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Masters Degrees (Fashion History)

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Investigate fashion, dress and style in culture and society. Examine the evolving relationship between fashion and film. MA Fashion Cultures offers a unique experience in fashion education at postgraduate level. Read more

Introduction

Investigate fashion, dress and style in culture and society. Examine the evolving relationship between fashion and film.

Content

MA Fashion Cultures offers a unique experience in fashion education at postgraduate level.

The course has two specific but interrelated pathways: History and Culture; and Fashion / Film. On this course you will have the opportunity to study fashion and dress within its historical, social and cultural contexts. A dynamic in-depth exploration of theoretical and methodological perspectives will give you a grounding in the history of fashion and an underpinning of social and cultural theory for both pathways. You will then undertake more specialised study on your chosen pathway. On the History and Culture pathway you will investigate fashion as object, representation and practice through an interdisciplinary approach from both historical and contemporary perspectives. On Fashion/Film you will investigate the ongoing changing relationship between fashion, costume and forms of film as well as the relationship between cinema and consumption within a global context. While you will choose one pathway, you will have the opportunity to attend the lectures for the other pathway if you wish to, so you can gain the fullest possible understanding of a variety of disciplines and their impact upon visual and material cultures.

The pathways are led by renowned experts in their respective fields, and they are supported by research fellows, professors, authors, curators and historians who contribute to the course. Based in one of fashion’s most important cities, our students benefit from access to the special collections and archives of many leading institutions in London, including the V and A, Museum of London and the British Film Institute. You will also have the opportunity to work with other graduate students from the Culture and Curation Programme on some units of the course.

We attract students from a wide variety of academic and industry backgrounds, some of whom have completed theory-based first degrees, while others come with practice-based backgrounds. After completing their Masters studies, some students from both former courses have progressed to higher level research degrees, and others have established themselves in a number of related fields including curation, visual merchandising, styling, archiving, fashion buying, lecturing and research.

Structure

Block One September to January

Social and Cultural Theories (20 credits) (both pathways)
Fashion Histories (20 credits) (both pathways)
Research Methods (20 credits) (both pathways)

Block Two February to May:

Cycles of Fashion (20 units) (History and Culture pathway), or
Fashion, Stardom and Celebrity Culture (20 credits) (Fashion / Film pathway), or
Sustainability and Fashion (20 credits) (either pathway)

Gendering Fashion (20 credits) (History and Culture pathway), or
Film Concepts, Global Cinema (20 credits) (Fashion / Film pathway), or
Consumer Behaviour and Psychology (20 credits) (either pathway); Collaborative Unit (20 credits) (both pathways)

Block Three May to September: Masters Project (60 credits) (both pathways)

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The business of fashion is a global, cultural and economic force shaped by creative professionals who share a passion for innovative customer-centric solutions. Read more

The business of fashion is a global, cultural and economic force shaped by creative professionals who share a passion for innovative customer-centric solutions. The fashion marketplace requires senior managers who can seamless bring together material resources, human capital, and commercial vision to produce a personalised customer offering.

This programme, which has been designed in conjunction with leading fashion retailers, represents a new direction in the integration of fashion retail management, fashion marketing, international consumer behaviour and supply chain planning. Its unique structure allows you to study at both the internationally renowned School of Design and Leeds University Business School, one of the top departments of its kind in the world. This means you'll have the opportunity to gain the varied knowledge and skills needed to for a managerial career in the exciting, dynamic and internationally-oriented fashion sector.

Specialist facilities

We have plenty of facilities to help you make the most of your time at the School of Design. You’ll be able to develop your practice in well-equipped studios and purpose-built computer clusters so you can build your skills on both PC and Mac. There are computer-aided design (CAD) suites with access to the latest design software and some of the latest design technology, such as digital printing and laser cutting facilities, and colour analysis/prediction labs, EEG/eye-tracking technology and digital photography.

We also have an impressive range of resources you can use for research. We house the M&S Company Archive including documents, advertising, photos, films, clothing and merchandise from throughout Marks & Spencer’s history, offering a fascinating insight into the changing nature of our culture over time.

Course content

  • The cultural reception, dissemination, promotion and eventual disposal of a fashion product within international markets involves an astoundingly complex chain of activities. This programme allows you to develop a unique blend of management skills, master analytical tools and customer marketing techniques in order to understand and shape global retail operations.
  • You’ll study six compulsory modules in total, covering fashion marketing, retailing and a specialised fashion dissertation in the School of Design, and the management of logistics, supply chains and understanding global consumers in Leeds University Business School. You’ll also study two from a selection of fashion-based optional modules, allowing you the flexibility to specialise in an area of your choice.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

COMPULSORY MODULES

Fashion Marketing 15 credits

Dissertation Global Fashion Management 60 credits

Managing Global Logistics and Supply Chains 15 credits

Operations and Supply Chain Management 15 credits

Consumer Behaviour Across Cultures 15 credits

OPTIONAL MODULES

Fashion Industry Analysis 15 credits

Sustainability and Fashion 15 credits

Textile Consultancy and Management 15 credits

Textile Product Design, Innovation and Development 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Global Fashion Management MA in the course catalogue


Learning and teaching

This programme employs a variety of learning and teaching methods including lectures, seminars, tutorials and group discussions. The modules will utilise methods of learning, teaching and assessment which are appropriate to Masters level study, such as group discussions, presentations, and report writing. Although a proportion of the contact time will be spent in teaching, emphasis will also be placed upon the use of group and independent learning. Discussion and interactive sessions will encourage you to critically examine key elements of fashion retail and management further. You will have the opportunity to hear from external academic and professional speakers from the fashion and retail business world, and it may be possible to participate in retail colloquiums.

Assessment

You'll be assessed by a variety of methods. Assessment on the programme is designed to be an integral part of the learning process, allowing you to enhance and confirm your knowledge and practice. Formative feedback will be provided through a combination of self-reflection, peer group and tutor feedback. Summative assessments will provide a measure of the extent to which you have achieved the learning outcomes of the modules.

Assessment within the modules will take various forms including: coursework assignments, reports, group work, presentations, examinations and the dissertation. You are encouraged to consider and discuss your work in tutorials using multiple assessment criteria related to modules Including, originality and appropriateness of concepts and treatments, communication strategy, project management, organisation, comprehension and professionalism.

Career Opportunities

The multidisciplinary nature of this programme means that you’ll have the chance to develop a unique blend of skills including management, analytical tools and customer marketing techniques. This will allow you to understand and shape global retail operations by managing multinational fashion organisations, international retail, foreign market entry, and global supply chains and value chains.

On graduating you'll be equipped to thrive in either further study or a diverse range of career paths. The knowledge you’ll have gained will make you especially employable in careers throughout the fashion value chain, including fashion buying, fashion marketing, fashion public relations, merchandising and logistics management, management of the product development process, retail or brand management, product sourcing and supply chain management, and e-commerce.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.




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Are you fascinated by the fashion industry? Would you like a career that combines creativity with business acumen? Southampton Solent University’s postgraduate fashion merchandise management programme will help you to develop an advanced understanding of merchandising practices, retail space design, product buying, consumer behaviour, marketing and academic research methods. Read more

Overview

Are you fascinated by the fashion industry? Would you like a career that combines creativity with business acumen? Southampton Solent University’s postgraduate fashion merchandise management programme will help you to develop an advanced understanding of merchandising practices, retail space design, product buying, consumer behaviour, marketing and academic research methods.

- Students study under the guidance of veteran industry professionals with strong links to fashion and retail businesses.
- Core units cover contemporary retail innovation, industry contexts, marketing, retail design, research methods, fashion buying and merchandising.
- Students work closely with Solent’s industry contacts. Retailing company B&Q is currently involved in teaching the ‘Retail Futures: Innovation and Enterprise’ unit.
- Previous industry collaborators have included MRA Architecture & Interior Design, and IBM.
- Students will also have the opportunity to work in Re:So, our student-managed high-street retail boutique, or pitch for agency work through Solent Creatives.
- Students are supported by tutors to secure industry work placements.
- Graduates will have learnt transferable business management, marketing and employability skills that are sought after by employers in a range of sectors.
- Available facilities include a 24 hour library; industry-standard design software; photographic and fashion studios; and a range of merchandising equipment.

The industry -

The retail workforce is projected to grow between 2013 and 2020, with job opportunities expected to increase for managerial positions in particular (Prospects, 2015). This unique degree programme will help you to capitalise on the growth, developing key skills that visual merchandising and product buying employers are seeking.

The programme -

With increasing competition in the retail sector, fashion merchandisers play a vital role in transforming ordinary store environments into exciting retail experiences. Students studying on Southampton Solent’s unique fashion merchandise management programme will undertake in-depth study of visual merchandising, retail design and fashion buying – delving into the psychological and cultural factors that influence consumer spending.

The curriculum also covers technical innovation and the place of technology in the modern retail environment. These contemporary innovations are examined alongside retail design, visual merchandising, in-store branding and the benefits of customer interaction.

Students can get involved in retail activities at Re:So, Solent’s student-run high-street store. Re:So stocks a range of fashion and craft products produced by our creative students, making it the ideal place to get hands-on visual merchandising experience. The store’s upper floor ‘learning zone’ has previously hosted guest speakers from the fashion industry, workshops, photo-shoots and exhibitions – all with an emphasis on developing student retail, enterprise and employability skills.

The course concludes with a final master’s project. This is a chance for students to specialise in an area that suits their unique career ambitions, applying the skills that they have learnt throughout the course. Project supervisors are chosen based on the topic of the dissertation, ensuring that students have one-to-one access to expert support.

Course Content

Programme specification document - http://mycourse.solent.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=6152

Teaching, learning and assessment -

The course is taught through seminars, tutorials and workshops, with an emphasis on creativity and critical thinking. You will collaborate with our industry partners and take part in occasional group projects.

Work Experience -

We can provide support and guidance to help you find relevant work experience at a fashion or design company through our close links with industry. Former students have completed placements in a wide range of areas, including:

- trend reporting for WGSN
- merchandising at the Hobbs Head Office
- design/trend consultancy for Mudpie
- design at Jenny Packham
- marketing at Harvey Nichols
- MRA Architecture and Interior Design
- visual communication at Calvin Klein.

Assessment -

Assessment is through projects, reports and a dissertation.

Our facilities -

You will have access to multimedia and IT suites, photography and printing studios, fashion studios, design-and-make workshops, and excellent library facilities.

Study abroad -

There are opportunities for trips abroad, as well as regular excursions to museums and exhibitions in and around London.

Web-based learning -

Solent’s virtual learning environment provides quick online access to assignments, lecture notes, suggested reading and other course information.

Why Solent?

What do we offer?

From a vibrant city centre campus to our first class facilities, this is where you can find out why you should choose Solent.

Facilities - http://www.solent.ac.uk/about/facilities/facilities.aspx

City living - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/southampton/living-in-southampton.aspx

Accommodation - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/accommodation/accommodation.aspx

Career Potential

Following this course, you will be well prepared for a career in fashion merchandise management or the broader fashion industry.

Suitable roles for graduates include:

- Visual merchandiser
- Buyer/allocator
- Merchandising
- Creative marketing
- Consumer behaviour consultant
- Store planner/designer
- Retail management
- Visual merchandising
- Business owner.

Links with industry -

Industry professionals share their knowledge and experiences with students through guest presentations, lectures, one-to-one tutorials and portfolio-viewing workshops.
Recent visiting lecturers have included: Caryn Franklin, Perry Curties, Iain R Webb, Wayne Johns, Bruce Smith, Ellen Rogers, Hannah Al-Shemmeri, Elaine Waldron, Maria Bonet and Richard Billingham.

On this course, we also work closely with industry partners, including MRA and IBM, who are involved in teaching on two specialist units.

Transferable skills -

During the course you’ll develop your research, writing and critical thinking skills, along with experience in presentation, networking and teamwork.

Tuition fees

The tuition fees for the 2016/2017 academic year are:

UK and EU full-time fees: £6,695 per year

International full-time fees: £11,260 per year

UK and EU part-time fees: £3,350 per year

International part-time fees: £5,630 per year

Graduation costs -

Graduation is the ceremony to celebrate the achievements of your studies. For graduates in 2015, there is no charge to attend graduation, but you will be required to pay for the rental of your academic gown (approximately £42 per graduate, depending on your award). You may also wish to purchase official photography packages, which range in price from £15 to £200+. Graduation is not compulsory, so if you prefer to have your award sent to you, there is no cost.
For more details, please visit: http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/graduation/home.aspx

Next steps

Think a career in fashion retail might be for you? With an expert teaching team, industry-standard facilities and a long history of providing graduates for retail and fashion management roles, Southampton Solent University’s postgraduate fashion merchandise management programme could be the ideal next step towards your dream career.

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Fashion media is experiencing explosive growth worldwide in response to the dynamic role of fashion in modern popular and consumer culture. Read more
Fashion media is experiencing explosive growth worldwide in response to the dynamic role of fashion in modern popular and consumer culture.

The ability to be a successful fashion journalist requires very specific skills relating to writing, visual appreciation and a technical understanding of fashion which touches on a broad range of influences.

This programme will explore fashion media in the broadest sense, including new digital media opportunities and the rapid growth of international media dedicated to fashion and lifestyle.

Why should I choose this programme?

Magazines and digital media demand well-trained fashion journalists with an understanding of context, history and trends. Journalists, whether digital or print based, need to be informed on both the technical and creative aspects of fashion design. They also need to be versatile writers capable of working across a wide variety of media.

This programme will provide you with the skills and know-how to secure jobs in a demanding but exciting sector, with a strong focus on digital media.

Key skills, aims and objectives

Ideas generation, research interviewing, writing and editing skills
Visual appreciation of fashion
Technical understanding of fashion and its context, history and trends
The ability to work in both digital and print media
Future opportunities

This programme will prepare you for a career in fashion journalism, both print and digital media.

Typical entry level jobs open to graduates of the programme include:

‌•Junior Fashion Writer
‌•Copy Editor
‌•Web Editor
‌•Social Media Editor
‌•Fashion Assistant
‌•Brand Agency Researcher
‌•Trend Researcher
‌•E-commerce Product Writer
‌•Fashion News Reporter
‌•Features Assistant

How to apply

Applying to study at RUL is a quick and easy process. We accept direct applications, have no formal application deadlines and there is no application fee.

Step 1 Apply

You can apply in the following ways:

•Apply online
•Apply directly to us using the application form available here http://www.regents.ac.uk/media/1188903/Regents-application-form.pdf
Once you have completed the application form, please send us the following supporting documents, by post, email or fax:

•Copies of academic transcripts and certificates of all academic study undertaken after secondary school
•One letter of academic reference
•A copy of your CV/resumé showing your work experience if applicable.
•A 300 to 500-word personal statement in support of your application, outlining your reasons for applying to your chosen programme and how you feel you will benefit from the course of study
•A copy of your passport photograph (ID) page
•One recent passport-sized, colour photograph, jpeg format (this must be emailed to us at )
•If not a native English speaker, proof of your English proficiency

Please note: most candidates will be assessed for admission on the basis of their submitted application materials. However, RUL reserves the right to invite candidates for interview and to reject those who decline to attend.

Step 2 Making an offer

We will assess whether you meet our minimum entry requirements and will make you an offer by both email and post, or notify you that you have been unsuccessful.

If you have completed your education and have met all the entry requirements, you will be sent an unconditional offer. If you still have to finish your exams, or have yet to submit supporting documentation, we will make you a conditional offer.

You can expect to receive a decision on your application within 10 working days of receipt of your completed application and supporting documents.

Step 3 Accepting the offer

If you wish to accept the offer you must:

•Confirm your acceptance via email/post/telephone/in person
•Pay the registration fee (non-refundable)
•Pay the non-EU advance tuition fee deposit, if applicable (non-refundable)
•Please note: although there is no formal deadline to pay your registration fee or non-EU advance deposit, if you need to apply for an international student visa to study in the UK, then we recommend that you pay these as soon as possible.

Please see here for information on how to pay http://www.regents.ac.uk/study/how-to-pay.aspx

Step 4 Full acceptance and visa

On receipt of your acceptance we will issue the final set of documentation and, where needed, the relevant visa support documentation. To find out if you need a student visa please consult the UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) website for current information: http://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/uk-visas-and-immigration (please note it is your own responsibility to arrange the appropriate visa).

For more information on course structure, admissions and teaching and assessment, please follow this link: http://www.regents.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/programmes/pg-dip-fashion-journalism.aspx#tab_course-overview

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The Msc in Luxury & Fashion Management is the ideal program for professionals wanting to further their knowledge in business and specialize in the fast-growing, lucrative domains of luxury and fashion. Read more
The Msc in Luxury & Fashion Management is the ideal program for professionals wanting to further their knowledge in business and specialize in the fast-growing, lucrative domains of luxury and fashion.
Students interested in Luxury and Fashion benefit from Paris' unique position in the world. Strong academic learning is made relevant through company visits and exploratory field trips. Guest speakers share their industry-specific knowledge with students, who may also participate in company projects. Learning is particularly dynamic and interactive: syllabi clarify the body of knowledge to be mastered, while reference textbooks facilitate student preparation and home-learning. Our experienced international faculty brings academic and professional learning to life. Our specialized faculty members utilize cutting-edge teaching methods.

The MBA in Luxury & Fashion Management provides students with the tools and understanding necessary to create and promote luxury brands.
This rigorous program lasts 12 months and covers all aspects of this lucrative industry including fashion, leisure, hotels, yachts, private jets, wineries and more. Key components of the program included comprehension of consumer behavior, marketing techniques, entrepreneurship and networking. We invite guest speakers from the luxury & fashion industries to give seminars throughout the year, giving our students the opportunity to create important links with professionals working in the field.

1st Trimester: Foundation courses
History of Civilisations and origins of Luxury
Luxury Marketing and Distribution
International Luxury Brand Management
Financial Management
Social Marketing and sustainable development
Integrated Marketing communication
Business Law & Intellectual Propert
Management of Innovation and Business Development

For the 2nd and the 3rd Trimesters you choose 1 between 2 Specializations:

First Specialization: Luxury & Fashion
History of Haute Couture & Ready to Wear
Fashion Strategic Marketing and trends Analysis
Strategy business modeling
Fashion Social Media Marketing Strategy
Brand strategy and Fashion Licensing
History of social Costume and social Evolution
Merchandising Strategies for fashion retailers
Italian Fashion Management industry
Accessories and Leather Goods
Human Recourse Management

Second Specialization: Luxury & Lifestyle
The welness industry
Luxury Automotive Industry
Merchandiding of luxury products
Strategy Business modeling
Luxury Jewelry Industry
Watch Business Fundamentals
French Etiquette
Private Jets and Yachting Industry
High Gastronomy
Wine Marketing
Fragrance and cosmectics Management
Tourism & Hospitality Management

Job Opportunities

Students with an MBA in Luxury & Fashion Management go on to work as:
International Brand Directors, International Product Managers, International Purchase Managers in Luxury Goods, International Luxury Business Development Managers, Buyers, and Fashion Consultants, etc.

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The history of people, their societies and cultures is the focus of this programme, where you’ll explore how people have lived and died across periods and geographies. Read more

The history of people, their societies and cultures is the focus of this programme, where you’ll explore how people have lived and died across periods and geographies.

Core modules will improve your research skills and introduce you to key concepts and issues in social and cultural history. You’ll also choose from a wide range of optional modules, allowing you to focus on societies and periods that interest you.

You could study apartheid in South Africa, communities and castes in India, birth and death in medieval Europe or social movements in the USA. You’ll be able to focus on gender, race and religion as well as other issues that have shaped the lives of individuals and communities.

Taught by expert researchers within the School of History and the Leeds Humanities Research Institute, this programme uses the latest approaches and thinking in social and cultural history to give you an insight into the lives of others.

We have a wealth of resources allowing you to explore topics that interest you. The world-class Brotherton Library and its Special Collections contain a huge number of early printed, archive and manuscript materials including the Liddle Collection on the First and Second World Wars, Leeds Library of Vernacular Culture, manuscript and commonplace books, travel journals and one of the best collections of cookery books and household manuals in the country.

Extensive collections of national, regional and local newspapers from over the years are available on microfilm, as well as cartoons and satirical prints from the British Museum and extensive collections of letters and correspondence. There’s even the Yorkshire Fashion Archive and M&S Archive on campus, allowing you to gain a real insight into popular culture over time.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

From the beginning of the programme you’ll study core modules developing your knowledge and skills in social and cultural history, building your understanding of research methods and exploring central concepts and debates in the subject.

In both semesters, you’ll also have the chance to choose optional modules from a wide range on offer, allowing you to focus on issues, themes and societies that interest you. You could draw on the diverse expertise of our tutors to select modules across Indian, African, American, British and Latin American history.

You’ll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the ‘Making History: Archive Collaborations’ optional module.

This programme will equip you with a broad skill set for historical research as well as a good base of subject knowledge. You’ll be able to demonstrate these with your dissertation, which allows you to conduct independent research on a topic of your choice. You’ll submit this by the end of the programme in September.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Research Methodology in History 30 credits
  • Dissertation (Social and Cultural) 60 credits
  • Concepts and Debates in Social and Cultural History 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Making History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Gender, Sex, and Love: Byzantium and the West, 900-1200 30 credits
  • Reformation(s): Belief and Culture in Early Modern Europe 30 credits
  • Medicine and Warfare in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 30 credits
  • Defending the Nation: Britain during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, 1793 to 1815 30 credits
  • India since 1947: Community, Caste and Political Violence 30 credits
  • Sexuality and Disease in African History 30 credits
  • Contesting Patriarchy: Debating Gender Justice in Colonial and Post-Colonial India.30 credits
  • Latin America and the Caribbean from Rebellion to Revolution, 1765-1845 30 credits
  • Insurgency and Counterinsurgency 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Social and Cultural History MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Social and Cultural History MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods. The majority of your modules will be taught through weekly seminars, where you’ll discuss issues and themes in your chosen modules with a small group of students and your tutors. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, giving you the space to shape your own studies and develop your skills.

Assessment

We use different types of assessment to help you develop a wide range of skills, including presentations, research proposals, case studies and essays, depending on the subjects you choose.

Career opportunities

This programme will heighten your cultural and social awareness as well as allowing you to build your historical knowledge. You’ll also gain high-level research, analysis and communication skills that will prove valuable in a wide range of careers.

Graduates have found success in a wide range of careers in education, research and the private sector. Many others have continued with their studies at PhD level.



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Our MA Art History and Theory is ideal if you are interested in working in academia, the art world or any other field in which visual, written and analytical skills are essential. Read more
Our MA Art History and Theory is ideal if you are interested in working in academia, the art world or any other field in which visual, written and analytical skills are essential.

At Essex, you have the freedom to study what most interests you. Some of the topics you may choose to explore include Early Modern art and architecture; the history of photography; modern and contemporary art; curatorial practice and exhibition design; as well as more vernacular forms of visual culture, such as body art and activist placards.

Regardless of the topics you pursue, we are committed to research-based teaching, with a particular emphasis on bringing the approaches of art history into contact with other disciplines and discourses. In so doing, we seek to facilitate a critical engagement with artworks and forms of visual culture, both within and beyond the traditional canons of art history.

To supplement what you learn in the classroom, frequent staff-led visits to London museums and galleries will expose you to the some of the world’s best museums and galleries, and you will be strongly encouraged to apply for a placement in order to gain experience in the museum and gallery world. On campus, the Essex Collection of Art from Latin America (ESCALA), Europe’s largest collection of contemporary art from Latin American, will provide an invaluable resource for studying art and curatorial practice first-hand.

One of the major reasons for choosing Essex is the quality of the education you will receive. Our Art History programme is 6th in the UK for research excellence, with 89% of our work rated “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” (REF 2014). We also achieved an exceptional 95% student satisfaction in the 2016 National Student Survey.

This course is available on either a full-time or part-time basis.

Our expert staff

Essex Art History features a dynamic group of art historians who investigate the production and reception of images and built environments, across cultures and media from the early modern period to the present. Our staff are experts on topics as diverse as activist art, 19th-century medical photography, the art of Latin America, urbanism, exhibition design and body art.

We also have significant experience in curation and public engagement. Recent projects include:
-Dr Gavin Grindon curated a section of Banksy’s Dismaland show and co-curated the Disobedient Objects exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, which was one of the most well attended shows in the museum’s history.
-Dr Matt Lodder has acted as contributor for various television shows on body art and body modification, including the Today programme, the Jeremy Vine Show, Sky News, BBC Breakfast News, ‘Coast’, and National Geographic’s ‘Taboo’.
-Dr Natasha Ruiz Gómez co-organised a major conference on Collect, Exchange, Display: Artistic Practice and the Medical Museum at the Hunterian Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons, London.

Specialist facilities

At Essex, you have the best of both worlds: on the one hand, you are part of a tight-knit, campus community with close ties to several small but excellent museums in the nearby town of Colchester; on the other hand, you can travel from campus to London in an hour, which puts the world’s best museums and galleries at your fingertips.

Our facilities enable you to gain curatorial experience and engage in object-based learning, a cornerstone of our approach when teaching the history of art and its modes of display:
-Our Essex Collection of Art from Latin America (ESCALA) is the most comprehensive Latin American art research resource in the UK and has a state-of-the-art teaching and research space. Many of our students gain work and research experience through our collection
-Our onsite gallery Art Exchange runs an on-going programme of contemporary art exhibitions, talks and workshops by curators and artists, as well as exhibitions organised by our postgraduate curatorial students
-Colchester’s iconic Firstsite gallery features an exciting programme of contemporary art exhibitions, film screenings and talks, and exhibitions organised by our students

Your future

The visual arts and culture industries have become an increasingly significant part of the national and international economy, and art history graduates leave Essex with the skills to take advantage of this growing opportunity.

Graduates from our programmes are ideally prepared for roles in the media, in advertising, in museums and galleries, in education (in schools, universities, and cultural institutions), as conservators, as auctioneers, dealers and antiques specialists, in charities, in publishing, as specialist arts lawyers, as PR agents, in fashion, or to run their own galleries.

Our recent graduates have gone on to work in a wide range of roles including:
-A member of the valuation team at Sotheby’s (New York)
-Head of Learning at firstsite (a contemporary arts centre in Colchester)
-Visual Merchandising Manager at John Lewis (Oxford Street, London)

We also offer research supervision for students who wish to continue their studies with a PhD or an MPhil. We cover the major areas of European art, architecture and visual culture from 1300 to the present, as well as the art and architecture of Latin America.

We work with our university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example Structure

Postgraduate study is the chance to take your education to the next level. The combination of compulsory and optional modules means our courses help you develop extensive knowledge in your chosen discipline, whilst providing plenty of freedom to pursue your own interests. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore to ensure your course is as relevant and up-to-date as possible your core module structure may be subject to change.

Art History and Theory - MA
-Dissertation - MA Schemes
-Researching Art History
-Art, Science, Knowledge (optional)
-Collecting Art From Latin America (optional)
-Critique and Curating (optional)
-Curating Inside Out (optional)
-Exhibition (Joint Project) (optional)
-Current Research in Art History (optional)
-Topics in Art History (optional)
-Art & Politics (optional)
-Art, Architecture and Urbanism (optional)

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The study of the history of art at Leeds has an international reputation for its innovative, rigorous, diverse and critically engaged approaches. Read more

The study of the history of art at Leeds has an international reputation for its innovative, rigorous, diverse and critically engaged approaches. Previously called MA History of Art, the name has been changed for 2018 to highlight the established strengths of this course with its emphasis on social and political approaches to art history.

At the cutting edge of the discipline, the MA in the Social History of Art builds on a unique legacy of dynamic and challenging scholarship, and continues to test the parameters of the discipline and shape wider debates in the field.

Around a shared commitment to understanding art as central to the production and reproduction of the social worlds we inhabit, our key research strengths lie in feminist, gender and Jewish studies, on questions of materialism and materiality, the postcolonial and the ‘non-Western’, as well as in provocations of those fields of art history considered more ‘established’, from Medieval and Renaissance up to the contemporary.

We combine an exceptional range of optional modules, core modules on methodology and advanced research skills, and self-directed research leading to a dissertation on a topic of your own choice.

Specialist facilities

The School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies offers a modern and well-equipped learning environment, complete with professionally laid out studios and versatile exhibition spaces in a beautiful listed building, fully redesigned and refurbished, at the heart of the University campus.

The University incorporates world-class library resources and collections, the Stanley & Audrey Burton Gallery, Treasures of the Brotherton, the Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, ULITA – an Archive of International Textiles and the [email protected] performance venue.

The world class Brotherton Library holds a wide variety of archive and early printed material in its Special Collections which are available for use in your independent research. Our other library resources are also excellent, and the University Library offers a comprehensive training programme to help you make the most of them.

Course content

Across both semesters, you’ll take core modules. These will enable you to develop practical skills for advanced-level research, and to engage critically with key debates in art history from the foundations of the discipline up to contemporary approaches.

Alongside this, you’ll work in depth on specialist topics, with choices from an array of optional modules covering a considerable chronological and geographic range with diverse critical and methodological approaches.

The development of your research skills and specialist knowledge will ultimately be focused in the writing of your dissertation – an independent and self-devised research project, which you will undertake with the guidance of your supervisor.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • MA History of Art Core Course 30 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 1 5 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 2 5 credits
  • Art History Dissertation 50 credits

Optional modules

  • Reading Sexual Difference 30 credits
  • The Margins of Medieval Art 30 credits
  • Unfinished Business: Trauma, Cultural Memory and the Holocaust 30 credits
  • Movies, Migrants and Diasporas 30 credits
  • Aesthetics and Politics 30 credits
  • Intersecting Practices: Questioning the Intersection of Contemporary Art and Heritage 30 credits
  • Encountering Things: Art and Entanglement in Anglo-Saxon England 30 credits
  • Anthropology, Art and Representation 30 credits
  • Unmaking Things: Materials and Ideas in the European Renaissance 30 credits
  • Individual Directed Study 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Social History of Art MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Social History of Art MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching methods including lectures, online learning, seminars and tutorials. However, independent study is crucial to the programme ― it allows you to prepare for classes and assessments, build on your skills and form your own ideas and research questions.

Assessment

Our taught modules are generally assessed through essays, which you will submit at the end of the semester in which you take each module.

Career opportunities

This programme will develop your visual, critical and cultural awareness and expand your subject knowledge in history of art. In addition, it will equip you with sophisticated research, analytical, critical and communication skills that will put you in a good position to succeed in a variety of careers.

Our graduates have pursued careers as curators and education staff in museums and galleries and worked for national heritage organisations, as well as in journalism, publishing, arts marketing, public relations, university administration and teaching. Others have transferred the skills they gained into fields like the insurance industry, independent style editing and freelance writing on fashion, arts and culture.

Many of our graduates have also continued with their research at PhD level and secured external funding to support them – including AHRC scholarships. A large proportion of our former research students are now developing academic careers in the UK, Europe, Asia, USA and Canada.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Explore the global fashion industry in depth and learn how you can build a career in it, while perfecting your knowledge of design processes, styling, branding, promotion and more. Read more
Explore the global fashion industry in depth and learn how you can build a career in it, while perfecting your knowledge of design processes, styling, branding, promotion and more.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/fashion-design

Overview

This dynamic new course will prepare you for the world of contemporary, global fashion design, improving your professional skills, your academic understanding and your industry knowledge.

You’ll develop a comprehensive understanding of the international fashion world, and the business-led factors that influence professional practice.

Our course mixes traditional and experimental fashion design processes with theory and practical work. This will encourage you to think about important issues and future trends in the fashion industry and how you could adapt or improve upon your design, styling, marketing or promotional work. For example, you might explore relationships between your design process, marketing strategy and psychological theories. Or you might look at the connections between mathematics and pattern-cutting; or sustainable design and production processes.

We'll investigate different markets and consumers, too. Having learned more about people's wants and needs, you'll use your insight to create innovative designs, along with branding and promotional strategies.

Throughout the course you'll be working closely with other students. Together, we'll share and debate our ideas and working practices, and learn to critically analyse our work.

Your studies will take place over three trimesters in a single calendar year.

Careers

Our course will equip you with the skills, knowledge and professional understanding you need to work as a fashion designer. You’ll also be well-prepared for related roles, such as styling and promotion, brand and marketing management, PR management/press, fashion production, buying or trend forecasting.

Or you might decide to make use of all these skills by becoming a freelance fashion designer, managing your own brand.

Whatever you decide to do, you’ll benefit from our links with industry professionals, academics and freelancers, who regularly contribute to the course, as well as our careers events including Creative Front Futures and Anglia Ruskin's Big Pitch competition, created for students with an entrepreneurial spirit.

Core modules

Process and Practice as Research
Key Issues in Fashion Design
Fashion Design and Brand
Master's Dissertation Art and Design
Master's Project: Art and Design

Assessment

We'll measure your progress using a number of assessment methods that reflect the skills you'll need to demonstrate in the fashion industry. These include sketchbooks; reflective journals; technical files; brand, consumer and market research files; collaboration files; brand and promotion packages; portfolio work (visualisation and styling); 3D realisation and collection creation; presentations (audio visual and oral); written reports; your Master's dissertation; and Personal Development Planning (PDP).

Where you'll study

Cambridge School of Art has been inspiring creativity since 1858 when it was opened by John Ruskin.

Engaging with current debates surrounding contemporary practice and with the state-of-the-art facilities, Cambridge School of Art houses light, bright studios, industry-standard film and photographic facilities, and 150-year-old printing presses alongside dedicated Apple Mac suites. Our digital art gallery, the Ruskin Gallery, exhibits both traditional shows and multimedia presentations, from national and international touring exhibitions and our own students.

We are the only university in Cambridge offering art and design courses at higher education level. A tight-knit community of artists, academics and over 900 students, we collaborate across our University, the creative industries, and other sectors. Cambridge is a centre for employment in the creative industries and there are rich opportunities for collaboration with the city’s entertainment, technological, scientific, arts and heritage industries.

Our graduates have a history of winning national and international awards and an excellent employment record. They include Pink Floyd's Syd Barrett and Dave Gilmour, Spitting Image creators Peter Fluck and Roger Law, and illustrator Ronald Searle, the creator of St Trinian's.

We’re part of the Faculty of Arts, Law and Social Sciences, a hub of creative and cultural innovation whose groundbreaking research has real social impact.

Specialist facilities

You’ll work in our two fashion studios with industrial sewing and finishing machines, mannequins and surface textile facilities. We have a large stock of calico and pattern paper available for you to buy.

You’ll also have access to our life drawing and sculpture workshops, printmaking studios, photography labs, computer suites (with Photoshop and Illustrator), and film-making facilities.

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If you do not have the appropriate undergraduate preparation to embark on one of our MA courses, you may apply for our nine-month Graduate Diploma in Art History and Theory, which can constitute a qualifying year for the relevant MA course. Read more
If you do not have the appropriate undergraduate preparation to embark on one of our MA courses, you may apply for our nine-month Graduate Diploma in Art History and Theory, which can constitute a qualifying year for the relevant MA course.

Our Graduate Diploma consists of eight modules at 3rd-year undergraduate level (up to two of these can be at 2nd-year level). You must complete the appropriate coursework and examinations, and can also write a project on a topic of your choice if this is agreed with your course director.

At Essex, you have the freedom to study what most interests you. Some of the topics you may choose to explore include the history of photography; modern and contemporary art; curatorial practice and exhibition design; as well as more vernacular forms of visual culture, such as body art and activist placards.

Regardless of the topics you pursue, we are committed to research-based teaching, with a particular emphasis on bringing the approaches of art history into contact with other disciplines and discourses. In so doing, we seek to facilitate a critical engagement with artworks and forms of visual culture, both within and beyond the traditional canons of art history.

On campus, the Essex Collection of Art from Latin America (ESCALA), Europe’s largest collection of contemporary art from Latin American, will provide an invaluable resource for studying art and curatorial practice first-hand.

One of the major reasons for choosing Essex is the quality of the education you will receive. We are 6th in the UK for research excellence, with 89% of our work rated “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” (REF 2014). We also achieved an exceptional 95% student satisfaction in the 2016 National Student Survey.

Our expert staff

Essex Art History features a dynamic group of art historians who investigate the production and reception of images and built environments, across cultures and media from the early modern period to the present. Our staff are experts on topics as diverse as activist art, 19th-century medical photography, the art of Latin America, urbanism, exhibition design and body art.

We also have significant experience in curation and public engagement. Recent projects include:
-Dr Gavin Grindon curated a section of Banksy’s Dismaland show and co-curated the Disobedient Objects exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, which was one of the most well attended shows in the museum’s history.
-Dr Matt Lodder has acted as contributor for various television shows on body art and body modification, including the Today programme, the Jeremy Vine Show, Sky News, BBC Breakfast News, ‘Coast’, and National Geographic’s ‘Taboo’.
-Dr Natasha Ruiz Gómez co-organised a major conference on Collect, Exchange, Display: Artistic Practice and the Medical Museum at the Hunterian Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons, London.

Specialist facilities

At Essex, you have the best of both worlds: on the one hand, you are part of a tight-knit, campus community with close ties to several small but excellent museums in the nearby town of Colchester; on the other hand, you can travel from campus to London in an hour, which puts the world’s best museums and galleries at your fingertips.

Our facilities enable you to gain curatorial experience and engage in object-based learning, a cornerstone of our approach when teaching the history of art and its modes of display:
-Our Essex Collection of Art from Latin America (ESCALA) is the most comprehensive Latin American art research resource in the UK and has a state-of-the-art teaching and research space. Many of our students gain work and research experience through our collection
-Our onsite gallery Art Exchange runs an on-going programme of contemporary art exhibitions, talks and workshops by curators and artists, as well as exhibitions organised by our postgraduate curatorial students
-Enjoy regular visits to London galleries, including Tate Modern, Tate Britain, the National Gallery and the Royal Academy of Arts, as well as many independent and alternative spaces
-Colchester’s iconic Firstsite gallery features an exciting programme of contemporary art exhibitions, film screenings and talks, and exhibitions organised by our students

Your future

The visual arts and culture industries have become an increasingly significant part of the national and international economy, and art history graduates leave Essex with the skills to take advantage of this growing opportunity.

Graduates from our programmes are ideally prepared for roles in the media, in advertising, in museums and galleries, in education (in schools, universities, and cultural institutions), as conservators, as auctioneers, dealers and antiques specialists, in charities, in publishing, as specialist arts lawyers, as PR agents, in fashion, or to run their own galleries.

Our recent graduates have gone on to work in a wide range of roles including:
-A member of the valuation team at Sotheby’s (New York)
-Head of Learning at firstsite (a contemporary arts centre in Colchester)
-Visual Merchandising Manager at John Lewis (Oxford Street, London)

We also offer research supervision for students who wish to continue their studies with a PhD or an MPhil. We cover the major areas of European art, architecture and visual culture from 1300 to the present, as well as the art and architecture of Latin America.

We work with our university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

Postgraduate study is the chance to take your education to the next level. The combination of compulsory and optional modules means our courses help you develop extensive knowledge in your chosen discipline, whilst providing plenty of freedom to pursue your own interests. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore to ensure your course is as relevant and up-to-date as possible your core module structure may be subject to change.

Graduate Diploma - Art History and Theory
-Art & Ideas III (optional)
-Curatorial Project
-Art, the Law and the Market (optional)
-Contemporary Art: 1980 to the Present (optional)
-Dissertation - Final Year Art History and Theory (optional)
-Final Year Dissertation Project (optional)
-Inventing the Future: Early Contemporary 1945-1980 (optional)
-Photography in History (optional)
-Reworking the Past (optional)
-Study Trip Abroad (Final Year) (optional)
-Study Trip Abroad (Year 2) (optional)
-Art and Power (optional)
-The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Reproduction: Film, New Media, Software and the Internet (optional)
-Visualising Bodies (optional)
-Picturing the City I (optional)
-After Impressionism: European Art From Van Gogh to Klimt (optional)
-Becoming Modern: European Art From Futurism to Surrealism (optional)
-Art in Latin America (optional)
-Art and Ideas II: More Art, More Ideas - Critique and Historiography in the History of Art (optional)
-Collect, Curate, Display (optional)
-Picturing the City II (optional)

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This programme combines strategic business design, fashion enterprise and social impact to help you become a successful fashion business innovator. Read more

This programme combines strategic business design, fashion enterprise and social impact to help you become a successful fashion business innovator.

Run by the School of Design and Leeds Enterprise Centre, Leeds University Business School, the programme allows you to view the fashion industry from social and cultural as well as commercial perspectives.

Along with concepts such as consumer behaviour, supply chain structures, branding and marketing, you’ll also study the principles of business and entrepreneurship and how they relate to social enterprise. You’ll also address the challenges of sustainability.

You’ll mix design, business and market-centred innovation to gain a broad base of skills to thrive in a complex, fast-paced and rapidly evolving industry.

Specialist facilities

We have plenty of facilities to help you make the most of your time at Leeds. You will be able to develop your practice in well-equipped studios and purpose-built computer clusters so you can build your skills on both PC and Mac. There is also a computer-aided design (CAD) suite with access to the latest design software and some of the latest design technology, such as digital printing and laser cutting facilities, clothing engineering and colour analysis/prediction labs.

We also have an impressive range of resources you can use for research. We house the M&S Company Archive including documents, advertising, photos, films, clothing and merchandise from throughout Marks & Spencer’s history, offering a fascinating insight into the changing nature of branding and advertising over time. ULITA, an archive of international textiles, is also housed on campus and collects, preserves and documents textiles and related areas from around the world.

Course content

From the very start of the programme you’ll develop a broad base of knowledge. You’ll explore the concepts of entrepreneurship, enterprise and social enterprise as well as different ethical, social and sustainable approaches. You’ll study the challenges faced by social enterprises today and even the process of setting up a new business.

At the same time, you’ll learn about consumer behaviour and the fashion marketing cycle. You’ll research and develop prototype garments to explore how innovative design ideas can meet the challenges of sustainability and ethics, or make the most of emerging technologies.

In addition, you can tailor your degree to suit your interests and career plans with a choice of optional modules on topics such as fashion photography, textile design, fashion industry analysis and sustainability. You will be presented with a range of research methods in cultural studies to develop research skills by applying them in your independent Masters project, through discussion with the tutors and potential supervisors.

Your independent project can be developed as a traditional dissertation on a fashion related topic of your choice, or a more creative based Professional and Contextual Studies project. In the contextual route you’ll research and develop your own design solution – which you’ll exhibit at the end of the year – supported by case studies and other independent work.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Fashion Marketing 15 credits
  • Fashion Futures 15 credits
  • Cultural Research Methods 30 credits
  • Enterprise and Society 15 credits
  • Enterprise Awareness 15 credits
  • New Venture Creation 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Fashion, Enterprise and Society MA in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

This diverse degree gives you a wide range of skills, and the variety of teaching methods used reflects this. We use workshops, seminars, presentations, lectures, practical sessions, tutorials, online learning, seminars and group learning sessions. Independent study is also vital to this degree, allowing you to develop your own designs and build your skill set.

Assessment

We use a range of assessment techniques, including presentations, essays, group and individual project work and portfolios of research and practical work.

Career opportunities

This course is designed to give you a broad knowledge base and a wide range of skills to help you become a forward-thinking, market-conscious innovator in the fashion industry.

You will have a lot to contribute to the thriving global fashion industry – as well as other sectors – in a range of social, commercial, marketing, management and enterprise careers. Past students have obtained positions with Harper’s Bazaar China, TJX Europe and the Kuoni Group among others, or they have created their own business.

You’ll also be well-prepared to develop further research projects at PhD level, and several of our graduates have secured funded PhD positions.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.




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Fashion is as much about stories, words and images as it is about products, garments and accessories. It has become a global cultural and social phenomenon, and advertising, photography, magazines and events are a main part of this shift. Read more
Fashion is as much about stories, words and images as it is about products, garments and accessories. It has become a global cultural and social phenomenon, and advertising, photography, magazines and events are a main part of this shift. The recent changes in digital communication tools and social media have led to words and images becoming even more pivotal to it, yet have also made this system increasingly complex and hard to control.

Our Global Fashion Media MBA was specifically designed to address these changes. It is mainly aimed at students or young professionals from a wide range of backgrounds who are interested in careers related to visual representations and communications, journalism, advertising, photographic styling, artistic direction, e-commerce, public relations, photography, and even digital technologies and social media management, either in the fashion world or in the creative industries at large.

This course has 3 main objectives :
Enriching our students’ fashion, visual and media culture with modules such as « Fashion Photography History » that puts in perspective the historical changes in visual representations of fashion and makes the connection with other creative fields, or « Fashion 2.0 » that focuses on the latest developments in digital communication.

Helping our students understand the strategic challenges faced by fashion companies and brands and the role of communication tools in it. Modules such as “International Marketing Communication”, “Branding” or “Sensorial Marketing” articulate communication tools with the global management of companies that have creative activities at the heart of their business.

Allowing students to use the skills they have acquired during the numerous workshops run by professionals that we offer throughout the year. Examples of this include maintaining a blog dedicated to fashion and culture throughout the programme and producing a fashion magazine in full, from feature and article writing to photo shooting and artistic direction.

This program ends with what we call the Capstone Project, an individual research and creative project. When working on the Capstone, each student is encouraged to appropriate specific topics of the MBA Global Fashion Media according to his or her own professional projects and areas of interest.

Moving from the Paris to the Shanghai campuses allows students not only to compare the sectorial differences between mature and emerging markets, but also to better understand the impact local cultures can have on communication and image production.

In both cities, students have the opportunity to attend a wide range of events, from meeting with professionals, attending fashion shows, exhibitions and professional fairs to taking company tours, thus allowing them to build their own professional network. The Career and Alumni Centre is also there to offer guidance to IFA Paris students and alumni, and brings together a large network of graduates and alumni from over 50 different nationalities.

All our programs are articulated around the ECTS framework as defined by the Bologne convention. After completing their course, students receive a total of 120 ECTS that can easily be transferred if they decide to study further. This program also received the IDEL/IDEART accreditation and is certified as an “International Master.”

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This one-year programme (two years part-time) is designed to give a deeper understanding of historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. Read more
This one-year programme (two years part-time) is designed to give a deeper understanding of historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. Research training includes historical methods, philosophical analysis and socio-cultural models, providing an interdisciplinary environment for those interested in progressing to a PhD or those simply interested in HPSM studies.

Former students have gone on to attract major doctoral funding awards and jobs in the media, government and NGOs. The core teaching staff are attached to the Department of Philosophy, the Northern Centre for the History of Medicine (co-run with Newcastle University) and the School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health. Modules are taught via lectures, seminars, personal tutorials and workshops. The diversity of staff research interests allows you to focus your research on a wide variety of topics, including historical, philosophical and/or cultural aspects of biology, biomedical ethics, the body, the environment, gender, medical humanities, medicine, and the physical sciences.

Programme Structure

Core Modules:
-Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine
-Dissertation (Philosophy, Health, or History)

Optional Modules:
Students choose a total of three optional modules, with at least one from List A and one from List B. The module titles below are those offered in 2015/16. Not all the modules will necessarily run every year.
List A:
-History of Medicine
-Science and the Enlightenment
-Ethics, Medicine and History
-Gender, Medicine and Sexuality in Early Modern Europe
-Gender, 'Sex', Health and Politics

List B:
-Philosophical Issues in Science and Medicine
-Phenomenology and the Sciences of Mind
-Current Issues in Metaphysics
-Philosophy of Social Sciences
-Ethics of Cultural Heritage

Learning and Teaching

The MA in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine (HPSM) provides the opportunity for in-depth engagement with historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. In the process, students develop critical abilities and independent research skills in an interdisciplinary environment that prepare them for further postgraduate study and for a wide range of careers where such skills are highly prized.

Students select three topic modules from two lists of usually five historical and five philosophical options. They are also required to take a Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine module and to complete a double-module dissertation in the Department of Philosophy, the Department of History, or the School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health.

Topic modules are typically taught via seven two-hour seminars, two one-to-one tutorials, and a workshop at the end of the module. Seminars incorporate staff-led discussion of topics, student presentations and small group discussions, in the context of a friendly, supportive environment. Seminars serve to (i) familiarise students with topics, positions and debates, (ii) help them to navigate the relevant literature, (iii) refine their oral and written presentation skills and (iv) further develop their ability to independently formulate, criticise and defend historical and philosophical positions. Students are expected to do approximately four hours of reading for each seminar. In consultation with the module leader students decide upon an essay topic, and the most appropriate supervisor available for their topic is allocated. At this point, they begin a more focused programme of reading and independent study, and also benefit from the one-to-one supervisions with the expert supervisor. These supervisions provide more focused teaching, tailored to a student’s chosen essay topic. Supervisions further enable students to develop and refine their own historiographical or philosophical positions, convey them clearly and support them with well constructed arguments. In the workshop students present a draft of their essay and receive further feedback from their peers as well as staff.

The core modules of the programme are the Research Methods module and the double-module Dissertation. The former consists of nine seminars, each of 2 hours duration and a feedback session. They introduce students to relevant methodologies and approaches in the history of medicine, history of science, philosophy of science, and medical humanities, as well as to HPSM resources in the University Library, research tools, MA-level essay composition and format, and other research-related matters. They also include focused advice and discussion concerning dissertation proposals, which students are required to submit as part of this module.

Having completed the three topic modules and the research methods module, students start work on their dissertations. The nature of the dissertation will vary depending upon the topic studied and the department in which the module is undertaken. Students are offered up to six one-to-one tutorials of up to an hour each, with a supervisor who will be an expert in their chosen field. The supervisions help to further refine skills acquired during the academic year (such as presenting and defending an argument in a clear, structured fashion) and to complete a substantial piece of high quality independent research.

In addition to this core teaching, students benefit from a range of activities, including an MA Dissertation Workshop, research seminars of the Centre for the History of Medicine and Disease, and regular meetings of EIDOS, the Philosophy Department’s postgraduate society. They are welcomed as full participants in the Department’s research culture, and are thus strongly encouraged to attend a range of other events, including weekly Research Seminars, and occasional Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures, conferences, workshops and reading groups. The programme director remains in regular contact with the students throughout the year and is available to discuss any issues that might arise (personal or academic).

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The History of Design and Material Culture MA focuses on both objects from everyday life and representations of them since the eighteenth century as a basis for research and analysis. Read more
The History of Design and Material Culture MA focuses on both objects from everyday life and representations of them since the eighteenth century as a basis for research and analysis.

The course allies theory and practice in seminar-based discussions that embrace various methodological issues and perspectives, including Marxism, discourse theory, phenomenology, semiology, museology, gender, race, class, memory and oral testimony. Depending on the material you analyse in your essays and seminars, as well as the dissertation topic you choose, you can also emphasise your own intellectual and subject-specific interests.

Since its inception in the late 1990s, the MA has garnered a national and international reputation as one of the pioneering and most successful programmes of its kind. As a research-led course, it harnesses the academic expertise of staff with a recognised wealth of teaching and research excellence in subject areas such as fashion and dress history, the history and theory of advertising, photography and the mass-reproduced image, and heritage and museum studies.

Under guidance, you will be encouraged to explore the relationship between theory and practice and to develop your own skills as an independent researcher, thinker and writer.

Course structure

The History of Design and Material Culture MA draws on the wide-ranging academic expertise of staff in the fields of the history of decorative arts and design, dress history, material culture, museology and social history.

It stimulates innovative and interdisciplinary study in the history of design and material culture in both their western and non-western contexts, considering the relationship between local, national and international patterns of production, circulation, consumption and use.

The course is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, study visits and tutorials. Considerable emphasis is placed on student involvement in the weekly seminar readings and discussions within the two thematic core modules, Exploring Objects and Mediating Objects.

Based at Pavilion Parade, a Regency building overlooking the famous Royal Pavilion, teaching takes place close to the seafront and city centre amenities.

Syllabus

• Exploring Objects

The Exploring Objects module introduces you to a series of different research methods and historiographical approaches, as you interrogate and make sense of designed objects in terms of how they are designed, produced, circulated, consumed and used in everyday life. It covers the period from the late eighteenth century to the present time and typically involves discussion and debate on the following themes, theories and methods: Marxist and post-Marxist historiography; production and consumption; gender and taste; phenomenology; object-based analysis; the use of archives; and 'good writing/bad writing'. It also introduces you to the academic rigour of postgraduate dissertation research.

• Mediating Objects

This module complements Exploring Objects by focusing on the mediation between 'this one' (the object itself) and 'that one' (the object as represented in word and image). On one level, it examines how objects are translated in various texts and contexts, from museum and private collections to photographs, advertisements, film and fiction. On another level, it examines how objects are transformed through the embodied processes of everyday rituals such as gift-giving and personal oral and collective memories. The module therefore deals with the idea of intertexualities and how the identities of things and people are phenomenologically bound up with each other. By extension, you examine objects in relation to ideas concerning sex, gender, class, generation, race and ethnicity.

• Dissertation

The centrepiece of your MA studies, the dissertation is a piece of original writing between 18,000 and 20,000 words on a research topic of your own choosing. It allows you to pursue a specific research topic related to your own academic and intellectual interests in a given area of the history of design and material culture, for example fashion and dress, textiles, ceramics and glass, product design, interior design and architecture, graphic communications, advertising and photography, film, museums, collecting and curating, and design pedagogy. The dissertation is largely based on primary research, often using specialist archives and surviving historical material.

Facilities

This course makes use of the University of Brighton Design Archives, which include the archives of the Design Council, Alison Settle, FHK Henrion and the South of England Film and Video Archive.

Close professional contact with national institutions such as the Victoria and Albert Museum, as well as with local collections and centres of historical interest (such as Brighton’s unique Royal Pavilion and Brighton Museum and Art Gallery, with its internationally famous collection of decorative art from the 1890s onwards), present research opportunities for students registered on the course.

The course is closely linked to our arts and humanities research division through a joint research lecture series, and we have successfully encouraged high achievers to register for the MPhil/PhD programme.

The student environment also includes the thriving postgraduate Design History Society as well as opportunities for conference presentation, professional contact and career development in the field.

Careers and employability

The course has an extremely healthy track record in helping students to take up careers in related areas of employment and further study. Many of our postgraduates have succeeded in finding work as lecturers, curators, journalists, designers and design consultants, while many others have pursued doctoral research, most often also securing prestigious funding from the AHRC (Arts and Humanities Research Council).

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The M.Phil. course in Public History and Cultural Heritage is designed to provide students with a rigorous grounding in public history and to prepare high-calibre graduates in a unique and thorough fashion for the management of cultural heritage. Read more
The M.Phil. course in Public History and Cultural Heritage is designed to provide students with a rigorous grounding in public history and to prepare high-calibre graduates in a unique and thorough fashion for the management of cultural heritage. We define ‘public history’ and ‘cultural heritage’ broadly. The course involves analysis of cultural memory, its construction, reception and loss; and study of the public status and consumption of history in modern society. Political issues surrounding public commemoration and ‘sites of memory’ are examined and the role of museums, galleries and the media in shaping public perceptions of the past is considered. The course also surveys the more concrete questions involved in the conservation, presentation and communication of the physical heritage of past cultures, particularly where interpretation and meaning are contested.

The M.Phil. course in Public History and Cultural Heritage is designed to provide students with a rigorous grounding in public history and to prepare high-calibre graduates in a unique and thorough fashion for the management of cultural heritage. We define 'public history' and 'cultural heritage' broadly. The course involves analysis of cultural memory, its construction, reception and loss; and study of the public status and consumption of history in modern society. Political issues surrounding public commemoration and 'sites of memory' are examined and the role of museums, galleries and the media in shaping public perceptions of the past is considered. The course also surveys the more concrete questions involved in the conservation, presentation and communication of the physical heritage of past cultures, particularly where interpretation and meaning are contested.

The course is taught in collaboration with the leading cultural institutions located in Dublin and several organisations offer internships to students. In recent years participating bodies have included Dublin City Gallery; Dublin City Library and Archive; Glasnevin Trust; Hugh Lane Gallery; The Little Museum of Dublin; Marsh's Library; the National Gallery of Ireland; the National Library of Ireland; the National Museum of Ireland; and St Patrick's Cathedral.

In a variety of modules, students are trained in the analysis and the presentation of their research findings. They are also introduced to the methodological challenges of advanced study and research at postgraduate level. The course comprises a core module, entitled Remembering, Reminding and Forgetting: Public History, Cultural Heritage and the Shaping of the Past, which runs across both terms. A suite of term-long electives is available on substantive themes. A three-month internship, located in one of our collaborating institutions, runs throughout the second term. Practitioner workshops are also held in the second term and provide an opportunity for national and international 'public historians' to discuss their work with the class. In any given year this may include novelists, artists, museum directors, or heritage and tourism policymakers. The course concludes with the production of a dissertation or major project, individually supervised by an member of staff.

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