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Masters Degrees (Expressive Arts)

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This studio based program develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. It provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. Read more
This studio based program develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. It provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. It is delivered by Computing with contributions from the Centre for Cultural Studies- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mfa-computational-arts/

What is computational art?

Computation consists of all the changes brought about by digital technology. Art is an open set of ways of acting inventively in culture. Mixing the two together in a systematic way gives us computational art. This is a very open field, and one that is set to expand enormously in the coming years. It is where the most exciting developments in technology and in culture can already be found. This degree will place you in the middle of this fast-evolving context.

Follow the links in the student profiles section for work produced by our graduates

What will I learn?

This degree develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. Over a two years (full-time) or four years (part-time) you will develop your artistic work and thinking through the challenge of developing a series of projects for public exhibition which will explore the technological and cultural ramifications of computation.

You will learn the fundamentals of programming and how to apply this knowledge expressively. You will work with popular open source programming environments such as Processing, OpenFrameworks, P5.js and Arduino, and will learn how to program in languages such as Java, Javascript and C++.

Since computational artworks don’t necessarily involve computers and screens, we also encourage students to produce works across a diverse range of media. Supported by studio technicians in state-of-the-art facilities, our students are producing works using tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, robotics, wearable technologies, paint, sculpture and textiles.

You will also study contextual modules on computational art and the socio-political effects of technology. Modules in the Centre for Cultural Studies provide students with the historical foundations, frameworks, critical skills and confidence to express their ideas effectively. You will have the opportunity to learn the cultural histories of technology, to reflect on computation in terms of its wider cultural effects, and to understand the way in which art provides rigorous ways of thinking.

Through our masterclass series, we regularly invite world-class artists and curators to explain their work and engage in critical dialogue with the students. This allows you to develop a wider understanding of the contemporary art scene and how your work sits within the professional art world.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Theo Papatheodorou.

Modules & Structure

Year 1 shares the same core learning as our MA in Computational Arts programme:

Programming for Artists 1- 15 credits
Programming for Artists 2- 15 credits
Workshops in Creative Coding 1- 15 credits
Final Project in Computational Arts- 60 credits
Physical Computing
Interactive Media Critical Theory- 15 or 30 credits
Physical Computing: Arduino and Related Technologies- 30 credits

In Year 2 you will study the following:

Studio Practice- 120 credits
Computational Arts Critical Studies- 60 credits

Assessment

In Year 2 you will be assessed by: self-evaluation report of 2,500 words; essay of up to 6,000 words; viva voce; exhibition of final work.

Skills & Careers

The programme will equip you with a broad training in the use of creative computing systems that are currently most important in artistic, design and cultural practices and the creative industries, as well as technologies that are yet to emerge.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This degree develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. It provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. Read more
This degree develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. It provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. It is delivered by Computing with contributions from the Centre for Cultural Studies- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-computational-arts/

What is computational art?

Computation consists of all the changes brought about by digital technology. Art is an open set of ways of acting inventively in culture. Mixing the two together in a systematic way gives us computational art. This is a very open field, and one that is set to expand enormously in the coming years. It is where the most exciting developments in technology and in culture can already be found. This degree will place you in the middle of this fast-evolving context.

Follow the links in the student profiles section for work produced by our graduates.

What will I learn?

This degree develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. Over a year (full-time) or two years (part-time) you will develop your artistic work and thinking through the challenge of developing a series of projects for public exhibition which will explore the technological and cultural ramifications of computation.

You will learn the fundamentals of programming and how to apply this knowledge expressively. You will work with popular open source programming environments such as Processing, OpenFrameworks, P5.js and Arduino, and will learn how to program in languages such as Java, Javascript and C++.

Since computational artworks don’t necessarily involve computers and screens, we also encourage students to produce works across a diverse range of media. Supported by studio technicians in state-of-the-art facilities, our students are producing works using tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, robotics, wearable technologies, paint, sculpture and textiles.

You will also study contextual modules on computational art and the socio-political effects of technology. Modules in the Centre for Cultural Studies provide students with the historical foundations, frameworks, critical skills and confidence to express their ideas effectively. You will have the opportunity to learn the cultural histories of technology, to reflect on computation in terms of its wider cultural effects, and to understand the way in which art provides rigorous ways of thinking.

Through our masterclass series, we regularly invite world-class artists and curators to explain their work and engage in critical dialogue with the students. This allows you to develop a wider understanding of the contemporary art scene and how your work sits within the professional art world.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Theo Papatheodorou.

Modules

Programming for Artists 1- 15 credits
Programming for Artists 2- 15 credits
Workshops in Creative Coding 1- 15 credits
Final Project in Computational Arts- 60 credits
Physical Computing- N/A

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The University of the West of England is committed to training outstanding and transformational teachers for the future, able to provide first class educational experiences that make a significant difference to the life chances of all children - and to do so through partnership schools in the region. Read more
The University of the West of England is committed to training outstanding and transformational teachers for the future, able to provide first class educational experiences that make a significant difference to the life chances of all children - and to do so through partnership schools in the region.

Teaching is a challenging, exciting and very rewarding career with a high level of job satisfaction. It is a great privilege, as well as a great responsibility, to be one of the first teachers to influence a child.

This one-year postgraduate course prepares you to take your place in primary schools as generalist teachers, within a specific key stage Primary (age range 5-11 years) subject specialism.

Course detail

You receive significant training in the core National Curriculum subjects (English, Mathematics, Science) and in professional studies. There are also short 'taster' courses in the foundation subjects and you will also pursue an individual specialist study in one of the following areas: language and literacy development, creative and expressive arts, science and technologies, knowledge and understanding of the world, or primary languages.

On this 38-week course, you spend 19 weeks in schools and 19 in the Department of Education at UWE. The course is designed so that your experiences in these two sites of learning are integrated. In school, you carry out directed tasks that support your learning in the Department, and study in the Department informs your practice in the classroom.

Seminars and lectures in General Professional Studies equip you to meet the standards to teach and assess the core subjects of maths, English and science and, with support, the foundation subjects of the National Curriculum. You are also offered a subject specialism.

Format

We have a contemporary approach to teaching and learning, making full use of up-to-date technology. The course is conducted through lectures, seminars, tutorials and group tasks. The lecturing team has a wide range of recent teaching experience in schools.

With in the department there are workshop areas where you practice many of the practical and school-focused aspects of primary education.

You are allocated a General Professional Studies Tutor who acts as an anchor person during the course and with preparation for a professional career in schools.

Placements

Approximately half the course is school-based where you gain in-depth experience in three different types of school during the year. Each block of school experience is preceded by several serial days of observation and planning.

Assessment

Assessment is based on five professionally based assignments and the final block school experience.

Careers / Further study

The Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) courses now include 40 credits of assessment at Master's Level (Level M). If you opt not to attempt the requisite credit at Level M, a Professional Graduate Certificate in Education will be available as an alternative award.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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This course provides an intensive, highly challenging and rewarding programme that will enable you to qualify as a primary teacher (Key Stage 1 and 2) or Foundation Stage/Key Stage 1 in one year. Read more
This course provides an intensive, highly challenging and rewarding programme that will enable you to qualify as a primary teacher (Key Stage 1 and 2) or Foundation Stage/Key Stage 1 in one year. You will also receive the award of PGCE with 60 credits towards a masters degree. School experience in our excellent range of partnership schools enables you to put theory to practice.

What will you study?

You will gain a sound knowledge of the core subjects of English, mathematics and science, together with the opportunity to explore and develop your understanding of subjects in the wider curriculum, such as history, geography, modern foreign languages, art and physical education. You will also develop the essential skills of communication, planning, teaching and assessment that you will need in practice. You will spend a minimum of 24 weeks in school placements, supported by a school-based mentor and/or a University tutor.

Assessment

Written assignments, school experience placements.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Modules
-Core National Curriculum areas: English, Maths and Science
-The Creative Practitioner covering broader subjects: Art, Design Technology, Educational Technologies, History, Geography, -Expressive Arts, Physical Education and Religious Education
-Early Years Specialism
-Research-informed Curriculum Leadership/Subject Specialism
-The Reflective Professional
-School Experience (24 weeks)

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Modern society has seen a number of changes to the family dynamic which have played a part in the increase of troubled children. Today, 20 per cent of children in the UK experience emotional, behavioural and mental health difficulties, leading to an increasing demand for play therapists. Read more
Modern society has seen a number of changes to the family dynamic which have played a part in the increase of troubled children. Today, 20 per cent of children in the UK experience emotional, behavioural and mental health difficulties, leading to an increasing demand for play therapists.

As a play therapist, you will help children come to terms with traumatic events in their lives through the use of play, where the child has the freedom and opportunity to express themselves by recreating their own world during their time with you.

Whether you're looking for a change in career, wanting to add therapeutic play to your existing psychological therapies, social work or medical skillset, or if you are a graduate just starting out in the field, this professional course, delivered in partnership with the Academy of Play and Child Psychotherapy Ltd (APAC), allows you to work under supervision with individual children who have slight to moderate problems. Please note that all applications and queries for this course will be dealt with by APAC, and that start dates may differ depending on your location of study. Find out more on the APAC website

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: we entered an increased number of units for this assessment, up from 11% in 2008 to 33% in 201.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/therapeuticplay_pgcert

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

You will be able to practise, with the guidance of a supervisor, using therapeutic play skills in schools and other settings including primary health care, providing emotional support for slight to moderate problems with individual children. If you are already working as a self-employed play therapist, this qualification will give you added confidence to continue working and offering your services as a practitioner.

- Play Therapist
- Play Worker
- Children's Nurse
- Nursery Nurse

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will undertake 100 hours of clinical practice in either a primary school, special needs school, nursery, primary health care, hospital, care home or adoption and foster care setting, where you will apply your learning in a practical setting.

Our Faculty of Health and Social Sciences has a well-established Playwork team and over recent years has developed close links with APAC and professional organisations Play Therapy UK and Play Therapy International.

Modules

Orientation and Setting Up Play Therapy Practice Using Non-Directive Play Therapy
You will be introduced to the principles of non-directive play and the therapeutic play continuum so you will be prepared to work one to one with children who have slight to moderate social, emotional and behaviour difficulties.

Using Expressive Arts Therapy to Reach the Unconscious
Add to your repertoire of play therapy tools and conditions, and study the main research methods that are applicable to play therapy and the fundamentals of neurobiology showing the beneficial effects of play.

Using Symbolic Play Therapy Tools and Metaphor Safely
Gain a sound working knowledge of child protection issues and add to your repertoire of therapeutic play media by including art, therapeutic story telling, movement, clay and sand therapy.

Professor Ieuan Ellis

Dean, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences

"We have a long history of providing education across a wide range of professional and academic disciplines in health, applied global ethics, social sciences and related subject areas... The Faculty has a number of areas of research excellence."

Ieuan is responsible for the strategic leadership of the Faculty of Health and Social sciences. He is also a member of Academic Board, and an elected staff representative on the Board of Governors. He is also Chair of the UK Council of Deans of Health and Co-chair of the National Allied Health Professions Advisory Board. After practicing as a chartered physiotherapist in the NHS and private sector, Ieuan entered higher education working initially at Northumbria University prior to joining our University. Ieuan has held a number of leadership and management roles across health and social care education and was awarded a personal chair as Professor in Healthcare Education.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Clinical Skills Suite
The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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A unique qualification. No matter what industry you work in, this multi-disciplinary degree will give you in-depth understanding of communication principles and skills. Read more

A unique qualification

No matter what industry you work in, this multi-disciplinary degree will give you in-depth understanding of communication principles and skills. It is a unique qualification in New Zealand.

Massey’s Master of Communication will deepen your understanding of communication practice.

This is a unique qualification in New Zealand. You do not have to have a background in communication to complete this degree.

Our students come from a wide range of disciplines including arts, social sciences, law, education, design or health services. You may have found yourself in a work role with a communication aspect and you want better insights into the principles and practice of communication.

The Master of Communication will help you to advance your career and to understand better how to manage your role’s communication aspects.

Internationally-recognised

Massey University’s business and management studies ranks in the top 250 (by QS (Quacquarelli Symonds) rankings). We are also ranked in the top 150 universities worldwide for business administration programmes by the ShanghaiRanking's Global Ranking of Academic Subjects.

Do communication research in a context relevant to you

The research project in this masters enables you to focus on a real-world communication challenge and combine different communication research approaches to develop a novel solution. You can draw on research approaches from public relations, expressive arts, communication management, marketing, linguistics, media studies or journalism studies, or create a bespoke research approach that includes supervision from a related discipline such as Maori studies, international relations or evaluation studies. Your learning will focus on practical, relevant outcomes for your career.

There are also opportunities to collaborate on a shared transdisciplinary research project with students and co-supervisors from the disciplines you may be working with in your job - such as quality management, emergency management or human resource management.. This will build your understanding of the practical connections between communication and related organisational functions.

You will graduate with an excellent grasp of research, analysis and problem-solving and know how to apply your knowledge to make a difference in your workplaces and community.

What will you learn

In the first segment of the programme you focus on studying the field of communication and its possibilities. This covers the history and theory of communication across different scholarly traditions (from both humanities and business) and industries.

In the second you choose a personalised experience from both ‘heartland’ courses relevant to your discipline - for instance advanced journalism issues, technology and cultural change, linguistics, media practice, advanced public relations or advanced marketing - and ‘sister disciplines’ such as quality management.

In the third segment of your programme you work on a research project of your choice that is relevant to your industry and discipline. For details see the ‘Planning’ area at the top right of this page.

Become a master, faster

The Master of Communication is 180 credits. This means that you can complete this qualification in three semesters of full-time study. We offer research supervision in the summer semester if you want to really fast-track your completion. If you study part-time the qualification usually takes between 2.5 and five years.

Multi-disciplinary

Massey offers you access to world-leading communication expertise across a broad range of specialisations, including media, humanities, business, organisational studies, social sciences, critical thinking and management. Massey’s Master of Communication enables you to pursue either organisational or creative approaches to communication, or combine these to become a well-rounded communication specialist.

A specialist communication university

We have the longest-running communication programme in New Zealand, the largest numbers of students in any university communication programme and the most options for communication-related study. Massey University’s graduates have a long-standing reputation for excellence in both theory and practice.

Our lecturers come from both academic and industry backgrounds, giving you the best of both worlds.

Why postgraduate study?

Postgraduate study is hard work but hugely rewarding and empowering. The Master of Communication will push you to produce your best creative, strategic and theoretical ideas. The workload replicates the high-pressure environment of senior workplace roles.

Our experts are there to guide but you will find that postgraduate study demands more in-depth and independent study.

Not just more of the same

Postgraduate study is not just ‘more of the same’ undergraduate study. It takes you to a new level in knowledge and expertise especially in planning and undertaking research.



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Our MA program provides students with a broad knowledge of anthropological theory and research methods. Students build their research and writing skills in their graduate courses, culminating in the preparation of a significant piece of scholarly writing, which constitutes their MA thesis. Read more

MA Program

Our MA program provides students with a broad knowledge of anthropological theory and research methods. Students build their research and writing skills in their graduate courses, culminating in the preparation of a significant piece of scholarly writing, which constitutes their MA thesis. The MA in Anthropology at UBC is based upon a combination of coursework, research and a thesis. Most students attain their degree within two years of starting the program; it is possible for a well-organized person to complete degree requirements during the first twelve to eighteen months of study.

The MA at UBC consists of the following course of study. Candidates must successfully complete

(1) Anthropology 500 (History of Anthropology)

(2) a professional seminar (Anth 506)

(3) an advanced methods course in ethnographic, archaeological or museum studies

(4) at least six credits of other elective courses

(5) after submitting an approved thesis proposal, a six credit thesis. The Anthropology MA thesis at UBC is modeled upon an article in a scholarly journal. It may be based upon original field research. In all cases, MA theses are limited to no more than 50 pages.

The Department accepts part-time MA candidates. The admission and residency requirements are the same as for the regular MA program, and the degree must also be completed within a five-year period. Anthropology 500 and 506 must be completed in the first year of study, the thesis proposal by the end of the second year.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts
- Specialization: Anthropology
- Subject: Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts

Research focus

UBC offers graduate study in the fields of socio-cultural anthropology (including legal, medical, and ecological anthropology, oral and expressive culture, religion, globalization, and applied anthropology), linguistic anthropology, anthropological archaeology, biological anthropology, and museum studies. Faculty research interests include North America, Asia (Russia, India, Japan, and Korea), Mesoamerica, South America, Oceania, Europe, and Africa. The program provides training in quantitative, qualitative, archaeological and museum methods.

Related Study Areas

Interdisciplinary contacts are encouraged, and links are maintained with departments and programs such as Asian Studies, the Institute of Asian Research, Linguistics, History, Geography, Sociology, and the Centre for Women's and Gender Studies.

Facilities

Extensive research facilities are available in the Museum of Anthropology, and in the Laboratory of Archaeology. The UBC Library has excellent collections to support program interests, as well as a large collection of microform theses and dissertations, and the Human Relations Area files. Anthropology has a dedicated graduate computer lab with a wide range of software to support quantitative and qualitative research.

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Why Surrey?. This Guildford School of Acting (GSA) programme emphasises practical actor training, delivered via a series of project workshops and rehearsals supported by extensive classes in relevant technical skills. Read more

Why Surrey?

This Guildford School of Acting (GSA) programme emphasises practical actor training, delivered via a series of project workshops and rehearsals supported by extensive classes in relevant technical skills.

GSA is one of the UK’s leading accredited drama schools, providing dedicated conservatoire training within a purpose built environment on the University of Surrey campus.

Programme overview

The MA Acting programme is specifically designed for those seeking a career in the performing arts, and who already have an undergraduate degree or have a minimum of five years’ professional experience.

This intensive programme offers practical training which focusses on the acquisition of technical skills in acting, voice and movement.

These support a range of rehearsal projects, screen acting projects and public performances. Students also take professional development workshops and classes in audition technique.

Cohorts are kept small to ensure that students receive the maximum amount of personal attention and contact.

Performance opportunities include a devised project, a final public production led by a production team of industry professionals, and a West End Showcase.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a compulsory Advanced Practice module.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

  • To deepen experiential knowledge and critical understanding of the practice of acting
  • To develop a comprehensive understanding of the techniques and methodologies that constitute a personally evolved rehearsal process
  • To develop an integrated technical approach to the practice of acting in rehearsal and performance
  • To provide an ensemble training context for the development of professional acting skills based on practical and theoretical understanding and reflective practice

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • An experiential and theoretical knowledge of key practical acting methodologies
  • An advanced understanding, which will inform ongoing skill attainment, of the physical and vocal techniques required to maintain an expressive body and the optimum functionality of the voice
  • A critical understanding of key theoretical and methodological developments in the practice of acting
  • An advanced understanding, which will inform ongoing skill attainment, of the application of technique to differing theatrical forms, styles, genres and historical contexts
  • A comprehensive understanding of current industry practice

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Recognise, interpret and contextualise approaches to performance texts
  • Identify and develop an individual methodological approach to rehearsal
  • Select vocal and physical techniques appropriate to voice, person and situation
  • Recognise and respond appropriately to the demands of different performance media
  • Critically analyse and reflect on their own and others’ practice

Professional practical skills

  • Successfully apply integrated vocal and psycho-physical techniques to the practice of acting in differing media
  • Sustain and develop an effective and creative individual rehearsal process
  • Demonstrate creative and imaginative work in performance
  • Contribute effective and appropriate practices and concepts to an ensemble process
  • Demonstrate evidence of practical research and effective preparation for entry into the current performance industry

Key / transferable skills

  • Be disciplined and consistent in a professional context
  • Conduct themselves constructively, positively, and sensitively towards others
  • Able to lead and collaborate as part of the team on practical and research projects
  • Communicate effectively and at an advanced level in both verbal and written form
  • Seek out, critique, and employ information appropriately
  • Recognise and develop commercial and artistic career opportunities

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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The MA Graphic Design course encourages designers to explore ways of developing understanding between co-communicators. Read more
The MA Graphic Design course encourages designers to explore ways of developing understanding between co-communicators.

You will do this by systematically interrogating design practice, through using design methods to analyse and comprehend situations and behaviour and by generating alternative and novel visual solutions. Students apply to the course predominantly from graphic design courses but are welcomed from a variety of backgrounds (if they can show an aptitude for typography) where they may have studied photography, architecture, illustration, interaction design, three dimensional design, fine art, or, subjects such as journalism, philosophy, psychology, anthropology or sociology. Whatever your background, you will be required to reflect on your worldview; the underlying assumptions and understanding that guides and constrains your practice, and to use this reflection as a starting point from which to further develop. Your practice can take many forms: it can be self-expressive, or socially orientated; print, screen-based or three-dimensional. It can focus on an aspect of a well-defined area of design, such as branding, experimental typography, publishing, and user-centred design, or on something more unconventional defined as part of your study.

Depending on what kind of focus you identify you will select one of three different types of Professional Development Portfolio (PDP). These reflect either a business, academic or curatorial/editing focus and provide you with another way of tailoring your study to meet your aspirations.

Graphic designers often work in groups, sometimes comprising members from different disciplines. The MA Graphic Design course provides many opportunities to work in interdisciplinary ways as it sits alongside the courses of other disciplines. Many of the taught sessions such as the introduction to research methods and processes occur in these interdisciplinary groups. At other times however you will be developing your project with your supervisor and other students on your course. This will require you to develop a theoretical framework, methodology and research methods that support your research focus.

As a graphic designer you should anticipate the possible consequences of your design interventions, including the meanings constructed through your practice, in relation to ethical and sustainability issues as well as to other relevant contexts. Creative approaches are required that respond to complex situations in which many problems reside. Outcomes are not constrained by media or by limited interpretations of what it is to be a graphic designer.

Consequently, an outcome might involve the design of an experience or service, as much as it might concern more conventional forms of graphic production.

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Our challenging, practice-based course offers you a unique approach to the practice of writing, emphasising innovation and experimentation in your work. Read more
Our challenging, practice-based course offers you a unique approach to the practice of writing, emphasising innovation and experimentation in your work.

On our MA Creative Writing, you deepen your knowledge of literary tradition, exploring different modes and genres in order to develop your own creative and expressive written skills. You expand your use of creative writing techniques and improve your critical judgement of your own work.

Our course encourages you to develop your writing by stepping outside your comfort zone and discovering the different approaches to verbal art that are possible today. This will invigorate your own practice, whether you are writing psychogeography, plays, novels, stories or something else. You will choose from a variety of modules, covering topics such as:
-Development of a novel plan, from research and concept-development, to plotting, character, and structure
-Experimental language play of the Oulipo group across the short story, autobiography, cartoons, cookery and theatre
-Relating magic to writing and creativity, both in theory and in practice
-Psychogeography, writing about walking, place, landscape, history and the psychic environment
-Poetic practice across experimental writing in poetry from the performative to the visual

To help you hone your craft, we also host two Royal Literary Fund Fellows, professional writers on-hand to help you develop your writing on a one-to-one basis, and regularly host talks and readings by visiting writers.

Essex has nurtured a long tradition of distinguished authors whose work has shaped literature as we know it today, from past giants such as the American poets Robert Lowell and Ted Berrigan, to contemporary writers such as mythographer and novelist Dame Marina Warner, and Booker Prize winner Ben Okri.

We are ranked Top 20 in the UK (Guardian University Guide 2015, and three-quarters of our research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014).

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

Our teaching staff are experienced and established writers who have a breadth of experience across literary genres, from novels, prose and plays, to poetry and song.

Our creative writing teaching team has a breadth of experience in the literatures of different cultures and different forms. Our current teaching staff include poet and short story writer Philip Terry, lyric writer and essayist Adrian May, novelist and camper Matthew de Abaitua, poet and performance-writer Holly Pester, poet, fisherman and memoirist Chris McCully, and award-winning playwrights Elizabeth Kuti and Jonathan Lichtenstein.

Our Centre for Creative Writing is part of a unique literary conservatoire that offers students the skills, support and confidence to respond artistically and critically to the study of writing with the guidance of experts.

Specialist facilities

-Write for our student magazine Albert or host a Red Radio show
-View classic films at weekly film screenings in our dedicated 120-seat film theatre
-Hear writers talk about their craft and learn from leading literature specialists at regular talks and readings
-Our on-campus Lakeside Theatre has been established as a major venue for good drama, staging both productions by professional touring companies and a wealth of new work written, produced and directed by our own staff and students
-Improve your playwriting skills at our Lakeside Theatre Writers workshops
-Our Research Laboratory allows you to collaborate with professionals, improvising and experimenting with new work which is being tried and tested

Your future

Many of our students have gone on to successfully publish their work, notable recent alumni including:
-Ida Løkås, who won a literary prize in Norway for The Beauty That Flows Past, securing a book deal
-Alexia Casale, whose novel Bone Dragon was published by Faber & Faber and subsequently featured on both the Young Adult Books of the Year 2013 list for The Financial Times, and The Independent’s Books of the year 2013: Children
-Elaine Ewert, recent graduate from our MA Wild Writing, placed second in the New Welsh Writing Awards 2015
-Patricia Borlenghi, the founder of Patrician Press, which has published works by a number of our alumni
-Petra Mcqueen, who has written for The Guardian and runs creative writing courses

We also offer supervision for PhD, MPhil and MA by Dissertation in different literatures and various approaches to literature, covering most aspects of early modern and modern writing in English, plus a number of other languages.

Our University is one of only 11 AHRC-accredited Doctoral Training Centres in the UK. This means that we offer funded PhD studentships which also provide a range of research and training opportunities.

A number of our Department of Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies graduates have gone on to undertake successful careers as writers, and others are now established as scholars, university lecturers, teachers, publishers, publishers’ editors, journalists, arts administrators, theatre artistic directors, drama advisers, and translators.

We work with our Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

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The profession of landscape architecture is concerned with the quality of land use, the aesthetic and history of landform and the complex integration of social, cultural, ecological and economic systems in the built environment. Read more

Overview

The profession of landscape architecture is concerned with the quality of land use, the aesthetic and history of landform and the complex integration of social, cultural, ecological and economic systems in the built environment. It involves the analysis of environmental, cultural, historical and legal factors as well as the exploration of human needs and expression. Landscape architecture approaches elements of change and their physical and phenomenal relationships through the implementation of landscape and garden designs, landscape plans, and landscape management strategies. The profession addresses a broad range of landscapes in urban, suburban, rural and ‘wilderness’ settings. The scale of such projects varies from expressive detailed design at a site scale to master planning at community and campus scales to landscape analysis and planning at regional scales.

The interdisciplinary nature of Landscape Architecture is a rich and diverse subject drawing on the traditions of both arts and sciences. The postgraduate Landscape Architecture course and the undergraduate Landscape and Garden Design Course are accredited (candidate status) by the Landscape Institute (LI).

Accreditation

The postgraduate Landscape Architecture course is accredited (candidate status) by the Landscape Institute (LI) and the International Federation of Landscape Architects (Europe).

Core modules in Year One

Semester One: Theories of Landscape, Landscape Ecology, Advanced Design Studio (Urban Territory Project), Research Methods in Landscape Architecture and Design, Research Colloquium.

Semester Two: Theory and History of Landscape and Garden Design, Professional Practice, Advanced Design Studio II, Options (e.g. Landscape and Environmental Assessment, Landscape Resource Management, Special topics (specific project/research interest area) and Dissertation or Design Research Project.

Work Experience

Landscape Architecture Programme internships are made available through project, research and industrial resources internal and external to the College. Visits and study tours are an important part of the course curriculum in conjunction with other design courses at Writtle University College.

Careers

Graduates have many employment possibilities with local authorities, technical and planning offices, government advisory, private sector landscape, environmental and urban design consultancies and private practice as Landscape Architects within the UK and internationally.

All Writtle University College degrees are awarded by the University of Essex.

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The profession of landscape architecture is concerned with the quality of land use, the aesthetic and history of landform and the complex integration of social, cultural, ecological and economic systems in the built environment. Read more

Overview

The profession of landscape architecture is concerned with the quality of land use, the aesthetic and history of landform and the complex integration of social, cultural, ecological and economic systems in the built environment. It involves the analysis of environmental, cultural, historical and legal factors as well as the exploration of human needs and expression.

Landscape architecture approaches elements of change and their physical and phenomenal relationships through the implementation of landscape and garden designs, landscape plans, and landscape management strategies. The profession addresses a broad range of landscapes in urban, suburban, rural and ‘wilderness’ settings. The scale of such projects varies from expressive detailed design at a site scale to master planning at community and campus scales to landscape analysis and planning at regional scales.

The interdisciplinary nature of Landscape Architecture is a rich and diverse subject drawing on the traditions of both arts and sciences.

If you would like to find out more about our postgraduate courses please see here: http://www.writtle.ac.uk/Postgraduate-Courses

Accredited

The postgraduate Landscape Architecture course is accredited (candidate status) by the Landscape Institute (LI) and the International Federation for Landscape Architects (Europe).

Core Modules in Year One

Semester One:
* Theories of Landscape
* Landscape Ecology
* Advanced Design Studio (Urban Territory Project)
* (Option) Research Methods in Landscape Architecture and Design
* Research Colloquium

Semester Two:
* Theory and History of Landscape and Garden Design
* Professional Practice
* Advanced Design Studio II and Options (e.g. Landscape and Environmental Assessment, Landscape Resource Management, Special topics (specific project/research interest area)

Work Experience

Landscape Architecture Programme internships are made available through project, research and industrial resources internal and external to the College. Visits and study tours are an important part of the course curriculum in conjunction with other design courses at Writtle University College.

Careers

Graduates have many employment possibilities with local authorities, technical and planning offices, government advisory, private sector landscape, environmental and urban design consultancies and private practice as Landscape Architects within the UK and internationally.

All Writtle College degrees are awarded by the University of Essex.

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Led by Professor Jo Stockham, the Print programme is a two-year specialist MA course. Renamed from Printmaking in 2015, this change signals that the study of the expanded field of Print is equal to the making of prints as a series of medium specific choices. Read more

Led by Professor Jo Stockham, the Print programme is a two-year specialist MA course. Renamed from Printmaking in 2015, this change signals that the study of the expanded field of Print is equal to the making of prints as a series of medium specific choices. We explore the mediated image approached through a range of intellectual approaches provided by a diverse team of tutors, all practicing artists. 

Access to world-class technical facilities in all print media means that we are able to both explore and expand the field of Print addressing the constant interplay between thinking and making, the image and technology. Students from a wide variety of backgrounds choose to study with us because of their interest in questions, which include, the nature of the copy, diagramming, appropriation, materiality of the image, the politics of print and print as a collaborative practice. 

Artists’ books and web based work as forms of distribution and explorations of narrative structures are a growing aspect of the course. We are benefiting from the renewed interest in the circulation, reception and creation of multiple images due to the ubiquity of digital images and computing.

We are embedded in a network of international print publishers, archives and galleries. A publishing project and exhibiting work are an integral part of the course. The potential for collaboration and residency situations where making work is a form of exchange is core to many students and we help them prepare for making applications to such opportunities. 

The aim of the programme is to enable students to work across a broad platform of media appropriate to their self defined ambitions and interests. By equipping graduates with experience of exhibiting, collaboration, editioning, lecturing, curating and a thorough critical engagement with a self defined body of work we aim to develop artists who understand the expressive nuances of different materials and forms of distribution in the expanded field of print. Evidence suggests they will be able to sustain themselves on graduation as exhibiting artists often engaged in related fields such as, teaching, publishing, curating and research.

An active research culture of staff, visiting artists, MPhil and PhD students is a core part of the programme and is shared through lectures, seminars, publications, presentations and exhibitions.

Alumni include, Andrea Buettner, Adam Dant, Mabe Bethonico, William Latham, Haris Epaminonda, Daniel Gustav Cramer, Christiane Baumgartner and Katsutoshi Yuasa.

The programme offers:

  • a critical context to understand the field of Print through making, exhibiting, discussion and writing
  • individual desk space 
  • access purpose-built workshops, offering internationally renowned printmaking facilities and instruction in relief and intaglio, screen printing, stone and plate lithography and large-format digital printing
  • access to college wide workshop facilities including metalwork casting, photography, ceramics and 3D printing. 
  • opportunities for teaching placements, workshop placements, exhibitions, overseas travel and international exchanges
  • an annual collaborative publishing project 
  • introductions to archives and collections, (eg V&A, Tate and British Museum) and editioning workshops (Paupers Press, The Thames Barrier Print Studio, Curwen)
  • a well-established publications programme which most recently published a print by Mark Titchner. Sales from these publications contribute to the Print Appeal Fund to support current students
  • continued support for alumni through Alumni RCA and programme specific events


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Why Surrey?. Successful entry on to this Guildford School of Acting (GSA) programme means you will be part of a carefully selected and committed ensemble of performers-in-training, equipped with the necessary self-discipline and motivation to master new skills and refine existing capabilities. Read more

Why Surrey?

Successful entry on to this Guildford School of Acting (GSA) programme means you will be part of a carefully selected and committed ensemble of performers-in-training, equipped with the necessary self-discipline and motivation to master new skills and refine existing capabilities.

GSA is one of the UK’s leading accredited drama schools, providing dedicated conservatoire training within a purpose built environment on the University of Surrey campus.

Programme overview

We place a very strong emphasis on the practical acquisition of technical skills together with a dedicated focus on professional development, and provide opportunities to combine these skills into musical theatre rehearsal projects and public performances.

The programme is intensive and specifically designed to equip participants in the ‘triple-threat’ disciplines of acting, singing, dancing.

Seminars in contextual and theoretical studies are taken together with masterclasses led by industry professionals in audition technique and repertoire.

These skills are integrated through project work which includes a devised project, a final public production led by a production team of industry professionals, and a West End Showcase.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

  • To deepen experiential knowledge, ability and critical understanding of the integrated practice of musical theatre
  • To develop a comprehensive theoretical and experiential understanding of the techniques and methodologies inherent in the practice of musical theatre
  • To enable an advanced knowledge of context, style, genre and idiom in the practice of musical theatre
  • To provide an ensemble training context for the development of professional skills based on practical and theoretical understanding and reflective practice
  • To enable the student to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical knowledge of how to research and create independent practice

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • An advanced understanding of the physical and vocal techniques required to maintain an expressive body and the optimum functionality of the voice
  • A critical understanding of key theoretical and methodological developments in the practice of musical theatre
  • A sophisticated understanding of the application of technique to differing theatrical forms, styles, genres and historical contexts
  • A comprehensive understanding of current industry practice

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Recognise, interpret and contextualise approaches to genre, idiom, style and historical context
  • Recognise and respond appropriately to the demands of different musical theatre styles
  • Ability to evaluate, critique and develop methodologies of practice
  • Critically analyse and reflect on their own and others’ practice

Professional practical skills

  • Identify and develop a personally effective and methodological approach to rehearsal
  • Select and apply vocal and physical techniques appropriate to different genres, styles and periods of musical theatre
  • Demonstrate creative, original and imaginative work in performance
  • Contribute effective and appropriate advanced practices and concepts to an ensemble process
  • Demonstrate evidence of extensive practical research and effective preparation for entry into the current performance industry

Key / transferable skills

  • Be disciplined and consistent in a professional context
  • Conduct themselves constructively, positively and sensitively towards others
  • Able to both lead and collaborate as part of a team, on practical and research projects
  • Communicate effectively and at an advanced level in both verbal and written form.
  • Seek out, critique and employ information appropriately
  • Recognise and develop commercial and artistic career opportunities.

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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Why Surrey?. Our new and innovative MFA Acting will train future generations of internationally renowned performers and teachers. Read more

Why Surrey?

Our new and innovative MFA Acting will train future generations of internationally renowned performers and teachers.

Delivered by Guildford School of Acting (GSA), one of the most highly regarded theatre schools in the UK, this programme provides world-class training alongside a sterling reputation and excellent industry links.

Programme Overview

Our new and innovative MFA Acting builds on the success of GSA’s current postgraduate programme by extending the high-quality, intensive training currently offered on our one year MA Acting programme. The MFA Acting programme is highly selective and intensive: students train for four semesters over two years, taking classes in acting, voice, movement and professional development, exploring a wide range of theatre traditions and performance styles in rehearsal projects and public productions.

This unique programme is delivered by expert teachers with extensive first-hand experience in the professional theatre sector in both the UK and the US.

Our beautiful campus boasts strong transport links to London, meaning our students can easily benefit from GSA’s proximity to the heart of UK theatre; London’s West End. This means our students not only receive world-class training, but are also heavily exposed to London theatre, cultural activities and highly beneficial industry networks.

Programme Structure

This programme is studied full-time over four consecutive semesters and two academic years.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational Aims of the Programme

Our MFA in Acting will provide graduates with:

  • The ability to employ a broad range of acting knowledge and skills in the creation and presentation of roles
  • The ability to perform in plays of various types and from various periods
  • The acquisition of advanced understanding and capabilities in voice and speech, movement, and play analysis
  • A working knowledge of historical, critical, and theoretical content and the ways they inform playwriting and dramatic writing, the creation of roles, and other aspects of production

Program Learning Outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • An experiential and theoretical knowledge of key practical acting methodologies
  • An advanced understanding, which will inform ongoing skill attainment, of the physical and vocal techniques required to maintain an expressive body and the optimum functionality of the voice
  • A critical understanding of key theoretical and methodological developments in the practice of acting
  • An advanced understanding, which will inform ongoing skill attainment, of the application of technique to differing theatrical forms, styles, genres and historical contexts
  • A comprehensive understanding of current industry practice

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Recognise, interpret and contextualise approaches to performance texts
  • Identify and develop an individual methodological approach to rehearsal
  • Select vocal and physical techniques appropriate to voice, person and situation
  • Recognise and respond appropriately to the demands of different performance media
  • Critically analyse and reflect on their own and others’ practice

Professional practical skills

  • Successfully apply integrated vocal and psycho-physical techniques to the practice of acting in differing media
  • Sustain and develop an effective and creative individual rehearsal process
  • Demonstrate creative and imaginative work in performance
  • Contribute effective and appropriate practices and concepts to an ensemble process
  • Demonstrate evidence of practical research and effective preparation for entry into the current performance industry

Key / transferable skills

  • Be disciplined and consistent in a professional context
  • Conduct themselves constructively, positively, and sensitively towards others
  • Able to lead and collaborate as part of the team on practical and research projects
  • Communicate effectively and at an advanced level in both verbal and written form
  • Seek out, critique, and employ information appropriately
  • Recognise and develop commercial and artistic career opportunities

Global Opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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