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Masters Degrees (Explosives)

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This course has been designed specifically to provide an opportunity to a wide range of attendees, which include military officers, defence industry staff, government servants and civilian students. Read more

Course Description

This course has been designed specifically to provide an opportunity to a wide range of attendees, which include military officers, defence industry staff, government servants and civilian students.

The course offers advanced academic background necessary for students to contribute effectively to technically demanding projects in the field of explosives and Explosives Ordnance Engineering (EOE). It does this by introducing them to up-to-date and current research, which enables them to obtain a critical awareness to problem solving and capability to evaluate both military and commercial best practice in the field of EOE.

This course enables students to learn in a flexible manner as it offers both part-time and full-time learning all with full access to an outstanding remote virtual learning environment and on-line literature through our extensive library facilities. Other qualities and transferable skills include opportunities that will enhance employment potential in this field, problem solving, self-direction and informed communication skills.

This course meets the educational requirements for the Engineering Council UK’s register of Chartered Engineers (CEng); the course is accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).

Overview

This course specialises in explosive ordnance and engineering and is world class in teaching and research. We have a diverse student body drawn mainly from personnel linked to the military from numerous industries and institutions in the UK as well as overseas providing a rich educational experience. Our class size is normally 20 - 25 comprising a combination of full and part time students.

Start date: Full-time: September. Part-time: by arrangement

Duration: Full-time MSc - one year, Part-time MSc - up to three years, Full-time PgDip - one year, Part-time PgDip - two years

English Language Requirements

Students whose first language is not English must attain an IELTS score of 7.0

Course overview

Part One of the MSc course contains an introductory period followed by academic instruction, which is in modular form. Students take ten core modules covering the main disciplines and choose two optional modules based upon their particular background, future requirements or research interests. To qualify for the Explosives Ordnance Engineering MSc, students must successfully complete formal examinations, individual coursework, one group project and a research project.

Research project:
In Part Two, students undertake a research project - a list of prospective projects is provided each year by the teaching staff. Alternatively, with the agreement of the teaching staff/supervisor, students may undertake appropriate research of their own choice.

The structure of this course has been devised so that students learn the fundamental elements of EOE from an academic perspective whilst having the opportunity to learn something new by selecting elective modules.

Modules

The MSc is 200 credits of which 90 are compulsory, 80 are for the thesis and 30 credits are elective.

The PgDip is 120 credits of which 90 are compulsory and 30 credits are elective.
Full modules are 10 credits each; half modules are 5 credits each.

Core:
- Ammunition Systems 1 (Warheads)
- Ammunition Systems 2 (Delivery Systems)
- Ammunition Systems 3 (Target Effects)
- Future Developments: Scanning the Horizon in EOE
- Insensitive Munitions (Half Module)
- Introduction to Explosives
- Manufacture and Material Properties of Explosives
- Gun Propellants
- Research Methodology
- Testing and Evaluation of Explosives (Half Module)
- Transitions To Detonation (Half Module)
- EOE Project Phase

Elective:
- Explosives and the Environment (Half Module)
- Explosives for Nuclear Weapons
- Pyrotechnics
- Computer Modelling Tools in Explosives Ordnance Engineering (Half Module)
- Risk Assessment for Explosives (Half Module)
- Forensic Investigation of Explosives and Explosive Devices
- Rocket Motors and Propellants

Individual Project

The aim of the project phase is to give the students an opportunity to apply the skills, knowledge and understanding acquired on the taught phase of the course to a practical problem in EOE. A list of available project titles is produced in the first few months of the course so that a student can make an early choice and begin planning their programmes well before the project phase begins. Suggestions for projects may come from a variety of sources, for example an individual student’s sponsor, a member of staff, or the wider EOE community.

Group Project

To integrate module learning into an overall critical evaluation of new trends in EOE the students undertake a group project, which considers current ‘Hot Topics in EOE’, for example, nanotechnology, insensitive munitions, analysis and detection and environmental initiatives. The group project involves the students working together to research these hot topics and to critically appraise the facts, principles, concepts, and theories relating to a specific area of EOE. They do this as a group and then individually prepare elements of a presentation that they feedback in groups to their peers in an open forum. The presentation is then graded from an individual and group perspective.

The group project enables the students to work as a team, enhances their communication skills and encourages the ability to present scientific ideas in a clear and concise manner. It also gives the students an understanding of the procedures and challenges associated with peer review and grading and prioritisation of presented work against a clear assessment framework.

Assessment

Coursework, examination, group project and individual thesis (MSc only).

Career opportunities

Many of the students are linked to military employment and as such are sponsored through this route. Therefore the majority of the students continue to work for them on completion of the course. However, the course has the potential to take you on to enhanced career opportunities often at a more senior level across a range of roles corresponding with your experience.

For further information

on this course, please visit our course webpage http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/courses/masters/explosives-ordnance-engineering.html

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This course is designed to give a broad introduction to the subject, rapidly advancing into the understanding of cutting-edge research and the latest methodologies. Read more

Course Description

This course is designed to give a broad introduction to the subject, rapidly advancing into the understanding of cutting-edge research and the latest methodologies. The course is highly practical and hands-on, aiming to produce forensic experts capable of giving expert witness testimonies in a courtroom situation and elsewhere.

The course consists of a two-week period of introductory studies followed by academic instruction in modular form. Most modules are of five days' duration, interspersed with weeks devoted to private study and visits to forensic science establishments.

The Forensic Explosives and Explosion Investigation MSc is part of the Forensic MSc Programme which has been formally accredited by the Forensic Science Society.

This degree is currently under review and some modules are likely to change.

Course overview

The course consists of a one-week period of introductory studies followed by academic instruction in modular form. Most modules are of five days' duration, interspersed with weeks devoted to private study. Students are required to take four core modules, four role specific modules and choose three elective modules based on their particular background, future requirements or interests. This is followed by a four-month research project and either a thesis or literature review and paper.

Duration: Full-time MSc - one year, Part-time MSc - up to three years, Full-time PgDip - one year, Part-time PgDip - two years

English Language Requirements

Students whose first language is not English must attain an IELTS score of 7

Individual Project

The individual project takes four months from April to July. The student selects from a range of titles, or may propose their own topic. Most are practically or experimentally based using Cranfield’s unique facilities.

Assessment

By written and practical examinations, continuous assessment, project presentation and viva voce.

Career opportunities

Supports professional development for those in security and defence occupations related to explosives, intelligence or search. Excellent grounding for career starters looking to join government scientific services, forensic laboratories, police departments and insurance companies.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage - http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/courses/masters/forensic-explosives-and-explosion-investigation.html

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Why this course?. The MSc in Forensic Science is the UK’s longest established forensic science degree course, celebrating its . Read more

Why this course?

The MSc in Forensic Science is the UK’s longest established forensic science degree course, celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2016/2017.

You’ll join a global network of Strathclyde forensic science graduates in highly respected positions all over the world.

In addition to preparing you for life as a forensic scientist, you’ll also graduate with a wide range of practical skills, problem solving and investigative thinking relevant to a wide range of careers.

You'll study

  • crime scene investigation
  • legal procedures and the law
  • evidence interpretation and statistical evaluation
  • analysis of range of evidence types including footwear marks, trace evidence, and questioned documents

Following a general introduction to forensic science in semester 1, you can choose to specialise in either forensic biology or forensic chemistry. As a forensic biologist you’ll study a range of topics including:

  • body fluid analysis
  • blood pattern interpretation
  • DNA profiling
  • investigation of assaults and sexual offences

If you choose to specialise in forensic chemistry, you’ll develop expertise in:

  • analysis of fires and explosives
  • drugs of abuse
  • alcohol and toxicology

The focal point of the course is our major crime scene exercise, in which you are expected to investigate your own mock outdoor crime scene, collect and analyse the evidence, and present this in Glasgow Sheriff Court in conjunction with students training in Strathclyde Law School.

Project

In semester 3, MSc students undertake a three-month project, culminating in the production of a dissertation.

Students may be given the opportunity to complete their project in an operational forensic science provider either in the UK or overseas (subject to visa requirements). Alternatively, students may complete their project within the Centre for Forensic Science itself, under the supervision of our team of academics.

Examples of institutions that previous Strathclyde students have been placed in to undertake their project include: 

  • Scottish Police Authority, Forensic Services
  • Centre for Applied Science and Technology (CAST)
  • Forensic Explosives Laboratory, Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL)
  • LGC Forensics
  • Cellmark Forensic Services
  • Institute of Environmental Science and Research, Auckland, New Zealand
  • Institute of Forensic Research, Krakow, Poland
  • Centre of Forensic Sciences, Toronto, Canada

The MSc in Forensic Science runs for 12 months, commencing in September. 

Facilities

Teaching takes place in the Centre for Forensic Science. It’s a modern purpose-built laboratory for practical forensic training, equipped with state-of-the-art instrumentation for analysis of a wide range of evidence types. This includes a microscopy suite, DNA profiling laboratory, analytical chemistry laboratory, blood pattern analysis room, and a suite for setting up mock crime scenes.

Accreditation

The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences is a professional body with members in over 60 countries and is one of the oldest and largest forensic science associations in the world.

Our MSc in Forensic Science is accredited by the Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences, demonstrating our commitment to meeting their high educational standards for forensic science tuition.

Assessment

Assessment consists of written coursework, practical work assessments, oral presentations and formal written examinations. Practical work is continually assessed and counts towards the award of the degree. The project is assessed through the completion of a dissertation.

The award of MSc is based upon 180 credits.

Careers

Most forensic scientists in Scotland are employed by the Scottish Police Authority.

In the rest of the UK, forensic scientists are employed by individual police forces, private forensic science providers such as LGC Forensics and Cellmark Forensic Services, or government bodies such as the Centre for Applied Science and Technology (CAST) and the Defence Science Technology Laboratory (DSTL).

Outside of the UK, forensic scientists may be employed by police forces, government bodies or private companies.

Forensic scientists can specialise in specific areas such as crime scene examination, DNA analysis, drug analysis, and fire investigation.

Most of the work is laboratory-based but experienced forensic scientists may have to attend crime scenes and give evidence in court.

Where are they now?

Many of our graduates are in work or further study.**

Job titles include:

  • Analytical Chemist
  • Biology Casework Examiner
  • Deputy Laboratory Director
  • DNA Analyst
  • Forensic Case Worker Examiner
  • Forensic DNA Analyst
  • Forensic Scientist
  • Laboratory Analyst
  • Medical Laboratory Assistant Histopathology
  • Research & Development Chemist

Employers include:

  • Gen-Probe Life Sciences
  • HKSTC
  • Key Forensic Services Ltd
  • Lancaster Labs
  • LGC Forensics
  • Life Technologies
  • National Institute Of Criminalistics And Criminology
  • NHS
  • Seychelles Forensic Science Lab
  • University of Strathclyde

*information is intended only as a guide.

**Based on the results of the National Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey (2010/11 and 2011/12).



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Research students in Forensic Science have the opportunity to work alongside a multidisciplinary team in the School of Life Sciences, and can benefit from strong links with industry practitioners. Read more
Research students in Forensic Science have the opportunity to work alongside a multidisciplinary team in the School of Life Sciences, and can benefit from strong links with industry practitioners.

You have the opportunity to engage in the work of the Forensic Analysis Research Group, to develop innovative methods and techniques to assist in solving crime and casework-related issues. The team are currently engaged in high-profile studies including collaborative projects with the Centre for Applied Science and Technology at the UK Home Office.

You have access to a range of training programmes to support you in your independent investigations and an experienced supervisory team are on hand to offer advice and direction. Ongoing research projects in the School include Chemical Analysis of Legal Highs and GHB, DNA Analysis in Forensic and Archaeological Contexts, and Microcrystalline Testing for Drugs.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Main research areas:
-Drug analysis
-Ignitable liquid and fuel analysis
-Explosives analysis
-DNA fingerprinting
-Fingerprinting science
-Dye and pigment analysis
-Forensic anthropology
-Spectroscopic techniques (including Raman) and separation science
-Surface analysis
-Mechanical properties of biological materials.

Recent research projects include:
-Chemical analysis of fingerprints
-Analysis of legal highs and GHB
-Analysis of fuel markers and detection of fuel adulteration
-Development of sensors for forensic applications
-Microcrystalline testing for drugs
-Analysis of smoke for fire investigation
-Enhancement of DNA at crime scenes
-Development of colloids and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)
-DNA analysis in forensic and archaeological contexts
-Molecular typing of skin micro-organisms in forensic identification
-Forensic analysis of the mechanical properties of biological materials.

How You Study

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisors to assess progress and guide research methodologies, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

A PhD is usually awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

Career and Personal Development

These postgraduate research programmes allow you the opportunity to expand your knowledge and expertise in the specialist field of forensic science. They provide the chance to develop an in-depth foundation for further research or progression to careers in forensic science-related industries.

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The MSc in Analytical and Forensic Chemistry is aimed at those with a strong interest in modern instrumentation and in novel methods of chemical and forensic analysis. Read more

The MSc in Analytical and Forensic Chemistry is aimed at those with a strong interest in modern instrumentation and in novel methods of chemical and forensic analysis.

A revolution in forensic, environmental and pharmaceutical science has been borne through advances in analytical science. We are now seeing a strong, worldwide demand for imaginative, skilled analysts who have knowledge and hands-on experience of modern analytical instrumentation.

Forensic science is a multidisciplinary activity that relies on chemical and analytical techniques to provide invaluable evidence from investigations of disasters, accidents and criminal activities. It may involve the detection of tiny amounts of explosives, poisons and drugs or the identification of fibres, paints, combustion residues, glass fragments, or counterfeit currency. Forensic work is also of a biological nature, with crime detection techniques such as DNA fingerprinting requiring an understanding of the underlying biochemistry.

The University’s Analytical Science Group has an international reputation for its innovative approach to analytical and forensic chemistry. We are one of the UK’s premier analytical groups, with a range of state-of-the-art facilities and instrumentation.

Study information

In Semester 1 you take three core modules. These are designed to give a broad and balanced understanding of the most important developments in modern analytical and forensic chemistry:

  • Topics in Analytical and Forensic Chemistry
  • Analytical and Forensic Laboratory with Specialist Topics
  • MSc Skills and Laboratory Techniques

In Semester 2 you use key research tools – such as online information retrieval – to learn about the background and the planning behind your chosen research project. You will also develop specialist knowledge of analytical and forensic chemistry:

  • Advanced Topics in Forensic and Analytical Chemistry
  • Advanced Topics in Molecular Medicine
  • MSc Project Literature Review

In Semester 3 you complete an advanced analytical and forensic chemistry research project culminating in a Masters-level thesis and an oral presentation of your research successes:

  • Masters Extended Research Project

Your learning will be diverse and varied. It will include interactive lectures, workshops, laboratory practicals, and computer lab sessions. You will explore the theoretical, practical and investigative aspects of analytical chemistry and forensic science, and develop invaluable professional skills, including the application of quality assurance and health safety, oral and written communication skills, problem solving, data handling and working in teams.

* All modules are subject to availability.

Future prospects

We teach a modern curriculum covering key areas of analytical chemistry of importance to industry, including process analysis, quality assurance, spectrometry and chromatography; and cutting-edge interdisciplinary research topics in areas such as lab-on-a-chip.

The knowledge and skills you will learn on this MSc will prepare you for a career in forensic science providing invaluable evidence from investigations of disasters, accidents and criminal activities.

We undertake world-class research in many scientific areas and are famous for our pioneering work on liquid crystals. Many of our Masters students choose to progress on to PhD-level study.



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Chemical engineers invent, design and implement industrial-scale processes through which raw materials are converted into products that we rely on every day, such as fuel, plastics, food additives, fertilisers, paper and pharmaceuticals. Read more

Chemical engineers invent, design and implement industrial-scale processes through which raw materials are converted into products that we rely on every day, such as fuel, plastics, food additives, fertilisers, paper and pharmaceuticals.

You will develop practical, laboratory-based skills, combined with expertise in computing and simulation. You will be guided by internationally renowned experts in areas such as nanotechnology, carbon capture and storage, minerals and materials, natural gas processing, and solvent extraction. You will have the opportunity to complete an industry project in conjunction with a relevant industry partner.

The Master of Engineering (Chemical) will lead to a formal qualification in chemical engineering.

CAREER OUTCOMES

Chemical Engineering Career Pathways [PDF]

Career opportunities in chemical engineering are extensive and exist in petrochemical, minerals processing, mining, chemical manufacturing, natural gas, explosives and fertiliser production and environmental consulting.

Our graduates are employed in a diverse range of industries, for companies including: ExxonMobil, BP, PETRONAS, Schlumberger, Nyrstar, BHP Billiton, Rio Tinto, Worley Parsons, ThyssenKrupp, WSP Parsons Brinckerhoff, Wood Group PSN, GHD, AECOM, Mars and Unilever.

PROFESSIONAL ACCREDITATION

The Master of Engineering is professionally recognised under two major accreditation frameworks — EUR-ACE® and the Washington Accord (through Engineers Australia). Graduates can work as chartered professional engineers throughout Europe, and as professional engineers in the 17 countries of the Washington Accord.

Master of Engineering (Chemical) is also accredited by IChemE (Institution of Chemical Engineers). This accreditation has worldwide recognition.



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Chemical engineers invent, design and implement industrial-scale processes through which raw materials are converted into products that we rely on every day, such as fuel, plastics, food additives, fertilisers, paper and pharmaceuticals. Read more

Chemical engineers invent, design and implement industrial-scale processes through which raw materials are converted into products that we rely on every day, such as fuel, plastics, food additives, fertilisers, paper and pharmaceuticals.

You will develop practical, laboratory-based skills, combined with expertise in computing and simulation. You will be guided by internationally renowned experts in areas such as nanotechnology, carbon capture and storage, minerals and materials, natural gas processing, and solvent extraction. You will have the opportunity to complete an industry project in conjunction with a relevant industry partner.

The Master of Engineering (Chemical) will lead to a formal qualification in chemical engineering.

MASTER OF ENGINEERING (WITH BUSINESS)

The Master of Engineering (with Business) is designed to provide students with a formal qualification in engineering at the masters level, with a business specialisation that recognises the need for engineers to understand the management and workings of modern professional organisations.

Students who undertake the Master of Engineering (with Business) replace five advanced technical electives with five business subjects that have been tailored specifically for engineering students and co-developed with Melbourne Business School.

Graduates will have a grounding in financial, marketing and economic principles enabling them to work efficiently in any organisation, as well as the ability to apply the technical knowledge, creativity and team work skills learnt in their engineering training. This combination of knowledge and skills will be a powerful asset in the workplace.

Key features

  • Combine a technical specialisation with exposure to the business and management skills that can help fast-track your career.
  • Benefit from subjects co-developed by Melbourne Business School and tailored specifically for engineering students.
  • Tight integration of subjects ensures that you understand the business side of engineering applications.
  • Be empowered with strong technical skills, as well as the business skills to understand how organisations work.

CAREER OUTCOMES

Chemical Engineering Career Pathways [PDF]

Career opportunities in chemical engineering are extensive and exist in petrochemical, minerals processing, mining, chemical manufacturing, natural gas, explosives and fertiliser production and environmental consulting.

Our graduates are employed in a diverse range of industries, for companies including: ExxonMobil, BP, PETRONAS, Schlumberger, Nyrstar, BHP Billiton, Rio Tinto, Worley Parsons, ThyssenKrupp, WSP Parsons Brinckerhoff, Wood Group PSN, GHD, AECOM, Mars and Unilever.

PROFESSIONAL ACCREDITATION

This Master of Engineering (with Business) degree is professionally recognised under two major accreditation frameworks — EUR-ACE® and the Washington Accord (through Engineers Australia). Graduates can work as chartered professional engineers throughout Europe, and as professional engineers in the 17 countries of the Washington Accord.



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The Guided Weapon Systems MSc is a flagship Cranfield course and has an outstanding reputation within the Guided Weapons community. Read more

Course Description

The Guided Weapon Systems MSc is a flagship Cranfield course and has an outstanding reputation within the Guided Weapons community. The course meets the requirements of all three UK armed services and is also open to students from NATO countries, Commonwealth forces, selected non-NATO countries, the scientific civil service and industry. The course structure is modular in nature with each module conducted at a postgraduate level; the interactions between modules are emphasised throughout. A comprehensive suite of visits to industrial and services establishments consolidates the learning process, ensuring the taught subject matter is directly relevant and current.

Overview

This course is an essential pre-requisite for many specific weapons postings in the UK and overseas forces. It also offers an ideal opportunity for anyone working in the Guided Weapons industry to get a comprehensive overall understanding of all the main elements of guided weapons systems.

It typically attracts 12 students per year, mainly from UK, Canadian, Australian, Chilean, Brazilian and other European forces.

English Language Requirements

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

IELTS - 6.5
TOEFL - 92
Pearson PTE Academic - 65
Cambridge English Scale - 180
Cambridge English: Advanced - C
Cambridge English: Proficiency - C

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Course overview

The course comprises a taught phase and an individual project. The taught phase is split into three main phases:
- Part One (Theory)
- Part Two (Applications)
- Part Three (Systems).

Core Modules

- Introductory and Foundation Studies
- Electro-Optics and Infrared Systems 1
- Radar Principles
- GW Propulsion & Aerodynamics Theory
- GW Control Theory
- Signal Processing, Statistics and Analysis
- GW Applications – Control & Guidance
- GW Applications – Propulsion & Aerodynamics
- Radar Electronic Warfare
- Electro-Optics and Infrared Systems 2
- GW Warheads, Explosives and Materials
- GW Structures, Aeroelasticity and Power Supplies
- Parametric Study
- GW Systems
- Research Project

Individual Project

Each student has to undertake an research project on a subject related to an aspect of guided weapon systems technology. It will usually commence around January and finish with a dissertation submission and oral presentation in mid-July.

Assessment

This varies from module to module but comprises a mixture of oral examinations, written examinations, informal tests, assignments, syndicate presentations and an individual thesis.

Career opportunities

Successful students will have a detailed understanding of Guided Weapons system design and will be highly suited to any role or position with a requirement for specific knowledge of such systems. Many students go on to positions within the services which have specific needs for such skills.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage - http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Courses/Masters/Guided-Weapon-Systems

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Why get a master’s degree from the Department of Criminal Justice? Do you want to. - increase your job opportunities and earning potential?. Read more
Why get a master’s degree from the Department of Criminal Justice? Do you want to:

- increase your job opportunities and earning potential?
- gain the credential you need to ascend to the top of federal agencies, state organizations, and private corporations?
- learn from expert faculty members about how you can become the expert?
- get the opportunity to publish articles in national and international journals?
- build lasting relationships with other top students?

Graduates of our master’s program have gone on to become the deputy director of the United States Secret Service; the counterterrorism chief for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives; the chief of police for Birmingham, Alabama; the director of federal affairs at the Business Council of Alabama; the editor-in-chief of LawOfficer.com; the lead agent/corporate security supervisor at Georgia Power Company; a cyber security systems analyst at Southern Company; and highly accomplished working professionals in many other important positions.

In addition, our graduates who then sought their PhDs or JDs have been accepted to some of the highest ranking social science programs and law schools in the nation, including Harvard University and The University of Virginia.

Admission

The application process is simple:

1. Visit The University of Alabama’s Graduate School website and click on the APPLY NOW button.
2. Use the online system to complete the basic graduate application form and submit your application fee, along with a few other things that you’ll need:
- A statement of purpose (Tell us about your interest in criminal justice and your exciting career plans — no more than one single-spaced page, please!)
- Your undergraduate transcripts
- Your exam score from the GRE
- Three letters of recommendation (Through the online system, you can submit contact information for the three people who have agreed to write letters of recommendation for you.)

APPLICATION DEADLINES

For students who would like to start in the fall semester:

Early admission deadline: February 15 (students applying by this date will receive extra consideration for funding)
Regular admission deadline: June 15

For students who would like to start in the spring semester:

Early admission deadline: October 1 (students applying by this date will receive extra consideration for funding)
Regular admission deadline: November 15

Funding

Assistantships come with a financial stipend paid directly to the student, along with significant tuition and health insurance support.

They are awarded on a competitive basis, after the Graduate Program Committee’s discretionary assessment of the quality of each student’s (1) academic performance prior to admission, (2) academic performance after admission (when applicable), and (3) professional performance as a departmental employee (when applicable).

Graduate Courses

We have only three required courses in our entire program, which means that the vast majority of our students’ degrees are made up of courses they choose.

Past courses have covered the topics of cybercrime, cybersecurity, terrorism, hate crimes, organized crime, civil and criminal trials, danger and disorder issues, white collar crime, murder in America, gender and crime, social inequality and crime, law and society, juvenile delinquency, drugs and crime, judicial process, health and crime, corrections, law enforcement, and more.

In addition, our students have the option to build their expertise by counting up to 6 credits of relevant coursework from other departments at The University of Alabama toward their MS in criminal justice, including courses from political science, history, social work, gender and race studies, American studies, anthropology, and counseling.

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