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Masters Degrees (Eye)

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This course provides ophthalmic professionals with the knowledge and skills required to reduce blindness and visual disability in their populations by developing an evidence-based public health approach for the control and management of blinding eye diseases. Read more
This course provides ophthalmic professionals with the knowledge and skills required to reduce blindness and visual disability in their populations by developing an evidence-based public health approach for the control and management of blinding eye diseases. It enables students to contribute effectively at a local, national and international level in research, training and service delivery.

The training will enable students to develop a public health oriented approach to eye care services and the control of blindness in keeping with the objectives of Vision 2020: The Right to Sight.

They will acquire and apply skills in epidemiological and operational research, critical analysis of strategies for the control of major blinding eye diseases, in programme planning, management and evaluation; facilitate a personal development, so enabling individuals to contribute more fully to their countries’ and societies’ eye health; engage with local, national and international networks of health professionals and systems, for the prevention of blindness worldwide.

Graduates from this course are expected to and encouraged to enter into careers with ministries of health, universities and NGOs involved in developing health services to prevent blindness and improve vision.

For further information on the International Centre for Eye Health (ICEH), visit http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/cru or http://www.iceh.org.uk.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/edu/qualityassurance/phec_progspec.pdf)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/mscphec.html

Additionally for the MSc Public Health for Eye Care, students are expected to be health care professionals involved in eye care, or to have an appropriate technical qualification and work experience.

Any prospective student who does not meet the above minimum entry requirement, but who has relevant professional experience, may still be eligible for admission. Qualifications and experience will be assessed from the application.

Objectives

At the end of this course students should be able to:

- describe the basic epidemiology of the major blinding eye diseases

- design and interpret studies to assess public health eye care needs using appropriate methods

- critically appraise and select appropriate public health intervention for the major blinding eye diseases

- design a comprehensive eye care programme for appropriate preventive and therapeutic measures for a community

- develop the skills necessary for resource mobilisation, management and evaluation of local comprehensive eye care programmes and integration in health systems

Structure

Term 1:
All students take the following compulsory modules:

Basic Epidemiology
Basic Statistics for Public Health and Policy
Epidemiology of Blinding Eye Diseases
Introduction to Health Economics
Public Health Programmes in Eye Care
Skills for Field Projects in Eye Care

Recommended optional modules can be taken after consultation with Course Director.

Term 2:
All students take the following compulsory modules:

Childhood Eye Disease and Ocular Infections
Non-Communicable Eye Disease
Implementing Eye Care: Skills and Resources
Global Disability & Health

Term 3:
All students take one optional module:

The choice will depend on the student’s interests in public health and health systems and should be discussed with their supervisor and the Course Director. The module can be selected from:

Applying Public Health Principles in Developing Countries
Principles and Practice of Public Health
Proposal Development

Project Report:
During the summer months (July - August), students complete a research project on an appropriate topic. Students undertaking projects overseas will require additional funding of about £1,500 to cover costs involved.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/mscphec.html#sixth

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The Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert) in Optometry in Eye Care Governance is a 60 credit Level 7 qualification, which seeks to provide those involved in the governing of eye care in the UK with a professional qualification. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert) in Optometry in Eye Care Governance is a 60 credit Level 7 qualification, which seeks to provide those involved in the governing of eye care in the UK with a professional qualification. Whilst we also run highly successful qualifications for those involved in clinical practice, this qualification is aimed at those who undertake clinical governance and advisory roles in the sector.

Starting in September, this course consists of three core modules – leadership skills, evidence-based eye care and audit, and legal aspects of UK optometry – as well as a free choice of 20 credits to allow students to follow their interests and increase their knowledge and understanding of a specific area. The aim of the course is to provide eye care professionals with the skills required to successfully oversee ophthalmic services, with the opportunity to become effective leaders within the sector, and with a comprehensive overview of their legal obligations in optometric practice in the UK.

Several modules are aligned with nationally agreed competency standards – for example, the Low Vision Service Wales and the MECS scheme among others.

Students who have evidence of achieving such standards within the last three years can present this to the Director of the programme for consideration for approved prior learning (APL) accreditation, where module credits would be given to the student in recognition of their prior achievements.

Distinctive features

• The opportunity to learn with one of the leading Optometry Schools in Europe, rated excellent for teaching and research.
• The involvement of research-active staff in course design and delivery.
• The variety of modules on offer.
• The flexibility of open learning.
• The only eye care governance course available in the UK.

Structure

The majority of the course will be delivered via Learning Central, the University's e-Learning system. You will have access to multimedia lecture presentations, supporting resources and discussions led by course tutors. On many of the modules leading educators in the field also provide practical skills workshops and tutorials. Formative and summative assessment is via online multiple choice questions, submitted written coursework and assignments (including group wikis and blogs) plus practical exams where appropriate.

Three of the modules are compulsory, and the further twenty credits can be taken from the wide variety available.

Some modules have pre-requisite partner modules.

Modules start at varying points throughout the year and the PGT team can advise students on the best order in which to study them according to personal circumstances.

The remaining 20 credits can be made up of any of our other modules.

Please visit the website to see which modules are available on this course:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/eye-care-governance-sept-pgcert

Teaching

Modules may differ, but you can expect to be taught online (via lectures and webinars), and by attending workshops for clinical modules.

Lectures are supported by the appropriate references and resources, and accompanied by assessment exercises. Participation in moderated online discussions is a feature in almost all modules. Practical workshops for skills training will be held at locations convenient to either the module content or the student cohort enrolled at that time, and instructed by educational leaders in that discipline.

Assessment

The assessment activities have been specifically designed to facilitate participants’ learning and achievement. All assessment elements are compulsory.

Assessment varies across the modules, but includes:

Written reports
Coursework assessment
Multiple choice questions (MCQ)
Practical examinations
Key Features Scenarios (used in medical education to test clinical reasoning, problem-solving ability and the ability to apply given knowledge)
OSCE's – Objective Structured Clinical Examinations
Group wikis
Blogs.

Feedback from assessments will be provided in written format for written reports and coursework, and written and/or oral for practical examinations and presentations. Scientific discussion via online forums will be moderated by module leaders, allowing them immediate input and opportunity to offer feedback. Students will need to pass each individual component in order to pass the module.

Career Prospects

The aim of the course is to provide eye care professionals with the skills required to successfully oversee ophthalmic services, with the opportunity to become effective leaders within the sector, and with a comprehensive overview of their legal obligations in optometric practice in the UK.

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The one-year Clinical Ophthalmology MSc will enhance your knowledge of common ocular diseases, ophthalmic surgical and laser procedures, clinical anatomy and ocular therapeutics. Read more
The one-year Clinical Ophthalmology MSc will enhance your knowledge of common ocular diseases, ophthalmic surgical and laser procedures, clinical anatomy and ocular therapeutics. You will develop analytical skills for solving clinical cases and evaluating published research, and gain valuable research experience through the opportunity to undertake a clinical library-based dissertation.

Degree information

Students on this programme will observe the diagnosis and management of a wide range of ocular diseases. Delivered by experienced clinicians and researchers, students will gain an understanding of clinical assessments and disease processes in the eye, imaging modalities, treatments and side-effects. Additional skills acquired are critical evaluation of scientific literature, research skills and the exposure to novel treatment strategies.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits over one year. The programme consists of eight core modules (120 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, flexible three years) is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits, flexible two years) is offered.

Mandatory modules - all eight modules, plus the dissertation module, must be taken.
-Basic Understanding of the Eye
-Common Ocular Diseases and Treatment
-Systemic Disease and the Eye
-Surgery and the Eye
-Disorders Affecting Retinal Function
-Retinal Imaging
-Ocular Therapeutics 1
-Ocular Therapeutics 2

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent library-based research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, problem-based learning, clinical application, and the possibility of clinical practice observation at Moorfields Eye Hospital. Assessment is through multiple choice question examinations, problem-based learning questions, and a dissertation.

Careers

This programme provides students with the unique opportunity to study at world-leading ophthalmology institutions, where they will be exposed to the most advanced diagnostic and treatment approaches. Students will learn directly from high-level clinicians and instructors from both Moorfields Eye Hospital and UCL, who will help them acquire the basis for further clinical advancement. Students will obtain practical skills to assist them at the start of an ophthalmic career, as part of a clinical specialty training programme leading to a specialist qualification.

Employability
This Clinical Ophthalmology MSc aims to provide students with clinical and academic abilities which will help them become clinical leaders in any future post. Students’ direct contact with leading clinicians and instructors will provide them with the basic knowledge to later become independent clinicians, able to lead others into modern ophthalmic medicine.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Ophthalmology and Moorfields Eye Hospital are recognised globally and have an outstanding track record in basic biomedical research, much of which has been translated into important advances in novel innovative therapies.

Students will benefit from advanced facilities and high-level ophthalmic practice.

The programme will also provide unique opportunities to interact with leading clinicians from Moorfields Eye Hospital as well as from other prominent institutions. International students from countries with less well-developed ophthalmic services will especially benefit from this unique programme.

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This new Master’s degree will deliver an in-depth understanding of clinical ophthalmology, disease pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment. Read more
This new Master’s degree will deliver an in-depth understanding of clinical ophthalmology, disease pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment. The programme combines lectures and seminars at UCL Institute of Ophthalmology with direct exposure to clinical practice in the ophthalmology clinics at the world-leading Moorfields Eye Hospital.

Degree information

The programme provides knowledge of the theory and practical skills of clinical ophthalmology including ocular pathology diagnosis and management, an understanding of clinical disease processes in the eye, the assessment of patients and the different imaging modalities and treatments available, as well as their limitations and side-effects.

Students undertake modules to the value of 360 credits. The programme consists of 16 mandatory modules (240 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits) and a case-based portfolio (60 credits).

Year One core modules
-Basic Understanding of the Eye
-Common Ocular Diseases and Treatment
-Systemic Disease and the Eye
-Surgery and the Eye
-Disorders Affecting Retinal Function
-Retinal Imaging
-Ocular Therapeutics I
-Ocular Therapeutics II
-Dissertation

Year Two core modules
-Clinical Practice: Cataract
-Clinical Practice: Cornea
-Clinical Practice: Glaucoma
-Clinical Practice: Medical Retina 1
-Clinical Practice: Medical Retina 2
-Clinical Practice: Paediatrics and Neuro-ophthalmology
-Clinical Practice: Uveitis
-Clinical Practice: Vitreo Retinal Surgery
-Case-based Portfolio

Dissertation/report
In year one all students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10–12,000 words. In year two students will construct a portfolio, examined by a viva.

Teaching and learning
In the first year the programme is predominantly delivered through lectures, seminars and attendance at clinical teaching sessions. The second year is largely clinic based and supplemented by taught sessions. Assessment is through written examinations, oral presentations, problem-based learning, dissertation and a case-based portfolio.

Careers

This Master’s degree will equip students with the practical skills required to begin an ophthalmic career and forms part of a clinical specialty training programme leading to a specialist qualification. The unique exposure to high-level clinicians and instructors is likely to lead to further clinical advancement.

Employability
The degree programme aims to provide students with clinical and academic skills which will help them become clinical leaders in any future post. Students' direct contact with leading clinicians and instructors will provide them with the basic knowledge to later become independent clinicians, able to lead others into modern opthalmic medicine.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Ophthalmology and Moorfields Eye Hospital are recognised worldwide and have an outstanding track record in biomedical research, much of which has been translated into important advances in innovative therapies.

Students will have the unique opportunity to observe the implementation of clinical knowledge in the diagnosis and treatment of a range of ocular diseases by experienced clinicians and researchers, in clinics in the second year.

The programme will teach students how to assess scientific literature, to evaluate the efficacy of novel treatment strategies, and consier how they fit into existing treatment algorithms.

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This MSc is aimed at students who wish to extend their knowledge and expertise in the eye as an integrated biological system. Read more
This MSc is aimed at students who wish to extend their knowledge and expertise in the eye as an integrated biological system. The programme provides a unique and integrated review of the physiology and biology of the eye, covering molecular and developmental cell biology, complex genetics, immunology and behavioural neuroscience.

Degree information

The programme offers students the opportunity to develop their knowledge and expertise in ocular cell biology, genetics, visual neuroscience, development and immunology. On completion of the programme, students gain an enhanced knowledge and understanding of scientific communication skills, scientific design and analysis, sophisticated laboratory techniques and valuable research experience.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), one or two optional modules (30 credits) and a research project (90 credits).

Core modules
-Ocular Cell Biology
-Genetics and Epidemiology of Ocular Disease
-Ocular Immunology
-Ocular Development in Health and Disease

Optional modules
Either
-Advanced Visual Neuroscience (30 credits)
Or
-Microvascular Biology (15 credits) and Visual Neuroscience (15 credits)

Dissertation/research project
All MSc students undertake either a research or informatics project using state-of-the-art techniques and equipment. The project culminates in a dissertation of 15,000–18,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, problem classes, journal clubs, self-directed studies and laboratory practical courses. Assessment is through long essays, coursework, laboratory practicals, oral examination and the research dissertation.

Careers

This programme provides excellent preparation for a PhD or a successful research career in academia or for positions in the public or commercial sectors. Previous students have also successfully obtained specialist trainee positions in ophthalmology at hospitals across the country.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-PG Dip Clinical Ophthalmology, University College London (UCL)
-Research Degree: Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London (UCL)
-Doctor, Mile End Hospital (NHS)
-GP (General Practitioner), Barnet Hospital (NHS)
-Research Associate, Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust

Employability
The programme aims to train first-class basic and clinical scientists in the field of ophthalmology.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Ophthalmology is one of the premier centres in the world for the study of vision and the mechanisms, diagnosis and therapy of eye disease. We embrace fundamental research, through the entire spectrum of translational medicine to clinical trials.

This MSc programme draws upon the extensive basic and clinical research experience available at the institute and at Moorfields Eye Hospital. Students gain expertise in basic cell biology, genetics, neuroscience and physiology, specialise in the biology of the eye as an integrated biological system and conduct a six-month research project within a world-class research environment.

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A professional doctorate that enables eye care professionals to enhance their knowledge, critical awareness of current issues, and to be at the forefront of their academic discipline through taught and research elements. Read more
A professional doctorate that enables eye care professionals to enhance their knowledge, critical awareness of current issues, and to be at the forefront of their academic discipline through taught and research elements.

Course outline

The Doctor of Optometry/ Doctor of Ophthalmic Science (previously known as the Aston “Ophthalmic Doctorate”) is a unique qualification - a professional doctorate - that enables eye care professionals to enhance their knowledge, and critical awareness of current issues, and to be at the forefront of their academic discipline through taught and research elements.

Taught modules are 20 credits each, nominally equivalent to 200 hours of student learning. Modules consist of remote access lectures with electronic formative assessments and a module coursework assignment such as reflective case records, or an essay/literature review related to the module. There are two study periods per year to complete taught modules; 1st October -31st January and 1st March - 30th June. Module results are ratified at Examination Boards held shortly after the end of each study period.

The research project is the major component of the doctorate, supervised by members of the Optometry Subject Group academic staff. Students will develop their research proposals based upon their own clinical interests, or may opt to select a project nominated by an Aston academic. Because this is a distance-learning programme, the research is not normally carried out on the University campus, and it is essential that the student has access to the facilities and resources needed to carry out the research, usually in the student's place of work.

The research stage requires a significant long-term commitment, as it is equivalent to around 2 years of full-time work (i.e. 4 years part-time). Candidates ultimately submit a thesis which is examined in a viva voce examination.

The Doctor of Optometry programme is aimed at practising optometrists, who will complete case records where required for taught module coursework, and will undertake a practice- based research project. The Doctor of Ophthalmic Science programme is for eye care professionals who may not be practising optometrists, e.g. medics/ orthoptists/ product designers; these students may complete scientific essays to fulfil the coursework requirements, and undertake a non-clinical research project.

This degree is only available as part-time distance learning, so it is vital that the student has access to a good broadband internet connection.

Flexible credit accumulation

New students initially register as LHS postgraduate students within a framework of flexible credit accumulation (FCA). Within this framework it is possible to graduate with a Postgraduate Certificate in Optometry (60 taught credits); Postgraduate Diploma in Optometry (120 taught credits); M.Sc. in Optometry/ Ophthalmic Science (180 credits: 120 taught, 60 dissertation) or the Doctor of Optometry (DOptom)/ Doctor of Ophthalmic Science (DOphSc).

As part of the flexible programme, UK optometrists may complete the theoretical element of the GOC-approved Independent Prescribing for Optometrists. Further information is available here: http://www1.aston.ac.uk/lhs/cpd/courses/optometry/independent-prescribing-for-optometrists/

The MSc requires the completion of 6 taught modules (120 credits) and a 60 credit narrative research review (dissertation).

Completion of the DOptom/ DOphSc requires 180 taught module credits and successful completion of a substantial personal research project, with submission of a thesis/ portfolio of work and a viva voce examination with an internal and external examiner. Up to 60 credits may be awarded in respect of Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL), whether experiential or certificated (e.g. previous completion of the Aston MOptom). To progress to full doctoral registration requires a minimum of 120 taught module credits including the compulsory 20 credit Research Methods module, an approved project proposal, and successful completion of the qualifying report stage, assessed by viva voce examination with an internal examiner. The report and the viva voce examination will be used to assess suitability for progression to the full doctoral project.

Timescales for study

Taught credits are valid for 5 years, so students studying for an MSc/PG Diploma/PG Certificate must complete their studies within 5 years of enrolment on the programme.

Students undertaking the DOptom/DOphSc. programme must complete their taught module requirement and complete the research stage within 6 years of registration. Note that in accordance with University Regulations for part-time research students, the earliest date for completion of the doctoral programme (i.e. submission of thesis/ portfolio) is 4 years following registration.

Subject guide and modules

Taught modules include:
-Accommodation and Presbyopia (OP4AAP)
-Advanced Contact Lenses (OP4ACL)
-Advanced Visual Science (OP4AVS)
-General Ocular Therapeutics (OP4GOT)
-Glaucoma (OP4GL1)
-Investigative Ophthalmic Science (OP4IOS)
-Myopia (OP4MY1)
-Nutrition and the Eye (OP4NE1)
-Ocular Pharmacology and Therapeutics (OP4OT1)
-Prescribing for disorders of the eye (OP4OT2)
-Refractive Surgery (OP4RS1)
-Research Methods (OP4RM1)
-Research Review (Dissertation modules OP4OPR and OP40SR)
-Retinal and Macular Disorders (OP4RMD)
-Visual Impairment (OP4VI1)

Learning, teaching & assessment

For taught modules, online lectures, available on our virtual environment whenever you chose to view them are accompanied by short tests throughout the module. Each module includes a substantial piece of coursework, e.g. a scientific literature review or portfolio of case records. The pass mark for all forms of taught module assessment is 50%.

For the main element of the doctorate, the research project, candidates submit a report and undergo a qualifying report stage within one year of becoming research active. Once this stage has been passed, candidates continue their research, culminating in the submission of a thesis (up to 80, 000 words) which is examined in a viva examination by experts in the chosen field. The degree of Doctor of Optometry or Doctor of Ophthalmic Science is awarded to candidates who successfully defend their thesis.

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A distance-learning course run by Aston University. Recent legislation has extended independent prescribing rights to optometrists, subject to the satisfactory completion of a General Optical Council (GOC) accredited training course. Read more
A distance-learning course run by Aston University.

Recent legislation has extended independent prescribing rights to optometrists, subject to the satisfactory completion of a General Optical Council (GOC) accredited training course. The restriction to the range of medicines that can be used and conditions that can be treated for IP optometrists is by reference to their competence:

‘Optometrist Independent Prescribers should be able to prescribe any licensed medicine for ocular conditions, affecting the eye and adnexa, within the recognised area of expertise and competence of the optometrist.’

Structure

Aston University is offering a distance learning course in Independent Prescribing for qualified optometrists. The course consists of two 20 credit modules delivered by distance learning using our e-learning environment, Blackboard. Each module is made up of online lectures assessed by unseen online tests and coursework.

The first module is entitled ‘Ocular Pharmacology and Therapeutics’ and covers topics including ocular immunology, pharmacology and ocular therapeutic drugs, frameworks of prescribing, prescribing safely and professionally.

The second module, taken after completion of the first module, is entitled ‘Prescribing for disorders of the eye’ and covers topics including evidence based practice and glaucoma in relation to independent prescribing.

A period of Learning in Practice

After successful completion of the two theory based modules and a practical assessment, optometrists are required to undertake practical training in the form of a clinical placement in conjunction with an Independent Prescriber (e.g. an ophthalmologist in a hospital eye department). To achieve Independent Prescriber status the optometrist must gain at least 12 days of clinical training.
For those who are already registered as Additional Supply or Supplementary Prescribers, the placement period required is 7 days.

Teaching methods

Each module consists of around ten ‘lectures’ delivered by distance learning via the Blackboard platform. Most topics are delivered by Powerpoint lectures with speech. Other lectures are delivered in a text-based format.

The first module covers aspects of ocular therapeutics, including the pharmacology and use of ocular therapeutic drugs.

The syllabus for the second module encompasses prescribing for ocular disease. Upon successful completion of the second module’s exam, optometrists will be required to undertake a clinical skills practical assessment at Aston University. The practical element will involve demonstration of slit lamp skills, contact tonometry and slit lamp binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy along with some objective structured clinical exam type questions.

Practice-based learning

Following completion of the two theoretical modules, trainees undertake a period of practice-based training. The aim of this component of the training is to develop competency in the practice of prescribing and to facilitate the integration of prescribing theory and practice with the conditions that the trainee will subsequently manage. This training will typically take place in the Hospital Eye Service under the supervision of a designated ‘mentor’ ophthalmologist. It is the responsibility of the trainee to arrange the clinical practice placement.

For IP the Clinical Placement comprises a minimum of 12 days (24 sessions of not less than 3 hours).

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Discover how insights from linguistics help to explain how humans learn, understand and use languages. Read more
Discover how insights from linguistics help to explain how humans learn, understand and use languages. Our MA Psycholinguistics provides you with a thorough grounding in research from the perspective of linguistics on human language processing, the representation of language in the brain, and first and second language acquisition.

You cover the processing and acquisition of sounds, words and sentences, look at different kinds of language disorders, and investigate the relevance of data from human language processing to our understanding of the nature of language. You also learn how to design and conduct experiments, and analyse the results from them.

Our researchers are using experimental techniques to understand how children learn language, how adults process language, and what happens when language ability is impaired by brain disorders. We combine a wide range of methodologies: corpora, infant behavioural studies at the babylab, response time and eye movement measures for adults

You can choose areas of special study including:
-How words are represented and accessed in the mind
-How speakers understand sentences in real time
-Music, language and the brain
-Children’s English

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’, placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and ranked among the top 150 departments on the planet according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016] for linguistics.

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our staff maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

In psycholinguistics, Sonja Eisenbeiss, Claire delle Luche and Fang Liu use experimental techniques to understand how children learn language, how adults process language, and what happens when language ability is impaired by brain disorders.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Our MA Psycholinguistics can lead to further research in the form of a PhD, or can lead you to a career in areas such as speech therapy, teaching, publishing, journalism, administration and public service.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Our graduates are successful in a wide variety of career paths. They leave Essex with a unique set of skills and experience that are in demand by employers.

Several of our MA Psycholinguistics graduates have taken up academic posts at top universities including the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics and the Universities of Tübingen, Hamburg, Kobe, and Thessaloniki.

Example structure

-Phonological Development
-Sentence Processing
-Experimental Design and Analysis
-Assignment Writing and Dissertation Preparation
-The Role of Age in Bilingual Development
-MA Dissertation
-Advanced Phonology (optional)
-First Language Acquisition (optional)
-Second Language Acquisition and Linguistics Theory (optional)
-American Languages (optional)
-Varieties of English (optional)
-Language Rights (optional)
-Semantics (optional)
-Language Learning (optional)
-English Syntax 1 (optional)
-Individual Differences in L2 Learning (optional)
-Syntactic Theory I (optional)
-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection (optional)
-Research Methods I (optional)
-English Syntax 2 (optional)
-Syntactic Theory II (optional)
-Sociocultural Linguistics (optional)
-Variation in English II (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis (optional)
-Research Methods II (optional)
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)
-Language Attrition (optional)
-Language in Context: From Pragmatics to Conversation Analysis (optional)
-Intercultural Communication: communicating across languages and cultures (optional)

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This course has been designed to fulfil the learning needs of the postgraduate eye care professional in practice; to provide advanced knowledge and facilitate understanding in this rapidly expanding field of healthcare. Read more
This course has been designed to fulfil the learning needs of the postgraduate eye care professional in practice; to provide advanced knowledge and facilitate understanding in this rapidly expanding field of healthcare.

The flexibility of the programme allows you to simply enrol for a module that interests you (what we refer to as non-degree), or aim for a specific Cardiff University Award

The MSc/PgDip/PgCert provides the opportunity for you to learn with one of the leading Optometry Schools in the UK, rated excellent for teaching and research, and amongst the highest ranked for overall undergraduate student satisfaction.  In 2015-16 we had 100% satisfaction in the Postgraduate Taught Education Survey.

We have designed this programme with you in mind - a busy professional who needs postgraduate studies to be flexible, to fit in with work, home and family life, to fulfil CET requirements and to achieve something worthwhile.  Many of the modules available are accredited by the College of Optometrists to provide Professional Certificates, Higher Certificates and Diplomas.

WOPEC (the Wales Optometry Postgraduate Education Centre) based at Cardiff University, already has an excellent reputation for delivering quality continuing education in an accessible format. If you have already completed a WOPEC course you may find you have already achieved some credits towards a University Award on this programme.

A deliberately wide portfolio of modules is offered in order to recognise the increasing desire for specialist training within optometry, including glaucoma, visual impairment, acute eye care, paediatrics, dry eye, medical retina, clinical teaching and leadership, amongst others. Specific programme pathways are suggested for optometrists wishing to focus on certain areas of practice, and there is a recommended programme pathway for those returning to work after a career break.

The programme is primarily aimed at eye care professionals in practice, studying part-time, at a distance from the University, with internet access to our virtual learning environment (VLE). Two thirds of the modules available on this programme also contain advanced practical training, which will normally be provided over a 1-2 day period.

Successful students on this programme will have an advanced standing both clinically and academically, taking them to the forefront of the profession, and enhancing their personal and professional development.

Several modules are aligned with nationally agreed competency standards – for example, the Low Vision Service Wales and the MECS scheme among others.

Students who have evidence of achieving such standards within the last three years can present this to the Director of the programme for consideration for approved prior learning (APL) accreditation, where module credits would be given to the student in recognition of their prior achievements.

Structure

The majority of the course will be delivered via Learning Central, the University's e-Learning system. You will have access to multimedia lecture presentations, supporting resources and discussions led by course tutors. On many of the modules leading educators in the field also provide practical skills workshops and tutorials directly relevant to everyday practice. These workshops are delivered by our staff within our custom-designed building. These sessions are an integral part of the course so attendance is compulsory.

Formative and summative assessment is via online multiple choice questions, submitted written coursework and assignments (including group wikis and blogs) plus practical exams where appropriate.

The course is designed to be flexible and so you pick and mix the modules you want to take from over twenty five 10 or 20 credit modules. All modules are optional, but some modules have pre-requisite partner modules. You can choose the modules you want to take to fit in with your home and work or we can suggest bundles that would work for your professional or personal circumstances.

Each 10 credits at postgraduate level equates to typically 25-30 hours of guided learning from your tutor(s), for example, lectures, discussions, practical workshops, tutorials, etc. You are expected to spend approximately 3-4 hours on self-directed study and reading to accompany each hour of guided learning, as directed by your tutor(s).

Please see the website for more details about the structure and content of each course:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/group/clinical-optometry

Teaching

Modules may differ, but you can expect to be taught online (via lectures and webinars), and by attending workshops for clinical modules.

Lectures are supported by the appropriate references and resources, and accompanied by assessment exercises. Participation in moderated online discussions is a feature in almost all modules.  Practical workshops for skills training will be held at locations convenient to either the module content or the student cohort enrolled at that time, and instructed by educational leaders in that discipline.

Assessment

The assessment activities have been specifically designed to facilitate participants’ learning and achievement. All assessment elements are compulsory.

Assessment varies across the modules, but includes:

Written reports.
Coursework assessment.
Multiple choice questions (MCQ).
Practical examinations.
Key Features Scenarios (used in medical education to test clinical reasoning, problem-solving ability and the ability to apply given knowledge).
OSCEs – Objective Structured Clinical Examinations.
Group wikis.
Blogs.
Written research project report.

Feedback from assessments will be provided in written format for written reports and coursework, and written and/or oral for practical examinations and presentations. Scientific discussion via online forums will be moderated by module leaders, allowing them immediate input and opportunity to offer feedback. Students will need to pass each individual component in order to pass the module.

The pass mark for the course is 50%, and a distinction is awarded for marks >70%.

Career Prospects

Successful students on this programme will have an advanced standing both clinically and academically, taking them to the forefront of the profession, and enhancing their personal and professional development.

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This new three year part-time Masters programme, taught entirely online, is jointly offered by the University of Edinburgh and the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh and leads to the degree of Master of Science (MSc). Read more

This new three year part-time Masters programme, taught entirely online, is jointly offered by the University of Edinburgh and the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh and leads to the degree of Master of Science (MSc). It has been developed in partnership with NHS Education for Scotland (NES).

Aimed primarily at optometrists seeking formal postgraduate training in community-based clinical care, this programme is also highly relevant for medical and surgical trainees entering specialty training in ophthalmology.

This degree is aligned with the curricula of both the FRCSEd and FRCOphth examinations in the United Kingdom and Ireland, making it very attractive to domestic and international students.

This programme is aimed at supporting optometrists seeking formal postgraduate training in community-based clinical care and also medical and surgical trainees entering specialty training ophthalmology.

This programme gives trainees first-rate preparation for the Fellowship of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (FRCSEd) and Fellowship of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists (FRCOphth) examinations or equivalent, with additional emphasis on acquired knowledge and its application.

The third-year MSc research project also serves as an opportunity to develop an academic career.

Online learning

The programme is taught entirely online. Students are supported by synchronous and asynchronous discussion with e-tutors - all leading clinicians in their field - and have access to a large learning resource, including subscriptions to key online books and journals. Students will be expected to lead e-seminars and e-journal clubs.

Our online learning technology is fully interactive, award-winning and enables you to communicate with our highly qualified teaching staff from the comfort of your own home or workplace.

Our online students not only have access to Edinburgh’s excellent resources, but also become part of a supportive online community, bringing together students and tutors from around the world.

The programme is headed up by Professor Baljean Dhillon.

Programme structure

Delivered through an online learning environment, this programme runs on a semester basis over three years and involves approximately 10-15 hours of study each week in a flexible, modular manner. All modules are compulsory and are taught and assessed using a clinical problem-based approach and involve participation in discussion boards and reflective portfolios.

Students accumulate credits by completing a series of modules leading to a Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or Master of Science degree. The minimum time for completion of the full Masters programme is three years, and the maximum time for completion is six years.

At the certificate and diploma levels, students must attend an end-of-year examination, held in Edinburgh for UK-based students or with a pre-approved partner institution for international students.

Year 1: Certificate

  • Basic Ophthalmic Science: Anatomy, Pathology, Physiology of the Ocular Structures
  • Basic Examination & Investigation Techniques
  • Basic Glaucoma
  • Basic Macular Disease
  • Basic Acute Eye Disease & Vision Loss
  • eTriage and Referral Refinement

Year 2: Diploma

  • Advanced Ophthalmic Science: Anatomy, Pathology, Physiology of the Ocular Structures
  • Advanced Examination & Investigation Techniques
  • Advanced Glaucoma
  • Advanced Macular Disease
  • Advanced Acute Eye Disease & Vision Loss
  • Advanced eTriage and Referral Refinement

Year 3: Masters

The final year involves a supervised masters research project, which will be undertaken in an approved topic that reflects your subspecialty interest and will require the submission of a written project report.

Career opportunities

This programme is designed for:

  • optometrists who wish to enhance their knowledge with particular regard to diagnosis and treatment of ocular disease as they take on an increasingly expanding role in the management of eye disease as part of a multidisciplinary healthcare team
  • medical and surgical trainees who aspire to specialise in ophthalmology, enabling them to study towards their FRCSEd, FRCOphth, or equivalent, in a flexible way

The award of MSc will highlight the student’s commitment to continuing professional development in their chosen career and will ensure a competitive edge when applying for clinical positions. The MSc will also help prepare them for an academic or research career.

The MSc is also relevant to GPs and trainee GPs with a special Interest in ophthalmology, family medicine physicians, orthoptists, ophthalmic nurses and other eye healthcare professionals seeking to advance their understanding of primary care ophthalmology and its interface with secondary care.



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This modular postgraduate course is designed to enable fully qualified optometrists to gain Additional Supply or Independent Prescriber status. Read more
This modular postgraduate course is designed to enable fully qualified optometrists to gain Additional Supply or Independent Prescriber status. The course consists of three modules held over one year. Each of the three modules carries 20 postgraduate credits. These credits count towards further postgraduate qualifications such as the MSc Clinical Ophthalmology & Vision Research.

Programme Description

In Scotland, optometrists have recently been granted independent prescribing rights, allowing them to treat a range of common ocular conditions independently. This represents a significant milestone in the development of the scope of optometric practice and puts Scottish optometry and Scottish optometric education at the forefront in Europe.

This programme provides qualified optometrists (UK-based and international) with an opportunity to enhance their knowledge ion the diagnosis and management of common eye disorders and to subsequently gain the right to prescribe medications for these conditions independently (this may vary for international students according to respective national legal regulations).

The course consists of three taught modules at Glasgow Caledonian University, which are complemented by a distance-learning component. A practical placement and a passing of a final exam set by the College of Optometrists are (required for registration of the qualification with the GOC.

All University-based modules are compact weekend sessions (one per module), consisting of lectures and clinical hands-on workshops.

For the distance-learning component, a series of articles on diagnosis and management of relevant eye conditions as well as on principles of medical prescribing will be made available. Upon completion of Module 3, a clinical placement is required for candidates who are aiming for 'Independent Prescriber' registration (IP) with the GOC. For international candidates not wishing to register their qualification in the UK, a clinical placement is not mandatory.

Credits accumulated in this course can be used in the future for further study towards Master-level qualifications.

Why Choose This Course?

This programme will provide students with an up-to-date knowledge on diagnosis and management of common eye disorders. It will also provide an opportunity to review and practise advanced clinical investigative techniques.

What You Will Learn

The course is consists of three taught modules at Glasgow Caledonian University, which are complemented by a distance-learning component. A practical placement and a passing of a final exam set by the College of Optometrists are (required for registration of the qualification with the GOC.

Career Opportunities

The course will enhance students' career prospects and allow them to take on extended professional responsibilities in primary and secondary eye care settings. It will provide students with a broad education in prescribing practice that will equip them with the necessary knowledge and skills to enhance their career and contribute effectively to extended professional roles. Students will develop their theoretical know-how and their clinical skills in the management of common ophthalmic conditions.

The programme is designed to train optometrists towards ‘Additional Supply’ or ‘Independent Prescribing’ accreditation. We welcome applications from both UK-based and international optometrists

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The course aims to foster advanced knowledge in clinical issues for optometrists, with an emphasis on how research informs practice and the evolution of eye care services and capabilities. Read more

The course aims to foster advanced knowledge in clinical issues for optometrists, with an emphasis on how research informs practice and the evolution of eye care services and capabilities. The programme recognises and incorporates Professional Certificates from the College of Optometrists. Modules have been designed with contributions from guest experts from ophthalmology, clinicians from hospital settings and other specialists. A number of CET points are available for optometrists undertaking these modules.

This course is delivered by distance learning, on a part-time basis, so is designed for working optometrists to fit their learning around their other commitments.

Graduates of this course will be equipped with skills to undertake extended clinical roles, promote the development of eye care within their region. They will develop critical thinking skills to evaluate and undertake research, and may go on to further research endeavours including doctoral research training.

Ulster University is experienced in delivering courses through distance learning and has bespoke support and online delivery of teaching through the virtual learning environment, BlackBoard Learn. Distance learning offers the student the advantage of learning at their pace and preferred time, and teaching materials have been specifically developed with the distance learner in mind, ensuring access is simple and comprehensive. Support for distance learning students is at hand daily from online tutors and the e-Learning Support Unit at Ulster.

The MSc course is designed and structured so you will have the opportunity to choose a particular area of study that interests you, building from a series of Professional certificates and then going on to study ophthalmic public health and advanced retinal imaging or choosing to undertake the Theory of Independent prescribing for optometrists The skills of self-motivation, independent learning, problem solving and developing and communicating scientific arguments are encouraged and developed through a programme which emphasizes critical thinking and discussion of issues through online media.

Students may not wish to undertake the whole MSc (180 credits), and there are options to undertake a Postgraduate Certificate (PgCERT), which amounts to 60 credits, or a Postgraduate Diploma (PgDIP), at 120 credits.

For those completing the MSc programme, a research project will be undertaken by the student in an area of their choosing with support and guidance from an academic supervisor. In addition, another member of staff will coordinate this module and provide generic support. This project will be a significant and novel piece of research.

Modules

Year one

  • Low vision
  • Glaucoma diagnosis and management
  • Medical retina
  • Paediatric eyecare

Year two

  • Evidence-based practice in sealthcare sciences
  • Principles of pharmacology and prescribing
  • Assessment, management and treatment of ocular conditions
  • Public health in optometry: national and global perspectives
  • Structure/function relationships in ocular disease

Year three

  • MSc research project

Attendance

This is a distance learning course and students access learning material via a virtual learning environment. 'elearning' is an excellent route for postgraduate learning as it gives unique flexibility and ownership of how and when you learn. It is a different experience from traditional face to face learning and is especially suited to adults who like to learn independently and are self-motivated. This course has been specifically designed with the elearner in mind, so learning material is appropriately displayed and students are encouraged to participate in discussion boards, and to contribute to online chats and are given regular small tasks to complete so learning is broken down into manageable segments.

Career options

Graduates will gain a Master's in Advanced Clinical Optometry from a UK university designed to enhance their academic and professional development. Graduates may use skills obtained to effectively promote and develop eye care in their area, and take part in enhanced eye care services. Graduates will gain valuable experience of undertaking research activities and producing high quality scientific reports. These skills will support the graduates who wish to develop their research careers.



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This course develops the careers of doctors whose interest is the practice of medicine in tropical and low- and middle-income countries. Read more
This course develops the careers of doctors whose interest is the practice of medicine in tropical and low- and middle-income countries. The course offers a wide choice of modules and provides training in clinical tropical medicine at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases.

The Diploma in Tropical Medicine & Hygiene (DTM&H):
All students going on the MSc will take the Diploma in Tropical Medicine & Hygiene. Students with a prior DTM&H, or holding 60 Masters level credits from the East African Diploma in Tropical Medicine & Hygiene may apply for exemption from Term 1 via accreditation of prior learning.

Careers

Graduates from this course have taken a wide variety of career paths including further research in epidemiology, parasite immunology; field research programmes or international organisations concerned with health care delivery in conflict settings or humanitarian crises; or returned to academic or medical positions in low- and middle-income countries.

Awards

The Frederick Murgatroyd Award is awarded each year for the best student of the year. Donated by Mrs Murgatroyd in memory of her husband, who held the Wellcome Chair of Clinical Tropical Medicine in 1950 and 1951.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/edu/qualityassurance/tmih_progspec.pdf)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/mstmih.html

Objectives

By the end of this course students should be able to:

- understand and describe the causation, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, management, and control of the major parasitic, bacterial, and viral diseases of developing countries

- demonstrate knowledge and skills in diagnostic parasitology and other simple laboratory methods

- understand and apply basic epidemiological principles, including selecting appropriate study designs

- apply and interpret basic statistical tests for the analysis of quantitative data

- critically evaluate published literature in order to make appropriate clinical decisions

- communicate relevant medical knowledge to patients, health care professionals, colleagues and other groups

- understand the basic sciences underlying clinical and public health practice

Structure

Term 1:
All students follow the course for the DTM&H. Term 1 consists entirely of the DTM&H lectures, seminars, laboratory practical and clinical sessions, and is examined through the DTM&H examination and resulting in the award of the Diploma and 60 Master's level credits at the end of Term 1.

Terms 2 and 3:
Students take a total of five study modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). Recognising that students have diverse backgrounds and experience, the course director considers requests to take any module within the School's portfolio, provided that this is appropriate for the student.

*Recommended modules

- Slot 1:
Clinical Infectious Diseases 1: Bacterial & Viral Diseases & Community Health in Developing Countries*
Clinical Virology*
Epidemiology & Control of Malaria*
Advanced Immunology 1
Childhood Eye Disease and Ocular Infection
Designing Disease Control Programmes in Developing Countries
Drugs, Alcohol and Tobacco
Economic Evaluation
Generalised Liner Models
Health Care Evaluation
Health Promotion Approaches and Methods
Maternal & Child Nutrition
Molecular Biology & Recombinant DNA Techniques
Research Design & Analysis
Sociological Approaches to Health
Study Design: Writing a Proposal

- Slot 2:
Clinical Infectious Diseases 2: Parasitic Diseases & Clinical Medicine*
Conflict and Health*
Design & Analysis of Epidemiological Studies*
Advanced Diagnostic Parasitology
Advanced Immunology 2
Clinical Bacteriology 1
Family Planning Programmes
Health Systems; History & Health
Molecular Virology; Non Communicable Eye Disease
Population, Poverty and Environment
Qualitative Methodologies
Statistical Methods in Epidemiology

- Slot 3:
Clinical Infectious Diseases 3: Bacterial & Viral Diseases & Community Health in Developing Countries*
Control of Sexually Transmitted Infections*
Advanced Training in Molecular Biology
Applied Communicable Disease Control
Clinical Immunology
Current Issues in Safe Motherhood & Perinatal Health
Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases
Implementing Eye Care: Skills and Resources
Medical Anthropology and Public Health
Modelling & the Dynamics of Infectious Diseases
Nutrition in Emergencies
Organisational Management
Social Epidemiology
Spatial Epidemiology in Public Health
Tropical Environmental Health
Vector Sampling, Identification & Incrimination

- Slot 4:
Clinical Infectious Diseases 4: Parasitic Diseases & Clinical Medicine*
Epidemiology & Control of Communicable Diseases*
Ethics, Public Health & Human Rights*
Global Disability and Health*
Immunology of Parasitic Infection: Principles*
Analytical Models for Decision Making
Clinical Bacteriology 2
Design & Evaluation of Mental Health Programmes
Environmental Epidemiology
Evaluation of Public Health Interventions
Genetic Epidemiology
Globalisation & Health
Molecular Biology Research Progress & Applications
Nutrition Related Chronic Diseases
Population Dynamics & Projections
Reviewing the Literature
Sexual Health
Survival Analysis and Bayesian Statistics
Vector Biology & Vector Parasite Interactions

- Slot 5:
AIDS*
Antimicrobial Chemotherapy*
Mycology*
Advanced Statistical Methods in Epidemiology
Analysing Survey & Population Data
Applying Public Health Principles in Developing Countries
Environmental Health Policy
Integrated Vector Management
Integrating Module: Health Promotion
Molecular Cell Biology & Infection
Nutrition Programme Planning
Pathogen Genomics
Principles and Practice of Public Health

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/ttmi.html

Project Report:
During the summer months (July - August), students complete a research project in a subject of their choice, for submission by early September. Projects may involve writing up and analysing work carried out before coming to the School, a literature review, or a research study proposal. Some students gather data overseas or in the UK for analysis within the project. Such projects require early planning.

Students undertaking projects overseas will require additional funding of up to £1,500 to cover costs involved. The majority of students who undertake projects abroad receive financial support for flights from the School's trust funds set up for this purpose.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/mstmih.html#sixth

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Applied linguistics addresses real-life language problems through insights gained from current linguistic theory, psychology and education. Read more
Applied linguistics addresses real-life language problems through insights gained from current linguistic theory, psychology and education.

Our MA is designed for people who want to know more about how foreign or second languages (particularly English) are learned, and how different kinds of classroom practice might affect proficiency. You explore different approaches to understanding language and language acquisition, and the methods that can be used to investigate language learning and teaching. You select a mixture of modules on language learning and its application to classroom practices.

You can choose areas of special study from a wide range of options, including:
-Teaching speaking and listening skills to language learners
-Psychological factors in second language learning
-Computer-assisted language-learning
-Literature and language-learning
-Age and bilingual development

You'll also be part of our Centre for Research in Language Development throughout the Lifespan (LaDeLi), a unique research centre specialising in all aspects of language learning and development.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’, placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and among the top 150 departments on the planet (QS World University Rankings 2016).

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

Our staff maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

In applied linguistics, Florence Myles, Monika Schmid, Sophia Skoufaki, Karen Roehr-Brackin, Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez, and Roger Hawkins focus on the learning of second and further languages, whilst Julian Good, Christina Gkonou and Tracey Costley focus on issues to do with the classroom teaching of English as a foreign language.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Our course can lead to careers in areas such as academic research, publishing, journalism, administration, public service and teaching. You develop key employability skills including research design, data analysis, thinking analytically, report writing and public speaking.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Our graduates are successful in a wide variety of career paths. They leave Essex with a unique set of skills and experience that are in demand by employers.

Example structure

Postgraduate study is the chance to take your education to the next level. The combination of compulsory and optional modules means our courses help you develop extensive knowledge in your chosen discipline, whilst providing plenty of freedom to pursue your own interests. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore to ensure your course is as relevant and up-to-date as possible your core module structure may be subject to change.

MA Applied Linguistics
-MA Dissertation
-Assignment Writing and Dissertation Preparation
-Language Learning
-Research Methods I
-Research Methods II
-Advanced Phonology (optional)
-First Language Acquisition (optional)
-Phonological Development (optional)
-Second Language Vocabulary: Learning, Teaching and Use (optional)
-Topics in the Psychology of Language Learning and Teaching (optional)
-Second Language Acquisition and Linguistics Theory (optional)
-American Languages (optional)
-Varieties of English (optional)
-Sentence Processing (optional)
-Language Rights (optional)
-Semantics (optional)
-Literature and Language Teaching (optional)
-English Syntax 1 (optional)
-Description of Language for TEFL/ELT and Applied Linguistics (optional)
-Individual Differences in L2 Learning (optional)
-Syntactic Theory I (optional)
-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory (optional)
-Experimental Design and Analysis (optional)
-Materials Design and Evaluation (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection (optional)
-English Syntax 2 (optional)
-Syntactic Theory II (optional)
-Teaching, Listening and Speaking (optional)
-Sociocultural Linguistics (optional)
-The Role of Age in Bilingual Development (optional)
-Variation in English II (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis (optional)
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)
-Language Attrition (optional)
-Teaching Practice I (optional)
-Approaches, Methods and Teacher Development for TEFL/TESOL (optional)
-Language in Context: From Pragmatics to Conversation Analysis (optional)
-Teaching Reading and Writing in TEFL/TESOL (optional)
-Intercultural Communication: communicating across languages and cultures (optional)

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Conduct an in-depth study of the grammar of English. Learn about dialectal and social variation, language change and the pragmatics of language use, and study varieties of English used around the world. Read more
Conduct an in-depth study of the grammar of English. Learn about dialectal and social variation, language change and the pragmatics of language use, and study varieties of English used around the world.

If you wish to focus specifically on the linguistics of the English language then our MA English Language and Linguistics should interest you. “Grammar” is the body of knowledge that enables a speaker to produce and understand the language(s) they speak. We study that knowledge, taking a practical approach to our research through analysis of English corpora, recordings and texts.

Our course allows you to cover a wide range of topics related to English, including:
-Dialectal and social variation
-Conversation analysis
-Language change
-Language rights
-Pragmatics

You also have the choice of optional topics including American languages, language and gender, multilingualism and language disorders.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’, placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and among the top 150 departments on the planet (QS World University Rankings 2016).

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our staff maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

In theoretical linguistics, Doug Arnold, Bob Borsley, Louisa Sadler, and Mike Jones work on the structure of sentences, focusing on English and other languages; Andrew Spencer investigates how complex words are created; and Nancy Kula and Wyn Johnson work on sound structure.

In sociolinguistics, Peter Patrick, Rebecca Clift, Enam Al Wer and Vineeta Chand all work on different aspects of how language varies, and investigate which factors cause such variation. Peter is also involved in language rights, and offers expert opinions in asylum cases where language is used to determine origin.

In applied linguistics, Florence Myles, Monika Schmid, Sophia Skoufaki, Karen Roehr-Brackin, Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez, and Roger Hawkins focus on the learning of second and further languages, whilst Julian Good, Christina Gkonou and Tracey Costley focus on issues to do with the classroom teaching of English as a foreign language.

In psycholinguistics, Sonja Eisenbeiss, Claire delle Luche and Fang Liu use experimental techniques to understand how children learn language, how adults process language, and what happens when language ability is impaired by brain disorders.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Our course can lead to careers in areas such as academic research, publishing, journalism, administration, public service and teaching. You develop key employability skills including research design, data analysis, thinking analytically, report writing and public speaking.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Our graduates are successful in a wide variety of career paths. They leave Essex with a unique set of skills and experience that are in demand by employers.

Example structure

-MA Dissertation
-Advanced Phonology
-English Syntax 1
-Varieties of English
-English Syntax 2
-Variation in English II
-First Language Acquisition (optional)
-Phonological Development (optional)
-Second Language Acquisition and Linguistics Theory (optional)
-American Languages (optional)
-Sentence Processing (optional)
-Language Rights (optional)
-Semantics (optional)
-Language Learning (optional)
-Individual Differences in L2 Learning (optional)
-Syntactic Theory I (optional)
-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory (optional)
-Experimental Design and Analysis (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection (optional)
-Research Methods I (optional)
-Syntactic Theory II (optional)
-Sociocultural Linguistics (optional)
-The Role of Age in Bilingual Development (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis (optional)
-Research Methods II (optional)
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)
-Language Attrition (optional)
-Language in Context: From Pragmatics to Conversation Analysis (optional)
-Intercultural Communication: communicating across languages and cultures (optional)

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