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The Postgraduate Certificate in Marine Biology (Conversion Programme) is a part-time programme running from September to March for graduates from non-biological or environmental disciplines unable to meet the entry requirements for direct entry onto the MSc in Marine Biology programme. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Marine Biology (Conversion Programme) is a part-time programme running from September to March for graduates from non-biological or environmental disciplines unable to meet the entry requirements for direct entry onto the MSc in Marine Biology programme. Students successfully passing all modules will be awarded the Postgraduate Certificate in Marine Biology. Those wishing to progress onto the MSc in Marine Biology must obtain an aggregate of at least 60% to be eligible to transfer onto the Master’s programme in the following academic year and will hold exemptions in passed modules taken in the Postgraduate Certificate in Marine Biology if she/he applies for the Master's in Marine Biology within 5 years from the date of successful completion of the Certificate Examinations.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/cku14/

Course Details

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

- Demonstrate a clear understanding and integration of knowledge of marine flora and fauna, the marine environment and its biological and physical properties and processes;

- Define the roles of management and conservation across the marine environment;

- Apply the knowledge and skills acquired in this course in the working environment enabling the development of policy

Format

This part time 30 credit programme will run two days a week from September to the end of February. Three modules (BL6010, BL6012 and BL6019) will run from September to December with examinations in December and one module (BL6016) will run from mid- January to the end of February with an examination at the end of February. There will be continuous assessment associated with all four modules on the programme and it is expected that students will also need to do significant reading of texts and scientific journals in their own time during the programme to show their wider knowledge of the subject matter.

Students take four taught modules to the value of 30 credits as follows:

BL6010 Characteristics of the Marine Environment (5 credits)
BL6012 Marine Megafauna (10 credits)
BL6016 Marine Ecology and Conservation (10 Credits)
BL6019 Ecological Applications of Geographical Information Systems (5 credits)

Assessment

This part time 30 credit programme will run two days a week from September to the end of February. Three modules (BL6010, BL6012 and BL6019) will run from September to December with examinations in December and one module (BL6016) will run from mid- January to the end of February with an examination at the end of February. There will be continuous assessment associated with all four modules on the programme and it is expected that students will also need to do significant reading of texts and scientific journals in their own time during the programme to show their wider knowledge of the subject matter.

Careers

As well as a number of professionally certified courses that will be provided throughout the course, students will also gain a variety of technical skills associated with research and computer skills (GIS in particular). Many transferable skills are also fostered through different learning approaches, including critical thinking, problem solving, report writing, oral presentations, statistical analysis, independent research and time management.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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Environmental issues at local, national and global levels are among the foremost challenges facing society today, and the result of complex interactions of natural processes with economic forces and policies. Read more
Environmental issues at local, national and global levels are among the foremost challenges facing society today, and the result of complex interactions of natural processes with economic forces and policies. It is widely recognised that most environmental problems, whether small-scale or global, are the result of a complex interaction of natural processes with economic forces and decisions. This programme provides graduates with a sound theoretical base and practical appreciation of the concepts and methods of environmental and natural resource economics relevant to policy decisions and research. It is designed to suit students with a primary interest in issues and policies concerning the rural environment.

Visit the website https://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/programmes/appenveco/msc/

Structure

For the MSc in Environmental Economics students will take:

- 4 core modules
- 3 elective modules*
- 2 research modules

* including one free choice from across all programmes (subject to approval on the Programme Convenor)

Core Modules:

- Economic Principles [this module must be taken in the first year]
- Economics of Environmental Policy
- Environmental Valuation: Theory, Techniques and Application
- Natural Resource Economics

Elective Modules:

- Applied Econometrics
- Climate Change and Development
- Project Planning and Management
- Environmental Science and Management
- Environmental Assessment
- Environmental Auditing and Environmental Management Systems
- International Environmental Law
- Ethics for Environment and Development
- either Water Resources Management or Sustainable Land Management or Biodiversity, Conservation and Development or Energy and Development
- One module selected from another programme, with the approval of the Programme Convenor

Research Modules:

- Research Methods
- Dissertation

Strengthening quantitative skills:
Some modules in this programme make use of applied mathematics, including use of calculus. If your basic quantitative analysis skills are weak, it is recommended that you should also study the non-examined module: Quantitative Methods (CF04), at or near the start of your studies. Study materials for this module are available to registered students only, and are obtainable through the online learning environment, Moodle, in the Study Skills section.

Teaching & Learning

1. Academic level

All CeDEP programmes are taught to Master’s (Second Cycle) level, which involves building upon existing knowledge and understanding typically associated with the Bachelor’s (First Cycle) level or its equivalent. Study at Master’s level requires:

- originality in developing and/or applying ideas, and extending or enhancing previous learning

- application of knowledge and understanding, including problem solving in new or unfamiliar environments within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts

- integration of knowledge and handling of complexity

- formulating judgements with incomplete or limited information, including reflection on social and ethical responsibilities

- clear and unambiguous communication of conclusions, and the knowledge and rationale underpinning these, to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- learning skills to study in a manner that may be largely self-directed or autonomous

Prospective students should note that distance education of this kind demands a high degree of commitment, determination and self-discipline. Whilst CeDEP provides significant support through the tutorial system and by other means, students taking on programmes of this nature should possess a strong measure of self-reliance.

2. Study Expectations

- How long will it take?
For students in full time employment, the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma, usually take three or four years to complete and the Certificate 2 years.

- When can I study?
You can begin your studies in either February or June. The examinations for all students are in October. The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June.

- How many hours a week?
For the 30 week study period starting in February, you will need to allocate 5–6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15 week session, 10–12 hours per module, per week is recommended.

- How many modules can I take per study year?
We strongly recommend that students should take only one or two modules in their first year, so that they can adjust to studying at a distance, whilst combining this with work and family life.

Students wishing to complete an MSc in two years they will need to enrol/pay for four core modules and both Research Methods and the Dissertation in the first year although the Dissertation is written and submitted in the second year. Please contact your programme convenor by email.

3. Assessment

- How you will be assessed
For each module you will sit a two-hour unseen examination held on a specific date in October, worth 80% of your total module mark. There is also an Examined Assignment (worth 20% of the total module mark) which is submitted during the study year and marked by your tutor.

- Examination arrangements
Examinations are held in students’ countries of residence, using the University of London’s network of approved Overseas Examination Authorities. Fees for taking examinations at all examination centres other than London are the responsibility of the student.

Assignments are submitted to CeDEP electronically via the online learning environment.

- Assessment of the Research Component
The Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541) are not assessed through final written examinations. These two modules constitute the Research Component of an MSc and are assessed entirely by submitted coursework.

4. Research Component

In order to qualify for an MSc, it is mandatory for CeDEP students to pass the Research Component.

The Research Component comprises two of the nine modules necessary for completion of an MSc. These are a Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541). The modules are assessed as follows:

- P506 through two examined assignments submitted during the study year
- P541 through a 10,000 word dissertation

The Research Component is studied over two consecutive years. The Research Methods module (P506) must be studied and successfully passed before the Dissertation module (P541). This is because it provides skills and techniques which will assist with the subsequent development and conduct of your research and preparation of your dissertation. Students are required to enrol and pay for P506 and P541 at the same time.

The dissertation is usually carried out during the final year of registration with CeDEP. Students conduct desk- or field-based research in a relevant topic of their choice. All research topics are subject to approval and each student is assigned a personal supervisor. Background reading and preparation of the proposal take place between the October exams and commencement of the final study year in February.

Scholarships

For further details and information on external scholarships visit the Scholarships section (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/)

Career prospects for graduates

Graduates of this programme will typically find work as environmental economists and advisers in the following fields:

- government ministries undertaking environmental planning and policy analysis work

- public and private sector companies conducting analyses of the environmental effects of economic activity

- international and non-governmental organisations concerned with the environmental implications of economic change and the economic implications of global environmental change

- consultancy work within the broad arena of environmental economics and policy

- applied research and teaching in institutions of research and higher education

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/applying/

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This programme is perfect training for those concerned with the management of natural resources or the implementation of environmental policy at local and international level, in communities, or in corporate and government organisations. Read more
This programme is perfect training for those concerned with the management of natural resources or the implementation of environmental policy at local and international level, in communities, or in corporate and government organisations. You will gain an understanding of the principal environmental policy issues confronting managers in diverse geographical and culture situations, and an awareness of the ethical and moral issues involved the use of natural resources. You will also benefit from both an academic award and professional recognition from partaking in one study programme.

This course takes a multidisciplinary approach to current issues of global environmental concern. It is relevant to those who are concerned with the management of resources and the making and implementation of policies that have an environmental impact at local, national and international levels.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/programmes/environmental/msc/

Structure

For the MSc in Environmental Management students will take:

- 4 core modules
- 3 elective modules*
- 2 research modules

* including one free choice from across all programmes (subject to approval on the Programme Convenor)

Core Modules:

- Introduction to Environmental Economics & Policy
- Environmental Science & Management
- Environmental Assessment
- Environmental Auditing and Environmental Management Systems

Elective Modules:

- Energy and Development
- Environmental Valuation: Theory, Techniques and Application
- Climate Change and Development
- Water Resources Management
- NGO Management
- Sustainable Land Management
- International Environmental Law
- Ethics for Environment and Development
- One module selected from another programme, with the approval of the Programme Convenor

Research Modules:

- Research Methods
- Dissertation

Teaching & Learning

1. Academic level

All CeDEP programmes are taught to Master’s (Second Cycle) level, which involves building upon existing knowledge and understanding typically associated with the Bachelor’s (First Cycle) level or its equivalent. Study at Master’s level requires:

- originality in developing and/or applying ideas, and extending or enhancing previous learning

- application of knowledge and understanding, including problem solving in new or unfamiliar environments within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts

- integration of knowledge and handling of complexity

- formulating judgements with incomplete or limited information, including reflection on social and ethical responsibilities

- clear and unambiguous communication of conclusions, and the knowledge and rationale underpinning these, to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- learning skills to study in a manner that may be largely self-directed or autonomous

Prospective students should note that distance education of this kind demands a high degree of commitment, determination and self-discipline. Whilst CeDEP provides significant support through the tutorial system and by other means, students taking on programmes of this nature should possess a strong measure of self-reliance.

2. Study Expectations

- How long will it take?
For students in full time employment, the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma, usually take three or four years to complete and the Certificate 2 years.

- When can I study?
You can begin your studies in either February or June. The examinations for all students are in October. The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June.

- How many hours a week?
For the 30 week study period starting in February, you will need to allocate 5–6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15 week session, 10–12 hours per module, per week is recommended.

- How many modules can I take per study year?
We strongly recommend that students should take only one or two modules in their first year, so that they can adjust to studying at a distance, whilst combining this with work and family life.

Students wishing to complete an MSc in two years they will need to enrol/pay for four core modules and both Research Methods and the Dissertation in the first year although the Dissertation is written and submitted in the second year. Please contact your programme convenor by email.

3. Assessment

- How you will be assessed
For each module you will sit a two-hour unseen examination held on a specific date in October, worth 80% of your total module mark. There is also an Examined Assignment (worth 20% of the total module mark) which is submitted during the study year and marked by your tutor.

- Examination arrangements
Examinations are held in students’ countries of residence, using the University of London’s network of approved Overseas Examination Authorities. Fees for taking examinations at all examination centres other than London are the responsibility of the student.
Assignments are submitted to CeDEP electronically via the online learning environment.

- Assessment of the Research Component
The Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541) are not assessed through final written examinations. These two modules constitute the Research Component of an MSc and are assessed entirely by submitted coursework.

4. Research Component

In order to qualify for an MSc, it is mandatory for CeDEP students to pass the Research Component.

The Research Component comprises two of the nine modules necessary for completion of an MSc. These are a Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541). The modules are assessed as follows:

- P506 through two examined assignments submitted during the study year
- P541 through a 10,000 word dissertation

The Research Component is studied over two consecutive years. The Research Methods module (P506) must be studied and successfully passed before the Dissertation module (P541). This is because it provides skills and techniques which will assist with the subsequent development and conduct of your research and preparation of your dissertation. Students are required to enrol and pay for P506 and P541 at the same time.

The dissertation is usually carried out during the final year of registration with CeDEP. Students conduct desk- or field-based research in a relevant topic of their choice. All research topics are subject to approval and each student is assigned a personal supervisor. Background reading and preparation of the proposal take place between the October exams and commencement of the final study year in February.

Career prospects for graduates

Graduates of this programme typically apply skills in natural resource management, environmental appraisal, environmental auditing and analysis and policy design to the work of:

- government ministries and related agencies, performing environmental planning and/or policy analysis work

- private companies and consultancies preparing environmental assessments, evaluations and policy advice

- corporations implementing programmes to meet goals of social and environmental responsibility

- research and educational institutions involved in environmental management and sustainable development

- international and non-governmental organisations concerned with economic development and environmental change

- charitable trusts and organisations carrying out conservation and educational field work

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/applying/

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Most of the world’s poorest people live in rural areas. These programmes will give you the scientific, technological and economic knowledge and the skills to analyse and tackle the poverty suffered by these people. Read more
Most of the world’s poorest people live in rural areas. These programmes will give you the scientific, technological and economic knowledge and the skills to analyse and tackle the poverty suffered by these people. You will be able to work on real issues, using the specialist expertise gained from your course.

The programmes integrate theory and practice and provide an understanding of how to manage organisations within their own cultural, political, technological, social, and institutional contexts, with the ultimate aim of solving problems of poverty reduction.

Visit the website https://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/programmes/poverty-reduction-policy-and-practice/msc/

Structure

For the MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice students will take:

- 3 core modules
- 4 elective modules*
- 2 research modules

* including one free choice from across all specialisms

- Specialisms:
If you are taking an MSc or a Postgraduate Diploma you may choose elective modules within a particular specialism. Choosing a specialism creates the opportunity for a clear focus in your studies, whereby you can develop understanding and skills relevant to specific professional interests. The name of the specialism will appear on the certificate awarded.

Core modules:

- Economics and Institutions for Development
- Understanding Poverty [compulsory]
- Managing Knowledge and Communication for Development
- Climate Change and Development

Elective Modules:
Specialisms
Development Management:
- Rural Finance
- Rural Development
- NGO Management
- Project Planning and Management
- Gender and Social Inequality
- Management in Rural Development

Inclusive Growth:
- Agricultural Policy and Trade
- Energy and Development
- Food Security and Social Protection
- Political Economy of Public Policy
- Rural Finance

Natural Resource Management:
- Water Resources Management
- Sustainable Land Management
- Environmental Science and Management
- Natural Resource Economics
- Biodiversity, Conservation and Development
- International Environmental Law

Research Modules:
- Research Methods
- Dissertation

Teaching & Learning

1. Academic level

All CeDEP programmes are taught to Master’s (Second Cycle) level, which involves building upon existing knowledge and understanding typically associated with the Bachelor’s (First Cycle) level or its equivalent. Study at Master’s level requires:

- originality in developing and/or applying ideas, and extending or enhancing previous learning

- application of knowledge and understanding, including problem solving in new or unfamiliar environments within broader (or multidisciplinary)contexts

- integration of knowledge and handling of complexity

- formulating judgements with incomplete or limited information, including reflection on social and ethical responsibilities

- clear and unambiguous communication of conclusions, and the knowledge and rationale underpinning these, to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- learning skills to study in a manner that may be largely self-directed or autonomous

Prospective students should note that distance education of this kind demands a high degree of commitment, determination and self-discipline. Whilst CeDEP provides significant support through the tutorial system and by other means, students taking on programmes of this nature should possess a strong measure of self-reliance.

2. Study Expectations

- How long will it take?
For students in full time employment, the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma, usually take three or four years to complete and the Certificate 2 years.

- When can I study?
You can begin your studies in either February or June. The examinations for all students are in October. The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June.

- How many hours a week?
For the 30 week study period starting in February, you will need to allocate 5–6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15 week session, 10–12 hours per module, per week is recommended.

- How many modules can I take per study year?
We strongly recommend that students should take only one or two modules in their first year, so that they can adjust to studying at a distance, whilst combining this with work and family life.

Students wishing to complete an MSc in two years they will need to enrol/pay for three core modules and both Research Methods and the Dissertation in the first year although the Dissertation is written and submitted in the second year. Please contact your programme convenor by email.

3. Assessment

- How you will be assessed
For each module you will sit a two-hour unseen examination held on a specific date in October, worth 80% of your total module mark. There is also an Examined Assignment (worth 20% of the total module mark) which is submitted during the study year and marked by your tutor.

- Examination arrangements
Examinations are held in students’ countries of residence, using the University of London’s network of approved Overseas Examination Authorities. Fees for taking examinations at all examination centres other than London are the responsibility of the student.

- Assignments are submitted to CeDEP electronically via the online learning environment.
Assessment of the Research Component

The Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541) are not assessed through final written examinations. These two modules constitute the Research Component of an MSc and are assessed entirely by submitted coursework.

4. Research Component

In order to qualify for an MSc, it is mandatory for CeDEP students to pass the Research Component.

The Research Component comprises two of the nine modules necessary for completion of an MSc. These are a Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541). The modules are assessed as follows:

- P506 through two examined assignments submitted during the study year
- P541 through a 10,000 word dissertation

The Research Component is studied over two consecutive years. The Research Methods module (P506) must be studied and successfully passed before the Dissertation module (P541). This is because it provides skills and techniques which will assist with the subsequent development and conduct of your research and preparation of your dissertation. Students are required to enrol and pay for P506 and P541 at the same time.

The dissertation is usually carried out during the final year of registration with CeDEP. Students conduct desk- or field-based research in a relevant topic of their choice. All research topics are subject to approval and each student is assigned a personal supervisor. Background reading and preparation of the proposal take place between the October exams and commencement of the final study year in February.

Scholarships

For further details and information on external scholarships visit the Scholarships section (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/)

Career prospects for graduates

As with all CeDEP programmes, the Poverty Reduction programme is designed to assist both existing development professionals and people moving into the field of international development. For the former, the programme offers a chance to upgrade and update their expertise, and to reflect systematically and in depth on their accumulated experience in the light of up-to-date theory and literature. It is anticipated that most graduates of this programme will find work in:

- government ministries and other public sector organisations concerned with policy analysis and implementation for poverty reduction

- international and non-governmental organisations concerned with issues of poverty reduction

- consultancies and development projects involved in activities promoting poverty reduction

Particular opportunities may be related to the choice of specialisms in natural resources management, agricultural and rural development, or development management

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/applying/

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The rationale for this innovative programme of study lies in the global environmental and development challenges that have been articulated in the Sustainable Development Goals. Read more
The rationale for this innovative programme of study lies in the global environmental and development challenges that have been articulated in the Sustainable Development Goals. It is clear that solutions to the challenge of sustainable development require holistic, integrated and co-ordinated actions across a very wide range of sectors, and will increasingly require a multidisciplinary approach. This programme aims to provide students with a broad grounding in the main concepts associated with sustainable development, but also provides the opportunity to specialise in one area in greater depth.

Visit the website https://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/programmes/sustainable/msc/

Structure

For the MSc in Sustainable Development students will take:

- 3 core modules
- 4 elective modules*
- 2 research modules

* including one free choice from across all programmes (subject to approval on the Programme Convenor)

- Specialisms
If you are taking an MSc or a Postgraduate Diploma you choose elective modules within a particular specialism. This creates the opportunity for a clear focus in your studies, whereby you can develop understanding and skills relevant to specific professional interests. The name of the specialism will appear on the certificate awarded.

Core Modules:

- Understanding Sustainable Development [compulsory]
- Climate Change and Development
- Environmental Science and Management
- Ethics for Environment and Development

Elective modules:
Specialisms

Development Management:
- Economics and Institutions for Development
- Managing Knowledge and Communication for Development
- NGO Management
- Project Planning & Management
- Management in Rural Development

Environmental Economics:
- Economic Principles [advised]
- Economics of Environmental Policy
- Environmental Valuation: Theory, Techniques and Application
- Natural Resource Economics

Environmental Management:
- Introduction to Environmental Economics & Policy
- Environmental Assessment
- Environmental Auditing and Environmental Management Systems
- International Environmental Law

Natural Resource Management:
- Water Resources Management
- Sustainable Land Management
- Biodiversity, Conservation and Development
- Natural Resource Economics

Rural Development and Change:
- Agricultural Trade and Policy
- Understanding Poverty
- Food Security and Social Protection
- Rural Development
- Gender & Social Inequality

Research component :
- Research Methods
- Dissertation

Teaching & Learning

1. Academic level

All CeDEP programmes are taught to Master’s (Second Cycle) level, which involves building upon existing knowledge and understanding typically associated with the Bachelor’s (First Cycle) level or its equivalent. Study at Master’s level requires:

- originality in developing and/or applying ideas, and extending or enhancing previous learning

- application of knowledge and understanding, including problem solving in new or unfamiliar environments within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts

- integration of knowledge and handling of complexity

- formulating judgements with incomplete or limited information, including reflection on social and ethical responsibilities

- clear and unambiguous communication of conclusions, and the knowledge and rationale underpinning these, to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- learning skills to study in a manner that may be largely self-directed or autonomous

Prospective students should note that distance education of this kind demands a high degree of commitment, determination and self-discipline. Whilst CeDEP provides significant support through the tutorial system and by other means, students taking on programmes of this nature should possess a strong measure of self-reliance.

2. Study Expectations

- How long will it take?
For students in full time employment, the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma, usually take three or four years to complete and the Certificate 2 years.

- When can I study?
You can begin your studies in either February or June. The examinations for all students are in October. The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June.

- How many hours a week?
For the 30 week study period starting in February, you will need to allocate 5–6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15 week session, 10–12 hours per module, per week is recommended.

- How many modules can I take per study year?
We strongly recommend that students should take only one or two modules in their first year, so that they can adjust to studying at a distance, whilst combining this with work and family life.

Students wishing to complete an MSc in two years they will need to enrol/pay for three core modules and both Research Methods and the Dissertation in the first year although the Dissertation is written and submitted in the second year. Please contact your programme convenor by email.

3. Assessment

- How you will be assessed
For each module you will sit a two-hour unseen examination held on a specific date in October, worth 80% of your total module mark. There is also an Examined Assignment (worth 20% of the total module mark) which is submitted during the study year and marked by your tutor.

- Examination arrangements
Examinations are held in students’ countries of residence, using the University of London’s network of approved Overseas Examination Authorities. Fees for taking examinations at all examination centres other than London are the responsibility of the student.

Assignments are submitted to CeDEP electronically via the online learning environment.

- Assessment of the Research Component
The Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541) are not assessed through final written examinations. These two modules constitute the Research Component of an MSc and are assessed entirely by submitted coursework.

4. Research Component

In order to qualify for an MSc, it is mandatory for CeDEP students to pass the Research Component.

The Research Component comprises two of the nine modules necessary for completion of an MSc. These are a Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541). The modules are assessed as follows:

- RP506 through two examined assignments submitted during the study year
- P541through a 10,000 word dissertation

The Research Component is studied over two consecutive years. The Research Methods module (P506) must be studied and successfully passed before the Dissertation module (P541). This is because it provides skills and techniques which will assist with the subsequent development and conduct of your research and preparation of your dissertation. Students are required to enrol and pay for P506 and P541 at the same time.

The dissertation is usually carried out during the final year of registration with CeDEP. Students conduct desk- or field-based research in a relevant topic of their choice. All research topics are subject to approval and each student is assigned a personal supervisor. Background reading and preparation of the proposal take place between the October exams and commencement of the final study year in February.

Scholarships

For further details and information on external scholarships visit the Scholarships section (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/)

Career prospects for graduates

Graduates of this programme will have a wide range of backgrounds and will typically find work in:

- government ministries and other public sector organisations concerned with policy analysis in the fields of sustainable development and environmental planning

- international and non-governmental organisations concerned with the sustainable dimensions of economic change

- consultancies and development projects concerned with issues of sustainability and analyses of the interface between environment and poverty

- applied research and teaching in institutions of research and higher education

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/applying/

Read less
Agriculture plays a critical role in poverty reduction by providing food, raw materials, employment, and ecosystem services. However, its ability to do this is threatened by demands from rising populations, stagnant yields, and increasing pressures on natural resources. Read more
Agriculture plays a critical role in poverty reduction by providing food, raw materials, employment, and ecosystem services. However, its ability to do this is threatened by demands from rising populations, stagnant yields, and increasing pressures on natural resources. Improving sustainable agricultural productivity and secure and equitable access to food has become a major global challenge.

This course provides students with the essential tools required for theoretical and empirical economic analysis, particularly in relation to the renewable natural resources sector. It aims to equip students with the rigorous technical skills that are generic to the field of agricultural economics, while maintaining a focus on applications rather than abstract analysis. Students are able to take modules orientated towards development, production, marketing, policy, and economic transition. The course is designed for those who wish to pursue a career as an agricultural economist or to undertake higher studies within this area.

Visit the website https://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/programmes/agecon/

Structure

For the MSc in Agricultural Economics students will take:

- 4 core modules
- 3 elective modules*
- 2 research modules

* including one free choice from across all programmes (subject to approval on the Programme Convenor)

Core modules:

- either Economic Principles or Economics and Institutions for Development [the chosen module must be taken in the first year]
- Agricultural Policy and Trade
- Food Security and Social Protection
- Political Economy of Public Policy

Elective modules:

- Applied Econometrics
- Climate Change and Development
- Natural Resource Economics
- Project Planning and Management
- Rural Development
- Rural Finance
- Sustainable Land Management
- Understanding Poverty (subject to approval by the Programme Convenor)
- Water Resources Management
- One module selected from another programme, with the approval of the Programme Convenor

Research component:

- Dissertation
- Research Methods

Strengthening quantitative skills:
It is recommended that students whose basic quantitative analysis skills are weak should also take a non-examined module:Quantitative methods (CF04) at or near the start of their studies. Study materials may be obtained from CeDEP’s online learning environment.

Teaching & Learning

1. Academic level

All CeDEP programmes are taught to Master’s (Second Cycle) level, which involves building upon existing knowledge and understanding typically associated with the Bachelor’s (First Cycle) level or its equivalent. Study at Master’s level requires:

- originality in developing and/or applying ideas, and extending or enhancing previous learning

- application of knowledge and understanding, including problem solving in new or unfamiliar environments within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts

- integration of knowledge and handling of complexity

- formulating judgements with incomplete or limited information, including reflection on social and ethical responsibilities

- clear and unambiguous communication of conclusions, and the knowledge and rationale underpinning these, to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- learning skills to study in a manner that may be largely self-directed or autonomous

Prospective students should note that distance education of this kind demands a high degree of commitment, determination and self-discipline. Whilst CeDEP provides significant support through the tutorial system and by other means, students taking on programmes of this nature should possess a strong measure of self-reliance.

2. Study Expectations

- How long will it take?:
For students in full time employment, the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma, usually take three or four years to complete and the Certificate 2 years.

- When can I study?
You can begin your studies in either February or June. The examinations for all students are in October. The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June.

- How many hours a week?
For the 30 week study period starting in February, you will need to allocate 5–6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15 week session, 10–12 hours per module, per week is recommended.

- How many modules can I take per study year?
We strongly recommend that students should take only one or two modules in their first year, so that they can adjust to studying at a distance, whilst combining this with work and family life.

Students wishing to complete an MSc in two years they will need to enrol/pay for four core modules and both Research Methods and the Dissertation in the first year although the Dissertation is written and submitted in the second year. Please contact your programme convenor by email.

3. Assessment

- How you will be assessed
For each module you will sit a two-hour unseen examination held on a specific date in October, worth 80% of your total module mark. There is also an Examined Assignment (worth 20% of the total module mark) which is submitted during the study year and marked by your tutor.

- Examination arrangements
Examinations are held in students’ countries of residence, using the University of London’s network of approved Overseas Examination Authorities. Fees for taking examinations at all examination centres other than London are the responsibility of the student.

Assignments are submitted to CeDEP electronically via the online learning environment.

- Assessment of the Research Component
The Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541) are not assessed through final written examinations. These two modules constitute the Research Component of an MSc and are assessed entirely by submitted coursework.

4. Research Component

In order to qualify for an MSc, it is mandatory for CeDEP students to pass the Research Component.

The Research Component comprises two of the nine modules necessary for completion of an MSc. These are a Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541). The modules are assessed as follows:

- P506 through two examined assignments submitted during the study year
- P541 through a 10,000 word dissertation

The Research Component is studied over two consecutive years. The Research Methods module (P506) must be studied and successfully passed before the Dissertation module (P541). This is because it provides skills and techniques which will assist with the subsequent development and conduct of your research and preparation of your dissertation. Students are required to enrol and pay for P506 and P541 at the same time.

The dissertation is usually carried out during the final year of registration with CeDEP. Students conduct desk- or field-based research in a relevant topic of their choice. All research topics are subject to approval and each student is assigned a personal supervisor. Background reading and preparation of the proposal take place between the October exams and commencement of the final study year in February.

Scholarships

For further details and information on external scholarships visit the Scholarships section (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/)

Career prospects for graduates

Typically, graduates of this programme will find work as applied economists in the following fields:

- government ministries undertaking work in agricultural policy analysis
- public and private sector companies involved in upstream and downstream agricultural industries
- international and non-governmental organisations concerned with the economic analysis of agricultural sector issues
- applied research and teaching in institutions of research and higher education

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/applying/

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Maynooth University, Department of Education are offering an exciting and innovative Postgraduate Diploma in Educational Leadership and Management (Future… Read more

Maynooth University, Department of Education are offering an exciting and innovative Postgraduate Diploma in Educational Leadership and Management (Future Leaders) for teachers who seek, or are currently in, leadership roles. The Future Leaders programme includes a combination of practical skills and theoretical foundations to support preparation for leadership and management positions at all levels.

The programme is designed and delivered by experienced leaders from a variety of professional education roles and has input from national and international academic/practitioner experts in the areas of educational leadership and management.

The diploma is offered at Level 9, with 60 credits and will be completed over one year on a part-time basis.

The programme will cost €2,900 & the current postgraduate student levy see link below:

https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships/fees

 

All fee payments and student levy queries should be referred to the Fee’s Office at Maynooth University: 

 

Location:

The course will be offered in the academic year (2018/2019) in the following venues (times & days) subject to sufficient numbers:

Maynooth University: Monday – 5.00-8.00pm

Tralee Education Centre: Monday – 5.00-8.00pm

North Dublin Centre (Drumcondra Area – Venue to be confirmed): Tuesday – 5.00-8.00pm

Carrick-on-Shannon Education Centre – Wednesday – 5.00-8.00pm

Laois Education Centre (Portlaoise) : Thursday - 5.00-8.00pm

 

Information Sessions / Open Nights:

If you would like to find out more about the programme and meet members of the course staff, the following open nights/information sessions will provide full details.

(i)  Maynooth University, Education Lecture Theatre, Education House (located in Car Park 12, North Campus - 6.00-7.30pm on Monday 26th February 2018 – (suitable for Drumcondra area candidates also)

(ii)  Tralee Education Centre – Monday 19th February 2018 - 5.00 – 6.30pm.

(iii) Carrick-on-Shannon Education Centre – Wednesday 21st February 2018 – 5.00-6.30pm

(iv) Laois Education Centre (Portlaoise) – Thursday 22nd February 2018 – 5.00-6.30pm

 

Please register your interest in attending the Information Session/Open Night of your choice by completing the following online form Please ensure that you select the centre you wish to attend.

Please note: Registering your interest for an Open Night/Information Session is not a guarantee of a place on the programme or application for same.

How to apply for the programme :                    

The PAC system is now open for applications to the Future Leaders Programme, Postgraduate Diploma in Educational Leadership and Management (PGDELM) and will close at 12.00 noon on 8th May 2018.

Application Process:

(i) Places on the course will be limited.

(ii) Fully completed eligible applications only will be considered.

In order to be prepared to make an official application via the Postgraduate Application Centre (PAC) http://www.pac.ie, please have the following documents ready:

  • Certified copies* of all official transcripts of results showing date of conferral or degree/diploma parchments (Primary Degree, Teaching Qualification or Concurrent Degree (including Teaching Qualification).
  • Certified copy* of birth certificate or valid passport.

Please note: A *certified copy is a copy of an original document that has been verified as being a true copy after the original document has been sighted by an authorized person (a member of An Garda Siochana, a Solicitor, or Commissioner for Oaths)

Apply Now

Modules include:

  • Leading and Managing Educational Innovation
  • Leadership for Enhancing Cultures of Communication
  • Participative Research as Leadership Practice
  • The Person and The Professional: Who am I as Leader?
  • Legal Contexts, Policy and Practice
  • Coaching & Mentoring in & as Leadership Practice

Course Duration: 1 year part-time



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The PhD (or doctorate) is the highest academic qualification available. A PhD degree is designed to provide strong grounding in highly specialised areas through research. Read more
The PhD (or doctorate) is the highest academic qualification available. A PhD degree is designed to provide strong grounding in highly specialised areas through research. Its goal is to enable students to be researchers in psychology, contributing to academic knowledge and developing work of internationally publishable quality. Bangor Psychology offers PhD supervision in the following specialisms:

• Cognitive Neuroscience
• Learning and Development
• Language
• Clinical Neuroscience
• Clinical and Health Psychology
• Experimental Consumer Psychology

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
You must have an undergraduate degree in psychology or a related subject, with a minimum degree class of 2:1 or equivalent, and additional postgraduate training (see below).

STUDY MODE AND DURATION
Full-time PhD students normally spend three years in study. If you do not already have a Master’s degree, then we would normally expect you to complete such a degree prior to starting the PhD programme.If you have already obtained an appropriate Master’s degree, you may be required to take one or more relevant modules in the School’s MSc in Psychological Research to complement your background and expertise.

Part-time students have five years to complete the PhD.
SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE
Three members of academic staff will be helping you with your research: a principal supervisor, a second supervisor and a chairperson - this last from a different research specialism. The major role of the second supervisor is to provide additional input on your research and to take over the supervision of the dissertation should the primary supervisor need to withdraw. The major responsibility of the chairperson is to ensure that a "best fit" is found between you and your supervisor. This group meets periodically with you in order to provide guidance on your research and to help with any difficulty that you might be experiencing.

REVIEWS AND PROGRESS TOWARDS THE PhD DEGREE

Probationary period
The first year acts as a probationary period. Your progress will be reviewed in February and June (for full-time students), according to the requirements of the School and the goals outlined in your individual course of study. If, after these reviews, your supervisory committee considers that your progress has been fully satisfactory, then you will cease to be “probationary”.

Subsequent reviews
During the second year there will be another research review in June, and again in February of your third year. If you have not completed the write-up of your thesis by June of the third year, there will be another review meeting in June of that year (and every February and June of subsequent years until completion).

The purpose of these meetings is to ensure that you are always moving forward effectively towards completion, and to enable your committee to provide any assistance that may be necessary to help guarantee completion of the work.

YOUR PhD THESIS
Your research thesis is a large project. It will require attention throughout your studies. We have established a system to keep your research on track and help you manage your time. Completing a successful thesis builds on skills and knowledge acquired throughout the MSc modules. It constitutes an original piece of research, usually including several experiments or observational studies.

Your PhD thesis must be defended at the end of your studies in a viva voce examination. This comprises an oral report of the research in the presence of an examining committee.

CHOOSING A RESEARCH TOPIC AND SUPERVISOR
If you are thinking of studying for a PhD degree, one of your first actions, before applying for admission to the programme, is to identify and communicate with a potential supervisor in the relevant area. The research interests and publications of our academic staff are listed within our web pages. Contact the people whose research is most relevant to the area in which you wish to work. In many cases, it is best to make initial contact by e-mail or by letter.

FUNDING
Funding for full-time PhD study (tuition fees plus living allowance) is available through a number of sources, including the ESRC, the University of Wales Bangor, and the School of Psychology, which offers a number of studentships aimed at exceptional candidates from the UK, Europe, and internationally. Our website offers more details on the funding available for PhD students.

You can obtain more information on funding opportunities from our Deputy School Administrator (Paula Gurteen, ). Alternatively, you can discuss funding options with your potential supervisor.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE
We invite applications for our funded studentships at set times throughout the year, both on our website and on jobs.ac.uk.

Applications from students who have already obtained funding for their studies are welcome at any time and can be done online on the University website.

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Top-up your existing qualification to a valuable Masters degree in just one year. Our course will suit you if you already hold the advanced level CIPD qualification of professional practitioner standards awards or a Postgraduate Diploma in Human Resource Management. Read more
Top-up your existing qualification to a valuable Masters degree in just one year. Our course will suit you if you already hold the advanced level CIPD qualification of professional practitioner standards awards or a Postgraduate Diploma in Human Resource Management. You can study with us while continuing to work.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/human-resource-management-ma-stage-three-only-top-up

In our rapidly-changing business world, human resource managers have an ever-widening remit. Increasingly, organisations want to measure their effectiveness globally, rather than locally, and take strategic decisions that influence their overall structure and function. HR professionals will be involved in much of this work.

This academically rigorous course provides a sound basis for taking on senior HR roles. It focuses on how the global marketplace impacts upon labour markets, looking particularly at the changing nature of employment after the worldwide credit crunch.

Our team at Lord Ashcroft International Business School believes that managers learn with and from each other to find solutions to real-life problems at work. That's why we encourage participative learning methods and work-based assignments so that it's not just you who benefits from your development, but also your employer.

Our course is recognised by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD), the UK's most credible specialist human resources training and awarding body.

While you’re here, you’ll benefit from state-of-the-art teaching and learning facilities, study areas, campus libraries with online databases containing professional journals, plus our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) through which you can access study resources and help.

Chelmsford: Semester 1: two three-day teaching blocks; Semester 2: one two-day teaching block plus independent study
Cambridge: Trimester 3 (June): one three-day teaching block plus independent study; Semester 2 (February): HRM in the Global Context plus independent study

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/human-resource-management-ma-stage-three-only-top-up

Careers

Your qualification will be recognised by CIPD, the UK's most credible specialist human resources training and awarding body.

Our course has a strong focus on the skills and knowledge you need for a successful career in human resource management. It’s essential if you’re preparing for, or aspiring to, managerial roles in HR either in UK or overseas.

Modules & assessment

Cambridge trimester 3 (June):
Three-day teaching-block plus independent study support from dissertation supervisor

Cambridge semester 2 (February):
HRM in the Global Context plus independent study with support from dissertation supervisor

Chelmsford semester 1 (September):
Two three-day teaching blocks: HRM Strategy in a Competitive Environment and HRD in an International Environment

Chelmsford semester (2 February):
One two-day teaching block plus independent study support from dissertation supervisor

Assessment

We’ll asses your progress through modular assignments that incorporate written reports and essays, oral presentations, case study analysis, exams and a portfolio.

Your faculty

The Lord Ashcroft International Business School is one of the largest business schools in the East of England, with nearly 100 full-time teaching staff and approximately 6,000 students from more than 100 countries.

Our striking and award-winning business school building in Chelmsford, as well as new buildings in Cambridge, offer the most advanced learning technologies. We’re well-recognised for our centres of excellence by students, employers and professional bodies alike.

What makes us stand out is that our courses don't just give you sound academic knowledge – they’re at the cutting edge of current business practice and highly relevant to employers. This is owing to the close links we have with the business community and the partnerships we've developed with a wide variety of businesses and public service organisations.

We're interested in people who are confident, ambitious and ready to take the challenge of making a difference in the world of business. If that's you, we'd love to hear from you.

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Course content. The MA performers route is led by mapdance company Artistic Directors, Yael Flexer and Detta Howe. Read more

Course content

The MA performers route is led by mapdance company Artistic Directors, Yael Flexer and Detta Howe.

Working intensively with international guest choreographers, students develop their technical and performance skills and deepen understanding of the creative process through experiencing varied choreographic methodologies and artistic approaches. 

mapdance operates as a professional company with daily technique classes and rehearsals. From mid-February to May, the company tours nationally and internationally whilst also offering educational workshops.

The 2017/18 Repertory includes new commissions and from Niv Sheinfeld and Oren Laor, Laila Diallo, Helen Parlor and Laura Aris.

The Techniques for Performance module accompanying the repertory module (and compulsory for performers route) focuses on excellence in contemporary dance performance involving daily technical training in various dance techniques including release and contemporary techniques, contact improvisation, pilates and Ballet work. This module normally runs autumn and spring semesters.

The MA Performance Dance operates in the context of a professional performance programme and a series of presentations by visiting artists and researchers.

Guest lecturers on the MA have included practitioners and curators all working at the edges of dance research.

There are also opportunities to engage in cutting-edge research with interactive technologies or to market yourself professionally as an artist using DVD and website technologies.

Our facilities

Over the past few years, we’ve redeveloped both of our campuses so that you have the best facilities available for your degree. We pride ourselves on the quality of the learning environment we can offer our students.

At the Bishop Otter campus there is an integrated approach to the provision of learning resources and support. We offer a substantial collection of books, journals and other materials to help you further your research. A range of study areas for group and quiet study including Wi-Fi areas for laptop use are available, or you can use our open access PC and Mac areas. We use an electronic learning environment with an expanding portfolio of online library resources from anywhere at any time.

The Learning Resource is the hub of the learning environment. It has two upper floors of library resources, one for silent study and one for quiet study, both of which have recently been refurbished. On the ground floor, you’ll find the Support and Information Zone, Media Centre, Otter Gallery, Costa Coffee and a variety of IT resources.

The Bishop Otter LRC also offers:

  • 130 open access PC workstations
  • 45 Apple iMacs
  • Ample printing facilities
  • Netbooks available on loan
  • Professional editing suites
  • Media loans counter
  • Wi-Fi and plug points throughout

Dance students have the use of four dance studios, a fully equipped 250-seat theatre and a 110-seat studio theatre.

Where this can take you

This course is suitable for you if you are a recent graduate or a dance artist who wishes to extend their technical and performance skills (and have completed a recognised BA degree). 

It will offer you …

  • an opportunity to work with international established and up and coming choreographers reflect on your professional practice and prior training
  • intensive technical training through a variety of contemporary techniques, Pilates, contact improvisation and Ballet
  • an opportunity to tour the repertoire across the UK and internationally
  • an opportunity to develop your teaching skills within the context of a touring company
  • time to deepen your understanding of your professional skills through practice, research and scholarship
  • professional Development
  • deepening your ability to articulate what you do in written and spoken form
  • a stepping-stone toward PhD study

You will develop skills in…

  • performance
  • technique
  • teaching in the context of a touring company
  • choreographic methodology and critical thinking
  • working independently (via dissertation projects)
  • research and the articulation of that research in writing

It will give you…

  • tools and skills to support you in the transition to professional practice
  • extensive experience of working with established choreographers alongside touring and networking that can aid you in gaining work as a performer or in establishing your work as an independent artist
  • a qualification that can aid in obtaining work within educational and HE institutions
  • preparation for further study i.e. PhD or professionally-related qualifications

Work placements

There are opportunities to engage with cutting edge research into interactive technologies and to market yourself professionally as an artist using DVD and website technologies.

Indicative modules

The MA in performance includes three core modules: Repertory, Techniques for Performance and Dissertation plus one optional module.

The postgraduate diploma includes two core modules: Repertory and Techniques for Performance and an optional module.

Repertory Module:

The repertory module: mapdance encompasses intensive creation periods with international guest choreographer. Students develop their technical and performance skills and deepen understanding of the creative process through experiencing varied choreographic methodologies and artistic approaches. Operating as a professional company with daily technique classes and rehearsals, the creation periods begin in Sept through to February. From mid-February to May, the company tours nationally and internationally whilst also offering educational workshops.

Techniques for Performance Module:

The Techniques for Performance module accompanying the repertory module (and compulsory for performers route) focuses on excellence in contemporary dance performance involving daily technical training in various dance techniques including release and contemporary techniques, contact improvisation, Pilates and Ballet work. This module normally runs autumn and spring semesters.

Teaching and assessment

Assessment on the MA performers route is based on three core modules, Repertory (60 credits), Techniques for Performance (30 credits) and Dissertation (60 credits) plus one optional module (30 credits). 

Assessment on the postgraduate diploma performers route is based on two core modules, Repertory (60 credits), Techniques for Performance (30 credits) and one optional module.

Assessment Techniques for Performance is continuous, that is process based.

Similarly the Repertory module is continuously assessed however the assessment is comprised by marks given by guest choreographers during the creation process and marks given by both Artistic Directors in rehearsal and on tour assessing both process and performance.



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The Master in Green Management, Energy and Corporate Social Responsibility is a 12-month program starting in January and concluding in December. Read more

Program Structure

The Master in Green Management, Energy and Corporate Social Responsibility is a 12-month program starting in January and concluding in December. The structure encompasses four segments, or Terms, from January to December. The program size is 70 ECTS

The first Term (January - February) is characterized by preparatory courses aimed at standardizing the skills of students coming from different backgrounds. This phase consists of 4 in -class courses that are designed to assist students to prepare for the Master
The second Term (February - April) consists of 7 in-class compulsory courses with the purpose of providing the fundamental knowledge and skills to tackle issues related to sustainability and energy challenges;
The third Term (April - July) includes 7 in-class specialization courses. In addition to 3 mandatory courses,each student must choose at least 4 courses aggregating different competencies depending on their interests and the four suggested career path
The fourth Term (September - December) is devoted to a job experience on the topics learned during the Master. The internship length is minimum 10 weeks and it will be based at the company's office. As an alternative students can apply for a research project. Internship and research project will be tutored by Master's faculty members
Filed projects (February - July) allow students to work on real life-business cases
Seminars and workshops, bespoke seminars, workshops and team building activities integrate the learning process during the first, second and third Terms.

MaGER is the first specialized Master program at Bocconi to have introduced the use of wireless devices (e.g. laptop or tablet) and advanced and interactive academic software as well as webinars in the classroom in order to enhance students' learning experience. Therefore, all students will be required to bring their own wireless device for class work.

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Process systems engineering deals with the design, operation, optimisation and control of all kinds of chemical, physical, and biological processes through the use of systematic computer-aided approaches. Read more

Process systems engineering deals with the design, operation, optimisation and control of all kinds of chemical, physical, and biological processes through the use of systematic computer-aided approaches. Its major challenges are the development of concepts, methodologies and models for the prediction of performance and for decision-making for an engineered system.

Who is it for?

Suitable for engineering and applied science graduates who wish to embark on successful careers as process systems engineering professionals. 

The course equips graduates and practising engineers with an in-depth knowledge of the fundamentals of process systems and an excellent competency in the use of state-of-the-art approaches to deal with the major operational and design issues of the modern process industry. The course provides up-to-date technical knowledge and skills required for achieving the best management, design, control and operation of efficient process systems. 

Why this course?

Process systems engineering constitutes an interdisciplinary research area within the chemical engineering discipline. It focuses on the use of experimental techniques and systematic computer-aided methodologies for the design, operation, optimisation and control of chemical, physical, and biological processes, e.g. from chemical and petrochemical processes to pharmaceutical and food processes. 

A distinguished feature of this course is that it is not directed exclusively at chemical engineering graduates. Throughout the years, the course has evolved from discussions with industrial advisory panels, employers, sponsors and previous students. The content of the study programme is updated regularly to reflect changes arising from technical advances, economic factors and changes in legislation, regulations and standards.

By completing this course, a diligent student will be able to: 

  • Evaluate the technical, environmental and economic issues involved in the design and operation of process plants and the current practice in process industries.
  • Apply effectively the knowledge gained to the design, operation, optimisation and control of process systems via proper methodologies and relevant software.
  • Apply independent learning, especially via the effective use of information retrieval systems and a competent and professional approach to solving problems of industrial process systems.
  • Apply and critically evaluate key technical management principles, including project management, people management, technology marketing, product development and finance.
  • Apply advanced approaches and use effectively related tools in more specialised subjects related to process industries (for example risk management, biofuels or CFD tools).
  • Integrate knowledge, understanding and skills from the taught modules in a real-life situation to address problems faced by industrial clients; creating new problem diagnoses, designs, or system insights; and communicating findings in a professional manner in written, oral and visual forms.
  • Define a research question, develop aim(s) and objectives, select and execute a methodology, analyse data, evaluate findings critically and draw justifiable conclusions, demonstrating self-direction and originality of thought.
  • To communicate his/her individual research via a thesis and in an oral presentation in a style suitable for academic and professional audiences.

Accreditation

This MSc degree is accredited by Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE).

Course details

The taught programme for the MSc in Process Systems Engineering is delivered from October to February and is comprised of six compulsory taught modules. There are four optional modules to select the remaining two modules from.

Group project

The Group Project, which runs between February and April, enables you to put the skills and knowledge developed during the course modules into practice in an applied context while gaining transferable skills in project management, teamwork and independent research. The group project is usually sponsored by industrial partners who provide particular problems linked to their plant operations. Projects generally require the group to provide a solution to the operational problem. Potential future employers value this experience. This group project is shared across the MSc in Process Systems Engineering and other courses, giving the added benefit of gaining new insights, ways of thinking, experience and skills from students with other backgrounds

During the project you will develop a range of skills including learning how to establish team member roles and responsibilities, project management, and delivering technical presentations. At the end of the project, all groups submit a written report and deliver a presentation to the industrial partner. This presentation provides the opportunity to develop interpersonal and presentation skills within a professional environment.

It is clear that the modern engineer cannot be divorced from the commercial world. In order to provide practice in this matter, a poster presentation will be required from all students. This presentation provides the opportunity to develop presentation skills and effectively handle questions about complex issues in a professional manner.

Part-time students are encouraged to participate in a group project as it provides a wealth of learning opportunities. However, an option of an individual dissertation is available if agreed with the Course Director.

Individual project

The individual research project allows you to delve deeper into a specific area of interest. As our academic research is so closely related to industry, it is very common for our industrial partners to put forward real-world problems or areas of development as potential research topics.

The individual research project component takes place between April/May and August for full-time students. For part-time students, it is common that their research projects are undertaken in collaboration with their place of work under academic supervision; given the approval of the Course Director.

Individual research projects undertaken may involve designs, computer simulations, feasibility assessments, reviews, practical evaluations and experimental investigations.

Typical research areas include:

  • Design, simulation and optimisation of process or energy systems.
  • Advanced process control methodologies.
  • Instrumentation and process measurement systems.
  • Multi-phase flow and processes.
  • Renewable energy systems.
  • Studies involving environmental issues.

Assessment

Taught modules 40%, Group project 20% (dissertation for part-time students), Individual Research Project 40%.

Your career

Graduates of the course have been successful in gaining employment in:

  • Engineering consultancies and design practices
  • Industry (oil and gas, petrochemical, chemical, food and drink, water and energy)
  • Research organisations
  • Central government departments
  • Local governments
  • Academic institutions.


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Our September 2018 course is full. We are currently accepting applications for September 2019. Motorsport is an exacting world that requires total commitment from its engineers. Read more

Our September 2018 course is full. We are currently accepting applications for September 2019.

Motorsport is an exacting world that requires total commitment from its engineers. Without their skills and expertise, teams don’t even get to race. This MSc will hone your skills and expertise in relation to motorsport and high performance engineering through a rigorous combination of teaching and motorsport related project work.

Who is it for?

Developed in collaboration with leading motorsport companies, this postgraduate programme prepares graduates for a career in motorsport or high performance engineering.

Why this course?

This course aims to provide you with a sound understanding of the fundamental scientific, engineering and managerial principles involved in motorsport, and their implementation within a high performance technology context.

You will cover design, construction and operation of competition vehicles, and related aspects of materials science, aerodynamics, structural analysis, vehicle systems, and management techniques related to motorsport.

You will be taught the skills required for the planning, execution and reporting of motorsport projects and to prepare them for a variety of roles in motorsport.

Cranfield University has undertaken research, consultancy and testing for the motorsport sector since the 1970s. The University is home to the FIA approved Cranfield Impact Centre and Cranfield Motorsport Simulation which work with F1 and leading motorsport companies. We have an international reputation for our expertise in aerodynamics, CFD, materials technology, including composites, safety of motorsport vehicle structures, power-train development, vehicle dynamics, simulation, data acquisition and electronics, tyre characterisation and modelling. This track record ensures the course is highly respected by the motorsport industry.

  • Practical sessions using Cranfield's facilities and equipment
  • Engagement with motorsport practitioners
  • Motorsport related project work.

Informed by Industry

The Industrial Advisory Board or Steering Committee is a very important factor in the success of the Cranfield Motorsport MSc programme. It includes representation from key individuals and leading organisations in global motorsport.

The board supports the development and delivery of the MSc Advanced Motorsport Engineering, ensuring its relevance to motorsport. It also assists students where careers are concerned, supports teaching and group design and individual thesis projects.

Accreditation

 MSc in Advanced Motorsport Engineering is accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET). Re-accreditation for the MSc in Advanced Motorsport Engineering is currently being sought from the Royal Aeronautical Society (RAeS) on behalf of the Engineering Council as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for registration as a Chartered Engineer. Candidates must hold a CEng accredited BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree to comply with full CEng registration requirements. 

Course details

The MSc course consists of nine one-week assessed modules, of which eight are assessed, which take place during October to February, a group design project and an individual thesis project.

Students who excel on the Masters' course have their performance recognised through prizes from our partners and associates presented either on the day of the Motorsport Group Design Presentations or at the Motorsport MSc 'Parc Ferme' Graduation event in the June of the following year.

Group project

Group design projects are usually sponsored by industry partners and provide students with experience of working on real challenges in the work place along with skills in team working, managing resources and developing reporting and presentation skills. Experience gained is highly valued by both students and prospective employers. Projects run from February to May.

The group design project forms an important element of the education and assessment process for our Masters' students. The group design project is an applied, multidisciplinary team-based activity, providing students with the opportunity to apply principles taught during their MSc course. The Presentation Day provides the students with an opportunity to present their work to an audience of industry representatives, academics and their peers.

Our group design projects have proven very successful in developing new conceptual designs which are now implemented in competition vehicles and have even influenced sporting regulations. The nature of the work is very much applied with the students accessing facilities and equipment here at Cranfield together with support from the academic team and motorsport practitioners.

2015-2016

  • Land Speed Record (LSR) motorcycle concept designs

Four student teams developed their concepts for the 500cc streamliner class. Within each team students specialised in disciplines such as CFD, aerodynamics, vehicle dynamics, powertrain, materials and structures. They created a wind tunnel model that was tested in the Cranfield facility. In addition to the technical aspects, students engaged in individual competency evaluation, peer review and personal reflection.

View our previous Group projects

Individual project

Each year we have a number of thesis projects with motorsport companies that are subject to Non-Disclosure Agreements. This reflects the competitive and confidential nature of motorsport. However, a number of thesis projects are in the public domain and reflect the opportunity students have to deepen their technical understanding.

The individual thesis project runs until early September. Thesis projects allow the students to deepen their understanding through research work related to motorsport.

Assessment

Taught modules 40%, Group project 20%, Individual project 40%

Your career

Motorsport is a highly competitive sector. Studying at Cranfield will immerse you in a highly focused motorsport engineering learning experience, providing you with access to motorsport companies and practitioners. Securing employment is ultimately down to the student who completes the job applications and attends the interviews. Successful students go on to be part of a network of engineers. You will find Cranfield alumni working across motorsport and the high performance engineering sector. 



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Sunderland's MA Curating is one of the few courses in the UK to specialise in curating across art, design, media and culture and has a unique delivery system which aims to fit the needs of national and international working arts professionals, as well as full-time international students. Read more
Sunderland's MA Curating is one of the few courses in the UK to specialise in curating across art, design, media and culture and has a unique delivery system which aims to fit the needs of national and international working arts professionals, as well as full-time international students.

Course overview

This course is for people who want to work either in the traditional areas of curating fine art and cultural artefacts or in emerging areas such as curating digital art, media or live art. We will equip you for careers in the gallery, non-gallery and digital sectors.

By the end of the course, you will have advanced skills in collecting, organising, interpreting and exhibiting cultural items. You will also have expertise in effective teamwork and collaboration with artists and practitioners. All this will be grounded in a rigorous understanding of the historical contexts of curating, arts administration and museums.

The course features three week-long blocks of intensive delivery in October, February and June, plus weekly online contact, meaning national and European candidates can fit attendance and travel around work or family commitments, whilst regular online contact supports the completion of assignments. The course is also a full-time MA for international students, who will attend both intensive blocks and weekly contact onsite. The second intensive block will take place in London in February, accessing key curators and institutions during visits to organisations including Tate, V&A, and Wellcome Collection.

This block is also available as a professional development short course, building on a history of masterclasses including in New York and the UK. With accreditation of prior learning, this 60-credit block can also be taken as an accredited qualification leading to a Postgraduate Diploma.

Graduates from Sunderland can be found in curatorial and academic roles across the world, in cities such as New York, Stuttgart, Vancouver and London. Our graduates are also employed here in the North East by galleries and archival services.

You will be taught by academic staff with research interests that range across art, design, media and culture, with particular specialisms in public art, performance art, and new media art. We provide a well-regarded resource for curators and exhibitors of new media art, known as Curatorial Research for Upstart Media Bliss (CRUMB).

For a specialist web pages about the course and the activities of students, please see: http://www.macurating.net

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Modules on this course include:
Curating 1 – Certificate (60 Credits)
-Genealogies of Curating
-Mechanics of Curating

Curating 2 – Postgraduate Diploma (60 Credits)
-Contexts of Curating
-Visions of Curating

Curating 3 – Masters Degree (60 Credits)
-Curatorial Practice
-Major Project and Report

Teaching and assessment

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working.

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, seminars, study visits and group work. These are supported by a range of guest speakers from diverse academic and industry backgrounds. You will also have high levels of contact with tutors who give regular feedback and support.

Field trips and practical workshops are important elements of the course, giving you direct contact with curators. Host organisations have included the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, Workplace Gallery, the Northern Gallery of Contemporary Art, the National Glass Centre and Shipley Art Gallery.

Facilities & location

The University has invested in modern facilities that include generous studio spaces and state-of-the-art teaching space and resources as part of a vibrant and outward-looking learning environment.

Arts and Design Library
Our Arts and Design Library has a specialist collection of over 120,000 books, CD-ROMs, videos, slides and one of the largest electronic information networks in the sector.

Journals and research
We subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date articles. Some of the most important sources include:
-Art Full Text + Art Abstracts, which is a major resource for media and arts information
-Design and Applied Arts Index, which covers journals featuring both new designers and the development of design and the applied arts since the mid-19th century
-British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC), which provides resources for the production, study and use of film and related media
-JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’), which provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences

Employment & careers

Postgraduates are highly employable and, on average, earn more than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree. On completing this course, you will be equipped for roles throughout the creative industries.

Specific opportunities include working in curatorial institutions and event management. Recent Sunderland graduates are now working in institutions such as the BALTIC, the Arnolfini (Bristol), Klomp Ching Gallery (New York), Banff Centre (Canada), Shipley Art Gallery and Tyne & Wear Archives and Museums.

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Campus-Based. October each year. Distance Learning. February each year. This MA will provide you with a unique and wide-ranging introduction to the complex and ever-changing role of the country house in its local, regional and national environment. Read more

Start Dates

Campus-Based: October each year.
Distance Learning: February each year.

Course Description

This MA will provide you with a unique and wide-ranging introduction to the complex and ever-changing role of the country house in its local, regional and national environment. The course is taught by distance learning, so you can learn around your existing commitments in a way that suits you.

This fascinating course investigates the architectural development of the English country house and its artistic contents, as well as its place within history and literature. The course also examines the economic and political importance of the house and its impact on the landscape, plus the technologies employed to design, build and run it.

[[Course aims ]]

To gain a detailed knowledge of the major issues related to the study of the country house and of the literature on the subject, and to develop an understanding of the complex and changing position of the country house in its local, regional and national environment.

Distance Learning

This course is also available for study by distance learning with a start date in February each year. Modules for the distance learning course may vary.

(Please note: The information included on this webpage is indicative of the course provision provided by the University of Leicester. Due to regular enhancement of the University's courses, please refer to Leicester's own website (http://www.le.ac.uk) for the most accurate and up-to-date course information. We recommend that you familiarise yourself with this information prior to submitting an application.)

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