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Masters Degrees (Expression)

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Molecular genetics is the study of genes at the molecular level. It focuses on the processes that underlie the expression of the genetic information from the DNA into the functional proteins that execute the genetic programme. Read more
Molecular genetics is the study of genes at the molecular level. It focuses on the processes that underlie the expression of the genetic information from the DNA into the functional proteins that execute the genetic programme. Within the School of Life Sciences research in molecular genetics is concentrated in the Human Genetics, Fungal Biology, and Developmental Genetics and Gene Control groups. In the Human Genetics group research in this area includes studies of the molecular basis of myotonic dystrophy and the identification of genes involved in cardiac development; the molecular genetics of muscle disease; mouse models of muscle disorders and molecular genetic approaches to anthropology and human population genetics. In the Fungal Biology group there are studies on the molecular events that determine stress responses during polarised growth, protein folding and secretion in yeasts and filamentous fungi; the molecular and cellular effects of stress on yeast cells and the genetic mechanisms that control sex in fungi. The Developmental Genetics and Gene Control group focuses on the mechanisms of eukaryotic gene expression and the genetics of vertebrate embryonic development. Developmental studies are focussed largely upon the mechanisms that control stem cell fate. Projects on the control of gene expression address the machinery used by cells to achieve appropriate levels of functional transcripts. These studies include control of transcription and the mechanisms of RNA maturation.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES
After identifying which Masters you wish to pursue please complete an on-line application form
https://pgapps.nottingham.ac.uk/
Mark clearly on this form your choice of course title, give a brief outline of your proposed research and follow the automated prompts to provide documentation. Once the School has your application and accompanying documents (eg referees reports, transcripts/certificates) your application will be matched to an appropriate academic supervisor and considered for an offer of admission.

COURSE STRUCTURE
The MRes degree course consists of two elements:
160 credits of assessed work. The assessed work will normally be based entirely on a research project and will be the equivalent of around 10 ½ months full-time research work. AND
20 credits of non-assessed generic training. Credits can be accumulated from any of the courses offered by the Graduate School. http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gradschool/research-training/index.phtml The generic courses should be chosen by the student in consultation with the supervisor(s).

ASSESSMENT
The research project will normally be assessed by a dissertation of a maximum of 30,000 to 35,000 words, or equivalent as appropriate*. The examiners may if they so wish require the student to attend a viva.
*In consultation with the supervisor it maybe possible for students to elect to do a shorter research project and take a maximum of 40 credits of assessed modules.

The School of Life Sciences will provide each postgraduate research student with a laptop for their exclusive use for the duration of their studies in the School.

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/studywithus/international-applicants/scholarships-fees-and-finance/scholarships/masters-scholarships.aspx

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The Institute of Genetic Medicine brings together a strong team with an interest in clinical and developmental genetics. Our research focuses on the causes of genetic disease at the molecular and cellular level and its treatment. Read more
The Institute of Genetic Medicine brings together a strong team with an interest in clinical and developmental genetics. Our research focuses on the causes of genetic disease at the molecular and cellular level and its treatment. Research areas include: genetic medicine, developmental genetics, neuromuscular and neurological genetics, mitochondrial genetics and cardiovascular genetics.

As a research postgraduate in the Institute of Genetic Medicine you will be a member of our thriving research community. The Institute is located in Newcastle’s Life Science Centre. You will work alongside a number of research, clinical and educational organisations, including the Northern Genetics Service.

We offer supervision for MPhil in the following research areas:

Cancer genetics and genome instability

Our research includes:
-A major clinical trial for chemoprevention of colon cancer
-Genetic analyses of neuroblastoma susceptibility
-Research into Wilms Tumour (a childhood kidney cancer)
-Studies on cell cycle regulation and genome instability

Cardiovascular genetics and development

We use techniques of high-throughput genetic analyses to identify mechanisms where genetic variability between individuals contributes to the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. We also use mouse, zebrafish and stem cell models to understand the ways in which particular gene families' genetic and environmental factors are involved in the normal and abnormal development of the heart and blood vessels.

Complex disease and quantitative genetics

We work on large-scale studies into the genetic basis of common diseases with complex genetic causes, for example autoimmune disease, complex cardiovascular traits and renal disorders. We are also developing novel statistical methods and tools for analysing this genetic data.

Developmental genetics

We study genes known (or suspected to be) involved in malformations found in newborn babies. These include genes involved in normal and abnormal development of the face, brain, heart, muscle and kidney system. Our research includes the use of knockout mice and zebrafish as laboratory models.

Gene expression and regulation in normal development and disease

We research how gene expression is controlled during development and misregulated in diseases, including the roles of transcription factors, RNA binding proteins and the signalling pathways that control these. We conduct studies of early human brain development, including gene expression analysis, primary cell culture models, and 3D visualisation and modelling.

Genetics of neurological disorders

Our research includes:
-The identification of genes that in isolation can cause neurological disorders
-Molecular mechanisms and treatment of neurometabolic disease
-Complex genetics of common neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease
-The genetics of epilepsy

Kidney genetics and development

Kidney research focuses on:
-Atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS)
-Vesicoureteric reflux (VUR)
-Cystic renal disease
-Nephrolithiasis to study renal genetics

The discovery that aHUS is a disease of complement dysregulation has led to a specific interest in complement genetics.

Mitochondrial disease

Our research includes:
-Investigation of the role of mitochondria in human disease
-Nuclear-mitochondrial interactions in disease
-The inheritance of mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy
-Mitochondrial function in stem cells

Neuromuscular genetics

The Neuromuscular Research Group has a series of basic research programmes looking at the function of novel muscle proteins and their roles in pathogenesis. Recently developed translational research programmes are seeking therapeutic targets for various muscle diseases.

Stem cell biology

We research human embryonic stem (ES) cells, germline stem cells and somatic stem cells. ES cell research is aimed at understanding stem cell pluripotency, self-renewal, survival and epigenetic control of differentiation and development. This includes the functional analysis of genes involved in germline stem cell proliferation and differentiation. Somatic stem cell projects include programmes on umbilical cord blood stem cells, haematopoietic progenitors, and limbal stem cells.

Pharmacy

Our new School of Pharmacy has scientists and clinicians working together on all aspects of pharmaceutical sciences and clinical pharmacy.

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Christianity and the Arts is taught in association with the National Gallery in London. The course investigates how Christian scripture, beliefs and practices have found expression in art over 2,000 years. Read more

Christianity and the Arts is taught in association with the National Gallery in London.

The course investigates how Christian scripture, beliefs and practices have found expression in art over 2,000 years. It traces the idea of beauty in Western theological tradition; makes use of examples in London.

Leads to further research or careers in teaching, journalism or the church.

Key benefits

  • Will enable students to work across disciplinary and specialism boundaries, and in particular to explore simultaneously the art-historical and theological dimensions of Christian art – approaches which are generally pursued in isolation from one another.
  • Will use rich cultural resources beyond the university – and specifically the artistic, human and web-based resources of the National Gallery.
  • Will provide opportunities for students to learn outside the university, in the context of an art museum, with likely additional visits/links to institutions with related collections, like the Courtauld Gallery, and the Victoria and Albert Museum.
  • Will enhance the experience of international students at the university by giving them a stimulating and privileged understanding of one of London’s (and the world’s) greatest treasuries of art.

Description

Our MA in Christianity and the Arts will investigate how Christian scripture, beliefs and practices have found expression in the arts over 2000 years. The course features a required module on the Idea of Beauty in Western Theology and a wide range of optional modules looking at different forms of artistic expression, different artistic periods with a focus on specific elements of the Christian narrative. You will also have the opportunity to explore a topic in detail through your dissertation.

Wherever possible the course draws on examples and case studies here in London, particularly the collections at The National Gallery, The Courtauld Institute and The Victoria and Albert Museum. We will help you to work across disciplinary and specialism boundaries, and in particular to explore both the art-historical and theological dimensions of Christian art – approaches which are generally pursued in isolation from one another.

Course purpose

To enable students to work across disciplinary and specialism boundaries, and in particular to explore simultaneously the art-historical and theological dimensions of Christian art – approaches which are generally pursued in isolation from one another.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you’re a full-time student, each week we’ll provide six to eight hours of teaching through lectures and seminars. We’ll expect you to undertake 34 of independent study.

If you’re a part-time student, each week we’ll provide two to four hours of teaching through lectures and seminars. We’ll expect you to undertake 17 hours of independent study.

Typically one credit amounts to 10 hours of work. 

Assessment

We assess the majority of our modules through coursework and/or examination, although other departments may differ. Your dissertation will be a 15,000-word thesis.

Career prospects

Our graduates use the skills and knowledge that they develop with us to pursue careers in teaching, journalism, media, museum work and the church, or other religious institutions. Others have continued their studies with further research. 



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The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Read more
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Its more than 2,500 students are engaged in a wide variety of challenging courses and hands-on learning experiences that extend across all areas of the humanities and sciences – from the great philosophers and classic literature to the world economy and environmental sustainability.

At the core of each department are faculty members who have garnered national acclaim for their best-selling books, ground-breaking research and creative endeavors. Together, students and their professors explore globally significant subjects and work towards the goal of improving every aspect of the way in which human beings live. To learn more about a specific area of study, click on the left-hand navigation bar for a full listing of academic departments.

English

Through the study of English, students learn to evaluate sensibilities both past and present, acquiring a profound knowledge of their own humanity and of the human condition in general. The study of English helps develop fluency of expression, skill in logical analysis, and facility in planning, organizing, and revising.

Undergraduate and graduate programs in English with a concentration in literature offers you an opportunity to explore the world around you and enduring issues of identity, morality, spirituality, and material success through the great minds of Western civilization.

The writing concentration explores various forms of creative expression through course work in literature, creative writing and non-fiction writing. Students pursuing this concentration have the opportunity to take courses in “Academic Writing” (expository, argumentative, creative writing), “Performance Writing” (screenplays, teleplays), “Writing for the Marketplace” (business, public relations), and “Rhetorical Theory” (ancient and modern).

With deep study of great literature, development of effective writing and communication skills, and courses in logic and political science, English is an excellent, traditional pre-law major, and with appropriate introductory sequences in the sciences, English is also an excellent pre-medical or pre-dental major. With a minor in Business or Computer Science, a student who majors in English will prepare especially well for many executive positions in business and government.

M.A. in English

The English language is arguably the most flexible instrument of thought and expression in the world. From the poetic drama of the Elizabethans to the experimental pyrotechnics of the modern novel, the study of English literature offers ever-fresh insights into the human condition, while helping students improve their command of today’s most influential language.

The 36-credit Master of Arts in English curriculum combines in-depth study of the wealth of the British and American literary traditions with an examination of how the language developed over time and how it is used in everyday discourse. As a degree candidate you will take three required courses designed to strengthen your critical reading and writing skills: “Text(s) in Context,” “Research and Criticism,” and “The Critical Tradition.” A thesis is also required.

You will also choose seven electives from a rich array of options that include: “Style and Syntax” (for writers and others who need a theoretical and technical knowledge of the field); “Cultural Linguistics” (an exploration of human communication in its cultural context, including the origins of language); “Middle English Literature” (lyric, romance, tale, fable and drama in the period 1100-1500); and “20th Century American Literature” (an intensive study of writers such as Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Pynchon and Morrison).

Through its wide-ranging subject matter and focus on reading and writing proficiency, the study of English prepares students for the broadest variety of careers. Studies show that an ability to learn new skills and procedures is an outstanding characteristic of those who have majored in English. Many graduates of master’s programs in English go on to become elementary or secondary school teachers or pursue doctorates and become college professors, but a graduate degree in English can also be excellent preparation for a career in business, law, journalism, public relations and many other fields.

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In recent years the study of plant sciences has been revolutionised by the development of new tools and technologies which have allowed unprecedented progress in the study of plant biology – knowledge which is being applied to develop sustainable solutions to some of the major challenges of the 21st century. Read more

In recent years the study of plant sciences has been revolutionised by the development of new tools and technologies which have allowed unprecedented progress in the study of plant biology – knowledge which is being applied to develop sustainable solutions to some of the major challenges of the 21st century.

This course will give you specialist training in the modern molecular aspects of plant science. A large part of your teaching will be delivered by academics from the University’s Centre for Plant Sciences (CPS) linked to the latest research in their areas of expertise.

You’ll explore the wide ranges of approaches used in biomolecular sciences as applied to plant science. This will cover theory and practice of recombinant DNA and protein production, bioimaging using our confocal microscope suite, practical bioinformatics and theories behind ‘omic technologies.

You’ll also learn how to design a programme of research and write a research proposal, read and critically analyse scientific papers in plant science and biotechnology and present the findings. A highlight of the course is your individual 80 credit practical research project.

The course is 100% coursework assessed (although some modules have small in course tests). Our teaching and assessment methods are designed to develop your independent thinking, problem solving, communication skills and practical ability, making you attractive to employers or providing an excellent foundation for further study (eg PhD).

You’ll study in a faculty ranked 6th in the UK for its research impact in the recent Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014).

Our Facilities

You’ll study in a stimulating environment which houses extensive facilities developed to support and enhance our faculty’s pioneering research. As well as Faculty operated facilities, the CPS laboratories are well equipped for general plant research. There is also a plant growth unit, including tissue culture suites with culture rooms, growth rooms and flow cabinets alongside transgenic glass-houses to meet a range of growth requirements.

Course content

On this course you’ll gain an overview of a range of modern techniques and methodologies that underpin contemporary biomolecular plant sciences.

You’ll also apply your knowledge to an extended practical investigation in the form of a laboratory-based mini project, involving practical training in a range of modern molecular biology and protein engineering techniques such as gene cloning, PCR, mutagenesis, protein expression, protein purification and analysis.

A module on plant biotechnology will address current topics such as the engineering of plants, development of stress-tolerant crop varieties and techniques for gene expression and gene silencing through reading discussion and critical analysis of recent research papers.

You’ll learn from the research of international experts in DNA recombination and repair mechanisms and their importance for transgene integration and biotechnological applications; plant nutrition and intracellular communication; and the biosynthesis, structure and function of plant cell walls.

You’ll also explore the wide range of approaches used in bio-imaging and their relative advantages and disadvantages for analysing protein and cellular function. Bioinformatics and high throughput omic technologies are crucial to plant science research and you will take modules introducing you to these disciplines.

In the final part of the course you'll work on an independent laboratory-based research project related to your course options. You’ll receive extensive training in experimental design, the practical use of advanced techniques and technologies, data analysis and interpretation, and will be assigned a research project supervisor who will support and guide you through your project.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Bioimaging 10 credits
  • Topics in Plant Science 10 credits
  • Practical Bioinformatics 10 credits
  • Plant Biotechnology 10 credits
  • High-throughput Technologies 10 credits
  • MSc Bioscience Research Project Proposal 5 credits
  • Research Planning and Scientific Communication 10 credits
  • Advanced Biomolecular Technologies 20 credits
  • Protein Engineering Laboratory Project 15 credits
  • Bioscience MSc Research Project 80 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Plant Science and Biotechnology MSc in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll have access to the very best learning resources and academic support during your studies. We’ve been awarded a Gold rating in the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF, 2017), demonstrating our commitment to delivering consistently outstanding teaching, learning and outcomes for our students.

Your learning will be heavily influenced by the University’s world-class research as well as our strong links with highly qualified professionals from industry, non-governmental organisations and charities.

You’ll experience a wide range of teaching methods including formal lectures, interactive workshops, problem-solving, practical classes and demonstrations.

Through your research project and specialist plant science modules, you’ll receive substantial subject-specific training. Our teaching and assessment methods are designed to develop you into a scientist who is able to think independently, solve problems, communicate effectively and demonstrate a high level of practical ability.

Assessment

We use a variety of assessment methods: multiple-choice testing, practical work, data handling and problem solving exercises, group work, discussion groups (face-to-face and online), computer-based simulation, essays, posters and oral presentations.

Career opportunities

The strong research element of the Plant Science and Biotechmology MSc, along with the specialist and generic skills you develop, mean you’ll graduate equipped for a wide range of careers.

Our graduates work in a diverse range of areas, ranging from bioscience-related research through to scientific publication, teacher training, health and safety and pharmaceutical market research.

Links with industry

We have a proactive Industrial Advisory Board who advise us on what they look for in graduates and on employability-related skills within our courses.

We collaborate with a wide range of organisations in the public and commercial sectors. Many of these are represented on our Industrial Advisory Board. They include:

  • GlaxoSmithKline
  • Ernst and Young
  • The Food and Environment Research Agency
  • The Health Protection Agency
  • MedImmune
  • Thermofisher Scientific
  • Hays Life Sciences
  • European Bioinformatics Institute
  • Smaller University spin-out companies, such as Lumora.

Industrial research placements

Some of our partners offer MSc research projects in their organisations, allowing students to develop their commercial awareness and build their network of contacts.



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Understanding, translating and communicating brand stories graphically. it's what today's key branding designers do. Driven by intelligent enquiry and evaluation, MA Graphic Branding and Identity challenges the whole meaning of graphic branding. Read more

Introduction

Understanding, translating and communicating brand stories graphically: it's what today's key branding designers do. Driven by intelligent enquiry and evaluation, MA Graphic Branding and Identity challenges the whole meaning of graphic branding. Explore the strategic thinking underlying brands and look at how that strategy can drive the creative expression.

Content

Driven by intelligent enquiry and evaluation, this programme encourages students to challenge what is understood about the meaning of graphic branding. It explores the strategic thinking underlying brands and focuses on how that strategy can drive the creative expression.

Look around you and you will see examples of the power of brands - on the High Street, within organisations and in the media. From Coca Cola to Virgin, the most successful brands are worth billions.

This MA course focuses on the role of visual identity within branding. The aim is to produce versatile and creative practitioners who understand design within a business, social and cultural context.

It addresses the subject from a broad perspective, covering individual, group, cultural, national, international, corporate and commercial identities. You will be encouraged to look critically at the graphic elements which make up a contemporary visual identity. The emphasis is on practical design, supported by theoretical components and the application of clear research methodologies. As well as developing a deeper knowledge of branding and graphic design, you will gain an understanding of how to develop brand strategies and propositions. An important part of the course involves developing an independent personal project that investigates these principles and their application.

Learning at this level will be about research, intellectual engagement, discovery, interaction and change. The final product for us is not in itself the goal - it is the research, exploration, evaluation and intellectual understanding of branding and identity that makes this MA distinctive.

Structure

Phase 1

Unit 1.1 Design Literacy
Unit 1.2 Research Methods (Visual Research)
Unit 1.3 Major Project Proposal

Phase 2

Unit 2.1 Workshop Options Project
Unit 2.2 Design + Rhetoric
Unit 2.3 Research Methods: Major Project Definition

Phase 3

Unit 3.1 Major Project Resolution: Practical and Report or
Unit 3.2 Major Project Resolution: Thesis

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This course explores the relationship between textual and visual forms of apprehension and expression in the modern world and their impact on European culture post-1900. Read more
This course explores the relationship between textual and visual forms of apprehension and expression in the modern world and their impact on European culture post-1900. The focus of the core module is on the graphic arts (poster, postage stamp, typography), photography and cinema, and on contemporary digital-based media. Various theoretical approaches will be explored in relation to the word/image problematic which will be situated in a number of European cultural traditions. Course options focus on specific media (photography, cinema) or themes (the city, avant-gardes).

The aim of the course is to bring students to a high level of theoretical and practical awareness of the text-image relation in cultural expression, equip them to analyse and evaluate the various forms text/image interaction takes, and to provide them with a training that will enrich their practice in other areas of study or professional engagement.

The course consists of one core module stretching over two semesters and four one-semester modules (from a choice of 5 or 6). The first core module focuses on Word/Image relations in graphic design, ranging from posters and postage stamps to typography and logotype. The second core semester focus on word/image relations in photography, cinema and the digital media. The one-term options, two of which are followed each semester, include Text and Photography, Figuring European National Identities, Figurations of the European City, the Russian Avant-Garde and East European Cinema. A dissertation on a subject of the student's choice is prepared over the summer months.

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This course offers you the opportunity to specialise in either Composition or Musicology & Ethnomusicology and is taught in the heart of London with access to major arts centres. Read more

This course offers you the opportunity to specialise in either Composition or Musicology & Ethnomusicology and is taught in the heart of London with access to major arts centres. It covers a wide range of subjects: the Composition pathway enables you to work closely with your lecturers to study a variety of musical genres and styles and,if you choose Musicology, you will benefit from seminars with leaders in the field covering the evolution of different musical forms and their role in and expression of the cultures in which they developed.

You can specialise in either Composition or Musicology and Ethnomusicology by selecting from a wide range of modulesacross Arts and Humanities. 

Key benefits

  • Intensively taught programme covering a wide range of specialised topics.
  • Provides a foundation for further research focusing on current approaches and advanced techniques.
  • Musicology and Ethnomusicology students choose from historical, sociocultural and theoretical modules taught by distinguished staff (including two fellows of the British Academy).
  • Composition students benefit from one-to-one lessons and participation in composition seminars and have the opportunity to hear their works performed by resident ensemble Lontano.
  • Option to take modules in other Arts and Humanities departments at King's, or at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS).
  • Located in the heart of London's music scene, with two major opera companies (Royal Opera Covent Garden and English National Opera) and two major arts centres (South Bank Centre—location of the Royal Festival Hall—and Barbican) within short walking distance.

Description

On this course you may specialise in either Composition or Musicology & Ethnomusicology. Please note, we do not offer a Performance pathway. If you follow the Composition pathway, you will work closely with your teachers and study a variety of musical genres and styles. If you choose Musicology, you will benefit from seminars with leaders in the field covering the evolution of different musical forms and their role in and expression of the cultures in which they developed. We encourage you to choose modules that reflect your particular interests, and up to a third of your choices may be from other Arts & Humanities departments, meaning you can build a broad and truly individual study pathway.

Our specialist modules will teach you current approaches to academic writing on music as well as advanced techniques for research and composition. At the end of your course, you will submit a special study – either a dissertation or a substantial work of 8-15 minutes in duration (the composition must be notated in a conventional manner) – for which we will give you one-to-one supervision.

Our aim is to nurture leaders in musicology, ethnomusicology and composition. If you intend go on to research or composition at doctoral level, or if you want to build on your existing skills, this course will be ideal for you.

Course purpose

For students intending to go on to research or composition at doctoral level, or wishing to build upon their existing skills. To provide training beyond undergraduate level in current techniques of music research and composition. To nurture leaders in musicology, ethnomusicology and composition.

Course format and assessment

Course credits 

Modules worth 120 credits, plus a special study (dissertation or portfolio) worth 60 credits.

Teaching 

If you are studying the Musicology & Ethnomusicology Pathway, we will give you six hours of teaching each week (if you are a part-time student, this is two to four in your first year, and one to two in your second) through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 24 hours (12 hours for part-time) of self-study.

If you are studying the Composition Pathway, we will give you four hours of teaching each week (one to two hours if you are a part-time student) through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 26 hours of self-study (13 hours for part-time).

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

We will assess you entirely through coursework. If you are studying the Musicology & Ethnomusicology Pathway, you will write a 12,000-word dissertation or critical edition. If you are studying the Composition Pathway, you will compose a substational work lasting 8-15 minutes. 



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Human rights law now permeates the study and practice of all areas of law, from our criminal justice processes, from planning appeals to privacy, terrorism to tort, health law to litigation. Read more
Human rights law now permeates the study and practice of all areas of law, from our criminal justice processes, from planning appeals to privacy, terrorism to tort, health law to litigation. It is a fascinating and absorbing area of law in its own right, encompassing bodily integrity rights, such as the right to life, the right not to be tortured and the right not to be detained, procedural rights such as the right to a fair trial (both civil and criminal), and expressive rights such as freedom of religion, of assembly and of free expression itself.

Nottingham Law School has significant academic expertise in the areas of human rights and justice. The LLM Human Rights and Justice is based on the significant expertise of academic staff in Nottingham Law School, particularly from its Centre for Conflict, Rights and Justice. The course parallels the historical and contemporary significance of these aspects of law, in particular their growth as topics of both domestic and international importance over recent decades.

The course will help you develop a strong analytical understanding of the key legal issues in the area, with a particular focus on European and international human rights and key aspects of international justice systems.

Modules Include: Public International and Humanitarian Law; Terrorism and International Response; Victims' Rights and Restorative Justice; Human Rights in Europe; Theory and Principles of International Law; Expression Rights; Human Rights and Criminal Justice; Discrimination Law in Employment; International Human Rights; International Criminal Court and International Crime; and Data Protection and Privacy.

Scholarships are available, visit: http://www.ntu.ac.uk/scholarshipsnls for details.

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This course is accredited by the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy UK (ADMPUK), so you'll become a fully registered dance movement therapist with the ADMPUK. Read more

Why choose this course:

• This course is accredited by the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy UK (ADMPUK), so you'll become a fully registered dance movement therapist with the ADMPUK

• You'll develop the skills you need to support the health and well-being of vulnerable people, so it's a really rewarding course to choose

• This course will give you dance movement psychotherapy training and a licence to practice, as well as giving you an academic qualification at masters level

• We will support you during your placement to make sure that you're ready for your career in dance movement psychotherapy when you graduate

• You will be given the opportunity to undertake CPD training in Zero Balancing body work. This concerns the cultivation of sensitivity to the structure and energy of the body.

About the course:

The programme gives you solid experience of clinical dance movement therapy practice, supervision and work in education, as well as further closed group work. The main emphasis is on your work in a clinical environment and using creative skills to explore self-expression. You will be allocated a personal tutor who'll be responsible for monitoring your overall progress. As well as taught components, you'll be required to engage in personal therapy as this is a requirement for professional registration. This is a private arrangement and the cost is not included in the fees. Individual or group therapy is acceptable.

This course is accredited by the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy UK, so you can be confident that you'll be learning the most up to date thinking on dance movement psychotherapy.

During the course you'll build up your experience of clinical dance movement therapy, and use your creative skills to explore self-expression.

It's important to understand the history of dance movement psychotherapy from the early pioneers through to the current thinking. You'll cover concepts such as the theory and practice of the art form and the importance of improvisation, creativity and play. You'll also use and reflect on psychotherapeutic theory, while considering the implications for placement and practice. Because anatomy and physiology are essential to your understanding of movement and its relevance for psychotherapy, you'll also explore this during the course.

We've excellent facilities including our new dance studio, and have close links with Déda, the Derby dance centre.

You'll be allocated a personal tutor who will be responsible for monitoring your overall progress. As well as the taught components, you'll need to take part in personal therapy throughout the course, which can be individual or group therapy, because this is a requirement for professional registration as a dance movement psychotherapist.

You'll need to undertake health screening at the start of the course to monitor your fitness to practice.

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Introduction. MA Contemporary Photography is a fine art photography course that explores the possibilities of both visual and conceptual expression, merging research deeply with practice. Read more

Introduction

MA Contemporary Photography is a fine art photography course that explores the possibilities of both visual and conceptual expression, merging research deeply with practice. The course is rooted in the idea that photography has no self-limiting identity or essence. In creating work that is visually exciting and intellectually compelling you’ll develop as an artist with photography at the core of your practice, defining, or redefining photography as the art form of the 21st century.

Content

MA Contemporary Photography understands photography as plural, trans disciplinary and multimedial global language that is situated at the core of contemporary visual art practice. The deep integration of theory and practice offers supportive environment in which to explore photography as form of expression that interlaces fine art, technology, aesthetics, politics and new media. Opportunities to research photography as a central component of discursive practices within the arts, the sciences and the construction of personal identities, provide students with tools to work in fields related to artistic production and the extended creative industries.

Unlike many other photography courses, this course is not committed to one notion of what photography is or to one form of media specific practice. Instead of working from a predefined notion of photography, the course aims to provide students with the tools to locate their own practice within a broad range of contemporary visual forms. 

Structure

MA Contemporary Photography is a two year (60 weeks) part-time course structured as two consecutive periods of 30 weeks each. Course attendance is three days in year one, and two days in year two. In year one we expect you to commit an average of 40 hours per week. In year two, your study is predominantly self-managed but we expect you to commit an average of 20 hours per week. Across the two years, you're expected to commit an average of 30 hours per week.

MA Contemporary Photography is credit rated at 180 credits, and comprises two units: Unit one (60 credits) and Unit two (120 credits).

Students successfully achieving Unit one may exit at this point with the award of Postgraduate Certificate.

Both units must be passed in order to achieve the MA, but the classification of the award of MA derives from the mark for Unit two only.



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The International Multimedia Journalism MA programme teaches multimedia journalism to graduates of universities outside the UK who aspire to pursue a career in the news industry. Read more
The International Multimedia Journalism MA programme teaches multimedia journalism to graduates of universities outside the UK who aspire to pursue a career in the news industry. You learn to report for newspapers, websites, radio and television in a live newsroom environment. Using state-of-the-art technology located in dedicated radio/television studios and multimedia newsrooms you work to real deadlines to make news programmes and upload your work to the internet. Your tutors are award-winning journalists with decades of front-line experience in national and international news. Every day starts with an editorial conference and the degree programme balances focus on journalism as practical reality with intense academic study and reflection.

This programme is especially designed for those students who do not intend to practise journalism in the United Kingdom.

About the Centre for Journalism

The Centre for Journalism is leading the development of journalism as an academic discipline rooted in professional newsroom practice. It was established in 2008 to achieve top standards in teaching and research.

A lively and welcoming community spirit exists within the Centre. There are regular social events, seminars and masterclasses. Recent visitors have included: Allan Little, BBC correspondent; Sarah Ivens founding Editor-in-Chief of OK! Magazine USA; Gavin Esler, former presenter of Newsnight; Jon Snow, presenter of Channel 4 News, Mark Thompson, former Director General of the BBC, Alex Crawford three times RTS TV journalist of the year, Stephanie Flanders former Economics Editor BBC and Stuart Ramsay Sky News chief Correspondent. Thanks to the range of research and professional interests in the Centre, we can offer wide scope for research supervision.

The Centre enjoys strong links with other academic departments including the School of History, Kent Law School and the School of Politics and International Relations. It encourages collaborative and interdisciplinary research and joint supervision.

Course structure

Compulsory modules in Reporting and Writing, Journalism and Free Expression and Practical Multimedia Journalism introduce you to the intellectual and professional challenges of reporting for newspapers, radio, television and the internet. You choose optional academic modules from a range including: History of Journalism; Reporting Conflict; Communication and Humanitarianism, Political Reporting and Propaganda - Media, Manipulation and Persuasion.

You may choose to complete a dissertation.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year.

JN800 - Reporting (45 credits)
JN802 - Practical Multimedia Journalism (45 credits)
JN804 - Dissertation in Multimedia Journalism (30 credits)
JN814 - Journalism and Free Expression (30 credits)
JN815 - Political Reporting (15 credits)
JN816 - Propaganda-Media, Manipulation and Persuasion (15 credits)
JN806 - Reporting Conflict (15 credits)
JN807 - Advanced Multimedia Storytelling (15 credits)
JN808 - Communication and Humanitarianism (15 credits)
JN813 - Sports Journalism (15 credits)

Assessment

The degree is taught by a combination of lectures, seminars, masterclasses, news days, tutorials and editorial conferences. Assessment is by coursework (including essays, reporting exercises and presentations) and examinations. The optional dissertation counts for a third of the final grade.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- teach the professional and academic skills required to practise multimedia journalism to those wishing to pursue a career in the news industry

- educate you to think critically about the ethics, duties and responsibilities of journalism in democratic societies and in emerging democracies and thus improve the quality of journalism as a profession

- produce graduates with a courageous and principled vision of the purpose of journalism and its constitutional value in contemporary democratic societies

- develop a detailed and systematic understanding of particular forms of journalism and their historic and contemporary role in the shaping of culture and society

- develop a systematic understanding and critical awareness of the impact of new technologies on journalism

- develop an appropriate range of cognitive, critical and intellectual skills and research skills

- foster lifelong learning skills that will enable you to work with self-direction and originality and to contribute to journalism and society

- bring scholarly and critical insights to bear on the subjects, activities and processes associated with multimedia journalism

- provide teaching and learning opportunities that are informed by high quality research and scholarship from within the Centre for Journalism and elsewhere.

Research areas

History of journalism, political reporting, environmental journalism, conflict reporting, documentary film, journalism technology, democracy, propaganda, global media

Study support

Postgraduate resources
The Centre is based in state-of-the-art multimedia newsrooms equipped with the latest audio and video-editing technology, a radio studio and broadcast-quality television facilities. A dedicated postgraduate newsroom opened in September 2010. Newsroom computers offer a wide range of software for teaching and research support. Students have access to Press Association news wires, Sky News Radio and Reuters World Television News feeds. They use the Centre’s dedicated multimedia website, http://www.centreforjournalism.co.uk which offers live publishing facilities in text, audio and video. The site is a forum for debate about issues in journalism and the news industry involving students and practitioners in Britain and abroad.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff regularly contribute to newspapers, magazines, journals and books. These have included: This is Today – a Biography of the Today Programme, The Phone Hacking Scandal: Journalism on Trial, Mirage in the Desert? Reporting the Arab Spring, Face the Future: Tools for the Modern Media Age and Afghanistan, War and the Media (Tim Luckhurst); What do We Mean by Local? (Ian Reeves), Specialist Journalism: Journalism Studies; Journalism: Theory, Practice & Criticism; Ethical Space; British Journalism Review; Parliamentary Affairs; Journal of Language and Politics; Environmental Communication; The Guardian; Media History; Political Quarterly; The Daily Telegraph; Independent; The Times; Sunday Telegraph; Toronto Globe and Mail; Los Angeles Times; The New Republic; The Word; Prospect.

Our students have obtained jobs at places such as Sky News, The Daily Mail, BBC Newsround and the Huffington Post.

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Master's specialisation in Medical Epigenomics. The only Master’s specialisation in the Netherlands covering the function of our epigenome, a key factor in regulating gene expression and in a wide range of diseases. Read more

Master's specialisation in Medical Epigenomics

The only Master’s specialisation in the Netherlands covering the function of our epigenome, a key factor in regulating gene expression and in a wide range of diseases.

Our skin cells, liver cells and blood cells all contain the same genetic information. Yet these are different types of cells, each performing their own specific tasks. How is this possible? The explanation lies in the epigenome: a heritable, cell-type specific set of chromosomal modifications, which regulates gene expression. Radboud University is specialised in studying the epigenome and is the only university in the Netherlands to offer a Master’s programme in this field of research.

Health and disease

The epigenome consists of small and reversible chemical modifications of the DNA or histone proteins, such as methylation, acetylation and phosphorylation. It changes the spatial structure of DNA, resulting in gene activation or repression. These processes are crucial for our health and also play a role in many diseases, like autoimmune diseases, cancer and neurological disorders. As opposed to modifications of the genome sequence itself, epigenetic modifications are reversible. You can therefore imagine the great potential of drugs that target epigenetic enzymes, so-called epi-drugs.

Big data

In this specialisation, you’ll look at a cell as one big and complex system. You’ll study epigenetic mechanisms during development and disease from different angles. This includes studying DNA and RNA by next-generation sequencing (epigenomics) and analysing proteins by mass spectrometry (proteomics). In addition, you‘ll be trained to design computational strategies that allow the integration of these multifaceted, high-throughput data sets into one system.

Why study Medical Epigenomics at Radboud University?

- Radboud University combines various state-of-the-art technologies – such as quantitative mass spectrometry and next-generation DNA sequencing – with downstream bioinformatics analyses in one department. This is unique in Europe.

- This programme allows you to work with researchers from the Radboud Institute for Molecular Life sciences (RIMLS), one of the leading multidisciplinary research institutes within this field of study worldwide.

- We have close contacts with high-profile medically oriented groups on the Radboud campus and with international institutes (EMBL, Max-Planck, Marie Curie, Cambridge, US-based labs, etc). As a Master’s student, you can choose to perform an internship in one of these related departments.

- Radboud University coordinates BLUEPRINT, a 30 million Euro European project focusing on the epigenomics of leukaemia. Master’s students have the opportunity to participate in this project.

Career prospects

As a Master’s student of Medical Epigenomics you’re trained in using state-of-the art technology in combination with biological software tools to study complete networks in cells in an unbiased manner. For example, you’ll know how to study the effects of drugs in the human body.

When you enter the job market, you’ll have:

- A thorough background of epigenetic mechanisms in health and disease, which is highly relevant in strongly rising field of epi-drug development

- Extensive and partly hands-on experience in state-of-the-art ‘omics’ technologies: next-generation sequencing, quantitative mass spectrometry and single cell technologies;

- Extensive expertise in designing, executing and interpreting scientific experiments in data-driven research;

- The computational skills needed to analyse large ‘omics’ datasets.

With this background, you can become a researcher at a:

- University or research institute;

- Pharmaceutical company, such as Synthon or Johnson & Johnson;

- Food company, like Danone or Unilever;

- Start-up company making use of -omics technology.

Apart from research into genomics and epigenomics, you could also work on topics such as miniaturising workflows, improving experimental devices, the interface between biology and informatics, medicine from a systems approach.

Or you can become a:

- Biological or medical consultant;

- Biology teacher;

- Policy coordinator, regarding genetic or medical issues;

- Patent attorney;

- Clinical research associate;

PhD positions at Radboud University

Each year, the Molecular Biology department (Prof. Henk Stunnenberg, Prof. Michiel Vermeulen) and the Molecular Developmental Biology department (Prof. Gert-Jan Veenstra) at the RIMLS offer between five and ten PhD positions. Of course, many graduates also apply for a PhD position at related departments in the Netherlands, or abroad.

Our approach to this field

- Systems biology

In the Medical Epigenomics specialisation you won’t zoom in on only one particular gene, protein or signalling pathway. Instead, you’ll regard the cell as one complete system. This comprehensive view allows you to, for example, model the impact of one particular epigenetic mutation on various parts and functions of the cell, or study the effects of a drug in an unbiased manner. One of the challenges of this systems biology approach is the processing and integration of large amounts of data. That’s why you’ll also be trained in computational biology. Once graduated, this will be a great advantage: you’ll be able to bridge the gap between biology, technology and informatics , and thus have a profile that is desperately needed in modern, data-driven biology.

- Multiple OMICS approaches

Studying cells in a systems biology approach means connecting processes at the level of the genome (genomics), epigenome (epigenomics), transcriptome (transcriptomics), proteome (proteomics), etc. In the Medical Epigenomics specialisation, you’ll get acquainted with all these different fields of study.

- Patient and animal samples

Numerous genetic diseases are not caused by genetic mutations, but by epigenetic mutations that influence the structure and function of chromatin. Think of:

- Autoimmune diseases, like rheumatoid arthritis and lupus

- Cancer, in the forms of leukaemia, colon cancer, prostate cancer and cervical cancer

- Neurological disorders, like Rett Syndrome, Alzheimer, Parkinson, Multiple Sclerosis, schizophrenia and autism

We investigate these diseases on a cellular level, focusing on the epigenetic mutations and the impact on various pathways in the cell. You’ll get the chance to participate in that research, and work with embryonic stem cell, patient, Xenopus or zebra fish samples.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/medicalbiology/epigenomics

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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Research profile. Normal growth of an animal, from the fertilised egg through to end of life maturity, requires concerted action of all the genes found in the animal genome. Read more

Research profile

Normal growth of an animal, from the fertilised egg through to end of life maturity, requires concerted action of all the genes found in the animal genome. Not all genes are active at any one stage or in any one cell type. Gene expression is dynamic yet programmed. Sometimes this programming goes awry and disease ensues. Research in the Division of Developmental Biology aims to characterise, understand and ultimately exploit the ever changing profile of gene expression found in mammals. This will allow the development of a better understanding of biology which in turn will enable new biotech, agricultural and biomedical advances to become reality.

We believe that a supported, active and innovative post-graduate student community is essential if we are to deliver our goals. This community represents the scientists, entrepreneurs, communicators and regulators of the future.

Research in the Division of Developmental Biology aims to enhance fundamental knowledge of the control of cellular growth and differentiation aiming to underpin the development of better disease intervention strategies.

We will advance our understanding of function in these essential biological processes through mechanistic studies at the cell, tissue and whole animal level with particular focus on:

  • animal biotechnology and stem cells
  • tissue and organ development
  • tissue damage and repair
  • regulatory networks in development

Within the Division of Developmental Biology we have 19 Group Leaders plus 2 Career Track Fellows who supervise about 30 students at any one time.

Training and support

Studentships are of 3 or 4 years duration and students will be expected to complete a novel piece of research which will advance our understanding of the field. To help them in this goal, students will be assigned a principal and assistant supervisor, both of whom will be active scientists at the Institute. Student progress is monitored in accordance with School Postgraduate (PG) regulations by a PhD thesis committee (which includes an independent external assessor and chair). There is also dedicated secretarial support to assist these committees and the students with regard to University and Institute matters.

All student matters are overseen by the Schools PG studies committee. The Roslin Institute also has a local PG committee and will provide advice and support to students when requested. An active staff:student liaison committee and a social committee, which is headed by our postgraduate liaison officer, provide additional support.

Students are expected to attend a number of generic training courses offered by the Transkills Programme of the University and to participate in regular seminars and laboratory progress meetings. All students will also be expected to present their data at national and international meetings throughout their period of study.

Facilities

In 2011 The Roslin Institute moved to a new state-of-the-art building on the University of Edinburgh's veterinary campus at Easter Bush. Our facilities include: rodent, bird and livestock animal units and associated lab areas; comprehensive bioinformatic and genomic capability; a range of bioimaging facilities; extensive molecular biology and cell biology labs; café and auditorium where we regularly host workshops and invited speakers.



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The School of English and Journalism offers research opportunities at the highest level of academic qualification. a PhD or a PhD by Practice. Read more
The School of English and Journalism offers research opportunities at the highest level of academic qualification: a PhD or a PhD by Practice.

The PhD by Practice programme offers experienced journalists the opportunity to reflect on and critique their professional work in an academic setting. Students are expected to provide a substantial body of work accumulated over their career, and then have the opportunity to produce an associated commentary to form the main body of a portfolio, which is submitted in place of a thesis.

The School has a well-established research environment. PhD students can gain teaching experience and subject specialities include international (French, American, British and Commonwealth and Swedish) comparative, historical and literary perspectives, class and gender, media of diaspora documentary studies and freedom of expression.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Example Research Areas:
-Media of Diaspora
-Literary Journalism
-Ethics and Regulation of Journalism
-International Human Rights and Journalism
-Media History
-Freedom of Expression
-Documentary Studies
-Class and Gender

How You Study

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisor, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

A PhD is awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

Career and Personal Development

A doctoral qualification may be regarded as the capstone of academic achievement and may be the starting point for a career in academia or research.

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