertation study, which involves tailored supervision in the application of research methods to a specific topic.

This programme relates to the following disciplines:

  • Sociology
  • Media and Communications
  • Humanities
  • Science and Technology Studies
  • Philosophy

Overall the programme has the following interrelated aims

  • to provide in-depth interdisciplinary knowledge of contemporary gender formations
  • to provide theoretical, analytical and methodological points of orientation for understanding gender and culture transnationally and across different societies and geo-political regions
  • to offer skilled supervision in the development and completion of a small research project which tests thoroughly a range of research skills
  • to expose students to a lively research environment and the relevant expertise of the research-led Departments of Sociology and Media and Communications

Modules & structure

Core components of the programme will familiarise you with the wide range of debates integral to the fields of gender studies, feminist theory, and cultural studies. These include:

  • questions about sexual difference and the performativity of gender
  • gender, science, debates on affect and emotion
  • gender and migration and the new international division of labour
  • feminism

You complete one core module and one option module each term, as well as a dissertation module in the spring term. The first core module introduces key debates and developments in feminist theory, cultural theory and, in particular, feminist cultural theory. It introduces both early debates which defined these fields and contemporary developments and departures. More specifically, you will be introduced to social constructivist and post-structuralist perspectives, to ‘new materialism’, to debates on feminism and the critique of universalism; to key questions in relation to feminism and biology; to debates on psycho-analysis and the emergence of queer theory and its intersection with feminist theory.

The second core module examines the place of gender, affect and the body in feminist theory and feminist practice. The course offers you different angles on what has become known as “the affective turn,” placing a strong emphasis on the history of feminist contributions to the study of affect and emotion as well as the body. We ask how bodies are constructed, experienced and lived from a variety of feminist perspectives, attending to questions of corporeal difference, as well as the intimacy of bodies, spaces, objects and technologies. We also reflect on the significance of affect and the body for feminist and queer cultural practices, as well feminist and queer activisms. This module therefore offers instruction in some of the most cutting edge issues in contemporary feminist theory. A team of leading feminist scholars based in the departments of Sociology and Media Communications at Goldsmiths teach this module on the basis of their research specialisms. 

There will be a series of dissertation workshops to help you plan and develop your dissertation, especially in regard to issues of methodology and method. Each student will be assigned a supervisor who will work with you to develop your proposal and undertake independent research.

Core modules

Option modules

You have 60 credits at your disposal, you can choose any 30 credit modules related to gender from postgraduate modules across the University. You can choose either a regular option (30 credits) or two ‘mini-options’ (2 x 15 credits).

For your other options, you can choose modules from either the Department of Sociology or the Department of Media and Communications as they co-convene the programme. You can also choose from the following departments across Goldsmiths:

Please note that not all modules are suitable for students from all academic backgrounds; you will discuss your choices with the Programme Convenor at the start of your degree.

Assessment

Assessment consists of coursework, extended essays, reports, presentations, practice based projects or essays/logs, group projects, reflective essays, and seen and unseen written examinations.

Skills

Graduates from this programme gain conceptual and methodological knowledge of the key concepts and debates in the study of gender and culture; the skills of critical analysis; the ability to distinguish and appraise a range of socio-cultural research methodologies; the skills to design and develop a research project; and the ability to recognise and account for sensitive ethical issues relating to research and representation.

The two core courses provide you with the necessary skills to understand the relationships between early debates in the fields of gender studies, feminist theory and feminist cultural theory, and the ability to critically engage with new developments in these fields. Furthermore, you will gain a critical appreciation of the role and place of the body and affect in the development of feminist cultural theory and gender theory, and the challenges that contemporary socio-cultural changes bring to the theorisation of the body.

Careers

Previous graduates have embarked on professional careers in social research, think tanks, the arts and cultural sectors, government and public administration, development, human rights, NGOs, and in media and communications globally. They have also progressed to PhD study.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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Why this course?. The MSc Applied Gender Studies degree at Strathclyde is a Master’s level course for those who wish to study how gender ‘works’ in relation to other structural inequalities such as race, sexuality, class and disability within society. Read more

Why this course?

The MSc Applied Gender Studies degree at Strathclyde is a Master’s level course for those who wish to study how gender ‘works’ in relation to other structural inequalities such as race, sexuality, class and disability within society.

If you wish to pursue a career in the charitable, education, government or civil service or the heritage sectors then this course is ideally suited to you. It will also appeal to those who may already be working within an organisation with a strong interest in gender in society.

For those who are interested in pursuing a more research focussed option the MSc Applied Gender Studies can also be taken as a Research Methods route. This allows graduates to meet the criteria for ESRC funding, an important factor if you plan to go on to PhD study in the Social Sciences.

By completing this course you will develop the analytical and practical skills necessary to engage critically with contemporary gender issues including:

  • gender theory 
  • gender equality
  • feminist theory
  • queer theory
  • LGBT studies
  • gender & society

A key focus of this course is how these concepts can be applied within real-world contexts. You will have the opportunity to gain first-hand experience working on a research project with an external organisation from the feminist third sector and organisations committed to gender equality in arts, culture and sport.

Glasgow has a diverse range of key women’s and equalities organisations in the city. The University of Strathclyde has particularly strong links with the Glasgow Women’s Library, the only accredited museum in the UK dedicated to women’s lives, histories and achievements. You'll benefit from access to the unique archival collections held by the Library as part of this course.

What you’ll study

Gender studies is a multi-disciplinary field dealing intersectionally with various social and cultural dimensions.

Reflecting this, the MSc Applied Gender Studies combines interdisciplinary core courses on gender theory, feminist research and the history of feminist thought, with optional classes within a range of disciplinary traditions.

Strathclyde has particular strengths in feminist and queer approaches within Journalism and Media Studies, English Literature, History, Creative Writing, Education, Politics and International Relations, Criminology and Social Policy.

This course comprises of three core courses:

  • Understanding Gender
  • Feminist Knowledge, Feminist Research
  • Feminisms – Continuity & Change

These core modules focus on providing students with an interdisciplinary frame for the critical study of gender that is underpinned by feminist theory and acknowledges the ways in which gender informs – and is informed by – other structural inequalities.

Understanding how feminist theory, research and activism has developed over time is a key element of the degree, and our core courses include visits to Glasgow Women’s Library to learn about feminist archiving and work with their original collections.

Collectively, these courses equip students with a knowledge and understanding of key feminist debates about ontology, epistemology and methodology, and enable them to identify both commonalities and differences in the ways these debates have been taken up in different disciplinary contexts over time.

Students also take three optional courses chosen from a range of modules. These are updated annually and may include:

  • Queer Global Literatures
  • Gender, Health and Modern Medicine
  • Diversity, Gender and Sexuality in Education
  • Feminism and International Relations
  • Transcultural Fandom and British Popular Culture
  • Italian Women Writers and the Anglophone Sphere

The Gender Studies Research Placement and Advanced Topics in Gender Studies options run every year. You'll also complete a Gender Studies dissertation. We're well placed to supervise projects aligned to a range of disciplinary interests and using diverse methodologies.

In addition to the MSc Applied Gender Studies, we also offer the MSc Applied Gender Studies (Research Methods) which is the recommended route for students intending to apply for a PhD in the Social Sciences.

Students on this programme take core modules Feminist Knowledge and Research, Advanced Topics in Gender Studies, Perspectives on Social Research, Quantitative Methods and Qualitative Methods.

Students following this route take only one of the optional courses listed above and similarly complete a dissertation.

Research placement

The Research Placement option provides students with the opportunity to put their Gender Studies learning and research training into practice in a real-world environment.

Students conduct a piece of research according to a brief produced in consultation with the host organisation.

The course team have established links with potential placement providers - in Glasgow and beyond - from the feminist third sector and a range of organisations committed to gender equality in arts, culture and sport.

Examples of organisations we have links with include Women in Journalism, Engender, Glasgow Women’s Library, Zero Tolerance, Rape Crisis Scotland, Women’s Support Project, Scottish Football Association, The Parliament Project and the National Union of Journalists.

Learning & teaching

The core courses are delivered in weekly seminars where there is an emphasis on student participation and engagement.

On both Feminist Knowledge, Feminist Research and Feminisms – Continuity and Change, some of our classes are held at Glasgow Women’s Library.

Assessment

The assessment is all in the form of coursework, with a range of assessments designed to allow students to demonstrate different research and writing skills.

All the core courses have more than one assessment point so that receiving and responding to feedback is built in to the course design. Optional modules are taught and assessed in a variety of ways.

On the Research Placement module, students will deliver their research in a form agreed in advance with the Placement provider so as to best meet their needs and provide the student with the opportunity to develop skills in delivering research in real world contexts.

Careers

The MSc Applied Gender Studies is a great route into working in the feminist third sector, or into equality and diversity work across a range of contexts.

We positively encourage part-time study and where students are already working in these areas there may be possibilities to conduct research for their placement and/or dissertation within their workplace.



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The MSc/MLitt in Gender Studies (Applied) equips students with conceptual and practical skills in gender analysis and research, underpinned by feminist theory. Read more
The MSc/MLitt in Gender Studies (Applied) equips students with conceptual and practical skills in gender analysis and research, underpinned by feminist theory. Through core modules – Understanding Gender, Feminist Research, and Key Feminist Thinkers – students are exposed to a range of theoretical and methodological approaches for studying gender. We give history and context to the development of key feminist debates, exploring commonalities and differences in the ways they have played out in different disciplines.

At the heart of the course is a concern about how academic debate informs, is shaped by, and is – at times – distanced from, how gender ‘works’ in real world contexts. Students explore these issues through a seminar-based course and are offered the opportunity to apply their learning in real world contexts through the Research Placement module.

This course is interdisciplinary, but, within this, students can emphasise Arts and Humanities (MLitt) or Social Science (MSc) approaches. The MSc places a greater emphasis on research methods and data analysis, and is the recommended route for students interested in PhD study in Social Sciences. The MLitt offers students more optional modules and is better suited to students looking for an all-round education in Gender Studies and/or is interested in PhD study in the Arts and Humanities.

The MSc/MLitt in Gender Studies (Applied) at the University of Stirling is unique in the UK in that it places the application of learning to real-world contexts at the heart of its course. It is housed within the Centre for Gender and Feminist Studies and students have access to its seminar course of visiting academics and practitioners working on gender and feminist issues in a variety of professional contexts. Students have the opportunity to apply their learning to a real-world research placement and the course team have established links with potential placement providers from the feminist third sector as well as with a number of organisations who are committed to gender equality as part of their work in arts, culture and sport.

Other admission requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
-IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill
-Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
-Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B
-Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component
-IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20

For more information go to English language requirements: https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses: http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx

About the Faculty

The Faculty of Arts and Humanities has four divisions: Communications, Media and Culture; History and Politics; Literature and Languages; and Law and Philosophy. The Faculty is home to a research culture characterised by innovative scholarship. We offer an integrated, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment for our diverse postgraduate community.

The quality of our research has led to regular awards from funders, such as the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), British Academy, Leverhulme Trust, Carnegie Trust and the Royal Society of Edinburgh. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF), Stirling was placed first in Scotland for research impact in Communications, Cultural and Media Studies, and first in Scotland for research publications in Law.

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The MA in Gender and Women’s Studies and English combines teaching and scholarship in Gender and Women’s Studies and in English Literature. Read more

The MA in Gender and Women’s Studies and English combines teaching and scholarship in Gender and Women’s Studies and in English Literature. This is a unique MA for students interested in Gender and Women’s Studies who want to pursue literary studies or who have a particular interest in women’s literature or feminist literary theory.

Students take core courses in each of the disciplines and can choose from a range of optional courses in addition to these. This combination is administered from the Centre for Gender and Women’s Studies - one of the largest centres in the UK for feminist research, gender studies and women’s studies.

Taught jointly with the http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/english-and-creative-writing/, the programme is run by the http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/sociology/research/research-centres/centre-for-gender-and-womens-studies/, part of the Sociology Department at Lancaster and one of the largest centres in the UK for feminist research, gender studies and women’s studies.

As an MA student, you will be immersed in the busy academic and social life of the centre, and part of a supportive and dynamic community of students and researchers from across the world. It is an ideal environment in which to learn and carry out research – and allows you to meet other scholars and activists, take part in seminars and workshops, and exchange ideas and insights with world-leading feminist and literary academics.

Graduates from this MA are now working in universities throughout the world, having used the programme as a springboard to PhD study. Others have gone on to work in local and national government, in public-sector, non-governmental or voluntary organisations, or are teaching in schools and colleges.

Find out more about the http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/sociology/research/, research centres and conferences that make studying in the Sociology Department at Lancaster so stimulating.

Course Structure

You will study a range of modules as part of your course, some examples of which are listed below.

Core

Optional

Information contained on the website with respect to modules is correct at the time of publication, but changes may be necessary, for example as a result of student feedback, Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies' (PSRB) requirements, staff changes, and new research.



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The development of this LLM specialisation will capitalise on the Centre for Gender Studies as a multi-faculty centre from 2012, allowing students to engage with contemporary gender theories alongside existing PG Law modules that engage issues in gender and women's rights. Read more
The development of this LLM specialisation will capitalise on the Centre for Gender Studies as a multi-faculty centre from 2012, allowing students to engage with contemporary gender theories alongside existing PG Law modules that engage issues in gender and women's rights.

Students are required to take a core module in Feminist Legal Theory, alongside units on the human rights of women, gender and migration and gender and armed conflict.

Students combine the study of units specifically focused on gender and/or women's rights with the modules from the large list of law options available to LLM students at SOAS, allowing the student to tailor their programme to suit future goals.

In taking this module, students should hope to develop an understanding of the role of gender as a tool for analysis and critical analytical skills in feminist legal methods.

Students will also study the work of gender experts in contemporary institutions and situate contemporary legal reforms on women's rights and gender perspectives within feminist histories, while analysing the role of non-Western feminist actors and theories in leading future legal reform and gender perspectives.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llm-in-law-and-gender/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three of fours years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law and Gender:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAC155 (1 Unit) as a core course.
- Human Rights of Women - 15PLAC112 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Gender, Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAH056 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- Childhood, Politics and Law - 15PPOH037 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAD155 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights of Women - 15PLAD112 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA Gender Studies and Law at SOAS caters for students with a variety of backgrounds and objectives. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MA Gender Studies and Law at SOAS caters for students with a variety of backgrounds and objectives:

- those coming from Women’s Studies or Gender Studies who wish to engage more deeply with gender theory in relation to regional specialisation and to connect this with legal knowledge, especially, but not exclusively, the societies of Asia, Africa and the Middle East;

- those coming from Asian, African or Middle Eastern Studies who wish to incorporate the study of gender and law into their own areas of expertise; and

- those having previously trained in particular disciplines, such as Anthropology, Comparative Literature, Cultural and Media Studies, History, Politics, Religious Studies, Sociology, Refugee/Diaspora Studies etc.

This programme provides:

- specialised research training in Gender Studies, in addition to focused study of feminist legal theories and a particular area of law. This pathway is suitable for students considering advanced postgraduate research in Gender Studies with a regional specialisation;

- a broad MA programme for students with some background in Women’s Studies, Gender Studies, and Area Studies etc. who wish to enhance their knowledge of gender in relation to cross-cultural legal issues;

- a special interest MA, which enables students to study gender issues in depth in relation to a particular regional or disciplinary specialisation alongside the acquisition of knowledge of feminist legal approaches and a study of a legal sub-discipline.

The MA Gender Studies and Law at SOAS is a unique programme, its principal aim being to re-focus issues prioritised in western Gender Studies and Legal Theory on the complex specificities of Asia, Africa and the Near and Middle East. Jointly housed by the Centre for Gender Studies and the School of Law, the programme offers the specialised study of gender and law in relation to the cultures of Asia, Africa and the Middle East, together with rigorous training in, and questioning of, contemporary gender theory. In terms of gender theory, it offers a solid foundation with sufficient breadth and depth to facilitate a range of specialist pathways. In terms of specialisation, it draws on the expertise of internationally recognised scholars of Asian, African and Middle Eastern Studies at SOAS.

Email:

Phone: 020 7898 4367

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/genderstudies/genderlaw/

Structure

Students take courses to the value of four units and complete a dissertation (which is also the assessment for the fourth course Feminist Legal Theory).

All students take the Preliminary course in law, legal reasoning and legal methods. This is a compulsory component which runs as an intensive two-week course in September, prior to the start of term.

All students take the compulsory core courses Gender Theory and the Study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East and Feminist Legal Theory (Dissertation). Further options include a wide range of gender and gender-related courses from a comprehensive list. Students also choose one Law option from the general MA in Law list (subject to course convenor approval).

Upon completion of coursework and written examinations in May/June, students will write a 10,000 word dissertation based on material acquired from Feminist Legal Theory.

- Programme Specification 15/16 (pdf; 175kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/genderstudies/genderlaw/file101845.pdf

Materials

Students will have access to a wealth of study resources available in the SOAS Library and in nearby institutions such as the British Library, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University College London Library and Senate House Library.

Teaching & Learning

Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

Each taught course has its own approved methods of assessment, designed to address the particular learning outcomes of that course. Assessment methods may include essays, weekly reaction papers, unseen, seen or take-home examinations, research projects, individual or group presentations, translations, learning journals, oral examinations etc., as appropriate.

Students are also required to attend regular seminars organised by the Centre for Gender Studies, details of which are included in the handbook and further details of which are advertised on the Centre’s website and notice board.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The graduate concentration in Women's and Gender Studies provides graduate students the opportunity to study gender and sexuality from a variety of disciplinary perspectives in conjunction with their study toward a master's or doctoral degree. Read more

The graduate concentration in Women's and Gender Studies provides graduate students the opportunity to study gender and sexuality from a variety of disciplinary perspectives in conjunction with their study toward a master's or doctoral degree. Interdisciplinary by nature, Women’s and Gender Studies courses primarily address the diversity of gendered experiences based on race, ethnicity, class, religion, nationality, and sexual orientation. The graduate concentration is an appropriate option for graduate students who wish to focus on gender and/or sexuality in their particular disciplinary field.

The graduate concentration in Women's and Gender Studies is offered to students in the following programs: Master of Arts (M.A.) in American Studies, English, History, Liberal Studies, and Political Science; Master of Science (M.S.) in the Division of Global Affairs, Public Administration and Social Work; and a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in American studies and the Division of Global Affairs.

The graduate concentration consists of a total of 12 credits. Students will take two courses cross-listed with Women's and Gender Studies from their own department and two core courses offered by the Women's and Gender Studies Program, taught by faculty members affiliated with the Graduate School.

The two core courses are:

  • 26:988:532 Feminist History and Theory (Fall semester) 
  • 26:988:570 Feminist Research and Methods (Spring semester)

Because the way that the graduate concentration in Women's and Gender Studies fits with each program is slightly different, students should seek advisement from the director of the graduate program in their own department as well as from the director of the Women's and Gender Studies Program at the beginning of their graduate studies. Full-time students should be able to complete the course of study for the graduate concentration in Women's and Gender Studies and for their master's or doctoral degree within their program's normal time frame.

Students interested in pursuing the graduate concentration in Women's and Gender Studies should contact the director of the Women's and Gender Studies Program after they have been accepted into the graduate program in their discipline.

Learning Goals

Learning Goals for Graduate Certificate

The Women’s and Gender Studies Program offers its own activities to help students achieve learning goals, including brown-bag lunch discussions of student and faculty research and the annual WGS conference. The goals and assessments below for the English courses required for the Concentration are in addition to those above for all English MA students.

Learning Goal 1: Familiarity with the ways feminist epistemologies have reshaped the agendas of intellectual inquiry in numerous fields; command of the foundational methodologies of doing interdisciplinary work in WGS as well as those most appropriate to the student’s area of disciplinary study, including the lexicons required to do this work; understanding of the research and the research methodologies employed by scholars across the disciplines to study women’s and gender issues, and ability to use these tools competently in the student’s own academic work.

Learning Goal 2: Understanding in historical perspective of the issues in American and other cultures that are based on assumptions about male/female sexual differences, differences in gender and sexual orientation, and their ideologies; command of the intellectual history within which feminism and gender studies have come to be defined and reframed and the complex dynamic of women’s histories in various times and places as they intersect with gendered social and cultural formations; understanding of the development of feminist and gender theories in the contexts of differing cultures, subcultures, and global histories; and ability to apply contemporary varieties of these theories to literary and cultural texts with rigor, creativity, appropriateness, and critical thought.

Learning Goal 3: The ability to connect broader issues in women’s history, feminist and gender theory, and related theories and methodologies to literary works under study.



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This MA scheme is ideal for those who wish to study Gender and Women’s Studies in combination with empirical and theoretical developments in Sociology at an advanced level, and particularly suitable for those interested in social research and/or feminist sociological theory. Read more

This MA scheme is ideal for those who wish to study Gender and Women’s Studies in combination with empirical and theoretical developments in Sociology at an advanced level, and particularly suitable for those interested in social research and/or feminist sociological theory.

Students take core courses in each of the disciplines and can choose from a range of optional courses in addition to these. This combination is administered from the Centre for Gender and Women’s Studies, one of the largest centres in the UK for feminist research, gender studies and women’s studies and part of one of the most highly regarded Sociology departments in the UK.

Course Structure

You will study a range of modules as part of your course, some examples of which are listed below.

Core

Optional

Information contained on the website with respect to modules is correct at the time of publication, but changes may be necessary, for example as a result of student feedback, Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies' (PSRB) requirements, staff changes, and new research.



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We offer research-based teaching in a wide range of philosophical subjects. We foster our students' professional development. A proportion of our recent PhD graduates have permanent academic posts in leading universities. Read more
We offer research-based teaching in a wide range of philosophical subjects. We foster our students' professional development. A proportion of our recent PhD graduates have permanent academic posts in leading universities.

The MPhil/PhD is the direct route to the PhD and is suitable for students who are ready to start writing a PhD thesis.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
Birkbeck's Department of Philosophy enjoys an international reputation for research. The department has a flourishing community of research students, and is committed to providing them with a first-rate philosophical training.
In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), Philosophy at Birkbeck was ranked 15th in the UK, with a research environment judged conducive to producing internationally excellent research.
In the Philosophical Gourmet Report 2014-2015, Philosophy at Birkbeck was ranked among the strongest in the UK, and was highly ranked in philosophy of action, philosophy of art, seventeenth-century philosophy and feminist philosophy.
The research interests of the department encompass a range of areas within the discipline: ancient philosophy, history of early modern philosophy, Kant, Nietzsche, history of analytic philosophy, logic, language, metaphysics, philosophy of mathematics, philosophy of mind, philosophy of action, philosophy of psychology, ethics, aesthetics, political philosophy, social and feminist philosophy, epistemology, and philosophy of science.
The department has been highly ranked for the standard of its research across a broad range, and especially our research and teaching in the area of feminist philosophy.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), Philosophy at Birkbeck was ranked 15th in the UK, with a research environment judged conducive to producing internationally excellent research.

In the Philosophical Gourmet Report 2014-2015, Philosophy at Birkbeck was ranked among the strongest in the UK, and was highly ranked in philosophy of action, philosophy of art, seventeenth-century philosophy and feminist philosophy.

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WHAT DOES THIS RESEARCH MASTER ENTAIL?. Reconfigure identity constructions and power differences in our globalised world. Read more

WHAT DOES THIS RESEARCH MASTER ENTAIL?

Reconfigure identity constructions and power differences in our globalised world

How do gender, race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, dis/ability and/or religion contribute to the formation of social identities? What role do ensuing power differences between these vectors play in our globalised and mediatised world? In the two-year Research MA in Gender Studies, you will approach a myriad of questions related to gender and other social categories through an intersectional approach.

The programme combines a thorough grounding in the historiography and contemporary state of Gender Studies as a discipline with intensive training in the critical practice of cultural theories and epistemologies from feminist, postcolonial, critical race, and queer perspectives. In a highly interdisciplinary setting and with academic staff and fellow students representing a range of fields from anthropology to literary studies, you will be trained to apply these theories to the analysis of representations of gender in artistic practices, literary texts, political discourses and (new) media and technology. The international and intellectually challenging setting of this programme offers you the opportunity to broaden your horizon and to build an academic and professional network.

Epistemology, politics, and ethics

During the courses and seminars, you will approach theories about subjectivity and representation from epistemological, political, and ethical perspectives. How have feminist theorists rethought Freud’s and Lacan’s ideas on (female) subjectivity, for instance? What differences do you see constructed between the East and the West in films, literature, and art works?

You will also investigate the development of feminist theories and the history and current statuses of colonial, post-colonial, and multicultural societies. In addition, you will explore the representation of gender and ethnicity in literature, new media, and new technologies.

International reputation

Utrecht University’s Research Master in Gender Studies is one of Europe’s most advanced interdisciplinary teaching and research programme in Gender Studies. Our research-focussed programme prepares students for postgraduate or PhD work in Gender Studies and related fields. 

You will benefit from engaging in a challenging and international setting that offers multiple avenues of investigation into complex social phenomena. The programme is closely allied with academics and institutions both within and outside Europe and offers an internationally recognised degree.

AFTER GRADUATION

After successfully completing this programme, you will possess advanced knowledge of and insight into the field of women’s, gender, and postcolonial studies.

You will also have the academic skills to:

  • Critically investigate the multiple approaches, methods, and topics currently addressed by scholars in this field.
  • Analyse factors of identity making such as gender, class, ethnicity, age, and sexuality in different globalized contexts.
  • Analyse power differences and processes of inclusion and exclusion, discrimination, and emancipation.
  • Reflect on how academic, cultural, artistic, journalistic, and policy-making institutions respond to societal challenges.
  • Formulate research questions, locate and interpret sources, assess the significance of your own research within the framework of current debates, and report your findings.

Career prospects

After completing the Research Master in Gender Studies you are qualified to apply for a postgraduate or doctoral research programme in the field of women’s, gender, and postcolonial studies. Furthermore, gender experts can also work at governmental organisations, NGO's, national and international women's organisations, and cultural institutions. Read more about possible career prospects.



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* subject to validation. Debate about God and the ultimate nature of reality is as vibrant now as it has ever been. Historical and cultural change has called into question the nature and truth of belief in God. Read more
* subject to validation

Debate about God and the ultimate nature of reality is as vibrant now as it has ever been. Historical and cultural change has called into question the nature and truth of belief in God. It has also opened the ‘West’ to different voices and traditions, which understand reality in distinctive ways.

This postgraduate certificate offers a unique opportunity to study the philosophical implications of this dynamic field at an advanced level. Students engage with highly contemporary European philosophy, plus a wide range of non-European philosophical traditions.

The modules are taught by experienced lecturers who are also leading scholars in the field. Their expertise ranges across cutting edge philosophical speculation about the absolute, feminist thought, Indian and Chinese traditions, and the fascinating connections between mysticism and philosophy.

The certificate offers a distinctively contemporary and global approach to philosophy of religion. Graduates in a related discipline will find this an exciting and challenging development of their study. Those who teach or otherwise work with religious ideas and communities will find it deepens and refreshes their knowledge and critical understanding.

Curriculum

The certificate is taught over one year in intensive blocks on Saturdays, and consists of four 15 credit modules.

1. Beyond Western Philosophy of Religion. Explores the challenges and opportunities created for philosophy of religion when we abandon the ‘Eurocentric’ perspective and take seriously the global interface of religious, cultural and political forms.

2. Feminist Philosophy of Religion. Considers how philosophy of religion can be reconfigured in light of feminist philosophical reflections on the concept of the divine, religious beliefs, languages and spiritual practices.

3. Thinking the Absolute: Modern and Contemporary Perspectives. Opens the door to engage with contemporary philosophy as it speculates on the limits of what can be thought and tries to break through those limits to touch upon a reality which is not tied to a human perspective.

4. Mysticism and Philosophy: Eastern and Western Perspectives. Explores the academically neglected 20th century flourishing of original and popular religious philosophies with their roots in eastern and western forms of mysticism. Key thinkers include Chardin, Huxley, Krishnamurti, Maharshi, Buber and Meher Baba.

Teaching & Research

The Theology, Philosophy and Religious Studies department is the leading research department at Liverpool Hope, with all staff publishing and researching at an international level. We have a strong tradition of supporting both taught Masters students and postgraduate researchers. Postgraduate seminars, which offer opportunities for students to present work, occur on a regular basis. There are frequent advanced research seminars and guest lectures.

The Association for Continental Philosophy of Religion is based at Liverpool Hope, and runs international conferences, seminars and reading groups, as well as sponsoring a series of publications. Departmental staff take leading roles in relevant academic societies, such as the Mystical Theology Network, the Kierkegaard Society of the UK and the Eckhart Society.

One of the key strengths of the department is its interdisciplinary nature, and its ability to draw on research expertise from across theological and religious studies perspectives.

Employability

The course offers you the opportunity to develop skills in analysing and presenting complex arguments, engaging with independent research and an in-depth critical understanding of religious philosophies. The tutorial team takes seriously how these contribute to your personal development, and provide an enhanced set of capabilities when seeking employment or further training in graduate careers such as civil service, teaching or social work. The course also offers the opportunity for career enhancement to those already involved in teaching religion, religious ministry or other occupations which involve dealing with cultural and religious complexity. In addition, the certificate provides a foundation for further Masters level work and for PhD research.

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This MA in Social Research provides a rigorous introduction to key issues in social science methodology, expands your proficiency in a range of research skills, and prepares you for further advanced research in the social sciences. Read more

This MA in Social Research provides a rigorous introduction to key issues in social science methodology, expands your proficiency in a range of research skills, and prepares you for further advanced research in the social sciences.

Five different pathways are available: Sociology; Gender and Women’s Studies; Media and Cultural Studies; Environment, Culture and Society; Science, Technology, Innovation and Social Practices.

The MA and its tailored pathways represent an ideal stepping stone to a PhD and open access to ESRC and AHRC funding programmes. Students will carry out hands on training in selected research methods and skills, and will become skilled in the translation of theoretically informed research questions into research projects. As part of the MA students will complete an extensive independent piece of research.

The programme consists of five core modules, one optional module and a dissertation and the modules undertaken will depend on your choice of pathway.

Course Structure

This MA has five different pathways available which allow students to tailor the programme to their own interests without losing the focus on research training. Below is a sample of modules which are available to students on this programme - for full details please read more about our pathways.

Core

Optional

Information contained on the website with respect to modules is correct at the time of publication, but changes may be necessary, for example as a result of student feedback, Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies' (PSRB) requirements, staff changes, and new research.



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If you’re interested in questioning the concepts of gender and development, as well as giving priority to issues and debates identified within specific countries, rather than relying on predominantly western literature, then this is the programme for you. Read more

If you’re interested in questioning the concepts of gender and development, as well as giving priority to issues and debates identified within specific countries, rather than relying on predominantly western literature, then this is the programme for you. It is an international, interdisciplinary and analytical course which does not assume that development is about the ‘third world’ modelling itself on the west, nor about women modelling themselves on men.

Programme details

Our programme will give you a thorough understanding of the centrality of gender relations in development and how gender is cross-cut by other significant differences, such as sexuality, ‘race’/ethnicity, (dis)ability and social class. Through our two core modules you will achieve a rigorous theoretical and conceptual foundation linked to a strong practical focus on issues and policies of gender and development. A third optional core module will give you a detailed understanding of methodological debates in social research, and you'll also take at least one more gender/development module.

You will then select from a wide range of exciting and cutting-edge specialist modules, including an optional module in law and development. Optional modules provide opportunities to explore substantive issues that excite you, such as human rights, global capitalism, feminist jurisprudence, the labour process, feminist theory and epistemology, and postcolonial theory. With personal supervision from one of our leading scholars, you will then progress to research and write your own 15,000 word dissertation.

Our programme takes place in the unique academic context of both a Women and Gender Studies Research Centre, with an exciting programme of research seminars and events, and a thriving Sociology department, with a strong international research and teaching profile. You may be a development professional looking to progress your career, a student moving on to graduate study with an interest in development or a researcher seeking a relevant MA as preparation for a research degree. Students from a wide range of backgrounds have prospered on this course, and we welcome your application.



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Why study at Roehampton. Build a rewarding career as a professionally-qualified registered dance movement psychotherapist. Graduates are eligible to register with the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy UK (ADMP UK). Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • Build a rewarding career as a professionally-qualified registered dance movement psychotherapist. Graduates are eligible to register with the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy UK (ADMP UK).
  • Benefit from our established network of psychotherapists and gain work experience within a supervised clinical placement in a range of settings. 
  • In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, the leading national assessment of quality, 100% of the research we submitted was rated “world leading” or “internationally excellent” for its impact.
  • The only institution in Europe to offer training in all of the arts and play therapies, including dramatherapy, art and dance movement psychotherapy, music and play therapy.

Course summary

This course is designed for people who have prior dance experience and professional or volunteering experience with people in need, and would like to practise as a dance movement psychotherapist.

Dance movement psychotherapy is a relational process in which a client and therapist engage in an empathetic creative process using body movement and dance to assist the integration of emotional, cognitive, physical, social and spiritual aspects of self. We believe that focusing on the creative potential of individuals in a relationship creates a sound ethical basis for psychotherapeutic work.

You will be taught by leading experts who will equip you with the skills, experience, and confidence to work as a dance movement psychotherapist. All graduating students are eligible to apply for registration with the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy (ADMP UK). Graduates often create their own positions; facilitating dance movement psychotherapy sessions within settings including: social services; special needs; schools; psychiatry; probationary and rehabilitation units; forensic psychiatry.

The course offers opportunities for you to explore and expand movement preferences, ways of interacting with others, belief systems, prejudices and values. Emphasis is placed on development of your own style as a dance movement psychotherapist. You also have the opportunity to perform and exhibit your ongoing work in a yearly Arts Therapies exhibition.

The MA in DMP benefits from cutting edge research conducted through the Centre for Arts Therapies Research (CATR) and this feeds directly into teaching. The programme ethos emphasises a critical consideration of different descriptions and explanations of bodies, human systems and therapeutic practices in different places and times. In the context of an individual student's experiences, beliefs, values and different 'cultures', our teaching actively promotes a participatory ethic, self-reflexive practices and the ability for critical reflection on: creative processes, intersubjectivity and the construction of social and power differentials, in learning and in psychotherapy.

Content

The uniquely interdisciplinary MA course in Dance Movement Psychotherapy integrates theoretical, experiential and clinical learning, preparing students to practice as dance movement psychotherapists. Cutting edge research cascades into teaching emphasising the social, biological and psychological construction of the moving body and meaning-making. Students are encouraged to develop a self-reflexive practice and the ability for critical reflection on creative processes.

Key areas of study include Contemporary DMP and psychotherapeutic theories, Feminist embodied reflexivity, clinical placement and supervision (for one-two days a week), dance movement improvisation skills and interventions, embodied performance practice, experiential anatomy for clinical practice, human development, movement and growth, Laban Movement Analysis and video observation.

Embodied practice and working with attention to the art of dance is placed at the centre of the programme. Drawing from Feminist, Psychoanalytical, Phenomenological and Systemic frameworks, the training emphasises the creative role of curiosity and a 'not knowing' position, a respect for difference, and appreciation of the effects that mutual influences have in all relationships.

Modules

Here are examples of modules:

  • Creative Processes: Reflexive Movement Improvisation
  • Theoretical Approaches in Dance Movement Psychotherapy
  • Psychopathology: Alternative World Views

Career options

Graduates can enter a variety of roles including: NHS clinical practice within in and out patient services, community services, prison services, special needs schools, performing arts contexts, drug rehabilitation, in social services with immigrants and asylum seekers, in shelters with women who have suffered domestic abuse, dementia services, learning disabilities services, child and adolescent mental health services.

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Taught in the critical tradition of Kent Law School, this programme examines the theory and practice of human rights law, international criminal law, humanitarian law, transitional justice, migration law and other fields in the context of different policy areas and various academic disciplines. Read more
Taught in the critical tradition of Kent Law School, this programme examines the theory and practice of human rights law, international criminal law, humanitarian law, transitional justice, migration law and other fields in the context of different policy areas and various academic disciplines.

It is particularly suited to those who currently work in, or hope to work in, international organisations, non-governmental organisations, international law firms and foreign affairs departments.

The programme is delivered at our Brussels School of International Studies (BSIS) in conjunction with our law school.

- Extended programme

The extended programme allows students the opportunity to study their subject in greater detail, choosing a wider range of modules, and also provides the opportunity to spend one term at the Canterbury campus. The extended programme is ideal for students who require extra credits, or would like to have more time to pursue an internship.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/772/human-rights-law

Course structure

We are committed to offering flexible study options at the School and enable you to tailor your degree to meet your needs by offering start dates in September and January; full- and part-time study; split-site options, and allowing students to combine two fields of study leading to a degree that reflects both disciplines.

Specialisations

The LLM in Human Rights Law allows students to choose secondary areas of specialisation from the range of programmes offered at BSIS. Thus, a focused programme of study can be constructed by studying Human Rights Law in the context of International Relations; International Conflict and Security; International Migration, and other subject areas we cover.

This leads to the award of an LLM degree in, for example, 'Human Rights Law with International Migration'.

Standard and extended versions

The LLM is offered in both a standard version (90 ECTS credits) and an extended version (120 ECTS credits) and in each case students may take the programme with or without a secondary specialisation. Those on the extended version will take more modules to gain extra credit.

Research areas

- European and Comparative Law

European and Comparative Law is being conducted both at an individual level as well as at the Kent Centre for European and Comparative Law, which was established in 2004 with a view to providing a framework for the further development of the Law School’s research and teaching activities in this area. Research and teaching reaches from general areas of comparative and European public and private law to more specialised areas and specific projects.

- Governance and Regulation

Legal research involves studying processes of regulation and governance. This research cluster focuses on the character of regulation and governance to critically understand the different modes through which governing takes place such as the conditions, relations of power and effects of governance and regulation. Work within this area is methodologically diverse.

Intellectually, it draws on a range of areas including socio-legal studies; Foucauldian perspectives on power and governmentality; Actor Network Theory; feminist political theory and political economy; postcolonial studies; continental political philosophy; and cultural and utopian studies.

- International Law

The starting point for research in international law at Kent Law School is that international law is not apolitical and that its political ideology reflects the interests of powerful states and transnational economic actors. In both research and teaching, staff situate international law in the context of histories of colonialism to analyse critically its development, doctrines and ramifications.

Critical International Law at KLS engages with theories of political economy, international relations and gender and sexuality to contribute to scholarly and policy debates across the spectrum of international law, which includes public, economic, human rights, criminal and commercial law. Scholars at the Centre for Critical International Law engage in the practical application of international law through litigation, training, research and consultancies for international organisations, NGOs and states.

- Law and Political Economy & Law and Development

Law and its relation to political economy are addressed from a variety of angles, including the exploration of the micro- and macrolevel of economic regulations as well as theoretical aspects of law and political economy.

- Legal Theories and Philosophy

Identifying the fact that several academics do work in cultural theory and political theory (including on normative concepts, religion and the state). While feminist and critical legal theories are focal points at Kent Law School, the departmental expertise also covers more essential aspects such as classical jurisprudence and the application of philosophy to law.

Other research areas within KLS include:

- human rights
- labour law
- law and culture
- law, science and technology
- legal methods and epistemology
- public law
- race, religion and the law.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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