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The Postgraduate Certificate in Marine Biology (Conversion Programme) is a part-time programme running from September to March for graduates from non-biological or environmental disciplines unable to meet the entry requirements for direct entry onto the MSc in Marine Biology programme. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Marine Biology (Conversion Programme) is a part-time programme running from September to March for graduates from non-biological or environmental disciplines unable to meet the entry requirements for direct entry onto the MSc in Marine Biology programme. Students successfully passing all modules will be awarded the Postgraduate Certificate in Marine Biology. Those wishing to progress onto the MSc in Marine Biology must obtain an aggregate of at least 60% to be eligible to transfer onto the Master’s programme in the following academic year and will hold exemptions in passed modules taken in the Postgraduate Certificate in Marine Biology if she/he applies for the Master's in Marine Biology within 5 years from the date of successful completion of the Certificate Examinations.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/cku14/

Course Details

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

- Demonstrate a clear understanding and integration of knowledge of marine flora and fauna, the marine environment and its biological and physical properties and processes;

- Define the roles of management and conservation across the marine environment;

- Apply the knowledge and skills acquired in this course in the working environment enabling the development of policy

Format

This part time 30 credit programme will run two days a week from September to the end of February. Three modules (BL6010, BL6012 and BL6019) will run from September to December with examinations in December and one module (BL6016) will run from mid- January to the end of February with an examination at the end of February. There will be continuous assessment associated with all four modules on the programme and it is expected that students will also need to do significant reading of texts and scientific journals in their own time during the programme to show their wider knowledge of the subject matter.

Students take four taught modules to the value of 30 credits as follows:

BL6010 Characteristics of the Marine Environment (5 credits)
BL6012 Marine Megafauna (10 credits)
BL6016 Marine Ecology and Conservation (10 Credits)
BL6019 Ecological Applications of Geographical Information Systems (5 credits)

Assessment

This part time 30 credit programme will run two days a week from September to the end of February. Three modules (BL6010, BL6012 and BL6019) will run from September to December with examinations in December and one module (BL6016) will run from mid- January to the end of February with an examination at the end of February. There will be continuous assessment associated with all four modules on the programme and it is expected that students will also need to do significant reading of texts and scientific journals in their own time during the programme to show their wider knowledge of the subject matter.

Careers

As well as a number of professionally certified courses that will be provided throughout the course, students will also gain a variety of technical skills associated with research and computer skills (GIS in particular). Many transferable skills are also fostered through different learning approaches, including critical thinking, problem solving, report writing, oral presentations, statistical analysis, independent research and time management.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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Environmental issues at local, national and global levels are among the foremost challenges facing society today, and the result of complex interactions of natural processes with economic forces and policies. Read more
Environmental issues at local, national and global levels are among the foremost challenges facing society today, and the result of complex interactions of natural processes with economic forces and policies. It is widely recognised that most environmental problems, whether small-scale or global, are the result of a complex interaction of natural processes with economic forces and decisions. This programme provides graduates with a sound theoretical base and practical appreciation of the concepts and methods of environmental and natural resource economics relevant to policy decisions and research. It is designed to suit students with a primary interest in issues and policies concerning the rural environment.

Visit the website https://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/programmes/appenveco/msc/

Structure

For the MSc in Environmental Economics students will take:

- 4 core modules
- 3 elective modules*
- 2 research modules

* including one free choice from across all programmes (subject to approval on the Programme Convenor)

Core Modules:

- Economic Principles [this module must be taken in the first year]
- Economics of Environmental Policy
- Environmental Valuation: Theory, Techniques and Application
- Natural Resource Economics

Elective Modules:

- Applied Econometrics
- Climate Change and Development
- Project Planning and Management
- Environmental Science and Management
- Environmental Assessment
- Environmental Auditing and Environmental Management Systems
- International Environmental Law
- Ethics for Environment and Development
- either Water Resources Management or Sustainable Land Management or Biodiversity, Conservation and Development or Energy and Development
- One module selected from another programme, with the approval of the Programme Convenor

Research Modules:

- Research Methods
- Dissertation

Strengthening quantitative skills:
Some modules in this programme make use of applied mathematics, including use of calculus. If your basic quantitative analysis skills are weak, it is recommended that you should also study the non-examined module: Quantitative Methods (CF04), at or near the start of your studies. Study materials for this module are available to registered students only, and are obtainable through the online learning environment, Moodle, in the Study Skills section.

Teaching & Learning

1. Academic level

All CeDEP programmes are taught to Master’s (Second Cycle) level, which involves building upon existing knowledge and understanding typically associated with the Bachelor’s (First Cycle) level or its equivalent. Study at Master’s level requires:

- originality in developing and/or applying ideas, and extending or enhancing previous learning

- application of knowledge and understanding, including problem solving in new or unfamiliar environments within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts

- integration of knowledge and handling of complexity

- formulating judgements with incomplete or limited information, including reflection on social and ethical responsibilities

- clear and unambiguous communication of conclusions, and the knowledge and rationale underpinning these, to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- learning skills to study in a manner that may be largely self-directed or autonomous

Prospective students should note that distance education of this kind demands a high degree of commitment, determination and self-discipline. Whilst CeDEP provides significant support through the tutorial system and by other means, students taking on programmes of this nature should possess a strong measure of self-reliance.

2. Study Expectations

- How long will it take?
For students in full time employment, the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma, usually take three or four years to complete and the Certificate 2 years.

- When can I study?
You can begin your studies in either February or June. The examinations for all students are in October. The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June.

- How many hours a week?
For the 30 week study period starting in February, you will need to allocate 5–6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15 week session, 10–12 hours per module, per week is recommended.

- How many modules can I take per study year?
We strongly recommend that students should take only one or two modules in their first year, so that they can adjust to studying at a distance, whilst combining this with work and family life.

Students wishing to complete an MSc in two years they will need to enrol/pay for four core modules and both Research Methods and the Dissertation in the first year although the Dissertation is written and submitted in the second year. Please contact your programme convenor by email.

3. Assessment

- How you will be assessed
For each module you will sit a two-hour unseen examination held on a specific date in October, worth 80% of your total module mark. There is also an Examined Assignment (worth 20% of the total module mark) which is submitted during the study year and marked by your tutor.

- Examination arrangements
Examinations are held in students’ countries of residence, using the University of London’s network of approved Overseas Examination Authorities. Fees for taking examinations at all examination centres other than London are the responsibility of the student.

Assignments are submitted to CeDEP electronically via the online learning environment.

- Assessment of the Research Component
The Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541) are not assessed through final written examinations. These two modules constitute the Research Component of an MSc and are assessed entirely by submitted coursework.

4. Research Component

In order to qualify for an MSc, it is mandatory for CeDEP students to pass the Research Component.

The Research Component comprises two of the nine modules necessary for completion of an MSc. These are a Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541). The modules are assessed as follows:

- P506 through two examined assignments submitted during the study year
- P541 through a 10,000 word dissertation

The Research Component is studied over two consecutive years. The Research Methods module (P506) must be studied and successfully passed before the Dissertation module (P541). This is because it provides skills and techniques which will assist with the subsequent development and conduct of your research and preparation of your dissertation. Students are required to enrol and pay for P506 and P541 at the same time.

The dissertation is usually carried out during the final year of registration with CeDEP. Students conduct desk- or field-based research in a relevant topic of their choice. All research topics are subject to approval and each student is assigned a personal supervisor. Background reading and preparation of the proposal take place between the October exams and commencement of the final study year in February.

Scholarships

For further details and information on external scholarships visit the Scholarships section (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/)

Career prospects for graduates

Graduates of this programme will typically find work as environmental economists and advisers in the following fields:

- government ministries undertaking environmental planning and policy analysis work

- public and private sector companies conducting analyses of the environmental effects of economic activity

- international and non-governmental organisations concerned with the environmental implications of economic change and the economic implications of global environmental change

- consultancy work within the broad arena of environmental economics and policy

- applied research and teaching in institutions of research and higher education

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/applying/

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This programme is perfect training for those concerned with the management of natural resources or the implementation of environmental policy at local and international level, in communities, or in corporate and government organisations. Read more
This programme is perfect training for those concerned with the management of natural resources or the implementation of environmental policy at local and international level, in communities, or in corporate and government organisations. You will gain an understanding of the principal environmental policy issues confronting managers in diverse geographical and culture situations, and an awareness of the ethical and moral issues involved the use of natural resources. You will also benefit from both an academic award and professional recognition from partaking in one study programme.

This course takes a multidisciplinary approach to current issues of global environmental concern. It is relevant to those who are concerned with the management of resources and the making and implementation of policies that have an environmental impact at local, national and international levels.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/programmes/environmental/msc/

Structure

For the MSc in Environmental Management students will take:

- 4 core modules
- 3 elective modules*
- 2 research modules

* including one free choice from across all programmes (subject to approval on the Programme Convenor)

Core Modules:

- Introduction to Environmental Economics & Policy
- Environmental Science & Management
- Environmental Assessment
- Environmental Auditing and Environmental Management Systems

Elective Modules:

- Energy and Development
- Environmental Valuation: Theory, Techniques and Application
- Climate Change and Development
- Water Resources Management
- NGO Management
- Sustainable Land Management
- International Environmental Law
- Ethics for Environment and Development
- One module selected from another programme, with the approval of the Programme Convenor

Research Modules:

- Research Methods
- Dissertation

Teaching & Learning

1. Academic level

All CeDEP programmes are taught to Master’s (Second Cycle) level, which involves building upon existing knowledge and understanding typically associated with the Bachelor’s (First Cycle) level or its equivalent. Study at Master’s level requires:

- originality in developing and/or applying ideas, and extending or enhancing previous learning

- application of knowledge and understanding, including problem solving in new or unfamiliar environments within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts

- integration of knowledge and handling of complexity

- formulating judgements with incomplete or limited information, including reflection on social and ethical responsibilities

- clear and unambiguous communication of conclusions, and the knowledge and rationale underpinning these, to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- learning skills to study in a manner that may be largely self-directed or autonomous

Prospective students should note that distance education of this kind demands a high degree of commitment, determination and self-discipline. Whilst CeDEP provides significant support through the tutorial system and by other means, students taking on programmes of this nature should possess a strong measure of self-reliance.

2. Study Expectations

- How long will it take?
For students in full time employment, the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma, usually take three or four years to complete and the Certificate 2 years.

- When can I study?
You can begin your studies in either February or June. The examinations for all students are in October. The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June.

- How many hours a week?
For the 30 week study period starting in February, you will need to allocate 5–6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15 week session, 10–12 hours per module, per week is recommended.

- How many modules can I take per study year?
We strongly recommend that students should take only one or two modules in their first year, so that they can adjust to studying at a distance, whilst combining this with work and family life.

Students wishing to complete an MSc in two years they will need to enrol/pay for four core modules and both Research Methods and the Dissertation in the first year although the Dissertation is written and submitted in the second year. Please contact your programme convenor by email.

3. Assessment

- How you will be assessed
For each module you will sit a two-hour unseen examination held on a specific date in October, worth 80% of your total module mark. There is also an Examined Assignment (worth 20% of the total module mark) which is submitted during the study year and marked by your tutor.

- Examination arrangements
Examinations are held in students’ countries of residence, using the University of London’s network of approved Overseas Examination Authorities. Fees for taking examinations at all examination centres other than London are the responsibility of the student.
Assignments are submitted to CeDEP electronically via the online learning environment.

- Assessment of the Research Component
The Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541) are not assessed through final written examinations. These two modules constitute the Research Component of an MSc and are assessed entirely by submitted coursework.

4. Research Component

In order to qualify for an MSc, it is mandatory for CeDEP students to pass the Research Component.

The Research Component comprises two of the nine modules necessary for completion of an MSc. These are a Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541). The modules are assessed as follows:

- P506 through two examined assignments submitted during the study year
- P541 through a 10,000 word dissertation

The Research Component is studied over two consecutive years. The Research Methods module (P506) must be studied and successfully passed before the Dissertation module (P541). This is because it provides skills and techniques which will assist with the subsequent development and conduct of your research and preparation of your dissertation. Students are required to enrol and pay for P506 and P541 at the same time.

The dissertation is usually carried out during the final year of registration with CeDEP. Students conduct desk- or field-based research in a relevant topic of their choice. All research topics are subject to approval and each student is assigned a personal supervisor. Background reading and preparation of the proposal take place between the October exams and commencement of the final study year in February.

Career prospects for graduates

Graduates of this programme typically apply skills in natural resource management, environmental appraisal, environmental auditing and analysis and policy design to the work of:

- government ministries and related agencies, performing environmental planning and/or policy analysis work

- private companies and consultancies preparing environmental assessments, evaluations and policy advice

- corporations implementing programmes to meet goals of social and environmental responsibility

- research and educational institutions involved in environmental management and sustainable development

- international and non-governmental organisations concerned with economic development and environmental change

- charitable trusts and organisations carrying out conservation and educational field work

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/applying/

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Most of the world’s poorest people live in rural areas. These programmes will give you the scientific, technological and economic knowledge and the skills to analyse and tackle the poverty suffered by these people. Read more
Most of the world’s poorest people live in rural areas. These programmes will give you the scientific, technological and economic knowledge and the skills to analyse and tackle the poverty suffered by these people. You will be able to work on real issues, using the specialist expertise gained from your course.

The programmes integrate theory and practice and provide an understanding of how to manage organisations within their own cultural, political, technological, social, and institutional contexts, with the ultimate aim of solving problems of poverty reduction.

Visit the website https://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/programmes/poverty-reduction-policy-and-practice/msc/

Structure

For the MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice students will take:

- 3 core modules
- 4 elective modules*
- 2 research modules

* including one free choice from across all specialisms

- Specialisms:
If you are taking an MSc or a Postgraduate Diploma you may choose elective modules within a particular specialism. Choosing a specialism creates the opportunity for a clear focus in your studies, whereby you can develop understanding and skills relevant to specific professional interests. The name of the specialism will appear on the certificate awarded.

Core modules:

- Economics and Institutions for Development
- Understanding Poverty [compulsory]
- Managing Knowledge and Communication for Development
- Climate Change and Development

Elective Modules:
Specialisms
Development Management:
- Rural Finance
- Rural Development
- NGO Management
- Project Planning and Management
- Gender and Social Inequality
- Management in Rural Development

Inclusive Growth:
- Agricultural Policy and Trade
- Energy and Development
- Food Security and Social Protection
- Political Economy of Public Policy
- Rural Finance

Natural Resource Management:
- Water Resources Management
- Sustainable Land Management
- Environmental Science and Management
- Natural Resource Economics
- Biodiversity, Conservation and Development
- International Environmental Law

Research Modules:
- Research Methods
- Dissertation

Teaching & Learning

1. Academic level

All CeDEP programmes are taught to Master’s (Second Cycle) level, which involves building upon existing knowledge and understanding typically associated with the Bachelor’s (First Cycle) level or its equivalent. Study at Master’s level requires:

- originality in developing and/or applying ideas, and extending or enhancing previous learning

- application of knowledge and understanding, including problem solving in new or unfamiliar environments within broader (or multidisciplinary)contexts

- integration of knowledge and handling of complexity

- formulating judgements with incomplete or limited information, including reflection on social and ethical responsibilities

- clear and unambiguous communication of conclusions, and the knowledge and rationale underpinning these, to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- learning skills to study in a manner that may be largely self-directed or autonomous

Prospective students should note that distance education of this kind demands a high degree of commitment, determination and self-discipline. Whilst CeDEP provides significant support through the tutorial system and by other means, students taking on programmes of this nature should possess a strong measure of self-reliance.

2. Study Expectations

- How long will it take?
For students in full time employment, the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma, usually take three or four years to complete and the Certificate 2 years.

- When can I study?
You can begin your studies in either February or June. The examinations for all students are in October. The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June.

- How many hours a week?
For the 30 week study period starting in February, you will need to allocate 5–6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15 week session, 10–12 hours per module, per week is recommended.

- How many modules can I take per study year?
We strongly recommend that students should take only one or two modules in their first year, so that they can adjust to studying at a distance, whilst combining this with work and family life.

Students wishing to complete an MSc in two years they will need to enrol/pay for three core modules and both Research Methods and the Dissertation in the first year although the Dissertation is written and submitted in the second year. Please contact your programme convenor by email.

3. Assessment

- How you will be assessed
For each module you will sit a two-hour unseen examination held on a specific date in October, worth 80% of your total module mark. There is also an Examined Assignment (worth 20% of the total module mark) which is submitted during the study year and marked by your tutor.

- Examination arrangements
Examinations are held in students’ countries of residence, using the University of London’s network of approved Overseas Examination Authorities. Fees for taking examinations at all examination centres other than London are the responsibility of the student.

- Assignments are submitted to CeDEP electronically via the online learning environment.
Assessment of the Research Component

The Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541) are not assessed through final written examinations. These two modules constitute the Research Component of an MSc and are assessed entirely by submitted coursework.

4. Research Component

In order to qualify for an MSc, it is mandatory for CeDEP students to pass the Research Component.

The Research Component comprises two of the nine modules necessary for completion of an MSc. These are a Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541). The modules are assessed as follows:

- P506 through two examined assignments submitted during the study year
- P541 through a 10,000 word dissertation

The Research Component is studied over two consecutive years. The Research Methods module (P506) must be studied and successfully passed before the Dissertation module (P541). This is because it provides skills and techniques which will assist with the subsequent development and conduct of your research and preparation of your dissertation. Students are required to enrol and pay for P506 and P541 at the same time.

The dissertation is usually carried out during the final year of registration with CeDEP. Students conduct desk- or field-based research in a relevant topic of their choice. All research topics are subject to approval and each student is assigned a personal supervisor. Background reading and preparation of the proposal take place between the October exams and commencement of the final study year in February.

Scholarships

For further details and information on external scholarships visit the Scholarships section (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/)

Career prospects for graduates

As with all CeDEP programmes, the Poverty Reduction programme is designed to assist both existing development professionals and people moving into the field of international development. For the former, the programme offers a chance to upgrade and update their expertise, and to reflect systematically and in depth on their accumulated experience in the light of up-to-date theory and literature. It is anticipated that most graduates of this programme will find work in:

- government ministries and other public sector organisations concerned with policy analysis and implementation for poverty reduction

- international and non-governmental organisations concerned with issues of poverty reduction

- consultancies and development projects involved in activities promoting poverty reduction

Particular opportunities may be related to the choice of specialisms in natural resources management, agricultural and rural development, or development management

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/applying/

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The rationale for this innovative programme of study lies in the global environmental and development challenges that have been articulated in the Sustainable Development Goals. Read more
The rationale for this innovative programme of study lies in the global environmental and development challenges that have been articulated in the Sustainable Development Goals. It is clear that solutions to the challenge of sustainable development require holistic, integrated and co-ordinated actions across a very wide range of sectors, and will increasingly require a multidisciplinary approach. This programme aims to provide students with a broad grounding in the main concepts associated with sustainable development, but also provides the opportunity to specialise in one area in greater depth.

Visit the website https://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/programmes/sustainable/msc/

Structure

For the MSc in Sustainable Development students will take:

- 3 core modules
- 4 elective modules*
- 2 research modules

* including one free choice from across all programmes (subject to approval on the Programme Convenor)

- Specialisms
If you are taking an MSc or a Postgraduate Diploma you choose elective modules within a particular specialism. This creates the opportunity for a clear focus in your studies, whereby you can develop understanding and skills relevant to specific professional interests. The name of the specialism will appear on the certificate awarded.

Core Modules:

- Understanding Sustainable Development [compulsory]
- Climate Change and Development
- Environmental Science and Management
- Ethics for Environment and Development

Elective modules:
Specialisms

Development Management:
- Economics and Institutions for Development
- Managing Knowledge and Communication for Development
- NGO Management
- Project Planning & Management
- Management in Rural Development

Environmental Economics:
- Economic Principles [advised]
- Economics of Environmental Policy
- Environmental Valuation: Theory, Techniques and Application
- Natural Resource Economics

Environmental Management:
- Introduction to Environmental Economics & Policy
- Environmental Assessment
- Environmental Auditing and Environmental Management Systems
- International Environmental Law

Natural Resource Management:
- Water Resources Management
- Sustainable Land Management
- Biodiversity, Conservation and Development
- Natural Resource Economics

Rural Development and Change:
- Agricultural Trade and Policy
- Understanding Poverty
- Food Security and Social Protection
- Rural Development
- Gender & Social Inequality

Research component :
- Research Methods
- Dissertation

Teaching & Learning

1. Academic level

All CeDEP programmes are taught to Master’s (Second Cycle) level, which involves building upon existing knowledge and understanding typically associated with the Bachelor’s (First Cycle) level or its equivalent. Study at Master’s level requires:

- originality in developing and/or applying ideas, and extending or enhancing previous learning

- application of knowledge and understanding, including problem solving in new or unfamiliar environments within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts

- integration of knowledge and handling of complexity

- formulating judgements with incomplete or limited information, including reflection on social and ethical responsibilities

- clear and unambiguous communication of conclusions, and the knowledge and rationale underpinning these, to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- learning skills to study in a manner that may be largely self-directed or autonomous

Prospective students should note that distance education of this kind demands a high degree of commitment, determination and self-discipline. Whilst CeDEP provides significant support through the tutorial system and by other means, students taking on programmes of this nature should possess a strong measure of self-reliance.

2. Study Expectations

- How long will it take?
For students in full time employment, the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma, usually take three or four years to complete and the Certificate 2 years.

- When can I study?
You can begin your studies in either February or June. The examinations for all students are in October. The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June.

- How many hours a week?
For the 30 week study period starting in February, you will need to allocate 5–6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15 week session, 10–12 hours per module, per week is recommended.

- How many modules can I take per study year?
We strongly recommend that students should take only one or two modules in their first year, so that they can adjust to studying at a distance, whilst combining this with work and family life.

Students wishing to complete an MSc in two years they will need to enrol/pay for three core modules and both Research Methods and the Dissertation in the first year although the Dissertation is written and submitted in the second year. Please contact your programme convenor by email.

3. Assessment

- How you will be assessed
For each module you will sit a two-hour unseen examination held on a specific date in October, worth 80% of your total module mark. There is also an Examined Assignment (worth 20% of the total module mark) which is submitted during the study year and marked by your tutor.

- Examination arrangements
Examinations are held in students’ countries of residence, using the University of London’s network of approved Overseas Examination Authorities. Fees for taking examinations at all examination centres other than London are the responsibility of the student.

Assignments are submitted to CeDEP electronically via the online learning environment.

- Assessment of the Research Component
The Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541) are not assessed through final written examinations. These two modules constitute the Research Component of an MSc and are assessed entirely by submitted coursework.

4. Research Component

In order to qualify for an MSc, it is mandatory for CeDEP students to pass the Research Component.

The Research Component comprises two of the nine modules necessary for completion of an MSc. These are a Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541). The modules are assessed as follows:

- RP506 through two examined assignments submitted during the study year
- P541through a 10,000 word dissertation

The Research Component is studied over two consecutive years. The Research Methods module (P506) must be studied and successfully passed before the Dissertation module (P541). This is because it provides skills and techniques which will assist with the subsequent development and conduct of your research and preparation of your dissertation. Students are required to enrol and pay for P506 and P541 at the same time.

The dissertation is usually carried out during the final year of registration with CeDEP. Students conduct desk- or field-based research in a relevant topic of their choice. All research topics are subject to approval and each student is assigned a personal supervisor. Background reading and preparation of the proposal take place between the October exams and commencement of the final study year in February.

Scholarships

For further details and information on external scholarships visit the Scholarships section (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/)

Career prospects for graduates

Graduates of this programme will have a wide range of backgrounds and will typically find work in:

- government ministries and other public sector organisations concerned with policy analysis in the fields of sustainable development and environmental planning

- international and non-governmental organisations concerned with the sustainable dimensions of economic change

- consultancies and development projects concerned with issues of sustainability and analyses of the interface between environment and poverty

- applied research and teaching in institutions of research and higher education

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/applying/

Read less
Agriculture plays a critical role in poverty reduction by providing food, raw materials, employment, and ecosystem services. However, its ability to do this is threatened by demands from rising populations, stagnant yields, and increasing pressures on natural resources. Read more
Agriculture plays a critical role in poverty reduction by providing food, raw materials, employment, and ecosystem services. However, its ability to do this is threatened by demands from rising populations, stagnant yields, and increasing pressures on natural resources. Improving sustainable agricultural productivity and secure and equitable access to food has become a major global challenge.

This course provides students with the essential tools required for theoretical and empirical economic analysis, particularly in relation to the renewable natural resources sector. It aims to equip students with the rigorous technical skills that are generic to the field of agricultural economics, while maintaining a focus on applications rather than abstract analysis. Students are able to take modules orientated towards development, production, marketing, policy, and economic transition. The course is designed for those who wish to pursue a career as an agricultural economist or to undertake higher studies within this area.

Visit the website https://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/programmes/agecon/

Structure

For the MSc in Agricultural Economics students will take:

- 4 core modules
- 3 elective modules*
- 2 research modules

* including one free choice from across all programmes (subject to approval on the Programme Convenor)

Core modules:

- either Economic Principles or Economics and Institutions for Development [the chosen module must be taken in the first year]
- Agricultural Policy and Trade
- Food Security and Social Protection
- Political Economy of Public Policy

Elective modules:

- Applied Econometrics
- Climate Change and Development
- Natural Resource Economics
- Project Planning and Management
- Rural Development
- Rural Finance
- Sustainable Land Management
- Understanding Poverty (subject to approval by the Programme Convenor)
- Water Resources Management
- One module selected from another programme, with the approval of the Programme Convenor

Research component:

- Dissertation
- Research Methods

Strengthening quantitative skills:
It is recommended that students whose basic quantitative analysis skills are weak should also take a non-examined module:Quantitative methods (CF04) at or near the start of their studies. Study materials may be obtained from CeDEP’s online learning environment.

Teaching & Learning

1. Academic level

All CeDEP programmes are taught to Master’s (Second Cycle) level, which involves building upon existing knowledge and understanding typically associated with the Bachelor’s (First Cycle) level or its equivalent. Study at Master’s level requires:

- originality in developing and/or applying ideas, and extending or enhancing previous learning

- application of knowledge and understanding, including problem solving in new or unfamiliar environments within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts

- integration of knowledge and handling of complexity

- formulating judgements with incomplete or limited information, including reflection on social and ethical responsibilities

- clear and unambiguous communication of conclusions, and the knowledge and rationale underpinning these, to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- learning skills to study in a manner that may be largely self-directed or autonomous

Prospective students should note that distance education of this kind demands a high degree of commitment, determination and self-discipline. Whilst CeDEP provides significant support through the tutorial system and by other means, students taking on programmes of this nature should possess a strong measure of self-reliance.

2. Study Expectations

- How long will it take?:
For students in full time employment, the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma, usually take three or four years to complete and the Certificate 2 years.

- When can I study?
You can begin your studies in either February or June. The examinations for all students are in October. The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June.

- How many hours a week?
For the 30 week study period starting in February, you will need to allocate 5–6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15 week session, 10–12 hours per module, per week is recommended.

- How many modules can I take per study year?
We strongly recommend that students should take only one or two modules in their first year, so that they can adjust to studying at a distance, whilst combining this with work and family life.

Students wishing to complete an MSc in two years they will need to enrol/pay for four core modules and both Research Methods and the Dissertation in the first year although the Dissertation is written and submitted in the second year. Please contact your programme convenor by email.

3. Assessment

- How you will be assessed
For each module you will sit a two-hour unseen examination held on a specific date in October, worth 80% of your total module mark. There is also an Examined Assignment (worth 20% of the total module mark) which is submitted during the study year and marked by your tutor.

- Examination arrangements
Examinations are held in students’ countries of residence, using the University of London’s network of approved Overseas Examination Authorities. Fees for taking examinations at all examination centres other than London are the responsibility of the student.

Assignments are submitted to CeDEP electronically via the online learning environment.

- Assessment of the Research Component
The Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541) are not assessed through final written examinations. These two modules constitute the Research Component of an MSc and are assessed entirely by submitted coursework.

4. Research Component

In order to qualify for an MSc, it is mandatory for CeDEP students to pass the Research Component.

The Research Component comprises two of the nine modules necessary for completion of an MSc. These are a Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541). The modules are assessed as follows:

- P506 through two examined assignments submitted during the study year
- P541 through a 10,000 word dissertation

The Research Component is studied over two consecutive years. The Research Methods module (P506) must be studied and successfully passed before the Dissertation module (P541). This is because it provides skills and techniques which will assist with the subsequent development and conduct of your research and preparation of your dissertation. Students are required to enrol and pay for P506 and P541 at the same time.

The dissertation is usually carried out during the final year of registration with CeDEP. Students conduct desk- or field-based research in a relevant topic of their choice. All research topics are subject to approval and each student is assigned a personal supervisor. Background reading and preparation of the proposal take place between the October exams and commencement of the final study year in February.

Scholarships

For further details and information on external scholarships visit the Scholarships section (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/)

Career prospects for graduates

Typically, graduates of this programme will find work as applied economists in the following fields:

- government ministries undertaking work in agricultural policy analysis
- public and private sector companies involved in upstream and downstream agricultural industries
- international and non-governmental organisations concerned with the economic analysis of agricultural sector issues
- applied research and teaching in institutions of research and higher education

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/applying/

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The MA Performance Dance has grown from a longstanding tradition of postgraduate study in dance at Chichester. Read more
The MA Performance Dance has grown from a longstanding tradition of postgraduate study in dance at Chichester. Offering dance graduates as well as dance artists, at different stages of their artistic lives, the chance to undertake a Masters Degree or Post Graduate Diploma in the UK’s leading Practice as Research department.[ae1] The programme enables students to develop their dance practice as a performer working intensively with a wide variety of established and up and coming international choreographers and performing with the University’s touring performance company: mapdance.

Course content
The MA performers route is led by mapdance company Artistic Directors, Yael Flexer and Detta Howe.
Working intensively with international guest choreographers, students develop their technical and performance skills and deepen understanding of the creative process through experiencing varied choreographic methodologies and artistic approaches.
mapdance operates as a professional company with daily technique classes and rehearsals. From mid-February to May, the company tours nationally and internationally whilst also offering educational workshops.

The 2016/17 Repertory includes new commissions and from Shobana Jeyasingh, Lea Anderson, Hagit Yakira and Cai Tomos.
The Techniques for Performance module accompanying the repertory module (and compulsory for performers route) focuses on excellence in contemporary dance performance involving daily technical training in various dance techniques including release and contemporary techniques, contact improvisation, pilates and Ballet work. This module normally runs autumn and spring semesters.

The MA Performance Dance operates in the context of a professional performance programme and a series of presentations by visiting artists and researchers.

Guest lecturers on the MA have included practitioners and curators all working at the edges of dance research.
There are also opportunities to engage in cutting-edge research with interactive technologies or to market yourself professionally as an artist using DVD and website technologies.
Audition Dates 2017:
28h February, 28th March and 23rd May.
Fees and Finance
Auditions for the post-graduate mapdance programme are currently available.
To apply for 2017-2018, please contact Admissions
To find out more about MA Performance Dance visit mapdance

Home tuition fees 2017
MA Performance Dance - Full Time including dissertation £10,440
Alumni Discount 10% for students applying within five years of completion of an undergraduate course at Chichester: £9396
Overseas fees 2016 are £14,450
Find out more in the application pack here, application form and reference form.

Where this can take you
This course is suitable for you if you are a recent graduate or a dance artist who wishes to extend their technical and performance skills (and have completed a recognised BA degree).

It will offer you …
o an opportunity to work with international established and up and coming choreographers reflect on your professional practice and prior training
o intensive technical training through a variety of contemporary techniques, Pilates, contact improvisation and Ballet
o an opportunity to tour the repertoire across the UK and internationally
o an opportunity to develop your teaching skills within the context of a touring company
o time to deepen your understanding of your professional skills through practice, research and scholarship
o professional Development
o deepening your ability to articulate what you do in written and spoken form
o a stepping-stone toward PhD study

You will develop skills in…
o performance
o technique
o teaching in the context of a touring company
o choreographic methodology and critical thinking
o working independently (via dissertation projects)
o research and the articulation of that research in writing

It will give you…
o tools and skills to support you in the transition to professional practice
o extensive experience of working with established choreographers alongside touring and networking that can aid you in gaining work as a performer or in establishing your work as an independent artist
o a qualification that can aid in obtaining work within educational and HE institutions
o preparation for further study i.e. PhD or professionally-related qualifications
Work placements

There are opportunities to engage with cutting edge research into interactive technologies and to market yourself professionally as an artist using DVD and website technologies.

People you'll meet
Now in its 11 year mapdance is directed by co-artistic directors Yael Flexer and Detta Howe.

This year the company is commissioning choreographers:
o Shobana Jeyasingh
o Lea Anderson
o Hagit Yakira
o Cai Tomos

Indicative modules
The MA in performance includes three core modules: Repertory, Techniques for Performance and Reflective Practice.
The postgraduate diploma includes two core modules: Repertory and Techniques for Performance and an optional module.
Repertory Module:
The repertory module: mapdance encompasses intensive creation periods with international guest choreographer. Students develop their technical and performance skills and deepen understanding of the creative process through experiencing varied choreographic methodologies and artistic approaches. Operating as a professional company with daily technique classes and rehearsals, the creation periods begin in Sept through to February. From mid-February to May, the company tours nationally and internationally whilst also offering educational workshops.

Techniques for Performance Module:
The Techniques for Performance module accompanying the repertory module (and compulsory for performers route) focuses on excellence in contemporary dance performance involving daily technical training in various dance techniques including release and contemporary techniques, contact improvisation, Pilates and Ballet work. This module normally runs autumn and spring semesters.

Teaching and Assessment
Assessment on the MA performers route is based on four core modules, Repertory (60 credits), Techniques for Performance (30 credits) Reflective Practice (30 credits) and Dissertation (60 credits).
Assessment on the postgraduate diploma performers route is based on two core modules, Repertory (60 credits), Techniques for Performance (30 credits) and one optional module.

Assessment Techniques for Performance is continuous, that is process based.
Similarly the Repertory module is continuously assessed however the assessment is comprised by marks given by guest choreographers during the creation process and marks given by both Artistic Directors in rehearsal and on tour assessing both process and performance.

Applications & Course Pre-requisites
Application to the course is made by completing the online application form and completing the additional requirements.
You will also be invited to attend an audition and an interview.

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The PhD (or doctorate) is the highest academic qualification available. A PhD degree is designed to provide strong grounding in highly specialised areas through research. Read more
The PhD (or doctorate) is the highest academic qualification available. A PhD degree is designed to provide strong grounding in highly specialised areas through research. Its goal is to enable students to be researchers in psychology, contributing to academic knowledge and developing work of internationally publishable quality. Bangor Psychology offers PhD supervision in the following specialisms:

• Cognitive Neuroscience
• Learning and Development
• Language
• Clinical Neuroscience
• Clinical and Health Psychology
• Experimental Consumer Psychology

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
You must have an undergraduate degree in psychology or a related subject, with a minimum degree class of 2:1 or equivalent, and additional postgraduate training (see below).

STUDY MODE AND DURATION
Full-time PhD students normally spend three years in study. If you do not already have a Master’s degree, then we would normally expect you to complete such a degree prior to starting the PhD programme.If you have already obtained an appropriate Master’s degree, you may be required to take one or more relevant modules in the School’s MSc in Psychological Research to complement your background and expertise.

Part-time students have five years to complete the PhD.
SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE
Three members of academic staff will be helping you with your research: a principal supervisor, a second supervisor and a chairperson - this last from a different research specialism. The major role of the second supervisor is to provide additional input on your research and to take over the supervision of the dissertation should the primary supervisor need to withdraw. The major responsibility of the chairperson is to ensure that a "best fit" is found between you and your supervisor. This group meets periodically with you in order to provide guidance on your research and to help with any difficulty that you might be experiencing.

REVIEWS AND PROGRESS TOWARDS THE PhD DEGREE

Probationary period
The first year acts as a probationary period. Your progress will be reviewed in February and June (for full-time students), according to the requirements of the School and the goals outlined in your individual course of study. If, after these reviews, your supervisory committee considers that your progress has been fully satisfactory, then you will cease to be “probationary”.

Subsequent reviews
During the second year there will be another research review in June, and again in February of your third year. If you have not completed the write-up of your thesis by June of the third year, there will be another review meeting in June of that year (and every February and June of subsequent years until completion).

The purpose of these meetings is to ensure that you are always moving forward effectively towards completion, and to enable your committee to provide any assistance that may be necessary to help guarantee completion of the work.

YOUR PhD THESIS
Your research thesis is a large project. It will require attention throughout your studies. We have established a system to keep your research on track and help you manage your time. Completing a successful thesis builds on skills and knowledge acquired throughout the MSc modules. It constitutes an original piece of research, usually including several experiments or observational studies.

Your PhD thesis must be defended at the end of your studies in a viva voce examination. This comprises an oral report of the research in the presence of an examining committee.

CHOOSING A RESEARCH TOPIC AND SUPERVISOR
If you are thinking of studying for a PhD degree, one of your first actions, before applying for admission to the programme, is to identify and communicate with a potential supervisor in the relevant area. The research interests and publications of our academic staff are listed within our web pages. Contact the people whose research is most relevant to the area in which you wish to work. In many cases, it is best to make initial contact by e-mail or by letter.

FUNDING
Funding for full-time PhD study (tuition fees plus living allowance) is available through a number of sources, including the ESRC, the University of Wales Bangor, and the School of Psychology, which offers a number of studentships aimed at exceptional candidates from the UK, Europe, and internationally. Our website offers more details on the funding available for PhD students.

You can obtain more information on funding opportunities from our Deputy School Administrator (Paula Gurteen, ). Alternatively, you can discuss funding options with your potential supervisor.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE
We invite applications for our funded studentships at set times throughout the year, both on our website and on jobs.ac.uk.

Applications from students who have already obtained funding for their studies are welcome at any time and can be done online on the University website.

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Top-up your existing qualification to a valuable Masters degree in just one year. Our course will suit you if you already hold the advanced level CIPD qualification of professional practitioner standards awards or a Postgraduate Diploma in Human Resource Management. Read more
Top-up your existing qualification to a valuable Masters degree in just one year. Our course will suit you if you already hold the advanced level CIPD qualification of professional practitioner standards awards or a Postgraduate Diploma in Human Resource Management. You can study with us while continuing to work.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/human-resource-management-ma-stage-three-only-top-up

In our rapidly-changing business world, human resource managers have an ever-widening remit. Increasingly, organisations want to measure their effectiveness globally, rather than locally, and take strategic decisions that influence their overall structure and function. HR professionals will be involved in much of this work.

This academically rigorous course provides a sound basis for taking on senior HR roles. It focuses on how the global marketplace impacts upon labour markets, looking particularly at the changing nature of employment after the worldwide credit crunch.

Our team at Lord Ashcroft International Business School believes that managers learn with and from each other to find solutions to real-life problems at work. That's why we encourage participative learning methods and work-based assignments so that it's not just you who benefits from your development, but also your employer.

Our course is recognised by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD), the UK's most credible specialist human resources training and awarding body.

While you’re here, you’ll benefit from state-of-the-art teaching and learning facilities, study areas, campus libraries with online databases containing professional journals, plus our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) through which you can access study resources and help.

Chelmsford: Semester 1: two three-day teaching blocks; Semester 2: one two-day teaching block plus independent study
Cambridge: Trimester 3 (June): one three-day teaching block plus independent study; Semester 2 (February): HRM in the Global Context plus independent study

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/human-resource-management-ma-stage-three-only-top-up

Careers

Your qualification will be recognised by CIPD, the UK's most credible specialist human resources training and awarding body.

Our course has a strong focus on the skills and knowledge you need for a successful career in human resource management. It’s essential if you’re preparing for, or aspiring to, managerial roles in HR either in UK or overseas.

Modules & assessment

Cambridge trimester 3 (June):
Three-day teaching-block plus independent study support from dissertation supervisor

Cambridge semester 2 (February):
HRM in the Global Context plus independent study with support from dissertation supervisor

Chelmsford semester 1 (September):
Two three-day teaching blocks: HRM Strategy in a Competitive Environment and HRD in an International Environment

Chelmsford semester (2 February):
One two-day teaching block plus independent study support from dissertation supervisor

Assessment

We’ll asses your progress through modular assignments that incorporate written reports and essays, oral presentations, case study analysis, exams and a portfolio.

Your faculty

The Lord Ashcroft International Business School is one of the largest business schools in the East of England, with nearly 100 full-time teaching staff and approximately 6,000 students from more than 100 countries.

Our striking and award-winning business school building in Chelmsford, as well as new buildings in Cambridge, offer the most advanced learning technologies. We’re well-recognised for our centres of excellence by students, employers and professional bodies alike.

What makes us stand out is that our courses don't just give you sound academic knowledge – they’re at the cutting edge of current business practice and highly relevant to employers. This is owing to the close links we have with the business community and the partnerships we've developed with a wide variety of businesses and public service organisations.

We're interested in people who are confident, ambitious and ready to take the challenge of making a difference in the world of business. If that's you, we'd love to hear from you.

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This course focuses on systems engineering and engineering management, and offers three different system engineering pathways, these are electronic, mechanical and mechatronic engineering. Read more
This course focuses on systems engineering and engineering management, and offers three different system engineering pathways, these are electronic, mechanical and mechatronic engineering.

The 18 month, three semester course can be undertaken as either a single award or a dual award. The single award is studied entirely at the University of Bolton. In the dual award mode, you will normally study at the University of Bolton in semester 1 (October to February) and at South Westphalia University of Applied Sciences, Soest, Germany, in semester 2 (March to July). The third semester (October to February) will be assigned to a project, and this will normally be undertaken at the University of Bolton.

Entry to the course is also available in semester 2 (February) in the case of the dual award scheme, the second semester (to be spent at South Westphalia University of Applied Sciences, Soest Germany) will be undertaken during October to January.

In the dual award mode the successful student will obtain two separate MSc awards, one from each university. In the single award mode the student will receive the award of an MSc from the University of Bolton only.

What you will study

You are required to successfully complete 180 credits of study to gain the MSc. The course comprises eight taught modules, each with a credit value of 15, making a total of 120 taught credits. In each of the two taught semesters, you will study four modules. The third semester is dedicated to a 60 credit individual project. Where possible, the project will involve a work placement or an industrially-related project, based at one of the two universities. During the project phase it is the intention to find, where possible, some form of work experience for all of the students enrolled on the MSc.

Electronic pathway modules

Control Engineering: Intelligent Systems (EEM4010); Advanced Control Technology (EEM4015).

Engineering Management: Business in Engineering (EEM4013); Technical Publications and Presentations (EEM4014); Project Management (EEM4017); Integrated Management (EEM4020).

Electronic Engineering: Microprocessor-based Systems (EEM4016) or Microcontrollers (AMI4655); Signal Processing (EEM4011) or Digital Signal Processing (AMI4622).

Project (EEM5001).

Read less
This course focuses on systems engineering and engineering management, and offers three different system engineering pathways, these are electronic, mechanical and mechatronic engineering. Read more
This course focuses on systems engineering and engineering management, and offers three different system engineering pathways, these are electronic, mechanical and mechatronic engineering.

The 18 month, three semester course can be undertaken as either a single award or a dual award. The single award is studied entirely at the University of Bolton. In the dual award mode, you will normally study at the University of Bolton in semester 1 (October to February) and at South Westphalia University of Applied Sciences, Soest, Germany, in semester 2 (March to July). The third semester (October to February) will be assigned to a project, and this will normally be undertaken at the University of Bolton.

Entry to the course is also available in semester 2 (February) in the case of the dual award scheme, the second semester (to be spent at South Westphalia University of Applied Sciences, Soest Germany) will be undertaken during October to January.

In the dual award mode the successful student will obtain two separate MSc awards, one from each university. In the single award mode the student will receive the award of an MSc from the University of Bolton only.

What you will study

You are required to successfully complete 180 credits of study to gain the MSc. The course comprises eight taught modules, each with a credit value of 15, making a total of 120 taught credits. In each of the two taught semesters, you will study four modules. The third semester is dedicated to a 60 credit individual project. Where possible, the project will involve a work placement or an industrially-related project, based at one of the two universities. During the project phase it is the intention to find, where possible, some form of work experience for all of the students enrolled on the MSc.

Electronic pathway modules
Control Engineering: Intelligent Systems (EEM4010); Advanced Control Technology (EEM4015).

Engineering Management: Business in Engineering (EEM4013); Technical Publications and Presentations (EEM4014); Project Management (EEM4017); Integrated Management (EEM4020).

Electronic Engineering: Microprocessor-based Systems (EEM4016) or Microcontrollers (AMI4655); Signal Processing (EEM4011) or Digital Signal Processing (AMI4622).

Project (EEM5001).

For more information please visit http://www.bolton.ac.uk/postgrad

Read less
This course focuses on systems engineering and engineering management, and offers three different system engineering pathways, these are electronic, mechanical and mechatronic engineering. Read more
This course focuses on systems engineering and engineering management, and offers three different system engineering pathways, these are electronic, mechanical and mechatronic engineering.

The 18 month, three semester course can be undertaken as either a single award or a dual award. The single award is studied entirely at the University of Bolton. In the dual award mode, you will normally study at the University of Bolton in semester 1 (October to February) and at South Westphalia University of Applied Sciences, Soest, Germany, in semester 2 (March to July). The third semester (October to February) will be assigned to a project, and this will normally be undertaken at the University of Bolton.

Entry to the course is also available in semester 2 (February) in the case of the dual award scheme, the second semester (to be spent at South Westphalia University of Applied Sciences, Soest Germany) will be undertaken during October to January.

In the dual award mode the successful student will obtain two separate MSc awards, one from each university. In the single award mode the student will receive the award of an MSc from the University of Bolton only.

What you will study

You are required to successfully complete 180 credits of study to gain the MSc. The course comprises eight taught modules, each with a credit value of 15, making a total of 120 taught credits. In each of the two taught semesters, you will study four modules. The third semester is dedicated to a 60 credit individual project. Where possible, the project will involve a work placement or an industrially-related project, based at one of the two universities. During the project phase it is the intention to find, where possible, some form of work experience for all of the students enrolled on the MSc.

Mechanical pathway modules
Control Engineering: Intelligent Systems (EEM4010); Advanced Control Technology (EEM4015).

Engineering Management: Business in Engineering (EEM4013); Technical Publications and Presentations (EEM4014); Project Management (EEM4017); Integrated Management (EEM4020).

Mechanical Engineering: Monitoring of Mechanical Systems (EEM4018); Advanced Production Engineering (EEM4019).

Project (EEM5001).

For more information please visit http://www.bolton.ac.uk/postgrad

Read less
This course focuses on systems engineering and engineering management, and offers three different system engineering pathways, these are electronic, mechanical and mechatronic engineering. Read more
This course focuses on systems engineering and engineering management, and offers three different system engineering pathways, these are electronic, mechanical and mechatronic engineering.

The 18 month, three semester course can be undertaken as either a single award or a dual award. The single award is studied entirely at the University of Bolton. In the dual award mode, you will normally study at the University of Bolton in semester 1 (October to February) and at South Westphalia University of Applied Sciences, Soest, Germany, in semester 2 (March to July). The third semester (October to February) will be assigned to a project, and this will normally be undertaken at the University of Bolton.

Entry to the course is also available in semester 2 (February) in the case of the dual award scheme, the second semester (to be spent at South Westphalia University of Applied Sciences, Soest Germany) will be undertaken during October to January.

In the dual award mode the successful student will obtain two separate MSc awards, one from each university. In the single award mode the student will receive the award of an MSc from the University of Bolton only.

What you will study

You are required to successfully complete 180 credits of study to gain the MSc. The course comprises eight taught modules, each with a credit value of 15, making a total of 120 taught credits. In each of the two taught semesters, you will study four modules. The third semester is dedicated to a 60 credit individual project. Where possible, the project will involve a work placement or an industrially-related project, based at one of the two universities. During the project phase it is the intention to find, where possible, some form of work experience for all of the students enrolled on the MSc.

Mechanical pathway modules

Control Engineering: Intelligent Systems (EEM4010); Advanced Control Technology (EEM4015).

Engineering Management: Business in Engineering (EEM4013); Technical Publications and Presentations (EEM4014); Project Management (EEM4017); Integrated Management (EEM4020).

Mechanical Engineering: Monitoring of Mechanical Systems (EEM4018); Advanced Production Engineering (EEM4019).

Project (EEM5001).

For more information please visit http://www.bolton.ac.uk/postgrad

Read less
This course focuses on systems engineering and engineering management, and offers three different system engineering pathways, these are electronic, mechanical and mechatronic engineering. Read more
This course focuses on systems engineering and engineering management, and offers three different system engineering pathways, these are electronic, mechanical and mechatronic engineering.

The 18 month, three semester course can be undertaken as either a single award or a dual award. The single award is studied entirely at the University of Bolton. In the dual award mode, you will normally study at the University of Bolton in semester 1 (October to February) and at South Westphalia University of Applied Sciences, Soest, Germany, in semester 2 (March to July). The third semester (October to February) will be assigned to a project, and this will normally be undertaken at the University of Bolton.

Entry to the course is also available in semester 2 (February) in the case of the dual award scheme, the second semester (to be spent at South Westphalia University of Applied Sciences, Soest Germany) will be undertaken during October to January.

In the dual award mode the successful student will obtain two separate MSc awards, one from each university. In the single award mode the student will receive the award of an MSc from the University of Bolton only.

What you will study

You are required to successfully complete 180 credits of study to gain the MSc. The course comprises eight taught modules, each with a credit value of 15, making a total of 120 taught credits. In each of the two taught semesters, you will study four modules. The third semester is dedicated to a 60 credit individual project. Where possible, the project will involve a work placement or an industrially-related project, based at one of the two universities. During the project phase it is the intention to find, where possible, some form of work experience for all of the students enrolled on the MSc.

Mechatronic pathway modules

Control Engineering: Intelligent Systems (EEM4010); Advanced Control Technology (EEM4015).

Engineering Management: Business in Engineering (EEM4013); Technical Publications and Presentations (EEM4014); Project Management (EEM4017); Integrated Management (EEM4020).

Electronic Engineering: Microprocessor-based Systems (EEM4016) or Microcontrollers (AMI4655).

Mechanical Engineering: Advanced Production Engineering (EEM4019).

Project (EEM5001).

For more information please visit http://www.bolton.ac.uk/postgrad

Read less
This course focuses on systems engineering and engineering management, and offers three different system engineering pathways, these are electronic, mechanical and mechatronic engineering. Read more
This course focuses on systems engineering and engineering management, and offers three different system engineering pathways, these are electronic, mechanical and mechatronic engineering.

The 18 month, three semester course can be undertaken as either a single award or a dual award. The single award is studied entirely at the University of Bolton. In the dual award mode, you will normally study at the University of Bolton in semester 1 (October to February) and at South Westphalia University of Applied Sciences, Soest, Germany, in semester 2 (March to July). The third semester (October to February) will be assigned to a project, and this will normally be undertaken at the University of Bolton.

Entry to the course is also available in semester 2 (February) in the case of the dual award scheme, the second semester (to be spent at South Westphalia University of Applied Sciences, Soest Germany) will be undertaken during October to January.

In the dual award mode the successful student will obtain two separate MSc awards, one from each university. In the single award mode the student will receive the award of an MSc from the University of Bolton only.

What you will study

You are required to successfully complete 180 credits of study to gain the MSc. The course comprises eight taught modules, each with a credit value of 15, making a total of 120 taught credits. In each of the two taught semesters, you will study four modules. The third semester is dedicated to a 60 credit individual project. Where possible, the project will involve a work placement or an industrially-related project, based at one of the two universities. During the project phase it is the intention to find, where possible, some form of work experience for all of the students enrolled on the MSc.

Mechatronic pathway modules

Control Engineering: Intelligent Systems (EEM4010); Advanced Control Technology (EEM4015).

Engineering Management: Business in Engineering (EEM4013); Technical Publications and Presentations (EEM4014); Project Management (EEM4017); Integrated Management (EEM4020).

Electronic Engineering: Microprocessor-based Systems (EEM4016) or Microcontrollers (AMI4655).

Mechanical Engineering: Advanced Production Engineering (EEM4019).

Project (EEM5001).

For more information please visit http://www.bolton.ac.uk/postgrad

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