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Masters Degrees (Facial Recognition)

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Forensic art encompasses a wide range of subjects, notably facial anthropology and identification, such as two and three-dimensional facial reconstruction, craniofacial superimposition, post-mortem depiction, composite art and age progression. Read more
Forensic art encompasses a wide range of subjects, notably facial anthropology and identification, such as two and three-dimensional facial reconstruction, craniofacial superimposition, post-mortem depiction, composite art and age progression.

This highly innovative one-year taught Masters course will encompass all these fields, employing highly specialised tutors from scientific backgrounds alongside experienced forensic art supervisors.

Why study Forensic Art at Dundee?

Forensic Art is the presentation of visual information in relation to legal procedures. A forensic artist may aid in the identification or location of victims of crime, missing persons or human remains, and may facilitate the identification, apprehension or conviction of criminals.

Forensic artists require technical and conceptual art skills alongside comprehensive medical and anatomical knowledge. The course provides training and expertise at the cutting-edge of the forensic art profession

What's so good about studying Forensic Art at Dundee?

You will benefit from the facilities of a well-established art college, whilst appreciating the newly-refurbished laboratories, a dedicated library and access to human material in a modern medical science environment.

The award-winning staff in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID) are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, craniofacial identification and the study of the human body. The core remit of the Centre is the study of anatomy and staff deliver high quality anatomy teaching at all levels, via whole body dissection which allows students to develop a sound knowledge of the human body.

The Centre was awarded a prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in November 2013. Presented in recognition of 'world class excellence', the Queen’s Anniversary Prizes are among the most highly-regarded awards for the UK’s universities and colleges.

Teaching & Assessment

Teaching methods include traditional and online lectures, practical workshops in the studio and dissecting room and small group discussions. These encourage debate around theoretical research-based solutions to current practical problems.

The MSc will be taught full-time over one year (September to August).

How you will be taught

The course is delivered using traditional methods including lectures, practical studio sessions and small group discussions with an encouragement into debate and theoretical solutions to current problems.

What you will study

This highly innovative one-year taught MSc will encompass these fields, employing highly specialised tutors from scientific backgrounds alongside experienced forensic artists.

Semester 1 (60 credits)

In semester 1 the focus is on the study of anatomy through dissection, prosection study, illustration and facial sculpture and applying this to life art practice. Students will also be introduced to research methods and digital media.

Anatomy 1 - Head and Neck (15 credits)

Anatomy 2 - Post Cranial (15 credits)

Life Art (10 credits)

Digital Media Practice (10 credits)

Research Methods (10 credits)

Semester 1 may be also taken as a stand-alone PGCert entitled ‘Anatomy for Artists’.


Semester 2 (60 credits)

Forensic Facial Imaging, Analysis and Comparison (25 credits)

Forensic Art (25 credits)

Medical-Legal Ethics (10 credits)

On successful completion of Semesters 1 and 2 there is an exit award of a Postgraduate Diploma in Forensic Art and Facial Identification.

Semester 3 (60 credits) - dissertation and exhibition resulting from a self-directed project undertaken either at the university or as a placement.

How you will be assessed

A variety of assessment methods are employed, including anatomy spot-tests; oral and visual presentations; portfolio assessment of 2D/3D image acquisition and of artwork; written coursework and examination, such as forensic case reports.

Careers

This programme aims to provide professional vocational training to underpin your first degree, so that you can enter employment at the leading edge of your discipline. Career opportunities in forensic art are varied and will depend on individual background and interests.

In forensic art, potential careers exist within the police force and overseas law enforcement. Possible careers include:

Police art & design departments producing law enforcement documents, image enhancement, CCTV surveillance, image collection, staff posters and presentations.
SOCO/CSIs in UK or overseas law enforcement agencies
Facial composite practitioner and witness interview expert in police force
Archaeological artist working with museums, institutes and exhibitions
Facial identification services
Medico-legal artwork
Freelance art applications
Special effects and the media/film world
Academia – teaching or research
PhD research

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The Centre for Anatomy & Human Identification provides a wide range of modules in key aspects of Medical Art and Forensic Art & Facial Identification which are offered on a stand-along basis. Read more
The Centre for Anatomy & Human Identification provides a wide range of modules in key aspects of Medical Art and Forensic Art & Facial Identification which are offered on a stand-along basis.

These modules enable the student to develop specialist expertise or perhaps refresh knowledge.

Our academic staff offer postgraduate modules in their specialist areas, therefore, students are taught by experts in the field.

What's so good about this course at Dundee?

Students benefit from the facilities of a well-established art college, whilst appreciating the newly-refurbished laboratories, a dedicated library and access to human material in a modern medical science environment.

The award-winning staff in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID) are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, craniofacial identification and the study of the human body. The core remit of the Centre is the study of anatomy and staff deliver high quality anatomy teaching at all levels, via whole body dissection which allows students to develop a sound knowledge of the human body.

The Centre was awarded a prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in November 2013. Presented in recognition of 'world class excellence', the Queen’s Anniversary Prizes are among the most highly-regarded awards for the UK’s universities and colleges.

Teaching & Assessment

The modules are delivered through traditional lectures, dissection, study groups and anatomical illustration workshops. These will be supplemented with tutorials to allow for small and large group-based discussion as well as life drawing critique sessions.

-Core modules
Anatomy for Artists
Medical Art 1: Image Capture and Creation
Medical Art 2: Communication and Education
Forensic Facial Imaging, Analysis and Comparison
Forensic Art

Progression

These modules form part of our postgraduate portfolio. You can continue from a single module to a Postgraduate Certificate, by combining the modules as follows:

Anatomy for Artists
Medical Art 1: Image Capture and Creation
Medical Art 2: Communication and Education (requires completion of Medical Art 1 or prior professional experience)
Upon completion of all three a PGCert in Medical Art will be awarded

Anatomy for Artists
Forensic Facial Imaging, Analysis and Comparison
Forensic Art (requires completion of Forensic Facial Imaging, Analysis and Comparison or prior professional experience)
Upon completion of all three a PGCert in Forensic Art and Facial Identification will be awarded.

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Understanding all aspects of Human-Robot interaction. the programming that coordinates a robot’s actions with human action as well the human appreciation and trust in the robot. Read more

Understanding all aspects of Human-Robot interaction: the programming that coordinates a robot’s actions with human action as well the human appreciation and trust in the robot.

At present, there are many sensors and actuators in every device – so they may become embedded in a physical reality. For robots that move around in a specific setting there is a pressing need for the development of proper methods of control and joint-action. The embedded, embodied nature of human cognition is an inspiration for this, and vice versa. Computational modelling of such tasks can give insight into the nature of human mental processing. In the Master’s specialisation in Robot Cognition you’ll learn all about the sensors, actuators and the computational modelling that connects them.

Making sense of sensor data – developing artificial perception – is no trivial task. The perception, recognition and even appreciation of sound stimuli for speech and music (i.e. auditory scene analysis) require modelling and representation at many levels and the same holds for visual object recognition and computer vision. In this area, vocal and facial expression recognition (recognition of emotion from voices and faces) is a rapidly growing application area. In the area of action and motor planning, sensorimotor integration and action, there are strong links with research at the world-renowned Donders Centre for Cognition.

At Radboud University we also look beyond the technical side of creating robots that can move, talk and interpret emotions as humans do. We believe that a robot needs to do more than simply function to its best ability. A robot that humans distrust will fail even if it is well programmed. Culture also plays a role in this; people in Japan are more open to the possibilities of robots than in, for example, the Netherlands. We will teach you how to evaluate humans’ attitudes towards a robot in order to use that information to create robots that will be accepted and trusted and therefore perform even better.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/robot

Why study Robot Cognition at Radboud University?

- We offer a great mix of technical and social aspects of robot cognition.

- This programme focuses on programming robot behaviours and evaluating them rather than building the robots themselves. We teach you to programme robots that will be used in close contact with human beings, for example in healthcare and education, rather than in industry.

- Our cognitive focus leads to a highly interdisciplinary AI programme where students gain skills and knowledge from a number of different areas such as mathematics, computer science, psychology and neuroscience combined with a core foundation of artificial intelligence.

- This specialisation offers plenty of room to create a programme that meets your own academic and professional interests.

- Together with the world-renowned Donders Institute, the Max Planck Institute and various other leading research centres in Nijmegen, we train our students to become excellent researchers in AI.

- To help you decide on a research topic there is a semi-annual Thesis Fair where academics and companies present possible project ideas. Often there are more project proposals than students to accept them, giving you ample choice. We are also open to any of you own ideas for research.

- Our AI students are a close-knit group; they have their own room in which they often get together to interact, debate and develop their ideas. Every student also receives personal guidance and supervision from a member of our expert staff.

Our research in this field

The programme is closely related to the research carried out in the internationally renowned Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour. This institute has several unique facilities for brain imaging using EEG, fMRI and MEG. You could also cooperate with the Behavioural Science Institute and work in its Virtual Reality Laboratory, which can be used to study social interaction between humans and avatars.

An example of a possible thesis subject:

- Engaging human-robot interactions in healthcare for children and/or the elderly

Social robots are often deployed with 'special' user groups such as children and elderly people. Developing and evaluating robot behaviours for these user groups is a challenge as a proper understanding of their cognitive and social abilities is needed. Depending on the task, children for example need to be engaged and encouraged in a different way than adults do. What are effective robot behaviours and strategies to engage children and/or elderly people? How can these robot behaviours be evaluated in a proper way?

Career prospects

Our Artificial Intelligence graduates have excellent job prospects and are often offered a job before they have actually graduated. Many of our graduates go on to do a PhD either at a major research institute or university with an AI department. Other graduates work for companies interested in cognitive design and research. Examples of companies looking for AI experts with this specialisation: Philips, Siemens, Honda, Mercedes, Google. Some students have even gone on to start their own companies.

Job positions

Examples of jobs that a graduate of the specialisation in Robot Cognition could get:

- PhD Researcher on Cognitive-Affective Modelling for Social Robots

- PhD Researcher on Automatic analysis of human group behaviour in the presence of robots

- PhD Researcher on Automatic analysis of affective quality of conversations in human-robot interaction

- Advisor and innovation manager in the healthcare industry

- Social robotics and affective computing for robots expressing emotions

- Developer of control algorithms for using optic flow in drones

- Advisor for start-up company on developing new uses for tactile displays

- Team member in design of emotion recognition and training for autistic children

Internship

Half of your second year consists of an internship, giving you plenty of hands-on experience. We encourage students to do this internship abroad, although this is not mandatory. We do have connections with companies abroad, for example in China, Finland and the United States.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/robot

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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The Applied Computing Department is a young department of modest size but is successful in attracting research funding from various sources in the UK and the EU (including industry, research councils and charitable foundations). Read more

Course Outline

The Applied Computing Department is a young department of modest size but is successful in attracting research funding from various sources in the UK and the EU (including industry, research councils and charitable foundations). It supports a significant range of research interest and over the last few years the number of research students has grown steadily. The Department has a history of involvement in EU framework projects. More recently, we were partners in two EU FP6 funded projects: SecurePhone and BroadWan. We have been working and collaborating with many European research institutions including The Technical University Graz, CNUCE, Pisa, Thales, Thomson, TELENOR, RAL, Salzburg, Telephonica – Spain, Atos Origin, The University of Saarbrucken – Germany, INFORMA – Italy, and ENST – France.

The main research areas of interest in the Department cover image / video processing and analysis techniques and applications; wireless mobile network technologies; and biometric-based authentications for constrained devices / environments. In image processing we mainly, but not exclusively, use wavelet transform techniques for facial feature detection and recognition, online image / video compression for constrained devices, visual speech recognition, feature detection in biomedical images, digital watermarking, content-based video indexing for biometric video databases. In the wireless networking area, our research effort focuses on convergence and integration of different wireless technologies and standards, wireless mesh technologies, intrusion detection and prevention, efficiency and stability of ad hoc networks.

Currently the Department has a number of research groups consisting of 5 research active academics, 12 PhD and 3 MSc/MPhil students at various stages of their studies.

Find out more about our Department of Applied Computing on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/appliedcomputing.

Teaching Method

Candidates spend a considerable part of their studies undertaking supervised research, at the end of which they submit a thesis embodying the results of that research. This thesis must demonstrate familiarity with, and an understanding of the subject, its principal sources and authorities. It should display critical discrimination and a sense of proportion in evaluating evidence and the judgements of others. The subject should be dealt with in a competent and scholarly manner.

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This one-year degree is designed for students who already hold a first degree (BA or BSc) in Forensic Anthropology or a related subject, and is intended to provide advanced training in subject areas which are germane to current professional requirements, but which are not available collectively at any other institution in the world. Read more
This one-year degree is designed for students who already hold a first degree (BA or BSc) in Forensic Anthropology or a related subject, and is intended to provide advanced training in subject areas which are germane to current professional requirements, but which are not available collectively at any other institution in the world.

Why study Anatomy & Advanced Forensic Anthropology at Dundee?

Forensic anthropology is the analysis of human remains for the medico-legal purpose of establishing identity. The discipline has adopted a pivotal role in UK and International investigations in cases of inter-personal violence and homicide, repatriation, mass disasters and war crimes.

Recent mass fatality incidents have highlighted the requirement for national and international disaster victim identification (DVI) capability, and cemented the forensic anthropologist’s role as a significant component within the multi-disciplinary response facility.

Traditionally the forensic anthropologist has dealt with human skeletal remains resulting from unexplained deaths; this professional definition is unrealistically restrictive given the multi-disciplinary nature of the demands of human identification in the twenty-first century. In particular there is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfil the requirements of DVI deployment.

Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification

This course is taught within the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identfication (CAHID) and is located in the Medical Sciences Institute at the University of Dundee, Scotland.

Prof Sue Black heads the Centre, she was awarded an OBE for her International Human Identification work from mass graves and co-authored Developmental Juvenile Osteology and The Juvenile Skeleton.

The award-winning staff of this Centre are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, craniofacial identification and the study of the human body.

The core remit of the Centre is the study of anatomy. The Centre delivers high quality anatomy teaching at all levels, via whole body dissection which allows students to develop a sound knowledge of the human body. The Centre relies on the generosity of donors for the ability to teach students to the highest standard possible.

The Centre was awarded a prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in November 2013. Presented in recognition of 'world class excellence', the Queen’s Anniversary Prizes are among the

Aims of the Programme

The aim of this programme is to provide training in anatomically-based forensic anthropology, and specifically to provide advanced training in musculoskeletal anatomy, juvenile osteology, comparative forensic osteology and DVI training.

What you will study

Course Structure:
This is a one year full time taught Masters programme in which all modules are compulsory. The research dissertation can be in the form of original laboratory research in an area pertinent to anatomy and forensic anthropology.

Human Gross Anatomy (Semesters 1 & 2):
Provides the opportunity to conduct whole body dissection, with particular emphasis on functional and musculoskeletal anatomy
Exposure to human form and function with direct relevance to the identification process
Only institution in the UK offering the opportunity to dissect cadavers which have been embalmed using the Thiel soft-fix method, which provides life-like preservation of the soft tissues.

Developmental Juvenile Osteology (Semester 1):
Focuses on the development of the human juvenile skeleton as a means to understanding adult skeletal form
Through practical examination, each bone of the body will be studied from its embryological origin, through key developmental milestones, until the attainment of its adult form
Practical sessions will focus on the unique Scheuer collection of juvenile skeletal remains.
Forensic Anthropology as Expert Evidence

Covering the more specialised skills including forensic anatomy, trauma analysis and age estimation in the living this module will cover the skills required to present your analyses in a court of law.

Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) training (Semesters 1 & 2):
Provides a thorough understanding of the DVI process in the UK and abroad
Developed by experienced practitioners, it is based on the National DVI Training course for the UK DVI team
Delivers a robust theoretical underpinning for anyone undertaking DVI work on a practical basis.

MSc Research Project (Semester 3):
Students will undertake an advanced level practical project supervised by a research-active practitioner
CAHID staff have significant experience in many areas of forensic human identification, including juvenile osteology, facial anthropology, facial reconstruction, age assessment in the living and dead, analysis of sexual dimorphism and ancestry, soft tissue biometric systems, human provenance, skeletal pathology and trauma, and virtual anthropology

How you will be assessed

A variety of assessment methods will be employed including practical spot exams, online assessment and traditional essay based examination.

Careers

There is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfill the requirements of DVI deployment. This degree will train individuals to be competent in specialist areas of anatomy and forensic anthropology.

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Cosmetic Medicine Courses Online. Taught completely online, our Cosmetic Medicine courses have been developed with the express purpose of promoting and enhancing the professional knowledge underpinning practice in cosmetic medicine. Read more

Cosmetic Medicine Courses Online

Taught completely online, our Cosmetic Medicine courses have been developed with the express purpose of promoting and enhancing the professional knowledge underpinning practice in cosmetic medicine. The courses are designed to complement practice based Recognise Prior Learning (RPL) awards, which are being developed for cosmetic medicine practitioners.

With Health Education England (HEE) adopting increasing regulatory requirements for aesthetic practice, individuals undertaking aesthetic procedures should have a formal postgraduate qualification. Therefore, these qualifications from our Cosmetic Medicine courses would be an important milestone in the healthcare practitioner's journey to be an aesthetic practitioner. Such qualifications are also regarded as integral by the individuals' regulatory authorities, such as the GDC, GMC and NMC.

The Postgraduate Diploma and MSc course is aimed at doctors, dentists and nurses with independent prescriber status. These roles are evolving with increasing demand amongst these specialists for a postgraduate qualification to help support their professional learning and clinical development.

Students may apply for the MSc in Cosmetic Medicine as a two year course, firstly by completing the Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), followed by the MSc (60 credits).

Postgraduate Diploma in Cosmetic Medicine

The Diploma in Cosmetic Medicine course has been specifically designed to promote and enhance working professional’s knowledge underpinning practice in cosmetic medicine. It is designed to complement separate practice based recognised prior learning (RPL) awards that are being developed for cosmetic medicine practitioners.

The aims and aspired outcomes of the course upon completion are to:

  • Develop analytical and critical appraisal skills in both theory and research related to cosmetic medicine.
  • Demonstrate critical application of research to cosmetic medicine practice.
  • Professional decision making: incorporating evidence based rationale in a variety of diverse and complex situations related to cosmetic medicine.
  • To be able to apply advanced problem-solving skills in clinical practice.
  • Demonstrate leadership in the delivery and advancement of cosmetic medicine.
  • Demonstrate leadership of teams in multi-agency, multi-cultural and/or international contexts.
  • Demonstrate evaluation skills in the delivery of care to patients.

Applicants would typically be doctors, dentists or nurses with independent prescriber status.

These roles are evolving with increasing demand amongst these specialists for a postgraduate qualification to help support their professional learning and clinical development.

Course Structure

The online Cosmetic Medicine Diploma lasts one calendar year and is a part-time distance learning course. It consists of 6 modules per year, each of 6 weeks’ duration.

Module 1 - Anatomy, Physiology and Professional Issues Overview

Module 2 - Facial Muscle Treatment

Module 3 - Facial Fat Pads

Module 4 - Skin

Module 5 - Hair

Module 6 - Other Aesthetic Approaches

Assessment

The course puts assessment at the heart of learning by using clinical scenarios to facilitate problem-solving, critical analysis and evidence-based care. The scenarios act as both the focus for learning and assessment thus embedding assessment within the learning process.

Each of the 6 modules has the same assessment format. Due to the online nature of the course, students are expected to login and participate in the course regularly throughout the module (ideally on a daily basis).

Students use the skills gained during the lectures to engage with the different activities (see below).

Clinical case scenarios with case based discussion - 40%

Individual learning portfolio - 10%

Group/individual activity - 20%

Case based examination - 30%

Teaching Methods

Each module has the same format. Using an online platform and one tutor per 10-15 students, the self-directed distance learning is guided by tutor stimulated discussion based on clinically rich case scenarios. Group projects are undertaken alongside independent projects. Reflective practice is recorded in a reflective portfolio to help students consider how the learning can be translated into everyday work and practice.

Teaching starts with 1 day of introductory lectures. Students may attend these lectures in the UK (Glyntaff campus, University of South Wales)

The lecture series are delivered by the faculty and tutors, they are a pre-course organiser, giving students the tools required to undertake the online course such as:

  • Scientific writing
  • Levels of evidence
  • Harvard referencing
  • Reflective writing

The lectures series give an opportunity to meet face to face with tutors/other students prior to the online course.

Students are not required to attend the lectures however those who attend do benefit as they get a "jump start" to the course. Students who are not able to attend, should request a skype/telephone call to orientate them onto the course and are advised to review the lecture slides.

MSc in Cosmetic Medicine

The Cosmetic Medicine MSc has been specifically designed to promote and enhance working professional’s knowledge underpinning practice in cosmetic medicine. It is designed to complement separate practice based recognised prior learning (RPL) awards that are being developed for cosmetic medicine practitioners.

The Masters in Cosmetic Medicine provides a progression route for the Postgraduate Diploma in Cosmetic Medicine offered by the University.

The Cosmetic Medicine Masters of Science runs over 1 calendar year. Students undertake an initial 12 week online module to develop their skills in critical appraisal and knowledge of research methodologies. Thereafter they are able to select a 1,500 word proposal and 10,500 word professional project.

Course Structure

Module 1 - Research Methodologies and Critical Appraisal: Cosmetic Medicine

Module 2 - Professional Project: Cosmetic Medicine

Teaching Methods

Module 1: Research Methodologies and Critical Appraisal - MSc teaching methods for this module are similar to the PG Diploma course modules, however it is run over 12 weeks.

Module 2: Professional Project - To produce the professional project, students continue to use the online course; however much of the work is self-directed.



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The University has a long history of face research. Read more

Introduction

The University has a long history of face research. Our internationally renowned team of experts study almost all aspects of face perception, including low level visual processing, adaptation, gaze perception, social perception such as mate preference and attractiveness, mechanisms of recognition and forensic aspects such as unfamiliar face matching and eye witness recovery of memories for faces. This research has led to EvoFIT, a unique system for constructing facial composites of offenders by witnesses and victims of crime, which has a suspect identification rate ten times higher than traditional methods used by police. You will become part of this vibrant research community as you study the key research methods related to face research and will put your learning into practice during a month-long placement.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Professor Peter Hancock

Bursaries are available: http://www.stir.ac.uk/scholarships/.

Course objectives

This course facilitates understanding of this diverse subject whilst allowing students to focus the majority of their efforts in face research, an area for which Psychology at Stirling has long been internationally renowned.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Teaching is delivered using a variety of methods including tutorials, demonstrations and practical classes, but the majority is seminar-based. Students are typically taught within small groups in specialist classes, with first-year PhD students or other postgraduate students (for example, in modules from other MSc courses).

Both taught and research postgraduates are integral to our research group and expected to participate in our regular meetings. All students allocated a peer mentor are provided with appropriate office space and equipment. In addition, each student is associated with an academic from Psychology.

Part-time students take the same modules spread over two years.

Why Stirling?

- REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

- Strengths
Psychology at Stirling is one of the leading psychology departments in the UK. It ranked in the top 20 in the recent research assessment (REF 2014) and is one of only seven non-Russell group universities to do so (Birkbeck, Royal Holloway, Sussex, Essex, St Andrews and Bangor; source Times Higher Education magazine). Its quality of research publications ranked third in Scotland after Aberdeen and Glasgow. Furthermore, the relevance of its research activity to society received the highest possible rating which only four other psychology departments in the UK achieved (REF 2014 results).

Psychology at Stirling University is small enough to fully involve MSc students in our lively and collegial community of research excellence.

Your three month full-time dissertation is supervised by leading UK academics.

Career opportunities

The course provides advanced training for a career involving face research. It is intended primarily for students who already have a degree in Psychology or an allied discipline who intend to proceed to a PhD in this field.

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The MSc Forensic Anthropology is designed to equip students with the skills necessary for the analysis and identification of human skeletal remains. Read more
The MSc Forensic Anthropology is designed to equip students with the skills necessary for the analysis and identification of human skeletal remains. The one-year degree is uniquely designed for students who already hold a degree in a relevant biomedical science and wish to pursue further study in Forensic Anthropology.

Why study Forensic Anthropology at Dundee?

Forensic anthropology is the analysis of human remains for the medico-legal purpose of establishing identity. The discipline has adopted a pivotal role in UK and International investigations in cases of inter-personal violence and homicide, repatriation, mass disasters and war crimes.

Our course provides you with training in dedicated laboratory areas with exclusive access to the unique skeletal collections in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identfication (CAHID). The programme offers a unique mix of theoretical subject matter combined with hands on practical experience which is delivered by case active academic staff who are world leaders in the field.

Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification

This course is taught within Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID). The award winning staff of CAHID are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, cranio-facial reconstruction and the study of the human body. The Centre is regularly contacted for advice and input in high-profile forensic cases both at home and abroad. The cases in which staff have involvement are reflected in much of the research undertaken by the Centre, enabling it to maintain a high profile within the forensic community.

The Centre was awarded a prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in November 2013. Presented in recognition of 'world class excellence', the Queen's Anniversary Prizes are among the most highly-regarded awards for the UK's universities and colleges.

Top 10 reasons to study Forensic Anthropology at Dundee

Only institution in the UK to offer a career progression pathway in Forensic Anthropology
Opportunity to review forensic case work undertaken by CAHID staff
Teaching by world leading forensic practitioners
Access to several unique skeletal collections
Opportunity to act as an expert witness in simulated courtroom exercises
We teach and train towards RAI accreditation standards following the approved Forensic Anthropology curriculum
Multidisciplinary approach with excellent links across subject boundaries
Access to cases from CAHID's virtual anthropology communication service
Regular programme of seminars delivered by invited speakers from the UK and abroad
Diversity of career opportunities – our graduates work in a variety of related fields

Teaching & Assessment

This course is taught by a team based in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID). Specialist teaching is undertaken by case-active forensic practitioners. The cases in which our staff have involvement are reflected in much of the research undertaken by the Centre, enabling it to maintain a high profile within the forensic community. In turn, this research feeds into our teaching.

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis.

How you will be taught

The programme will be taught through a combination of face-to-face lectures and on-line learning resources as well as a large practical involving direct examination of the adult human skeleton.

Course Structure

This is a one year full time taught Masters programme in which all modules are compulsory. The research dissertation can be in the form of original laboratory research in an area pertinent to anatomy and forensic anthropology.

- Forensic Osteology (20 Credits)
- Peri and Post mortem processes (20 credits)
- Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) training (20 credits)
- Research Methods (20 credits)
- Forensic Human Identification (20 credits)
- Forensic Science and the Law (20 credits)
- Developmental Juvenile Osteology (20 credits)
- Research Project (60 credits)

How you will be assessed

Assessments will take the form of in-course essays, paper appraisal and presentation exercises in addition to final degree examinations and MSc research dissertation.

Careers

There is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfil the requirements of DVI deployment. This course will greatly increase the professional employment characteristics of any student undertaking it who seeks a career in forensic anthropology, forensic osteology or DVI.

Where are our graduates now?

Previous graduates in Forensic Anthropology have progressed to become teachers and researchers in the field with some going on to provide their skills and services on both the national and international forensic front.

Some of our graduates have gone on to pursue careers in biomedical research, scene of crime analysis, forensic science, human biology and osteological research.

Many have chosen to enter a degree in medicine or dentistry and have found that the skills they have acquired in Forensic Anthropology stand them in good stead, particularly with regards to radiology, paediatrics, gerontology and orthopaedics.

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Our Orthodontics MSc programme is open to international and home students. The home student programme (UK/EU) runs alongside our NHS Specialist Registrar Clinical Training. Read more

Our Orthodontics MSc programme is open to international and home students. The home student programme (UK/EU) runs alongside our NHS Specialist Registrar Clinical Training. It will equip you with the knowledge and skills to become an orthodontic specialist. We have an international reputation and membership of the Northern Universities Consortium. This ensures that the most skilled UK orthodontic teachers will tutor you.

Our Orthodontics MSc programme welcomes international and home students.

The course is designed to equip you with the knowledge and skills required to complement your clinical training and we aim to provide:

-Knowledge to support the clinical treatment of orthodontic cases, including simple and complex cases appropriate for specialist practitioner level

-An evidence base for orthodontics and the skills required to appraise the evidence base

-Applied research within orthodontics

The course provides theoretical teaching to support the development of an orthodontic specialist. We provide a comprehensive seminar programme incorporating the theoretical and diagnostic elements of specialist knowledge, and the opportunity to carry out a research project allied to our research strategy. Our course includes:

-Normal and abnormal development of the dentition

-Tooth movements and facial orthopaedics

-Orthodontic materials

-Orthodontic biomechanics

-Orthodontic techniques

-Biological sciences relevant to orthodontics

-An overview of multidisciplinary orthodontics.

The aim of the research component is to expose you to the principles and practicalities of performing dental research. Projects range from laboratory studies, analysis of new data sets, systematic reviews and short term clinical studies.

Research projects are identified and allocated during the first term. By the end of the first year you will have completed your first draft of your literature review and have established your methodology. More time is available for research during the second and third years with the dissertation handed in at the end of January of the third year. You will be encouraged to publish your research work in scientific journals.

The course, based in our School of Dental Sciences, has been running for two decades and we have a good national reputation. Our graduates have gone on to work in prestigious practices, senior academic posts and in hospital consultant positions.

The next intake for this course is in 2019.

Centre for Oral Health Research

The School’s Centre for Oral Health Research (COHR) is where most of our research activity takes place. COHR has a particular focus on understanding molecular and cellular mechanisms and translating these into clinical settings. Evaluation of clinical, community and economic strategies to improve public health and inform a wider health agenda is a central research theme.

Delivery

The course is 36 months. For NHS Registrars, who may undertake their clinical work elsewhere, attendance is required on a Thursday and Friday each week. International students are enrolled on a full-time programme including clinical practice and are required to attend daily throughout term time. 

Our teaching methods include case seminars, journal club and research sessions. Additional learning and teaching opportunities are also available through the Northern Universities Consortium (NUC).

Some of the seminars are held at peripheral hospitals across the region, eg Middlesbrough and Carlisle. The majority of NUC days are not held in Newcastle and you will have to make your own travel arrangements.

Facilities

The School of Dental Sciences at Newcastle is one of the most modern and best equipped in the country, occupying a spacious, purpose-built facility. The School is in the same building as the Dental Hospital, adjacent to the Medical School and Royal Victoria Infirmary teaching hospital, forming one of the largest integrated teaching and hospital complexes in the country.

Our facilities include:

  • a cone beam CT scanner and implant planning software, used extensively for patients treated on our implant programmes
  • in-house production laboratories providing excellent learning opportunities around clinician-technician communication
  • excellent library and computing facilities on-site.
  • research laboratories in Oral Biology, Anthropology and Dental Materials Science
  • a dedicated clinical research facility offering clinical training and research opportunities of the highest international standard

Find out about our dental laboratory facilities and Dental Clinical Research Facility on the Centre for Oral Health Research website. 



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COURSE CONTENT. Module Outline. Analysis, Practice & Technique. You will engage with traditional acting classes covering a range of techniques and approaches. Read more

COURSE CONTENT

Module Outline:

Analysis, Practice & Technique

You will engage with traditional acting classes covering a range of techniques and approaches. You will be encouraged to develop a reflective practice mentality and will explore through an analytical lens the work of established practitioners in this field.

 

Specialist Craft Skills

You will train in the art of ADR and voice over for animated characters, Motion Capture and facial capture work for the virtual performer, and finally high level combat skills covering guns, swords and a range of arms, taught by one of the country’s foremost combat and armoury experts.

 

Performance Projects

You will produce a wide range of filmed performance projects that demonstrate your array of skills. This could be a motion capture performance, a devised scene or performances from films you have been in.

 

Research and the Industry

Prepares you for the critical and analytical aspects of study at Master’s level, and lays the groundwork for further potential study at Doctoral level within the Department.

 

Independent Study: Specialist Project or Research Project

In this independent, project driven module, you will pursue your own enthusiasms and developing specialisms. This will usually take the form of a portfolio of work, a short film or a substantial written research project.

 

OUR FACILITIES

MA Screen Acting will be delivered in the new £30m Engineering and Digital Technology Park being constructed at the Bognor Regis campus.

Students will use industry standard equipment in CAD labs, edit suites, professional recording studios and a dedicated green screen stage.

Our commercial sound stage is one of three in the UK and will be used industry professionals including the London Metropolitian Orchestra. 

WHERE THIS CAN TAKE YOU

Our graduates are particularly well suited to work with film production companies, TV production studios, radio outlets, newspapers, PR firms and advertising agencies. 

INDICATIVE MODULES

  • Analysis, Practice & Technique
  • Specialist Craft Skills
  • Performance Projects
  • Research and the Industry
  • Independent Study: Specialist Project OR Research Project


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