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Bournemouth University has one of the largest face-processing laboratories in the UK, and our academic staff have expertise in neuropsychological disorders of face-processing and forensic applications of face-processing research. Read more
Bournemouth University has one of the largest face-processing laboratories in the UK, and our academic staff have expertise in neuropsychological disorders of face-processing and forensic applications of face-processing research. This expertise is central to the delivery of the course, where you will learn about the detection, management and potential remediation of face-processing disorders, including those with acquired, progressive, developmental or neuropsychiatric origins.

Through the study of contemporary issues in face-processing research, the fascinating programme of study is especially relevant if you hope to become a researcher in this area and/or are seeking further professional development by gaining a unique and relevant qualification in an increasingly difficult job market.

You will also gain key technological skills that are required for face-processing research. There will be training in the manipulation of facial stimuli, instruction in programming, and consideration of methodological issues and experimental design. Using our state-of-the-art research equipment, including eye-tracking, tDCS, EEG and when possible MRI, you will get plenty of practical, hands-on experience. These skills will be fundamental for the research project, in which you will carry out an experimental investigation addressing a novel research question in the field.

The course was reveiwed in February 2016.

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This MSc is provided jointly by the Department of Psychology and the York Neuroimaging Centre (YNiC), and recruits contributing faculty from other university departments such as The Hull-York Medical School. Read more
This MSc is provided jointly by the Department of Psychology and the York Neuroimaging Centre (YNiC), and recruits contributing faculty from other university departments such as The Hull-York Medical School. The overarching aim of the MSc in Cognitive Neuroscience at York is to provide a bridge between undergraduate study and PhD research in cognitive neuroscience, experimental psychology and imaging methods.

The course has been developed around training and research using neuroimaging techniques, and the experimental and analytical methods on which they depend. Through our specialist modules students are introduced the principles of neuroimaging, gaining hands on experience in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetoencephalography (MEG), eletroencephalography (EEG) or transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), learning how to design, analyze and evaluate neuroimaging experiments, and how such experiments are contributing to our understanding of the brain mechanisms underpining cognition and behaviour. Along the way, students also receive training on generic statistical, writing and research skills, and are exposed to main research topics in cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience. Finally, students complete an extended empirical project, typically using a neuroimaging technique of their choice. The empirical project is supported by the state-of-the-art facilities at YNiC.

Content

Specialist modules place neuroimaging in the wider context of cognitive neuroscientific research and introduce students to the principles of neuroimaging the design of neuroimaging experiments and specialist methods required for the analysis of neuroimaging data. These include:
-Basic principles in neuroimaging
-Research Design and Analysis in Neuroimaging
-Topics in Cognitive Neuroscience
-Programming in Neuroimaging

Empirical project
Project enables students to participate in the design and implementation of a theoretically-motivated piece of pure or applied research in cognitive neuroscience providing hands-on training in advanced brain imaging methods, some of which are being developed at York. Topics are chosen so as to be timely and practicable within the relevant resource and time constraints. We regard it as important that the topic not only engages the interest and enthusiasm of the student, but is also a good match to the specialist expertise and knowledge of the supervisor.

Many of our students' projects are published. Each year we offer projects on a wide variety of topics linked to faculty research interests. For example students have used fMRI to investigate the processing of emotional and social cues, representation of semantic knowledge in the brain, disruption of visual cortex in patients with macular degeneration and brain mechanisms underpinning language understanding, face processing, number processing or anxiety and risky behaviour. Students have also used MEG and TMS to investigate brain mechanisms of memory for words and pictures, connectivity patterns between brain regions and auditory perception. Some of these projects are methodological in nature in that they aim to study the analytical strategies to apply in brain research, or they aim to develop the use of new imaging methods.

General research modules
These provide a solid grounding in contemporary issues in psychology and neuroscience, psychological research methods, professional and generic skills.

Assessment
Modules are assessed through a variety of different assignments and exams including practical reports, essays, multiple choice questions, critical analysis of published papers, short notes on a range of topics, dissertation on the Empirical Project, poster presentation.

Backgrounds

This challenging but rewarding course will best suit applicants who are:
-Interested in the brain and its workings (see What is cognitive neuroscience? in the overview)
-Interested in Psychology as a biological science
-Considering a career in research, especially in psychology, cognitive Neuroscience or imaging methods (many other career choices would be compatible with the general scientific, academic and professional training you will receive as part of the course)
-Comfortable with computers and statistics

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This course looks at research in child psychology, focusing on the advanced study of psychological development in children and the implications of psychological theory and research for policy and practice. Read more
This course looks at research in child psychology, focusing on the advanced study of psychological development in children and the implications of psychological theory and research for policy and practice. It is ideal if you would like to start or promote a career working with children in areas such as teaching and social work; it also provides an excellent foundation for pursuing a research career in child/developmental psychology.

-Aimed at childcare professionals, including teachers, paediatric nurses and social workers, this course will develop their knowledge of child psychology and enhance their professional work.
-Areas of expertise include: psychosocial issues concerning living with facial disfigurement and impairment in childhood and adolescence; children's expertise in describing and recalling faces; reading development in blind children; phonological awareness and letter knowledge in reading development; bullying; the development of biological at-risk children (very pre-term); children's regulatory problems (crying, feeding, sleeping) and ADHD; autism, face processing and ‘Theory of Mind'; anxiety disorders; learning and the role of cognitions in fears and anxiety; language development in typical development and developmental disorders; pre-verbal infant cognitive, social and emotional development; and development of numerical abilities.

What will you study?

Taught by researchers active in the field of child psychology, this MSc has a strong research focus, and you will be encouraged to approach empirical research critically. You will study four, year-long, 30-credit modules, including three core modules and one option module, plus a 60-credit dissertation.

You will be introduced to the theories of child psychology, considering them in relation to the real world, and will cover the empirical research and theories of developmental psychology, focusing on implications for policy and practice. You will also study the application of developmental psychology to social policy, such as social issues, education and school issues and health, and the factors influencing the development of children's relationships. You will consider both typical and atypical development, including a range of developmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders, dyslexia, etc. Your dissertation enables you to study an area of interest in depth and gain valuable research skills.

Assessment

Essays, in-class tests, presentations, unseen examinations, laboratory reports and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Applications of Psychological Research
-Cognitive and Social Development
-Development in Typical and Atypical Populations
-Methods and Statistics for MSc Psychology
-Psychology Dissertation

Optional modules to be confirmed.

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Developmental Psychology MSc develops your understanding of the psychological processes that underlie an individual's social, emotional and cognitive development throughout their life. Read more
Developmental Psychology MSc develops your understanding of the psychological processes that underlie an individual's social, emotional and cognitive development throughout their life.

To understand any psychological phenomenon fully it is necessary to understand how it develops. The Master’s programme at Kent gives you a deep understanding of the advanced methods, analytical techniques, and theoretical and practical approaches to developmental psychology and developmental psychopathology.

You focus on questions such as: What psychological changes occur during infancy, childhood, and adolescence? What psychological processes drive the development of children? What can psychologists do to promote healthy development in neurotypical individuals and support development among individuals with developmental disorders?

The MSc in Developmental Psychology at Kent is taught by academics and professionals such as educational psychologists, clinical psychologists, child therapists, and speech and language therapists.

The programme draws on the strengths of academic staff and researchers working in the field of developmental psychology, with expertise including language development, representational ability and early social-cognitive understanding of others, singing, infant face processing, the development of prejudice and social exclusion, and developmental psychopathology. MSc students also have the opportunity to use the Kent Child Development Unit (KCDU) (http://www.kent.ac.uk/psychology/childdevelopmentunit/index.html), a resource including child-friendly lab space and a register of 3,000 potential child participants.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/66/developmental-psychology

About the School of Psychology

As a student within the School of Psychology at Kent, you benefit from our supportive, dynamic and diverse environment for creative research and learning.

All of our taught Master’s (MSc) programmes have been recognised by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the nationally recognised criteria for preparation training for PhD research.

Conducting both basic and applied research in several areas, Psychology at Kent is highly regarded as a leading European centre for postgraduate research. Our cutting-edge, internationally recognised research in developmental, cognitive, social, and forensic psychology underlies our reputation for research excellence across these areas. We attract excellent visiting scholars and postgraduate students from both within the UK and overseas.

Some of our PhD students are self-funded, and others are funded by grants or awards either from the School, UK or their countries of origin. Some are also paid to undertake part-time teaching within the School. We have a strong track record of attracting ESRC research studentship funding, which involves partnerships with external organisations such as Age UK and the Equality and Human Rights Commission and collaborative studentships with partners such as People United.

Course structure

We provide you with specialised knowledge of a range of theoretical and practical approaches to developmental psychology and developmental psychopathology, including an understanding of how research in developmental psychology can inform policy and practice across educational, health, forensic and clinical professional practice (eg research on language and reading development, social and emotional development).

You study four compulsory modules and two option modules. The compulsory modules are Advanced Statistics and Methodology (SP801), Advanced Topics in Cognitive Development (SP581), Advanced Topics in Developmental Psychopathology (SP854) and a supervised empirical or theoretical dissertation (SP998).

Modules

The modules below are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

SP801 - Statistics and Methodology (40 credits)
SP851 - Advanced Topics in Cognitive Development (20 credits)
SP854 - Advanced Topics in Developmental Psychopathology (20 credits)
SP998 - Advanced Research Project in Psychology (60 credits)
SP802 - Current Issues in Social and Applied Psychology Part 1 (20 credits)
SP813 - Advanced Topics in Intergroup Relations (20 credits)
SP850 - Advanced Cognitive (Neuroscience) Methods in Practice (20 credits)
SP817 - Current Issues in Social and Applied Psychology II :Applications (20 credits)
SP842 - Advanced Developmental Social Psychology (20 credits)
SP852 - Developmental Psychology in Professional Practice (20 credits)
SP853 - The Psychology of Eyewitness Testimony (20 credits)

Assessment

The programme includes lecture, workshop, and seminar-based teaching, as well as practical demonstrations of modern methods for studying child development (eg behavioural techniques, eye-tracking, electroencephalography), and an individually supervised empirical research project. Assessment is mainly by coursework assignment (4000-6000-word essays), examination (for the Advanced Statistics and Methodology, and the Advanced Topics in Developmental Psychopathology modules only), plus the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- foster your intellectual development by providing you with specialised knowledge of a range of theoretical approaches to developmental psychology and statistical and methodological expertise in order that you should be well equipped to make your own original contribution to psychological knowledge

- provide teaching that is informed by current research and scholarship and that requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- help you to develop research skills and transferable skills in preparation for entering academic or other careers as practicing professional psychologists

- satisfy the academic requirements of the knowledge base specified by the British Psychological Society

- enable you to manage your own learning and to carry out independent research

- help you to develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Careers

Our Developmental Psychology MSc graduates commonly go into the fields of health, teaching, or further education. Many of our graduates take up roles as assistant psychologists in the NHS with a view to becoming a professional clinical psychologist, or pursue doctoral study and academic careers at higher education institutions. Because the MSc Developmental Psychology programme is taught by academics and professionals, it offers students wide opportunities to pursue a variety of careers.

The programmes we offer help you to develop general critical, analytic, and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings. For example, last year’s graduates have taken up full-time salaried/funded positions as assistant psychologists, as PhD trainees, as healthcare advisers/workers in the private sector and in Childhood and Adolescent Mental Health Services, and as specialist charity workers.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Our specialised research interests in psychology include evolutionary psychology, perception and cognition, animal behaviour, neuroscience, social psychology and forensic psychology. Read more

Course Overview

Our specialised research interests in psychology include evolutionary psychology, perception and cognition, animal behaviour, neuroscience, social psychology and forensic psychology. We have PhDs funded by UK research councils and charities and we welcome self-funding applicants interested in doing postgraduate research in psychology.

We offer MPhil supervision in the areas of psychology covering Newcastle's research strengths:

Clinical and health psychology

We research developmental disorders of perception and cognition, and the development and assessment of cognitive models of, and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) treatment for: bipolar disorder; psychosis; anxiety; developmental disorders

Behaviour and evolution

We carry out studies of animal and human behaviour including: the evolutionary psychology of mate choice; attractiveness and co-operation; evolutionary approaches to personality

Visual perception and human cognition

Our research includes: perception of natural scenes; psychophysics and attention; visual social cognition and face processing; advertising and consumer behaviour

Development psychology

We focus on how different cognitive skills develop in children, from memory systems to learning in school. We have particular strength in developmental disorders such as Autistic Spectrum Disorder.

Forensic psychology

Our research includes: investigative interviewing of victims; witnesses and suspected offenders of crime, including eye-witness testimony; sexual offending, including historical allegations of sexual abuse; communication in legal contexts

Training and Skills

As a research student you will receive a tailored package of academic and support elements to ensure you maximise your research and future career. The academic information is in the programme profile and you will be supported by our Faculty of Medical Sciences Graduate School.

For further information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/psychology-mphil-phd/#training&skills

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/psychology-mphil-phd/#howtoapply

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Psychology at Kent offers a supportive, dynamic and diverse environment for creative research and learning. During your research, you are supported by a panel including a main and secondary supervisor. Read more
Psychology at Kent offers a supportive, dynamic and diverse environment for creative research and learning.

During your research, you are supported by a panel including a main and secondary supervisor. Your supervisors are individually selected for you based on their compatibility with your research interests. Typically, you meet with your supervisors more frequently at the initial stages of research than during the phases of data collection and analysis.

You receive training in research-specific and broader ‘transferable’ skills, including academic writing, career management and presentation skills. You also have the opportunity to train for an advanced teaching qualification (ATAP). The Advanced Statistics and Methodology module from our taught MSc programme is available for doctoral students that have not already completed an advanced statistics and methods course.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/78/psychology

The School of Psychology

Kent's School of Psychology supports research in a number of areas, including: social psychology; developmental psychology; forensic psychology; cognitive psychology; existential psychology; personality and motivation.

We conduct both basic and applied research in several areas, and we are highly regarded as a leading European centre for postgraduate research. We have a long-established international reputation in social psychology, and this is complemented by our strengths in cognitive, developmental and forensic psychology.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

The School has excellent facilities for both laboratory and field research, including advanced laboratory and teaching facilities. Resources include:

- three fully equipped colour video laboratories for face-to-face group research, together with ten satellite laboratories connected via remote-control CCTV and two-way audio links

- 58 research laboratories, all containing networked computers

- a further 80 PCs available exclusively to Psychology students, including a designated MSc computer-networked room providing full email and internet access

- shared offices and a personal, networked computer for research students

- a full range of computer-based experiment generators and productivity software installed on all the School’s systems

- an upgraded laboratory suite with equipment for digital sound and vision recording

- four Brain Vision EEG labs (including one for simultaneous TMS & EEG, and one portable EEG system)

- two trans-cranial direct current electrical stimulators (GVS, Magstim)

- Neuroconn tDCS/tACS electrical stimulator with facilities for simultaneous EEG

- Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) PowerMAG Research 100 High Frequency Stimulator

- two Tobii eye-trackers (Tobii X120 & Tobii T60 XL portable)

- one Arrington eye-tracker

- a suite equipped with Bio-Pac recorders to allow for a range of physiological measures to be taken during stressful and other tasks

- specialist laboratories equipped for face processing and vision research

- CRS ColorCal II Colorimeter/Photometer

- CRS Audiofile for synchronized audio-visual presentation

- numerous PC and Mac labs to run behavioural experiments

- Mirror Stereoscopes for dichoptic presentation and stereo vision research

- immersive virtual reality lab (including integrated eye-tracker)

- a social cognition laboratory

- creation in 2010 of the Kent Child Development Unit and research team focusing on how children learn about their world, about other people and about the language they hear around them.

- Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Journal of Experimental Social Psychology; Journal of Personality and Social Psychology; Child Development; Clinical Psychology Review. Details of recently published books can be found within the staff research interests.

- Researcher Development Programme
Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Careers

Our postgraduate students commonly go into the fields of health, teaching or further education. For instance, many of our graduates take up roles as assistant psychologists in the NHS with a view to becoming a professional clinical or forensic psychologist. Upon completing our Master’s courses, graduates have also pursued doctoral study and academic careers at higher education institutions.

The programmes we offer help you to develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Psychology at Kent offers a supportive, dynamic and diverse environment for creative research and learning. During your research, you are supported by a panel including a main and secondary supervisor. Read more
Psychology at Kent offers a supportive, dynamic and diverse environment for creative research and learning.

During your research, you are supported by a panel including a main and secondary supervisor. Your supervisors are individually selected for you based on their compatibility with your research interests. Typically, you meet with your supervisors more frequently at the initial stages of research than during the phases of data collection and analysis.

You receive training in research-specific and broader ‘transferable’ skills, including academic writing, career management and presentation skills. You also have the opportunity to train for an advanced teaching qualification (ATAP). The Advanced Statistics and Methodology module from our taught MSc programme is available for doctoral students that have not already completed an advanced statistics and methods course.

During term-time, our research groups hold weekly meetings to discuss ongoing work, and weekly seminars also take place featuring external speakers. Numerous data analysis and research methods workshops are available (recent examples include structural equation modelling; hierarchical linear modelling; meta-analysis; EPrime experimental software), as well as individual training opportunities.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/79/social-psychology

The School of Psychology

Kent's School of Psychology supports research in a number of areas, including: social psychology; developmental psychology; forensic psychology; cognitive psychology; existential psychology; personality and motivation.

We conduct both basic and applied research in several areas, and we are highly regarded as a leading European centre for postgraduate research. We have a long-established international reputation in social psychology, and this is complemented by our strengths in cognitive, developmental and forensic psychology. The School attracts excellent visiting scholars and postgraduate students from both within the UK and overseas.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

The School has excellent facilities for both laboratory and field research, including advanced laboratory and teaching facilities. Resources include:

- three fully equipped colour video laboratories for face-to-face group research, together with ten satellite laboratories connected via remote-control CCTV and two-way audio links

- 58 research laboratories, all containing networked computers

- a further 80 PCs available exclusively to Psychology students, including a designated MSc computer-networked room providing full email and internet access

- shared offices and a personal, networked computer for research students

- a full range of computer-based experiment generators and productivity software installed on all the School’s systems

- an upgraded laboratory suite with equipment for digital sound and vision recording

- four Brain Vision EEG labs (including one for simultaneous TMS & EEG, and one portable EEG system)

- two trans-cranial direct current electrical stimulators (GVS, Magstim)

- Neuroconn tDCS/tACS electrical stimulator with facilities for simultaneous EEG

- Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) PowerMAG Research 100 High Frequency Stimulator

- two Tobii eye-trackers (Tobii X120 & Tobii T60 XL portable)

- one Arrington eye-tracker

- a suite equipped with Bio-Pac recorders to allow for a range of physiological measures to be taken during stressful and other tasks

- specialist laboratories equipped for face processing and vision research

- CRS ColorCal II Colorimeter/Photometer

- CRS Audiofile for synchronized audio-visual presentation

- numerous PC and Mac labs to run behavioural experiments

- Mirror Stereoscopes for dichoptic presentation and stereo vision research

- immersive virtual reality lab (including integrated eye-tracker)

- a social cognition laboratory

- creation in 2010 of the Kent Child Development Unit and research team focusing on how children learn about their world, about other people and about the language they hear around them.

- Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Journal of Experimental Social Psychology; Journal of Personality and Social Psychology; Child Development; Clinical Psychology Review. Details of recently published books can be found within the staff research interests.

- Researcher Development Programme
Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Careers

Our postgraduate students commonly go into the fields of health, teaching or further education. For instance, many of our graduates take up roles as assistant psychologists in the NHS with a view to becoming a professional clinical or forensic psychologist. Upon completing our Master’s courses, graduates have also pursued doctoral study and academic careers at higher education institutions.

The programmes we offer help you to develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Unlike other courses which focus on offender assessment and rehabilitation, this new course will examine the theoretical and investigative aspects of forensic psychology, tracking the criminal justice process from the crime scene to the court room. Read more
Unlike other courses which focus on offender assessment and rehabilitation, this new course will examine the theoretical and investigative aspects of forensic psychology, tracking the criminal justice process from the crime scene to the court room. It is an exceptionally hands-on, practical course, using our unique on-campus Crime Scene Training Centre together with Psychology Testing Suites with the latest eye-tracking and face-processing equipment.

As well as the underlying theories regarding the psychology of investigations and considering areas such as how face processing can assist identification of individuals, you will explore different offence types - sexual offending, murder and violent crime, group offending (including terrorism, hooliganism and rioting), and different forms of cyber-crime (e.g. hacktivism and on-line sexual abuse).

You’ll be expected to investigate and scrutinise violent mocked-up crime scenes to provide written and verbal evidence, learning how to present expert witness testimony in a mock court.

You will evaluate victims, witnesses, suspects and offenders, environment, geography and time, working with practitioners who create fieldwork, case studies and exercises based on their real experiences.

Guest speakers sharing their knowledge will be an integral feature of the course, as will Terri Cole, the course leader's own experiences as a Behavioural Investigative Adviser and Serious Crime Analyst. Terri worked for a number of years with police forces providing offender profiling, crime scene assessment and offence linkage advice in relation to serious sexual offences and murder. She brings her expertise and experience together to focus on crime scene behaviour and how psychology can assist investigations on this new course.

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The University has a long history of face research. Read more

Introduction

The University has a long history of face research. Our internationally renowned team of experts study almost all aspects of face perception, including low level visual processing, adaptation, gaze perception, social perception such as mate preference and attractiveness, mechanisms of recognition and forensic aspects such as unfamiliar face matching and eye witness recovery of memories for faces. This research has led to EvoFIT, a unique system for constructing facial composites of offenders by witnesses and victims of crime, which has a suspect identification rate ten times higher than traditional methods used by police. You will become part of this vibrant research community as you study the key research methods related to face research and will put your learning into practice during a month-long placement.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Professor Peter Hancock

Bursaries are available: http://www.stir.ac.uk/scholarships/.

Course objectives

This course facilitates understanding of this diverse subject whilst allowing students to focus the majority of their efforts in face research, an area for which Psychology at Stirling has long been internationally renowned.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Teaching is delivered using a variety of methods including tutorials, demonstrations and practical classes, but the majority is seminar-based. Students are typically taught within small groups in specialist classes, with first-year PhD students or other postgraduate students (for example, in modules from other MSc courses).

Both taught and research postgraduates are integral to our research group and expected to participate in our regular meetings. All students allocated a peer mentor are provided with appropriate office space and equipment. In addition, each student is associated with an academic from Psychology.

Part-time students take the same modules spread over two years.

Why Stirling?

- REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

- Strengths
Psychology at Stirling is one of the leading psychology departments in the UK. It ranked in the top 20 in the recent research assessment (REF 2014) and is one of only seven non-Russell group universities to do so (Birkbeck, Royal Holloway, Sussex, Essex, St Andrews and Bangor; source Times Higher Education magazine). Its quality of research publications ranked third in Scotland after Aberdeen and Glasgow. Furthermore, the relevance of its research activity to society received the highest possible rating which only four other psychology departments in the UK achieved (REF 2014 results).

Psychology at Stirling University is small enough to fully involve MSc students in our lively and collegial community of research excellence.

Your three month full-time dissertation is supervised by leading UK academics.

Career opportunities

The course provides advanced training for a career involving face research. It is intended primarily for students who already have a degree in Psychology or an allied discipline who intend to proceed to a PhD in this field.

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We know not everyone can, or indeed wants to study full-time or by evening classes. That's why our flexible learning route allows you to vary the pace and order of study to suit your personal circumstances. Read more

Why this course?

We know not everyone can, or indeed wants to study full-time or by evening classes.

That's why our flexible learning route allows you to vary the pace and order of study to suit your personal circumstances. This route combines the best of full-time, part-time and open learning study.

You’ll carry out most of your studies off-campus, with compulsory attendance at only one or two weekend schools per year.

You’ll begin on an open learning basis with the option to supplement your studies through optional face-to-face classes in Glasgow.

This study method is ideal if you value face-to-face contact with tutors, visiting specialists and fellow students, but can’t attend fixed weekly classes.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/mba-flexible/

How does flexible learning work?

On joining the programme, you’ll be given a recommended study timetable which allows you to complete the Strathclyde MBA within 3 years. It aims to provide you with an ideal balance of home study, attendance at weekend schools and intensive seminars in Glasgow.

Along with the timetable, we send you your first year of core learning materials and key text books, and provide full details of our on-line and tutor support programme.

If you wanted to fast-track and complete the Strathclyde MBA in less than 3 years, our support team can suggest an alternative study schedule. Alternatively, if you'd like to take a bit longer to complete your MBA, we can accommodate your studies up to a maximum of 6 years.

- Compulsory weekend schools
There are certain subjects, such as “the Learning Manager” which we feel can’t be taught at a distance. This is why we’ve incorporated two compulsory weekend schools over the duration of the entire programme. These weekend schools are included in the standard tuition fee.
You can obtain great value through working with other ambitious managers, often from a wide cross-section of industry and commerce.

- Optional intensive seminars
To make the most of your MBA experience we strongly recommend that you take advantage of the optional intensive face-to-face seminars in Glasgow. The cost of these are included in the tuition fees.
These sessions provide a valuable opportunity for in-depth study of a chosen subject area, to meet fellow students and benefit from shared experiences. In addition, intensive seminars are key to accelerating your progress through the programme.
Our suggested timetable will give you a firm idea of commitments well in advance. This allows you to plan your year ahead at work and home.

When can I join the programme?

In theory, you can start flexible learning study whenever you like. However, we do have an annual schedule of induction classes, weekend schools and intensive seminars. We recommend that you start close to an induction period. These normally take place around April and October each year.

We do our best to schedule induction classes, weekend schools and intensive seminars together throughout the year. This ensures that you have every opportunity to maximise your stay in Glasgow.

Weekend schools run for all study routes of the Strathclyde MBA. If you can’t make a specified date, then you have the opportunity to attend the next weekend school at a later date.

Intensive seminars are only scheduled for our flexible learning course members. If you’re unable to attend, we recommend that you complete the subject area using core learning materials rather than delay your progress.

How much time do I need to commit to studying?

If you attend all possible weekend schools and intensive seminars on offer in any one year, you should expect to be away from the office for a total of around 15 days.

You can also expect to spend around a minimum of 15 hours a week in addition to weekend school and optional seminar attendance.

Accreditation

Less than 1% of business schools in the world hold "triple accreditation", and Strathclyde is one of them. The 3 international accrediting bodies are:
- The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business
- The European Quality Improvement System
- The Association of MBAs

To gain accreditation by one of these bodies is an achievement in itself. To gain accreditation by all three bodies is a truly outstanding accomplishment and one we're proud of.

- Association of Masters of Business Administration (AMBA)
You’re eligible to join AMBA after enrolment on an MBA course.

Entry requirements

Our selection process is designed to identify talented professionals from a wide range of academic, business and cultural backgrounds.

While there are formal requirements for entry listed below, we take into consideration:
- your potential
- your interpersonal and team working qualities
- the range and nature of your managerial experience

In order to assess these skills we ask you to complete a number of essays outlining your experience and aspirations alongside references supporting your work experience and academic record.

We may ask you to undertake a formal interview to discuss your achievements and aspirations. We would encourage you to visit the school or centre you’re applying to and to ask as many questions as you need to clarify your decision.

Qualifications & experience

For entry to the MBA programme you must:
- hold a degree from a UK university, or equivalent academic qualification from a comparable non-UK institution. If you studied for your undergraduate degree at a non-UK institution we will need a copy of your degree transcript. Professional qualifications will also be considered.
- be at least 24 years of age.
- have a minimum of three years' full-time postgraduate experience where the management of people and resources has played a significant role.

Entry at Diploma level may be offered to applicants who do not hold sufficient recognised degree level qualifications, but who do:
- hold non-degree/professional qualifications plus at least five years' varied management experience.
- have no formal qualifications but extensive and varied management experience (10 or more years).
- are exceptional candidates over the age of 24 with a minimum of two years' managerial experience. This is available only to candidates applying to routes other than full-time.

Admissions testing

Although the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) is not a standard requirement of our admissions process, strong verbal reasoning and numerical abilities are critical for the MBA and we may ask you to undertake such a test.

Competence in English

The MBA programme is highly interactive and requires a high level of competence in English speaking, writing, reading and understanding. A minimum score of 6.5 in IELTS is required for those applicants whose first language is not English. We may consider applicants who fall slightly below these standards if they are willing to undertake pre-sessional study.

Computer competence

In order to undertake the Diploma/MBA you need to be competent in word processing, the use of spreadsheets and in report writing.

Careers

We recognise that career development is one of the main reasons why people invest in an MBA. The MBA job market offers plenty of global opportunity but can be complex and challenging.

That's why we offer a dedicated careers service for MBA students. This consists of career planning and skills development as well as unlimited access to personal advice and coaching. Our careers service is delivered in-house and by a team of top consultants.

We work with you to complement your own proactive job search efforts. We'll also help you use your own career background and strengths to help with your next career move.

You’ll gain the understanding and tools to develop your personal, strategic career plan, as well as the self-marketing and communication skills to make effective applications and impress at interview.

You’ll have the knowledge of the global job market and a range of contacts to make it work for you.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/mba/scholarships/

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The fields of graphics, vision and imaging increasingly rely on one another. Read more
The fields of graphics, vision and imaging increasingly rely on one another. This unique and timely MSc provides training in computer graphics, geometry processing, virtual reality, machine vision and imaging technology from world-leading experts, enabling students to specialise in any of these areas and gain a grounding in the others.

Degree information

Graduates will understand the basic mathematical principles underlying the development and application of new techniques in computer graphics and computer vision and will be aware of the range of algorithms and approaches available, and be able to design, develop and evaluate algorithms and methods for new problems, emerging technologies and applications.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a research project (60 credits).

Core modules
-Mathematical Methods, Algorithmics and Implementation
-Image Processing
-Computer Graphics
-Research Methods

Optional modules
-Machine Vision
-Graphical Models
-Virtual Environments
-Geometry of Images
-Advanced Modelling, Rendering and Animation
-Inverse Problems in Imaging
-Computation Modelling for Biomedical Imaging
-Computational Photography and Capture
-Acquisition and Processing of 3D Geometry

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project related to a problem of industrial interest or on a topic near the leading edge of research, which culminates in a 60–80 page dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and tutorials. Lectures are often supported by laboratory work with help from demonstrators. Student performance is assessed by unseen written examinations, coursework and a substantial individual project.

Careers

Graduates are ready for employment in a wide range of high-technology companies and will be able to contribute to maintaining and enhancing the UK's position in these important and expanding areas. The MSc provides graduates with the up-to-date technical skills required to support a wealth of research and development opportunities in broad areas of computer science and engineering, such as multimedia applications, medicine, architecture, film animation and computer games. Our market research shows that the leading companies in these areas demand the deep technical knowledge that this programme provides. Graduates have found positions at global companies such as Disney, Sony and Siemens. Others have gone on to PhD programmes at MIT, Princeton University, and Eth Zurich.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Senior Post-Doctoral Research Associate, University of Oxford
-Software Engineer, Sengtian Software
-Graduate Software Engineer, ARM
-IT Officer, Nalys
-MSc in Computer Games and Entertainment, Goldsmiths, University of London

Employability
UCL Computer Science was one of the top-rated departments in the country, according to the UK Government's most recent research assessment exercise, and our graduates have some of the highest employment rates of any university in the UK. This degree programme also provides a foundation for further PhD study or industrial research.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Computer Science contains some of the world's leading researchers in computer graphics, geometry processing, computer vision and virtual environments.

Research activities include geometric acquisition and 3D fabrication, real-time photo-realistic rendering, mixed and augmented reality, face recognition, content-based image-database search, video-texture modelling, depth perception in stereo vision, colour imaging for industrial inspection, mapping brain function and connectivity and tracking for SLAM (simultaneous localisation and mapping).

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This Masters degree provides you with a strong conceptual and theoretical understanding of big data analytics. You will gain the essential skills and confidence required to apply and produce knowledge and understanding of issues surrounding big data analytics in a range of contexts. Read more
This Masters degree provides you with a strong conceptual and theoretical understanding of big data analytics. You will gain the essential skills and confidence required to apply and produce knowledge and understanding of issues surrounding big data analytics in a range of contexts. This will enable you to evaluate, adapt, create and utilise appropriate models, methods, practices, theories and computational techniques in the face of changing and evolving technology. There is the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of visualisation concepts, modelling and algorithmic foundations, as well as to develop and evaluate new or advanced bespoke solutions for processing, analysing and making sense of big and/or complex data. The programme enables you concentrate on a specific practical area within computer science and is suitable whether you are a recent graduate or already working in the IT industry and looking to change career paths.

What will I study?

Gaining an in-depth and systematic knowledge of big data management theories, concepts, methodologies and professional practice, you will develop a systematic and critical understanding of algorithms and programming techniques for processing, storing, analysing, visualising and interpreting data.

You will learn the practical skills of mathematics that underpin the processing of data, the programming applications required to manage big data, and the visualisation techniques necessary to make sense of large data sets. There will also be the opportunity to work with emerging technologies derived from industry.

How will I study?

The course is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials with a mixture of daytime and evening classes. Sessions will frequently be highly interactive with a focus on the practical application of concepts and the use of case studies drawn from real life. An emphasis on small group sizes ensures that you will have plenty of opportunities for individual discussions with your tutors. Typically, you will study for approximately nine hours a week if you are studying on a full-time basis.

How will I be assessed?

Your vocational capability, academic critical thinking and intellectual development will be assessed throughout the course. This is achieved through a combination of coursework, case studies, problem-solving exercises and examinations. You may be assessed individually or as part of a group.

Who will be teaching me?

You will be taught by highly qualified, experienced and enthusiastic academic staff who are research-active and fully engaged with the wider business and academic community. The programme team specialise in a variety of subjects so you will benefit from a wide range of expertise. There will also be occasional input from external IT professionals who will be invited to teach particular sessions.

What are my career prospects?

As organisations become ever more dependent on data, there are increasing opportunities in specialist positions related to obtaining, processing and visualising data.

The MSc Big Data Analytics provides you with the skills and knowledge to develop your interests for a career in data science. You will be ideally placed to progress into roles where you will work as a data scientist or data analyst.

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As a midwife registered with a relevant professional, statutory or equivalent regulatory body, this continuing professional development course offers you an opportunity to deepen and enhance your practice through the acquisition, extension and critical appraisal of your knowledge and skills. Read more
As a midwife registered with a relevant professional, statutory or equivalent regulatory body, this continuing professional development course offers you an opportunity to deepen and enhance your practice through the acquisition, extension and critical appraisal of your knowledge and skills. This will enhance your suitability for revalidation.

The course reflects professional, UK-wide, government and international benchmarks for advanced level practice for the health and social care workforce to equip students with the contemporary knowledge, professional and leadership skills for advanced level practice.

You will gain contemporary knowledge and skills in the areas of clinical and direct care practice, leadership and collaborative practice, improving quality and developing practice, and developing self and others.

The course prepares you for the development of new efficient and ethical ways of working that offer a better quality of life and quality of care by placing service users and carers at the centre of decision-making and service redesign.

Special features

This course offers flexible learning. You can study full or part-time to achieve a recognised academic award.

You can also take standalone units as short courses for professional development only. The methods of teaching vary between units and include face-to-face, online and distance learning methods. The leadership and managing change units will relate specifically to midwifery.

Teaching and learning

We use a range of teaching and learning methods, including face-to-face, blended and online/distance learning.

The course focuses on an active learning approach and is designed to prompt the discovery, processing and application of knowledge through collaboration and cooperation.

You will draw on your own experiences - both academic and work-based - when learning. The course will promote the construction of understanding through task-related activities and reflection.

We have extensive experience and good practice in online learning, with dedicated e-learning technologists to support you and our staff in making the most of the learning platform.

Coursework and assessment

You can undertake standalone units as short courses for professional development purposes only, or build up a selection of optional and compulsory course units to complete a PGCert or PGDip academic award and, on completion of a dissertation unit, an MSc.

The dissertation unit enables you to consolidate your learning by completing a piece of work from a range of options:
-Research grant proposal
-Full or adapted systematic review
-Report-based dissertation including: public health report/health needs assessment; service development/organisational change audit; evaluation of service delivery/policy

We use a range of assessments throughout the course to assess your knowledge and understanding and to develop your intellectual and practical skills.

Career opportunities

The course is structured around the real challenges facing advanced level midwifery practitioners, and each unit will draw from - and build on - your own professional experience.

This will enable you to apply your new knowledge to midwifery and mould the course to best suit your learning requirements.

Accrediting organisations

The Health and Care Professions Council ( HCPC ) has validated the following units:
-Multiprofessional Support of Learning and Assessment in Practice (Mentorship) (PDF, 208KB)
-Preparation of Supervisors of Midwives (POSOM) (PDF, 98KB)

The General Pharmaceutical Council has validated the following unit:
-Independent Prescribing

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The MSc Process Systems Engineering programme will widen your understanding of the fundamental concepts of process systems engineering. Read more
The MSc Process Systems Engineering programme will widen your understanding of the fundamental concepts of process systems engineering.

It will provide you with a thorough grounding in current technologies and trends that will prepare you will for a rewarding career and/or further research.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

This Masters programme trains graduates of engineering, science or related disciplines in general and specialist process systems engineering subjects.

Such areas are not generally covered in engineering and science curricula, and BSc graduates tend to be ill prepared for the systems challenges they will face in industry or academia on graduation.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Optimisation and Decision-Making
-Process Modelling and Simulation
-Advanced Process Control
-Renewable Energy Technologies
-Refinery and Petrochemical Process
-Technology, Business & Research Seminars
-Process and Energy Integration
-Process Systems Design
-Supply Chain Management
-Knowledge-based Systems and Artificial Intelligence
-Biomass Processing Technology
-Introduction to Petroleum Production
-Process Safety and Operation Integrity
-Dissertation

FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT AND ACADEMIC SUPPORT

Modules related to the different groups are taught by a total of six full-time members of staff and a number of visiting lecturers.

As part of their learning experience, students have at their disposal a wide range of relevant software needed to support the programme material dissertation projects. In recent years, this work included the design of various knowledge-based and business systems on the internet, the application of optimisation algorithms, and semantic web applications.

Numerous laboratory facilities across the Faculty and the University are also available for those opting for technology-based projects, such as the process engineering facility, a control and robotics facility and signal processing labs.

The work related to the MSc dissertation can often be carried out in parallel with, and in support of, ongoing research. In the past, several graduates have carried on their MSc research to a PhD programme.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Engineers and scientists are increasingly expected to have skills in information systems engineering and decision-support systems alongside their main technical and/or scientific expertise.

Graduates of this programme will be well prepared to help technology-intensive organisations make important decisions in view of vast amounts of information by adopting, combining, implementing and executing the right technologies.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The programme aims to provide a highly vocational education which is intellectually rigorous and up-to-date. It also aims to provide the students with the necessary skills required for a successful career in the process industries.

This is achieved through a balanced curriculum with a core of process systems engineering modules supplemented by a flexible element by way of elective modules that permit students to pursue an element of specialisation relevant to their backgrounds, interests and/or career aspirations.

An integrated approach is taken so as to provide a coherent view that explores the interrelationships between the various components of the programme. The programme draws on the stimulus of the Faculty’s research activities.

The programme provides the students with the basis for developing their own approach to learning and personal development.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

Knowledge and understanding
-State-of- the-art knowledge in process systems engineering methods, in the areas of: modelling and simulation of process systems, mathematical optimization and decision making, process systems design, supply chain management, process and energy integration, and advanced process control technologies
-Advanced level of understanding in technical topics of preference, in one or more of the following aspects: renewable energy technologies, refinery and petrochemical processes, biomass processing technologies, and knowledge-based systems

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Select, define and focus upon an issue at an appropriate level
-Collect and digest knowledge and information selectively and independently to support a particular scientific or engineering enquiry
-Develop and apply relevant and sound methodologies for analysing the issue, developing solutions, recommendations and logical conclusions, and for evaluating the results of own or other’s work

Professional practical skills
-Assess the available systems in the process industries
-Design and/or select appropriate system components, and optimise and evaluate system design
-Apply generic systems engineering methods such as modelling, simulation, and optimization to facilitate the assessment and development of advanced process technologies and systems

Key / transferable skills
-Preparation and delivery of communication and presentation
-Report and essay writing
-Use of general and professional computing tools
-Collaborative working with team members
-Organising and planning of work
-Research into new areas, particularly in the aspect of literature review and skills acquisition

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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Occupational therapy practice is concerned with enhancing the daily lives of individuals with a very broad range of physical, mental health or social needs. Read more
Occupational therapy practice is concerned with enhancing the daily lives of individuals with a very broad range of physical, mental health or social needs. As an occupational therapist you will work with clients to improve function and enable them to fulfil the demands of their daily lives with greater satisfaction. You will work with people of all ages from all walks of life, in hospital, in the community, in their place of employment or in their home, and have the opportunity to work in a very wide variety of professional practice areas.

The fundamental aim of the MSc Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) programme is to enable you to graduate with a master’s degree in occupational therapy and be eligible to apply for registration as an occupational therapist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) in the UK. The Degree does not provide eligibility to practice in any other country although the degree is WFOT recognised.

HCPC approved and COT/WFOT accredited

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/occupational-therapy-pre-registration/

Why choose this course?

- Graduates from this programme will be fit for purpose, practice, and award in the UK. We enable you to develop a profound understanding of the potential for occupational therapy to promote the health and wellbeing of the population. Skills acquired will be evidenced based, innovative and give you the capacity to make a significant contribution to the profession, specifically contribute to excellence in client care and the professional knowledge base. On successful completion of the degree and 1000 hours of clinical practice education you will be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council as a registered Occupational Therapist in the UK.

- Many of our graduates go on to further educational development at PhD/DPhil and professional doctorate level. We are mindful of the anticipated transformation of practice over the next 20 years as well as the changes to demographics and the political innovation resulting in the widening participation agenda. We therefore aim to attract graduate students, who are academically able, demonstrate appropriate values of self-determination, motivation and critical awareness of learning needs and show potential for leading leadership, innovation and research.

- Based in Oxford, the environment for learning is rich with diversity, culture, specialist health and social care resources, academic resources as well as close commuting links to London.

- Our programme is staffed by occupational therapists expert in diverse clinical specialities, and supported by occupational therapy practice educators from all areas of mainstream and specialist practice. Our lecturers are experienced in their specialist practice areas and have reputations for excellence with established links with colleagues, organisations and institutions at national and international level.

- This course benefits from shared and inter-professional education opportunities, in addition to profession specific ones, to develop the professional qualities and attributes for current and future health and social care practice.

- Our ongoing investment in a new technology infrastructure is enabling the teaching team to exploit successful technology-enriched learning throughout the programme. We have a large and dedicated building in Oxford (Marston Road) equipped with state-of-the-art classroom and clinical skills and communication suites and resources. We run a weekly Hand Therapy clinic and a monthly Community Occupational Therapy Assessment Clinic for the public. Students are invited to observe other qualified OT's working in these clinics.

- We have a strong research profile, with experienced researchers working in established areas of cancer care, children and families, drug and alcohol, physical rehabilitation and enablement, inter-professional education and collaborative practice.

- Established in 1938, we are the oldest School of Occupational Therapy in England, and have one of the best occupational therapy library collections in the country.

- We have an excellent track record of high levels of student satisfaction, low student attrition rates and high employability.

Teaching and learning

MSc in Occupational Therapy is taught alongside the well-established and highly-regarded BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy.

Pre-registration Masters students will be taught alongside the undergraduate students in all occupational therapy specific modules. These will be identified with different module numbers and names to those of the undergraduate programme. This dual level teaching in classroom will provide you with the opportunity to learn the core skills and specific attributes of occupational therapy alongside the BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy students.

However, the pre-registration Masters students are provided with an enhanced level 7 learning experience with module specific tutorials to explore a more critical and evidence based approach to the subject matter and thus develop professional competence in academic, research and digital literacy, critical thinking and personal self-awareness.

Our approach will require you to actively engage in these Masters level tutorials and become self-directed, innovative, creative and critical learners. Teaching will assist you to construct knowledge through the analysis, synthesis and conceptualisation of your learning experiences, thus developing a lifelong approach to learning. This supports employability in a marketplace that demands adaptability, continuous development and leadership.

You will have the opportunity for face-to-face and virtual learning activities. Our inter-professional module is taken alongside other health and social care pre-registration master's level students, enabling you to prepare for the interdisciplinary work you will encounter in the health and social care environment.

Working at master’s level, you will focus on developing your knowledge in occupational therapy, which is evidence-based and strongly underpinned by research.

This master's degree will:
- Enable you to be a reflective, proactive, innovative and adaptable occupational therapy practitioner, with the ability to critique research and evaluate the effectiveness of evidence in a wide variety of practice settings.

- Develop a critical understanding of the theory of occupation and teach you to challenge existing models and approaches used in occupational therapy from an informed perspective.

- Provide opportunities to develop your ability to work both independently and as part of a team in the context of social, technological, administrative and policy changes.

How this course helps you develop

This course is mapped against the University's postgraduate attributes so that all occupational therapy graduates are equipped with the skills of academic literacy, digital and information literacy, global citizenship, research literacy, critical self awareness and personal literacy. These attributes are in addition to the NHS core values of respect and dignity, commitment to quality of care, compassion, and aspiring to improve the lives of others where everyone counts and we work together for patients.

Careers

The majority of graduates from the occupational therapy degrees work as qualified and registered occupational therapists, but there are increasing opportunities to work in non-specified professional roles in mental health and community settings. There are also increasing numbers of employment roles that are not explicitly described or advertised as an ‘occupational therapist’ but match the skills specification of an occupational therapist. This is due to the changing nature of health and social care practice and the new and emerging roles and opportunities for occupational therapy.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The Centre for Rehabilitation within the Department of Sport and Health Sciences has strong leadership in the director, Professor Helen Dawes. The Centre brings together research, education and care. It is underpinned by a strong, well-published research group, the Movement Science Group, along with clinical expertise, rehabilitation, knowledge and care of adults and children with neurological conditions. Within the Centre, staff, students and alumni across the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences are engaged in a number of research projects.

Examples of ongoing research projects within the faculty:
- Driving rehabilitation - cognitive mechanisms of driving and performance implications for clinical populations

- Fatigue management – Central and peripheral fatigue and mechanisms in clinical populations

- Dual task control in Stroke - influence on community mobility

- Efficacy of Intensive motor learning programmes – Themed (Magic) camps for children with hemiplegia

- Arts in Health Research – collaboration with Breathe Arts Health Research with research opportunities across many arts related activities

- Virtual Reality (VR) technologies – development and implementation of VR technologies in rehabilitation

- Early identification of motor and sensory processing impairments in children

- Sensory processing disorders and impact on function and behaviour in children with autism

- Measurement and monitoring of rehabilitation participation- Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), Systematic Review of Vocational Rehabilitation for people with TBI

- Therapy for hand writing in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD)

- Monitoring movement in people with neurological conditions – mechanisms and impact e.g. head drop in Parkinson Disorder

- Physical activity impact on sleep, behaviour cognition, health and wellbeing in children with neurodisability

- Falls in people with learning disabilities – an understanding of the impact of anxiety

- A Functional Electrical Stimulation Plantar flexion System for Bone Health Maintenance in Spinal Cord Injury Patients

- Professional development Perspectives of Occupational Therapists working in the NHS and concepts of Occupational Balance, Cultural perspectives and attitude change in professional identity acquisition.

Research areas and clusters

Our staff are involved in research both independently and collaboratively.

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