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Brussels is the centre of European decision making. It is estimated that 60% of national legislation of EU member states originates, in some form, in Brussels. Read more
Brussels is the centre of European decision making. It is estimated that 60% of national legislation of EU member states originates, in some form, in Brussels. Anyone wanting to enter a career in civil service, either at the EU level or in a national government in Europe, must gain a strategic understanding of the scope, content, decision-cycle and implementation of policy in Europe.

In a quickly changing world, the European Union is a key actor. As the largest economy, it is the first trading partner for many countries around the world. But by developing its own foreign and defence policy, it equally seeks to become a crucial diplomatic player.

This MA programme responds to an increasing need to study the EU’s external relations at an advanced level. The EU is studied in its different dimensions, such as foreign policy, security and external relations law, but also from an outsider’s perspective in a context of global change and regional instability.

The programme draws heavily on the presence of the EU and other institutions in the proximity of the Brussels School of International Studies (BSIS) and builds on the tradition of inviting high-level diplomats to share their views with students. Key modules are taught by leading experts in the field from both the Brussels and Canterbury campuses of the University of Kent.

By taking an interdisciplinary and critical look at the EU’s international role, this MA programme prepares students well for careers in diplomacy, research and employment in diverse organisations that deal with the external dimension of the EU.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/767/eu-external-relations

Duration: One year full-time, two years part-time (standard version); 18 months full-time, three years part-time (extended version)

- Extended programme
The extended programme allows students the opportunity to study their subject in greater detail, choosing a wider range of modules, and also provides the opportunity to spend one term at the Canterbury campus. The extended programme is ideal for students who require extra credits, or would like to have more time to pursue an internship.

About the Brussels School of International Studies

The Brussels School of International Studies is a multidisciplinary postgraduate School of the University of Kent. We bring together the disciplines of politics, international relations, law and economics to provide in-depth analysis of international problems such as conflict, security, development, migration, the political economy and the legal basis of a changing world order.

We are a truly international School: our students are drawn from over 50 countries. The strong international composition of our staff and student body contributes significantly to the academic and social experience at BSIS. Being located in Brussels allows us to expose students to the working of major international organisations, such as the EU and NATO, and to the many international and non-governmental organisations based here. Students also have the opportunity to undertake an internship with one of these organisations.

Course structure

We are committed to offering flexible study options at the School and enable you to tailor your degree to meet your needs by offering start dates in September and January; full- and part-time study; split-site options, and allowing students to combine two fields of study leading to a degree that reflects both disciplines.

Specialisations

The MA in EU External Relations allows students to choose secondary areas of specialisation from the range of programmes offered at BSIS (http://www.kent.ac.uk/brussels/studying/index.html). Thus, a focused programme of study can be constructed by studying EU External Relations in the context of International Relations; Conflict and Security; Human Rights Law and other subject areas we cover.

This leads to the award of an MA degree in, for example, 'EU External Relations with Human Rights Law'.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a research-active teaching environment which ensures a good grounding in the study of social science in general, in public policy and its formulation, and in European public policy in particular

- offer a critical perspective of the interplay between international relations, European politics, and European integration, as they relate to the inputs, processes, systems and policy outcomes at the European level

- ensure that you acquire a solid understanding of methodologies for the study of social science in general, and in the application of those understandings to the study of European public policy in particular

- ensure that you acquire a solid understanding of the major theoretical approaches to policymaking and policy analysis, the historical development of the contemporary European policy landscape, and the application of theoretical and historical knowledge to the analysis and understanding of contemporary issues and cases in the field

- ensure that you acquire the necessary skills for the advanced assessment of contemporary problems in European politics, society, and economy, and their solutions

- develop your general research skills and personal skills (transferable skills)

- produce the policy-relevant knowledge, as well as analytical and research skills, which are valued in employment contexts linked to EU- and national policymaking.

Careers

The School of Politics and International Relations has a dedicated Employability, Placements and Internships Officer who works with students to develop work-based placements in a range of organisations. Centrally, the Careers and Employability Service can help you plan for your future by providing one-to-one advice at any stage of your postgraduate studies.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Our graduates have gone on to careers in academia, local and national government and public relations.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Gain a thorough theoretical and practical grounding in the science of external fixation of diaphyseal and metaphyseal fractures and deformity. Read more
Gain a thorough theoretical and practical grounding in the science of external fixation of diaphyseal and metaphyseal fractures and deformity

•You will have on-going access to other professionals to facilitate your learning
•Attend lectures, seminars, group work, and facilitated discussion held at Warwick Medical School
•Undertake home study and self-directed reading (including some pre-course work)

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The MSc in Operational Research aims to realise the potential of graduates, so that you immediately can play an effective role in providing model-based support to managers helping them to make better decisions at an operational/technical level. Read more

Why this course?

The MSc in Operational Research aims to realise the potential of graduates, so that you immediately can play an effective role in providing model-based support to managers helping them to make better decisions at an operational/technical level.

You’ll develop a rigorous academic understanding of advanced analytical methods that are used to provide structured and analytical approaches to decision-making.

You’ll also develop practical skills in using operational research models to support decision-makers.

Study mode and duration:
- MSc: 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time
- PgDip: 9 months full-time or 21 months part-time
- Distance learning options available

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/operationalresearch/

You’ll study

Study for the Postgraduate Diploma degree lasts nine months, following the same taught classes as for the MSc. As well as allowing you to complete a recognised course in a shorter time, the Diploma provides the opportunity for a wider range of applicants to enter the operational research world. Students demonstrating sufficient progress may be allowed to transfer in-course to study for the MSc.

The course is structured comprising four classes each semester, with the ‘Becoming an Effective Operational Researcher’ module running through both semesters. The first semester involves only core classes, whereas the second semester involves only one core class and three electives.

- Dissertation
MSc students undertake a three-month project. This is typically for an external organisation. You’ll apply the concepts and theories studied on the course.
Subject to demand, the MSc can also be obtained part-time, over two or three years. The same topics are studied, normally 1 to 2 days per week. Most part-time students are already in employment and are sponsored by their employers. They carry out their project work within their own organisations.

Distance learning option

All classes are taught using material presented online. Classes are supported by faculty members who also teach on the full-time course and who guide and support discussion via discussion forums.

This is a flexible degree and duration can vary. Minimum durations are PgCert: 13 months; PgDip: 20 months; MSc: 26 months.

Work placement

The apprenticeship scheme forms a vital component of the MSc in Operational Research. Through the scheme, many of our students spend an invaluable three weeks in January working in the analytical function of their host organisation.

Last year, more than 35 selected students worked with over 25 different organisations based all over the UK, including Capita, Department of Health, Diageo, Doosan Babcock, First Scotrail, Glasgow City Council, NHS, RBS, Scottish Enterprise, SEP, Scottish Water, and Tesco Bank.

Students work on all manner of projects that link directly to their semester 1 classes, allowing them to deliver real work that can make an immediate impact to their host organisations. Every year, our students gain not only valuable experience that is relevant to their job hunt, but also make contacts that can be of assistance throughout their career.

The scheme has a highly competitive selection process, where the students with the strongest generic skills and academic capabilities are chosen for external placements. Other students are also given invaluable opportunities to work with external organisations in this three week period, for example in the form of group projects analysing their operations.

In addition, many MSc projects are carried out for an external organisation. Students spend the three months from July to September working on a project of importance to their clients. The aim is to gain direct experience in applying the concepts and theories studied on the course. Projects may be carried out individually or in small teams of two or three students. Project clients include many major concerns, in fields ranging from aerospace to whisky distilling.

Major projects

Most of the taught modules on the programme introduce you to a variety of techniques, methods, models and approaches. However, the practical reality of applying analytical methods in business is often far removed from the classroom. Working with decision-makers on real issues presents a variety of challenges. For example, data may well be ambiguous and hard to come by, it may be far from obvious which business analysis methods can be applied and managers will need to be convinced of the business merits of any suggested solutions. While traditional teaching can alert students to such issues, understanding needs to be reinforced by experience.

This is primarily addressed by the core module ‘Becoming an Effective Business Analyst’, which takes place over both semesters and also involves the ‘apprenticeship scheme’. Every year, case studies and challenging projects are presented to the students by various organisations such as Accenture, British Airways, RBS and Simul8.

Facilities

Strathclyde’s Business School is one of the largest institutions of its kind in Europe. We have around 200 academic staff and more than 3,000 full-time students.

The departments and specialist units work together to provide a dynamic, fully-rounded and varied programme of specialist and cross-disciplinary postgraduate courses.

Course awards

Strathclyde MSc Operational Research students were awarded the May Hicks Prize of the OR Society three years in a row:
- Christoph Werner (2013)
- Geraint Roberts (2012)
- Rutger Albrink (2011)

The prize recognizes the best industry-based student projects in operational research and has an award of £1,000.

Student competitions

Every year, the best overall performance in the MSc Operational Research course is recognised by the Tony Christer Prize. The prize involves a formal recognition by the department and an award of £100.

English language requirements

If you’re a national of an English speaking country recognised by UK Border Agency (please check most up-to-date list) or you have successfully completed an academic qualification (at least equivalent to a UK bachelor's degree) in any of these countries, then you do not need to present any additional evidence.
For others, the department requires a minimum overall IELTS score of 6.5 (with no individual component below 5.5 (or equivalent)). Pre-sessional courses in English are available.
If you are from a country not recognised as an English speaking country by the United Kingdom Border Agency (UKBA), please check English requirements before making your application.

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Careers

In the department, we have very good links with business and have hosted recruitment events for many companies including Barclay’s Wealth, British Airways, Deloitte, Morgan Stanley, Rolls Royce, Sopra and SIMUL8, to name a few.

The skills you learn in the MSc make you very marketable to potential employers. Other employers where our graduates have found work include Clydesdale Bank, HSBC, PWC, RBS, Roland Berger and the Scottish Government.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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An increasing number of chemicals is used by society today, which are also released into the environment. Ecotoxicology is concerned with their potential impacts on the ecosystem. Read more

About the Program

An increasing number of chemicals is used by society today, which are also released into the environment. Ecotoxicology is concerned with their potential impacts on the ecosystem. It aims to investigate and discover effects of chemicals on biological systems in order to develop methods for risk management, as well as to predict ecological consequences.

The international "Master of Science program in Ecotoxicology" integrates concepts of Environmental Chemistry, Toxicology and Ecology and includes Social Sciences and Economics as well. Due to its interdisciplinary and applied approach, the Program enables its graduates to analyze complex problems and to develop practical solutions.

As environmental problems reach far beyond national borders, an international approach is necessary and the situation in developing countries needs special solutions.

The Master in Ecotoxicology is carried out under the Institute for Environmental Sciences.

For the latest news about our Institute of Ecotoxicology you can also check our Ecotox-Blog under:
http://www.master-ecotoxicology.de/ecotox-blog

Program Structure

All students take the 9 required modules, as well as a 10-week Research Project Course and an Applied Module at External Organisations of 8 weeks to obtain a deep knowledge in the field of Ecotoxicology. Afterwards, studentes personalize the Program by choosing 2 Modules of the 5 Specialty Areas. The Master Thesis with colloquium round out the 4-semester Program.

Specialty Areas:

Applied Environmental Chemistry & Environmental Physics,
Chemistry,
Applied Ecology,
Geoecology and
Socioeconomics & Environmental Management

Applied Module at External Organizations (AMEO)

The module AMEO is an 8-week internship, which can be performed at an external university or a governmental or industrial research institute in Germany or abroad. Students become familiar with working practice, requirements of the job market and career opportunities and can establish business contacts. They apply, confirm and expand knowledge and competences achieved during their study.

Following an introductory discussion with the supervisors, the students perform the (research) work on their own and discuss the obtained results regularly with their supervisors. The content depends on the actual research questions in the selected research organizations. Topics or possible positions will be suggested by the staff of the Institute for Environmental Sciences or maybe suggested by the students. The topics should be directly related to applied problems relevant in these external organisations and should ideally offer the students opportunities to apply their knowledge and skills in areas, which are not the particular research areas at the Institute for Environmental Sciences in Landau. They include, but are not restricted to the following areas:

Engineering aspects (e.g. hydrology, mitigation techniques)
Multimedia modelling
Food web modelling
Fish, bird or mammal ecotoxicology and risk assessment
Agricultural sciences
Socioeconomics
Specific aspects in regulatory ecotoxicology
Risk communication, economic or societal aspects

Research Project Course (RPC)

The students work independently on a research topic of the university for a total time of about 10 weeks. The topics depend on the actual research conducted in the various research groups. However, all topics do have an interdisciplinary character covering at least two different disciplines (e.g. chemistry and ecology, or physics and risk assessment). The students submit proposals for topics selected from a list provided by the teaching staff including a time and resource planning as well as an independently conducted literature search. Following an introductory discussion with the supervisor, the students perform the research work on their own and discuss the obtained results regularly with their supervisor. Following the practical work, the students write a report including the theoretical background, the methods used, the results obtained and a discussion of the results based on the relevant scientific literature. The students present and defend the outcome of their work at an oral presentation. Following successful completion the students are able to plan a scientific work package, conduct the work, evaluate the results based on the relevant literature and present the outcomes.

The content depends on the actual research questions in the research groups associated with the Institute for Environmental Sciences. They include, but are not restricted to the following areas:

Chemical experiments in the lab
Environmental colloid chemistry
Environmental organic chemistry
Physical transport or transfer processes of environmental chemicals
Ecotoxicological lab tests
Ecotoxicological field studies
In situ or monitoring work in the field
Molecular genetics
GIS data analysis
Literature reviews
Exposure, effect or landscape modelling
Assessment or management of risks

More information on the program structure and contents can also be found under:
https://www.uni-koblenz-landau.de/en/campus-landau/faculty7/info-prospective-students/master-of-science-ecotoxicology/aims-and-contents

Employment outlook

The Program enables the graduates to conduct independent scientific work and prepares in particular for independent and leading positions in the numerous emerging fields of Ecotoxicology. The graduates are able to take responsibility in a professional manner in: Scientific facilities and research institutes, Authorities, public offices and ministries with a regulatory role, Non-governmental organizations, Industry and consulting enterprises. The international orientation of the program qualifies graduates for a global job market. In addition, the Master program prepares for a PhD study.

“I value very much the excellent education and the close individual support from the teaching staff during my studies that allowed me to pursue own research ideas and to find my field of interest. A cooperation of the university with the German Federal Environment Agency enabled me to gain experience in the environmental risk assessment of pesticides. I qualified for a traineeship in the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and am now working in the field of pesticide risk assessment.” Klaus Swarowsky (Master Ecotoxicology, EFSA)

Internationally Networked

The Institute for Environmental Sciences is globally connected through international research projects and student exchange programs. The international nature of the Program is achieved through numerous international research and teaching staff, regular seminars from guest lecturers from abroad, and possible internships all over the world.
You will find a map which displays the locations our cooperation partners under:

https://www.uni-koblenz-landau.de/en/campus-landau/faculty7/info-prospective-students/master-of-science-ecotoxicology/aims-and-contents#network

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In the current political and economic climate, and the reconfiguration of Britain’s relationship with Europe, a deep understanding of EU governance and institutional structure is critical for those working in government, media and economics. Read more
In the current political and economic climate, and the reconfiguration of Britain’s relationship with Europe, a deep understanding of EU governance and institutional structure is critical for those working in government, media and economics.

Our programme will provide you with a detailed overview of key contemporary debates in European politics and policies, and insights into cross-national and comparative perspectives.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The MSc in European Politics and Policy offers students two pathways. The European Politics and Policy pathway explores in detail the EU’s main policy areas. The second pathway, European External Relations, offers the opportunity to focus on the EU as an international actor.

Both pathways involve a common set of compulsory modules, including Research Methods and Politics of the European Union. Each pathway has two further compulsory modules, in addition to three optional modules from a range of European and/or international politics topics.

Students are required to complete either a dissertation or placement project on a topic of their choice.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and either a dissertation or placement. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Introduction to Research
-Research in Practice
-Institutional Architecture of the European Union
-Policies of the European Union
-Comparative Regional Integration
-Foundations of EU Law
-Global Governance
-EU External Relations
-Dissertation
-Placement
-Politics of International Intervention 1
-International Political Economy
-EU and Neighbourhood
-European Social Dimension
-Theorizing European Integration
-Global Governance
-Theories of International Relations
-Key Issues in International Relations
-International Security and Defence
-Politics of International Intervention 2
-EU Counter-Terrorism Law
-EU Employment Law and Social Policy
-Law of International Organizations

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The aims of the programme are:
-To enable students to understand and evaluate contemporary debates in the study of European politics and policy, concerning the relationship between the European and national levels, institutional structures and the external relations of the EU
-To deepen students’ knowledge of theoretical aspects of European politics and policy, including different theories of European integration and external relations
-To enable students to develop their knowledge and understanding in at least three sub-fields of international politics: students take fiveprogramme compulsory modulesand three further modules from a list of optional modules available in the postgraduate curriculum
-To provide students, with the opportunity, through the placement option, to spend three months working in a field related to their degree (this will not only provide students with new insights into European Politics and Policy but also develop a broad array of transferable skills)

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-A critical knowledge of contemporary debates in the study of European politics and policy studies with particular reference to the relationship between European and national levels and institutional structures
-An in-depth understanding of theoretical aspects of European politics, including different theories of European integration
-A detailed knowledge and understanding within at least two sub-fields of European politics and policy, for example in-depth understanding of policy evolution and historical change in relation to European politics
-An understanding of processes of knowledge creation and contestation within European politics
-An understanding of techniques of research and enquiry and their application to the study of politics

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Gather, organise and deploy evidence and information from a range of different sources
-Analyse and synthesise a wide range of material in verbal and numerical formats
-Deal with complex issues systematically and creatively
-Make sound judgements on the basis of incomplete evidence
-Demonstrate self-direction and originality in solving problems and analysing evidence
-Construct reasoned argument
-Apply theoretical frameworks to empirical analysis

Professional practical skills
-Make appropriate use of information and communications technology
-Form effective arguments
-Organise own workload to meet deadlines
-Formulate research questions
-Use software packages to analyse qualitative and quantitative data
-Present research findings orally and in writing

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate and present ideas effectively
-Reason critically
-Use information and communication technology for the retrieval and presentation of material
-Organise and plan their own work
-Adopt a proactive approach to problem-solving
-Collaborate with others to achieve common goals
-Deploy a range of relevant research skills
-Make decisions in complex situations
-Take responsibility for their own learning

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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This course focuses on the physical processes that generate natural hazards through an advanced understanding of geological and environmental processes. Read more

Why take this course?

This course focuses on the physical processes that generate natural hazards through an advanced understanding of geological and environmental processes.

You will be fully trained by internationally recognised experts in hazard identification, terrain evaluation techniques as well as hazard modelling and risk assessment techniques. Providing you with the essential skills to monitor, warn and help control the consequences of natural hazards.

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course is accredited by the Geological Society of London. It offers advanced professional and scientific training providing an accelerated route for you to attain Chartered Status, such as Chartered Geologist (CGeol) and Chartered Scientist (CSci) on graduation.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Aid organisations
Environmental organisations
Offshore work
Civil sector roles
Mining
Insurance companies

Module Details

You can opt to take this course in full-time or part-time mode.

The course is divided into two parts. The first part comprises the lecture, workshop, practical and field work elements of the course, followed by a five-month independent research project. The course is a mixture of taught units and research project covering topics including site investigation, hazard modelling and mapping, soil mechanics and rock mechanics, contaminated land, flooding and slope stability.

Here are the units you will study:

Natural Hazard Processes: The topic of this unit forms the backbone of the course and give you an advanced knowledge of a broad range of geological and environmental hazards, including floods, landslides, collapsible ground, volcanoes, earthquakes, tsunamis, hydro-meteorological and anthropogenic hazards. External speakers are used to provide insights and expertise from an industry, regulatory and research perspective.

Numerical Hazard Modelling and Simulation: This forms an important part of the course, whereby you are trained in the application of computer models to the simulation of a range of geological and environmental hazards. You will develop skills in computer programming languages and use them to develop numerical models that are then used to simulate different natural hazard scenarios.

Catastrophe Modelling: On this unit you will cover the application of natural hazard modelling to better understand the insurance sector exposure to a range of geological and environmental hazards. It includes external speakers and sessions on the application of models for this type of catastrophe modelling.

Volcanology and Seismology: You will gain an in-depth knowledge of the nature of volcanism and associated hazards and seismology, associated seismo-tectonics and earthquake hazards. This unit is underpinned by a residential field course in the Mediterranean region that examines the field expression of volcanic, seismic and other natural hazards.

Flooding and Hydrological Hazards: These are a significant global problem that affect urban environments, one that is likely to increase with climate change. This unit will give you an in-depth background to these hazards and opportunities to simulate flooding in order to model the flood hazard and calculate the risk.

Hazard and Risk Assessment: This unit gives you the chance to study the techniques that are employed once a hazard has been identified and its likely impact needs to be measured. You will have advanced training in the application of qualitative and quantitative approaches to hazard and risk assessment and their use in the study of different natural hazards.

Field Reconnaissance and Geomorphological Mapping: These techniques are integral to the course and an essential skill for any graduate wishing to work in this area of natural hazard assessment. On this unit you will have fieldwork training in hazard recognition using techniques such as geomorphological mapping and walk-over surveys, combined with interpretation of remote sensing and aerial photography imagery.

Spatial Analysis and Remote Sensing: You will learn how to acquire and interpret aerial photography and satellite imagery, and the integration and analysis of spatial datasets using GIS – all key tools for hazard specialists.

Geo-mechanical Behaviour of Earth Materials: You will train in geotechnical testing and description of soils and rocks to the British and international standards used by industry.

Landslides and Slope Instability: This unit will give you an advanced understanding of landslide systems, types of slides in soils and rocks and methods for identification and numerical analysis.

Impacts and Remediation of Natural Hazards: You will cover a growing area of study, including the impact of hazardous events on society and the environment, and potential mitigation and remediation methods that can be employed.

Independent Research Project: This provides you with an opportunity to undertake an original piece of research to academic or industrial standards, typically in collaboration with research staff in the department or external industry partners. In addition to submission of a thesis report, you also present the results of your project at the annual postgraduate conference held at the end of September.

Programme Assessment

The course provides a balanced structure of lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops. You will learn through hands-on practical sessions designed to give you the skills in laboratory, computer and field techniques. The course also includes extensive field work designed to provide field mapping and data collection skills.

Assessment is varied, aimed at developing skills relevant to a range of working environments. Here’s how we assess your work:

Poster and oral presentations
Project reports
Literature reviews
Lab reports
Essays

Student Destinations

This course provides vocational skills designed to enable you to enter this specialist environmental field. These skills include field mapping, report writing, meeting deadlines, team working, presentation skills, advanced data modelling and communication.

You will be fully equipped to gain employment in the insurance industry, government agencies and specialist geoscience companies, all of which are tasked with identifying and dealing with natural hazards. Previous destinations of our graduates have included major re-insurance companies, geological and geotechnical consultancies, local government and government agencies.

It also has strong research and analytical components, ideal if you wish to pursue further research to PhD level.

We aim to provide you with as much support as possible in finding employment through close industrial contacts, careers events, recruitment fairs and individual advice.

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Information Technology is now fundamental in every aspect of our daily lives. IT systems are crucial for delivering every day services such as banking, web based services and information systems. Read more
Information Technology is now fundamental in every aspect of our daily lives. IT systems are crucial for delivering every day services such as banking, web based services and information systems.

The MSc Information Technology is a full time, one year taught course, intended for students who are seeking a professional career in the IT industry. There is no requirement for a first degree in computing, but proficiency in at least one programming language is a requirement.

The course covers a range of topics including advanced programming, user-interface design, software engineering and management.

This course will give you the knowledge of IT from an organisation oriented viewpoint, allowing you to be capable of designing and implementing IT systems for a wide range of organisations.

The course has been specifically designed to suit the requirements of the IT industry, where you will be able to take up technical or management positions. Our graduates enter employment in many roles, including computer programmers, technical authors and research associates.

Course Aims
-Programming: You will gain a thorough grounding of advanced programming concepts using Java including efficient data structures and algorithms and high performance distributed computing.
-User-Interfaces: You will learn the theory of human computer interaction (HCI) and put this into practice in a number of ways, including user centred design of aspects of people's interaction with digital systems.
-Software Engineering: You will learn and be able to apply the principles of software engineering and case studies using UML, software testing techniques, and privacy and security aspect of software systems.

Learning Outcomes
We expect our graduates to be capable of designing and implementing IT systems for a wide range organisations. A thorough understanding of the following subjects are expected:
-Designing user interfaces following sound principles of interface design
-Designing, specifying, implementing and testing software components and systems using UML, Java and a range of software testing techniques
-Dependability of IT systems including topics in privacy and security
-Computer architectures and high performance distributed computing

Project

The dissertation project undertaken by students in Terms 3 and 4 (Summer Term and Vacation Term) is carried out individually, which might involve collaboration with another organisation. The subject matter of projects varies widely; most projects are suggested by members of staff, some by external organisations, and some by students themselves, usually relating to an area of personal interest that they wish to develop further.

A collaborative project is supervised by a member of the Department, but the collaborating organisation will normally provide an external supervisor. Organisations that have collaborated in projects in the past include Glasgow Town Planning Department, British Rail Passenger Services Department, North Yorkshire Police, North Yorkshire Fire Services, NEDO, the Royal Horticultural Society, Biosis UK, Centre Point sheltered housing, York Archaeological Trust, and the University of York Library.

The subject matter of projects varies widely; most projects are suggested by members of staff, some by external organisations, and some by students themselves, perhaps relating to an area of personal interest that they wish to develop further.

All project proposals are rigorously vetted and must meet a number of requirements before these are made available to the students. The department uses an automated project allocation system for assigning projects to students that takes into account supervisor and student preferences.

Examples of previous project include:
-A Study into the User Experience and Usability of Web Enabled Services on Smartphones
-Agent simulation of large scale complex IT systems
-Do People Disclose their Passwords on Social Media?
-Dynamic Sound Generation for Computer Games
-Iterative linear programming as an optimisation method for buyer resources in online auctions evaluated using a Java-based Monte Carlo simulation
-Qchat (Web-based chat application for quantum physicists)
-Software for dyslexic readers: an empirical investigation of presentation attributes
-Web-based IQ Testing Application for Fluid Intelligence Analysis
-Agent simulation of large scale complex IT systems

Information for Students

Whilst the MSc in Information Technology does not require a formal qualification in computing, we do expect you to have some understanding of computer related issues.

As everyone arrives with different experience, we have put together the following summary of what we expect you to know, with some suggestions of how you can prepare before you arrive.

You'll start the course with a focus on writing and developing Java programs. We assume that you are familiar with programming concepts and terminology, so we advise you to review basic programming concepts, such as:
-Variables and their types
-Control structures (e.g. if-statements, loops)
-Subprograms (e.g. procedures, functions)
-Compilation and debugging.

If you have never used Java, you will benefit greatly from doing some reading and trying out Java programming before you arrive. We will teach you from first principles, but the pace will be fast and you will find it easier to keep up if you've practiced with the basics beforehand. Tutorials and practical exercises are the best way for you to prepare, and the Deitel and Deitel book below is a good source of these.

Careers

Here at York, we're really proud of the fact that more than 97% of our postgraduate students go on to employment or further study within six months of graduating from York. We think the reason for this is that our courses prepare our students for life in the workplace through our collaboration with industry to ensure that what we are teaching is useful for employers.

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This innovative programme explores how arts and creative enterprises work in theory and practice, as well as the impact they can have on individuals and communities. Read more

Overview

This innovative programme explores how arts and creative enterprises work in theory and practice, as well as the impact they can have on individuals and communities.

You’ll gain an understanding of the policy contexts of creative work, analyse and apply theories of art and culture and examine the cultural industries that comprise the arts, including theatre, performance, dance, opera, crafts, and museums.

Then you’ll choose from optional modules to focus on topics that suit your interests and career plans, such as arts management or culture and place, and investigate topics like audience engagement and cultural policy. You may even have the chance to undertake a placement or a consultancy project for an external cultural organisation.

You’ll be taught by leading researchers in a city with a diverse cultural landscape. Whether you’ve already started your career or see yourself moving into the sector, this programme will give you the knowledge and skills to support your ambitions.

The degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months. The part-time MA may be of special interest to those who are working in related fields as part of their career development.

Facilities and Resources

On and off-campus, you’ll benefit from opportunities to get involved in various cultural activities. The School of Performance and Cultural Industries organises the annual Little Leeds Fringe Festival, a series of cultural events on campus giving you the chance to volunteer in the management and programming team. What’s more, you can join any of the student societies that run events, campaigns and productions throughout the year.

You’ll study in a city with a rich cultural life that’s also a hub for business and entrepreneurship – home to the Leeds International Film Festival and Leeds International Piano Competition, as well as a variety of galleries, museums, theatres and other cultural facilities.

Our purpose-built landmark building [email protected] houses two professional-standard and publicly licensed theatres that regularly host work by both students and visiting theatre companies – one of which is a technically advanced research facility.

Our School includes rehearsal rooms, two black-box studios, costume construction and wardrobe stores, a design studio and scenic workshop, video editing and sound recording suits as well as computer aided design.

Our links with external organisations are among our biggest strengths, giving you the chance to take performance to different environments outside of the university context. We’re always developing new relationships with partners in different contexts to offer you more opportunities to participate.

Opera North, West Yorkshire Playhouse, the National Media Museum, Leeds City Council, Red Ladder Theatre Company, Limehouse Productions, Phoenix Dance Theatre, the National Coal Mining Museum for England, HMP New Hall, Blah Blah Blah Theatre Company, the BBC and HMP Wetherby are all among our partners.

Course Content

Core modules in Semester One will lay the foundations of the programme. You’ll explore different theoretical approaches to understand the relationships between culture, creativity, and entrepreneurship, learning about cultural industries and how public policy impacts on cultural development.

To help you focus your studies in the areas that suit your interests and career plans, you’ll choose one of two optional modules which allow you to specialise in either the relationship between culture and place or management and leadership in the arts and cultural industries.

You’ll then choose another optional module to complement or broaden your studies. You could focus on topics such as audience engagement or cultural policy, or you may be able to gain experience of consultancy working in teams to complete a brief for an external organisation. If you select the Creative Work module, you could spend two weeks on a placement in a cultural organisation as the basis of a small-scale research project.

Another core module that runs throughout the year will develop your understanding of research methods in the arts and cultural industries. By the end of the programme you’ll demonstrate your skills and knowledge by completing an independent research project on a topic of your choice.

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If you want to become a manager or leader in a technology-based organisation, then this degree is for you. We’ll equip you with the analytical tools and techniques to improve internal and external operations, as well as an understanding of the processes and technologies used by engineering businesses. Read more
If you want to become a manager or leader in a technology-based organisation, then this degree is for you. We’ll equip you with the analytical tools and techniques to improve internal and external operations, as well as an understanding of the processes and technologies used by engineering businesses.

Designed for

Our MSc in Engineering Business Management is designed for those who want to become managers and leaders in technology-based businesses. It is designed for graduates from a wide range of engineering, scientific and business backgrounds and is suitable for those with or without professional experience.

The Course Provides

A broad education in management and business with the analytical tools and techniques so that you can improve internal and external operations, as well as an understanding of the processes and technologies used by engineering businesses.

During the course you’ll develop skills in the research, analysis and evaluation of complex business problems, and gain a methodical understanding of the functional relations between business divisions that can optimise efficiency and competitiveness.

Course Content

1. Core Business Modules:
Financial Analysis and Control Systems
Plus atleast one from:
1. Strategic Marketing
2. Organisations, People and Performance

Core Operations/Technology Modules:
1. Logistics and Operations Management
2. Project Planning, Management and Control
3. Operations Strategy for Industry
4. Product Design and Development Management
5. Quality Reliability and Maintenance
6. Manufacturing Technology.

Plus one elective module from the full list of modules

Learning style

Taught material is a blend of lectures, seminars, syndicate activities, practical exercises and case studies to encourage teamwork and practical grounding of the material. Module leaders are experts in their fields and are supported by external speakers working in organisations at the forefront of their fields.

After You Graduate

Graduates can expect to be employed as leaders of business development, manufacturing, quality assurance, human resources or customer service in a wide variety of manufacturing or service organisations, particularly where technology plays a significant part in business success.

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Our MSc Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) programme helps you to develop the knowledge, skills and attributes to enable you to work with clients of all ages who have physical, mental health or learning difficulties. Read more
Our MSc Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) programme helps you to develop the knowledge, skills and attributes to enable you to work with clients of all ages who have physical, mental health or learning difficulties. If you already have a degree, and have carried out some relevant experience, then this programme could be your route into occupational therapy.

This pre-registration course is a two-year accelerated programme which enables you to take advantage of interprofessional learning (IPL), encouraging professionals to learn with and from each other – an understanding that helps to ensure you have the expertise to respond adequately and effectively to the complexity of your clients’ needs, and ensures that care is safe, seamless and of a high standard.

Central to the philosophy of our programme is the value attached to ‘occupation’ and ‘activity’ as a means to achieving the health and wellbeing of individuals, which enhances their quality of life, thus enabling them to achieve their desired goals.

Placement Opportunities

In order to prepare you for the work-place and enrich your learning, we organise the practice placement education for you with multi-professional health care teams in a wide range of settings. You will gain experience of working as part of a multidisciplinary team with people who have physical and mental health care needs.

Over a thousand hours will be spent in the practice environment, where you will apply the theory and practice of occupational therapy.

Whilst on placement you will have an educator allocated to you, and contact with a member of the academic team.

Placements encompass a variety of multidisciplinary health and social care settings based within the NHS, the Private Sector, Social Services, Voluntary Organisations and Primary Health Care Services.

Professional accreditation

Completing our course enables you to become an occupational therapist, and makes you eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and professional membership of the College of Occupational Therapists (COT).

HCPC registration is required to work as an occupational therapist in the UK, and once you are registered you are able to practice in a wide variety of clinical settings.

We are committed to embedding the NHS Constitution Values (which are strongly reflected in our University values) into everything we do. They define the behaviours and expectations of all our staff and students underpinning the work we do in the university, clinical arena and other workplaces.

We understand that not all of our students and staff are employed within the NHS, but these values uphold the underlying principles of excellent care as a standard and as such we expect that anyone who has any aspect of their work which ultimately cares for others will aspire to uphold these values.

For us, involving not only our students but service users, experts by experience, carers and NHS/non NHS professionals in the creation and delivery of all programmes is vital.

Our expert staff

A unique feature of our School is that most of our staff work or have worked within clinical practice. This enhances our grasp of the contemporary links between academic research, the major issues of the day and real-life practice.

Occupational Therapy is taught by registered experienced staff with a variety of different backgrounds. The course is led by Dr Wendy Bryant, who is also the university’s subject lead for occupational therapy. Wendy practised as an occupational therapist in a range of health and social care settings from 1984 until becoming an academic in 2003. She was awarded the UKOTRF Institute of Social Psychiatry Scholarship for research into mental health service-user experiences of occupational therapy facilities in an acute mental health unit in West London.

We also have expertise in the areas of dementia, occupation therapy for children, and the assistance of dogs in treatments. Specialist guest lecturers additionally lend external expertise to our academic staff.

Specialist facilities

Within our School of Health and Human Sciences, we have a range of specialist clinical laboratories and IT facilities to assist you with the effective learning and acquisition of new skills; for students of our MSc Occupational Therapy, we have a specialist lab at our Colchester Campus which provides you with access to kitchen, bedroom, and wheelchair facilities to help develop your skills in helping people in the home.

We also arrange off-site visits to farms and other specialist external facilities to assist in your learning, and offer excellent physical and online resources in terms of libraries, computer labs, datasets, archives and other research materials.

Our student-run Occupational Therapy Society is also involved in many internal and external events.

Your future

Successful completion of our MSc Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) programme leads to eligibility to apply for registration as an occupational therapist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC), which then allows you to practise as an occupational therapist in the UK.

If you are a self-funding international student interested in working outside of the UK we would advise that you check registration procedures with the relevant professional body in that country.

Example structure

Year 1
-Interprofessional Collaboration and Development
-Research in Health Care
-Foundations of Occupational Therapy Practice
-Occupational Performance in Practice
-Learning in Practice 1
-Learning in Practice 2

Year 2
-Research Activity
-Transformation Through Occupation
-Contexts of Occupational Therapy Practice
-The Competent Occupational Therapist
-Learning in Practice 3
-Learning in Practice 4

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IT and information systems drive and control organisations. This course gives you a grounding in management practices and develops your skills so you can play a key role in the design, implementation and development of information systems. Read more

About the course

IT and information systems drive and control organisations. This course gives you a grounding in management practices and develops your skills so you can play a key role in the design, implementation and development of information systems.

You can apply to base your dissertation on a project which you would work on with an external organisation. Recent projects include working with a national company to develop a prescriptive method for qualifying risks and quantifying the value added by advanced service systems for process packaging equipment.

Core modules

Information Systems Project Management; Information Systems Change Management; Information Systems Modelling; Information Systems and the Information Society; Operations and Supply Chain Management; Strategic Management; Managing People in Organisations; Dissertation; Research Methods and Dissertation Preparation

Examples of Optional Modules

One of the following: E-Business and E-Commerce; Business Intelligence; International Business Strategy

You can apply to base your dissertation on a project which you would work on with an external organisation. Recent projects include working with a national company to develop a prescriptive method for qualifying risks and quantifying the value added by advanced service systems for process packaging equipment.

The example course structure listed is indicative and may be subject to change in future years. The content of our courses is reviewed annually to make sure it's up-to-date and relevant.

Individual modules are occasionally updated or withdrawn. This is in response to discoveries through our world-leading research; funding changes; professional accreditation requirements; student or employer feedback; outcomes of reviews; and variations in staff or student numbers. In the event of any change we'll consult and inform students in good time and take reasonable steps to minimise disruption. Please note that not all combinations of elective modules may be possible because of timetabling.

How we teach

We teach management from a truly global perspective, and our courses are based on pioneering research into the challenges faced by businesses everywhere. We use a combination of lectures, seminars, case studies, group work for collaborative learning, and web-based discussion groups. You'll be assessed through Individual assignments, group projects, end-of-semester examinations and a dissertation.

We’ll teach you how to identify opportunities, solve problems and inspire others. Many of our teaching staff are world-class researchers working in policy-relevant areas. Our courses are based on their research. We also bring in guest speakers from business, local government and industry. You can apply to carry out a project with an external organisation as part of your course. We also offer you the chance to spend the summer at another university overseas.

Your career

At Sheffield University Management School, we are committed to focusing on employability and our postgraduate students’ future career prospects. We have two specialist careers advisors in the School, dedicated to providing full-time career support throughout your course.

You will have many opportunities during your course to engage in personal and professional development. Our courses are designed to enable you to acquire the transferable skills essential for employment: communication, organisation, and the ability to deal with complex issues creatively and systematically.

Our dedicated Employability Hub acts as a key interface between students and employers. Its staff will help you access employability support, skills development and opportunities throughout your masters.

Our graduates work for companies such as Adidas, ASDA, Boots, ExxonMobil, HSBC, Morgan Stanley, Pepsico International, Sainsbury’s and Vodafone. Their job titles include Head of Business Enhancement, Management Consultant, Product Marketing Manager, Web Marketing Consultant and Campaign Manager.

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This course brings together theoretical and applied expertise in finance and accounting practices. Read more

About the course

This course brings together theoretical and applied expertise in finance and accounting practices. You’ll gain a good understanding of the basics of financial statement analysis, corporate governance and international finance as well as the quantitative and analytical skills essential for developing fundamental problem-solving skills.

You can apply to base your dissertation on project work with an external organisation. Recent projects include group nominal structure for a multinational engineering firm, and developing a funding strategy for a Sheffield-based capital investment programme.

Core modules

Corporate Finance; Research Methods for Finance and Accounting; Comparative Finance and Financial Services; Quantitative Methods for Finance and Accounting; Project Dissertation

Examples of optional modules

Five of the following: Corporate Governance; Issues in Finance; International Finance; Risk and Uncertainty; Management Accounting; Financial Accounting and Financial Statement Analysis; Emerging Market Finance; Philosophical Perspectives on Accounting, Financial Management and Finance; Financial Management

You can apply to base your dissertation on project work with an external organisation. Recent projects include group nominal structure for a multinational engineering firm, and developing a funding strategy for a Sheffield-based capital investment programme.

The example course structure listed is indicative and may be subject to change in future years. The content of our courses is reviewed annually to make sure it's up-to-date and relevant.

Individual modules are occasionally updated or withdrawn. This is in response to discoveries through our world-leading research; funding changes; professional accreditation requirements; student or employer feedback; outcomes of reviews; and variations in staff or student numbers. In the event of any change we'll consult and inform students in good time and take reasonable steps to minimise disruption. Please note that not all combinations of elective modules may be possible because of timetabling.

How we teach

We teach management from a truly global perspective, and our courses are based on pioneering research into the challenges faced by businesses everywhere. We use a combination of lectures, seminars, case studies, group work for collaborative learning, and web-based discussion groups. You'll be assessed through Individual assignments, group projects, end-of-semester examinations and a dissertation.

We’ll teach you how to identify opportunities, solve problems and inspire others. Many of our teaching staff are world-class researchers working in policy-relevant areas. Our courses are based on their research. We also bring in guest speakers from business, local government and industry. You can apply to carry out a project with an external organisation as part of your course. We also offer you the chance to spend the summer at another university overseas.

Your career

At Sheffield University Management School, we are committed to focusing on employability and our postgraduate students’ future career prospects. We have two specialist careers advisors in the School, dedicated to providing full-time career support throughout your course.

You will have many opportunities during your course to engage in personal and professional development. Our courses are designed to enable you to acquire the transferable skills essential for employment: communication, organisation, and the ability to deal with complex issues creatively and systematically.

Our dedicated Employability Hub acts as a key interface between students and employers. Its staff will help you access employability support, skills development and opportunities throughout your masters.

Our graduates work for companies such as Adidas, ASDA, Boots, ExxonMobil, HSBC, Morgan Stanley, Pepsico International, Sainsbury’s and Vodafone. Their job titles include Head of Business Enhancement, Management Consultant, Product Marketing Manager, Web Marketing Consultant and Campaign Manager.

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This course involves combining communication studies, applied linguistics, international management and intercultural communication. Read more
This course involves combining communication studies, applied linguistics, international management and intercultural communication.

Economic globalisation and rapid developments in ICT mean that many organisations now operate on an international scale, or at the very least interact with consumers, clients and/or partner organisations in other countries. Even ‘local’ companies and organisations may have a multicultural workforce, or offer their services or products abroad. As a result, communication has become increasingly international and intercultural.

Organisations seek to create communication strategies that support their overall strategy and objectives. In doing so, they need to interact with stakeholders who may have a variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds. These stakeholders may include employees, customers, suppliers, financial backers or even local governments. In the Master’s specialisation in International Business Communication, you’ll learn about the all factors, including cultural and linguistic ones, that play a role in communication and need to be taken into account in order to create effective communication strategies.

In your future career as a business executive or communication specialist, you’ll need to be able to assess the quality, reliability and validity of the research that informs your practical decisions ‘on the job’. In other words, you’ll need to be able to judge whether existing research – as well as your own – complies with the ground rules of academic rigor. The programme therefore places emphasis not only on training your research skills but also on developing your awareness of what ‘good research’ entails.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ibc

Why study International Business Communication at Radboud University?

- This is one of very few programmes in Europe (and the only programme in the Netherlands) that also focuses on the cultural and linguistic dimensions of international business communication.

- The specialisation deals with theory and insights that are relevant to achieving effective communication in various organisational contexts; from interpersonal communication in a meeting with (multicultural) colleagues, to marketing communication aimed at reaching international target audiences.

- Students do a (group) internship in which they work towards solving a particular communication issue or answering a specific communication question for a company or organisation. This provides hands-on experience in a relevant organisational setting.

- This specialisation attracts students from different countries and because admission to the programme is selective (max. 50 students per year), you’ll be part of a small group of highly motivated Dutch and international students. This means that to a certain extent, your learning environment is international as well.

- Guest speakers are regularly invited to share their knowledge about current developments in business, management and organisational communication.

- Although the main focus is on international communication in larger, multinational companies, graduates of this programme will be able to apply what they’ve learned in a variety of organisations – for profit, non-profit or governmental institutes.

Language(s) and management perspective

Languages form the heart of communication and that is why this Master’s specialisation is taught within Radboud University’s Faculty of Arts. The programme places a strong focus on the role that languages play in effective corporate communication. Of course, the languages used are not the only factor to consider in a multicultural environment - which is why you will be encouraged to also consider communication issues and strategy from an international management perspective.

In short, you’ll explore the impact of globalisation on business communication, the role of linguistic and cultural diversity in corporate communication, and the human and operational consequences of organisations’ language policy or strategies. In doing so, you’ll also come to understand how such issues can shape and affect an organisation’s performance.

Career prospects

With a Master’s specialisation in International Business Communication, you could pursue a career in government, semi-government, business or academia. For example, our graduates work as internal or external communication managers or press spokespeople in companies, government departments, health institutions or non-profit organisations. Many work in marketing communications at multinational companies, as communication trainers for consultancies, as social media managers or as PR consultants.

- International perspectives
Since the programme focuses on communication in international contexts, and on communication with international target groups, a sizable number of graduates have found jobs outside the Netherlands or with international organisations operating from the Netherlands.

- Wide range of communication functions
Job openings for our graduates can cover a wide range of communication functions, organisational types and (business) sectors. This is because organisations have increasingly come to realise that effective communication is essential to all organisational functions (e.g. marketing, PR, HRM, R&D, finance), and have made a real effort over the past decades to professionalise communications, making (international) business communication an increasingly important discipline.

Our approach to this field

Corporate communication involves orchestrating internal and external communication instruments to support an organisation’s core activities and to manage its relationship with different types of stakeholders. Due to the internationalisation of markets and businesses, corporate communication has gone global in recent years. Organisations that operate internationally need to take different cultures and language backgrounds into account when designing their communication. Culture and language(s) may affect international communication at three levels:
- The management level: e.g. when CEOs communicate with internal or external audiences
- The organisational level: e.g. when a company communicates about its Corporate Social Responsibility policy
- The marketing level: e.g. when products or services are promoted to an international audience in (corporate) advertising.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ibc

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Food security exists when everybody has access to sufficient, nutritious and safe food at all times. However, various predictable and unpredictable challenges around the globe, including changes in climate (i.e. Read more

Local food security in a globalising world

Food security exists when everybody has access to sufficient, nutritious and safe food at all times. However, various predictable and unpredictable challenges around the globe, including changes in climate (i.e. rising/falling temperatures, droughts and floods, diseases and pests), market tendencies, insufficient access to food for households, unequal distribution of resources and opportunities and inadequate food distribution channels, prevent the realisation of this idealistic and often oversimplified term.

Despite a growing number of large-scale, high-external input farms and enough food production to feed the world, post-harvest losses result in less optimal yields and (locally) produced foods are often used for other purposes, such as animal feed or biofuel. Consequentially, 795 million1 undernourished people around the globe do not have access to this lost and wasted food.

Ensuring access to food for everyone is the key to ending hunger, which will require improved collaboration between various stakeholders - producer (organisations), the private sector, governments, traders and development organisations. Structures, policies and programmes must be continuously adapted to a variety of external factors, such as the economy, environment and current social structures. Rethinking of informal rules and habits is another essential step in attaining food security, considering even members of the same household are not guaranteed equal access to food. In light of these external factors and challenges, this specialisation presents various interventions needed to combat hunger and ensure food security for everyone.

Competences

At graduation, you will have the ability to:
• define the economic, commercial and marketing needs, constraints and opportunities of those in rural communities who produce for local and regional markets
• analyse food security at a local and global level
• apply tools for diagnosing food security
• analyse the livelihoods of farmers who produce for local and regional markets and understand farmers' coping strategies
• select, explain and design an appropriate development intervention leading to food security
• develop support programmes for farmers, producers and other groups
• mainstream food security within Agricultural and rural development programmes
• define the economic, commercoal and marketing needs, constraints and oppertunities for small-scale producers in rural communities
• formulate and recommend any organisational adjustments that are needed within service-delivery organisations.

Career opportunities

Rural Development and Food Security specialists explore effective responses to mal- and undernourishment, by defining needs, constraints, coping strategies and opportunities for small-scale producers in rural communities. In selecting appropriate context-specific interventions, which reflect understanding of the local context in its wider context, they consider stakeholder relationships and how collaboration could be organised to each stakeholder’s benefit while helping farmers to safeguard their ability to ensure local food security. In the face of globalisation, slow economic growth and political instability, specialists may design and implement responses for (non-)governmental organisations or partners in the private sector, in the form of projects, programmes, market structures or policies.

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An interdisciplinary approach to the law and politics of the European Union for those who want a deeper understanding of EU law and wider government trends. Read more
An interdisciplinary approach to the law and politics of the European Union for those who want a deeper understanding of EU law and wider government trends. This genuinely inter-disciplinary programme (with the School of Politics and International Relations) provides an approach to the study of the EU which will enable you to analyse how our understanding of the nature of the European Union is shaped by our particular disciplinary perspectives. Core modules include Constitutional Law of the EU and Politics of European Governance. You will also complete a supervised dissertation and have international exchange opportunities.

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the law and politics of the european Union. It is designed for those who want a deeper understanding of EU law and wider government trends.

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmeuropeanlawandpublicaffairs/

Your studies

Core modules in this programme include EU External Relations, and the Law and Governance of the EU. Optional modules will include: EU Competition Law; Law of the Eurozone; and, Social and Economic Law of the EU. You will also complete a supervised dissertation.

On completion of your studies, you will have:
- a deep understanding and knowledge of law and governance in the European Union;
- identified legal and policy trends in EU governance;
- developed advanced legal research skills;
- increased your ability to communicate the results of research; and,
- an increased ability to identify and analyse problems from a legal perspective.

Studying abroad

The School affords its students the opportunity to spend a semester abroad as part of the Comparative, International and European Law (CIEL) Graduate exchange programme with our partner Universities in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. Students participating in the programme will have their dissertations jointly supervised by staff in UCD and in the institution which they are visiting. Successful completion of the semester abroad will lead to the award of a Certificate in Comparative, International and European Law.

Your future

This programme will enable you to qualify in the legal profession with the intent of specialising in European law and public affairs. It is also the ideal platform from which to pursue a career in the European public service.

Features

The Sutherland School of Law offers a wide range of modules for the Masters programmes. Reflecting its interdisciplinary nature, there are core modules that must be taken in both Law and Politics. The core law modules are

- Law and Governance of the EU involves identifies and analyses the nature of the rule of law, the constitutionalisation of the EU and the nature of governance in general and in the EU in particular.

- EU External Relations Law examines the legal aspects of the EU's role as a global player using Article 21 of the Treaty on European Union that provides the basis for external action by the EU.

Other Law modules of especial interest to those undertaking this programme include:
- Social and Economic Law of the EU examines not only modern EU economic policy but also its increasingly important and controversial role in the area of social policy, and the role of the EU social partners.

- European Environmental Law traces the development of EU and international environmental law to date with particular attention being paid to current key areas of controversy in environmental law, such as climate change.

CIEL

Any student admitted to an LLM programme in the Law School also can apply on a competitive basis to spend their second semester at one of our sister Law Schools:
- University of Antwerp
- Maastricht University
- The University of Mannhein
- Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
- Universite de Toulouse 1 – Capitole

Students must score 6.5 in IELTS or 90 in the internet TOEFL exams in the relevant language of instruction (English, French or German). Spaces are allocated on a competitive basis. Students who are accepted onto this programme graduate with an LLM and are awarded a certificate in International and Comparative Law (CIEL).

Careers

This programme will enable you to qualify in the legal profession with the intent of specialising in European Law and Public Affairs. It also the ideal platform from which to pursue a career in European Public Service.

We have an excellent Careers Development Centre here at UCD, designed to help you with information regarding future employment or studies. UCD hold a number of graduate events throughout the year including a dedicated law fair at which at which many of the big Law firms will be in attendance. The School of Law has a dedicated careers advisor on it’s Academic staff, Dr. Oonagh Breen, and a staff member from the careers office will be in attendance at the School of law on a number of occasions throughout the academic year. To see the full range of services offered by the careers office go to http://www.ucd.ie/careers/

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmeuropeanlawandpublicaffairs/

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmeuropeanlawandpublicaffairs/apply,80080,en.html

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part-time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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