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Masters Degrees (Extractive Metallurgy)

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This course is for non-metallurgy scientists and engineers who wish to pursue a career in the minerals industry as extractive metallurgists. Read more
This course is for non-metallurgy scientists and engineers who wish to pursue a career in the minerals industry as extractive metallurgists.

It will provide you with a knowledge and understanding of the core areas of mineral processing and extractive metallurgy.

As a graduate, you could obtain employment in the extractive metallurgy sector of mining and chemical companies or further your career within the minerals industry.

Career opportunities

Graduates can obtain employment in the extractive metallurgy sector of mining and chemical companies, or further their careers within the minerals industry.

Credit for previous study

Applications for recognition of prior learning (RPL) are assessed on an individual basis.

Notes

A number of units include an on-campus laboratory requirement in Kalgoorlie. You will need to meet all travel and accommodation expenses incurred in meeting this requirement.

2016 Curtin International Scholarships: Merit Scholarship

Curtin University is an inspiring, vibrant, international organisation, committed to making tomorrow better. It is a beacon for innovation, driving advances in technology through high-impact research and offering more than 100 practical, industry-aligned courses connecting to workplaces of tomorrow.

Ranked in the top two per cent of universities worldwide in the Academic Ranking of World Universities 2015, the University is also ranked 25th in the world for universities under the age of 50 in the QS World University Rankings 2015 Curtin also received an overall five-star excellence rating in the QS stars rating.

Curtin University strives to give high achieving international students the opportunity to gain an internationally recognised education through offering the Merit Scholarship. The Merit Scholarship will give you up to 25 per cent of your first year tuition fees and if you enrol in an ELB program at Curtin English before studying at Curtin, you will also receive a 10 per cent discount on your Curtin English fees.

For full details and terms and conditions of this scholarship, please visit: curtin.edu/int-scholarships and click on Merit.

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This course is designed to meet the needs of professional metallurgists with an undergraduate qualification in this field. It will help you develop specialist knowledge and skills in extractive metallurgy and provide you with the knowledge and qualifications required to further your career in the minerals industry. Read more
This course is designed to meet the needs of professional metallurgists with an undergraduate qualification in this field. It will help you develop specialist knowledge and skills in extractive metallurgy and provide you with the knowledge and qualifications required to further your career in the minerals industry.

You will choose from a range of higher level coursework units to complement your educational background and career aspirations. You will also undertake project work which may involve research, field and laboratory work and you will complete a written report and/or dissertation on your findings.

Please note that this course includes three units that require you to attend laboratory sessions, totalling two or three days per semester, at the Kalgoorlie campus.

Career opportunities

Careers for extractive metallurgy specialists include in-house specialists in mining and chemical companies, consultants, academics and researchers.

Credit for previous study

Applications for credit for recognised learning (CRL) are assessed on an individual basis. If you hold a Curtin Graduate Diploma in Metallurgy or Bachelor of Engineering (Minerals Engineering), or equivalent, you can be granted up to 100 points of CRL. Other qualifications and/or experience may be considered in your application.

Notes

The equivalent of one semester's worth of units may be taken from other universities such as the University of Queensland, towards this degree with the approval of the course coordinator.

2016 Curtin International Scholarships: Merit Scholarship

Curtin University is an inspiring, vibrant, international organisation, committed to making tomorrow better. It is a beacon for innovation, driving advances in technology through high-impact research and offering more than 100 practical, industry-aligned courses connecting to workplaces of tomorrow.

Ranked in the top two per cent of universities worldwide in the Academic Ranking of World Universities 2015, the University is also ranked 25th in the world for universities under the age of 50 in the QS World University Rankings 2015 Curtin also received an overall five-star excellence rating in the QS stars rating.

Curtin University strives to give high achieving international students the opportunity to gain an internationally recognised education through offering the Merit Scholarship. The Merit Scholarship will give you up to 25 per cent of your first year tuition fees and if you enrol in an ELB program at Curtin English before studying at Curtin, you will also receive a 10 per cent discount on your Curtin English fees.

For full details and terms and conditions of this scholarship, please visit: curtin.edu/int-scholarships and click on Merit.

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The Department of Materials Engineering offers opportunities for study in the following fields. Read more

Program Overview

The Department of Materials Engineering offers opportunities for study in the following fields: casting and solidification of metals; ceramic processing and properties; refractories; corrosion; composites; high temperature coatings; biomaterials; extractive metallurgy including hydrometallurgy, bio-hydrometallurgy, electrometallurgy, and pyrometallurgy; physical metallurgy; thermo-mechanical processing related to materials production; environmental issues related to materials productions; electronic materials; nanofibers; textile structural composites.

Materials Engineers are experts on the entire life cycle of materials, including recovery of materials from minerals, making engineered materials, manufacturing materials into products, understanding and evaluating materials performance, proper disposal and recycling of materials, and evaluating societal and economic benefits.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Applied Science
- Specialization: Materials Engineering
- Subject: Engineering
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Registration options: Full-time
- Faculty: Faculty of Applied Science

Research focus

Composites, Microstructure Engineering, Extractive Metallurgy, Solidification, Biomaterials & Ceramics

Research highlights

In our research, we work closely with industry partners internationally. We have faculty with world-renowned expertise in hydrometallurgy, sustainability, nanomaterials, biomaterials and ceramics. Recent research developments in the department are helping to reduce environmental impact in the mining industry and enabling new possibilities in medical treatments. We also have a leading role in MagNet, an initiative that aims to achieve significant reductions in carbon dioxide emissions in the transportation sector. We have a long history of providing excellence in education and offer one of the top-rated materials programs in North America. Graduates of our program are enjoying rewarding careers locally and internationally in a wide range of industries from mining to advanced electronics, health care and aerospace.

Related Study Areas

Biomaterials, Ceramics, Composites, Hydrometallurgy, Microstructure Engineering, Corrosion

Facilities

Research is carried out in both the Frank Forward Building and the Brimacombe Building (AMPEL) on UBC campus.

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Scientific analysis is a key tool in the interpretation of archaeological artefact and assemblages. Read more
Scientific analysis is a key tool in the interpretation of archaeological artefact and assemblages. This MSc offers detailed training in the use of scientific techniques for the analysis of archaeological and heritage materials, and a solid background in the archaeology and anthropology of technology allowing students to design and implement archaeologically meaningful scientific projects.

Degree information

This degree aims to bridge the gap between archaeology and science by integrating both a detailed training in the use of scientific techniques for the analysis of inorganic archaeological materials and a solid background in the anthropology of technology. By the end of the degree, students should have a good understanding of the foundations of the most established analytical techniques, practical experience in their application and data processing, as well as the ability to design research projects that employ instrumental analyses to address archaeological questions.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), four optional modules (75 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Laboratory and instrumental skills in archaeological science

Optional modules - you are then able to choose further optional modules to the value of 75 credits. At least 15 credits must be made up from the following:
-Technology within Society
-Archaeological Data Science

At least 30 credits must be made up from the following list below:
-Technology within Society
-Archaeological Data Science
-Archaeological Ceramic Analysis
-Archaeological Glass and Glazes
-Archaeometallurgy 1: Mining and Extractive Metallurgy
-Archaeometallurgy 2: Metallic Artefacts
-Geoarchaeology: Methods and Concepts
-Interpreting Pottery
-Working with Artefacts and Assemblages

In order to allow for a flexible curriculum, students are allowed to select up to 30 credits from any of the postgraduate courses offered at the UCL Institute of Archaeology under other Master's degrees.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical demonstrations and laboratory work. A popular aspect of this programme is its extensive use of analytical facilities. Assessment is through essays, practicals, projects, laboratory reports and oral presentations depending on the options chosen, and the dissertation.

Careers

Given our strong emphasis on research training, many of our MSc graduates take up further research positions after their degree, and over half of our MSc students progress to PhD research. Their projects are generally concerned with the technology and/or provenance of ceramics, metals or glass in different regions and periods, but most of them involve scientific approaches in combination with traditional fieldwork and/or experimental archaeology.

Some of our graduates are now teaching archaeometry or ancient technologies at different universities in the UK and abroad. Others work as conservation scientists in museums and heritage institutions, or as finds specialists, researchers and consultants employed by archaeological field units or academic research projects.

Employability
Due largely to an unparalleled breadth of academic expertise and laboratory facilities, our graduates develop an unusual combination of research and transferable skills, including critical abilities, team working, multimedia communication, numerical thinking and the use of advanced analytical instruments. On completion of the degree, graduates should be as comfortable in a laboratory as in a museum and or an archaeological site. They become acquainted with research design and implementation, ethical issues and comparative approaches to world archaeology through direct exposure to an enormous variety of projects. The range of options available allows students to tailor their pathways towards different career prospects in archaeology and beyond.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK. Its specialist staff, outstanding library and fine teaching and reference collections provide a stimulating environment for postgraduate study.

The excellent in-house laboratory facilities will provide direct experience of a wide range of techniques, including electron microscopy and microphone analysis, fixed and portable X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, infra-red spectroscopy, petrography and metallography under the supervision of some of the world's leading specialists.

The institute houses fine teaching and reference collections that are extensively used by MSc students including ceramics, metals, stone artefacts and geological materials from around the world. In addition, the institute has a wide network of connections to museums and ongoing projects offering research opportunities for MSc students.

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This MA provides training in the documentation and interpretation of artefacts from archaeological sites and museum collections. Students benefit from a placement within a museum or an archaeological unit where experience will be gained in the practice of finds analysis. Read more
This MA provides training in the documentation and interpretation of artefacts from archaeological sites and museum collections. Students benefit from a placement within a museum or an archaeological unit where experience will be gained in the practice of finds analysis.

Degree information

Students are introduced to the skills of finds specialists, practical issues of artefact study, and debates about the collection, interpretation, reporting and curation of archaeological materials. They develop the ability to evaluate different approaches to artefact studies and undertake the cataloguing and analysis of an artefact assemblage.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), an optional work placement and a research project (90 credits).

Core modules - all students are required to take the following:
-Working with artefacts and assemblages
-Technology within Society

Optional modules - students choose to follow further optional modules up to the value of 60 credits from an outstanding range of Master's options available at the UCL Institute of Archaeology. For this degree, some of the most popular choices include:
-Antiquities and the Law
-Archaeological Ceramic Analysis
-Archaeological Glass and Glazes
-Archaeometallurgy I: Mining and Extractive Metallurgy
-Archaeometallurgy II: Metallic Artefacts
-Art: Interpretation and Explanation
-British and European Prehistory: Neolithic to Iron Age
-Experimental Archaeology
-Funerary Archaeology
-Geoarchaeology
-Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
-Interpreting Pottery
-Issues in Conservation: Understanding Objects
-Making and Meaning in Ancient Greek Art
-Making and Meaning in Ancient Roman Art
-Prehistoric Stone Artefact Analysis

Dissertation/report
The 15,000–word dissertation normally combines a professional standard finds report with an academic overview.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through formal lectures, seminars and practical sessions. It can include a placement at a relevant museum or archaeological unit where students gain experience in the practical study and the recording of an artefact assemblage. Assessment is through an essay, a portfolio, a project proposal and the dissertation.

Careers

Some recent graduates of the programme have gone on to PhD studies while others have pursued a very wide range of professional careers both within and beyond archaeology. The main career path is working as assistants, museum curators or working in the antiquities service recording finds.

Top career destinations for this degree
-Project Team Officer, English Heritage
-Archaeologist, Museum of London Archaeology
-Museum Building Manager, Hainan and Haopioen Arts Museum
-Artefacts Assistant, Maidstone Council
-Freelance Numismatist, Self-Employed Numismatist

Employability
The degree is tailored to give graduates a solid grounding in systematically recording and documenting artefacts as well as analysing artefact assemblage. They will also have a basic understanding of creating graphs and diagrams, and analysing and assembling finds-catalogues. Without concentrating on any specific epoch, we give students the tools for understanding and systematically analysing any artefact assemblages.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Whether you plan a career as finds assistant, museum curator or plan a materials based PhD, this course provides you with the skills you need to successfully identify, describe and document artefacts and analyse assemblages. The emphasis of the course is very much on practical application, so there will be numerous handling sessions and praxis-related tasks.

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study. Its outstanding archaeological library is complemented by UCL's Main Library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries. UCL is located in central London, within walking distance of the British Museum and the British Library.

UCL's own museums and collections form a resource of international importance for academic research. Students will work on material from the institute's collection as part of their assessment. Past students on this programme have made effective use of the resources at the British Museum, the Museum of London and the Museum of London archives, the Petrie Museum, Victoria and Albert Museum and other British and international museums. The Wolfson Labs provide a unique facility for scientific analyses of materials and have been used by numerous artefact students for their dissertations after the required training.

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The Department of Materials Engineering offers opportunities for study in the following fields. Read more

Program Overview

The Department of Materials Engineering offers opportunities for study in the following fields: casting and solidification of metals; ceramic processing and properties; refractories; corrosion; composites; high temperature coatings; biomaterials; extractive metallurgy including hydrometallurgy, bio-hydrometallurgy, electrometallurgy, and pyrometallurgy; physical metallurgy; thermo-mechanical processing related to materials production; environmental issues related to materials productions; electronic materials; nanofibers; textile structural composites.

Materials Engineers are experts on the entire life cycle of materials, including recovery of materials from minerals, making engineered materials, manufacturing materials into products, understanding and evaluating materials performance, proper disposal and recycling of materials, and evaluating societal and economic benefits.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Science
- Specialization: Materials Engineering
- Subject: Engineering
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Applied Science

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The Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) offers graduate programs leading to the degrees of Master of Applied Science (MASc), Master of Engineering (MEng), and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD). Read more
The Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) offers graduate programs leading to the degrees of Master of Applied Science (MASc), Master of Engineering (MEng), and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD). Graduate courses and research opportunities are offered to qualified students in a wide range of subjects.

Typical subjects in extractive and process metallurgy involve a study of the equilibria existing during the reduction of oxides with carbon and metals, life cycle analysis of materials, properties of iron and steelmaking slags, the fundamental properties of fused salt solutions, fused salt electrolysis of reactive metals, kinetics of high-temperature reactions, mathematical modelling of metallurgical processes, process metallurgy, and hydrometallurgy.

Typical physical metallurgy and materials science subjects deal with the structure, properties, and application of advanced materials in such fields as nanomaterials, surface chemistry, energy, sustainability, optoelectronics, biomaterials, nuclear materials, metalmatrix composites (MMCs), metallic glasses, corrosion, fatigue, phase transformations, and solidification. These studies are all related to the general problem of understanding structure-property-processing-performance relationships in materials.

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