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Masters Degrees (Experimental Film)

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This course has been designed to offer a genuinely creative methodology and understanding of current and future potential for film experimentation in artists' moving image. Read more
This course has been designed to offer a genuinely creative methodology and understanding of current and future potential for film experimentation in artists' moving image. This places the programme at the forefront of postgraduate studies exploring moving image in its most creative form. The course offers a range of input from staff in filmmaking, and will enable you to develop a major body of practical work created within the context of a critical understanding of contemporary experimental film theory.

You will have access to our moving image resources and specialised filmmaking equipment, augmented by excellent technical and academic support. To complete a specific project brief, other materials will also be provided, enabling you to meet the learning outcomes of the course and/or project. However, if you choose to develop your own film options requiring additional resources, then you will have to meet any further costs associated with that. View a full list of our current moving image resources.

Key features
-The course provides an exploration of the relationship between film, moving image, sound and critical frameworks. This is supported by the excellent moving image resources at the Knights Park campus, including a moving-image studio, post-production facilities and high-end film equipment. One-to-one tutorials, seminars, exhibitions and discussion all feature in the programme.
-Taught by filmmakers, creative practitioners, curators and writers, including many off-site visits and visits by professional artists, filmmakers and curators. This includes the opportunity to participate in a public screening programme at BFI Southbank, and a seminar forum at FID Marseille International Film Festival.
-Every year, the course nominates a graduate to participate in the European workshop on artists' moving image at the Schermo dell'Arte film festival in Florence, where they receive professional mentoring.

What will you study?

The curriculum offers three distinct areas of critical and practical inquiry options, supported by a specialised seminar/lectures series: artists' moving image; independent film; and the materiality of film.

You will undertake self-initiated research supported by taught modules and an experienced group of research-active staff, and will explore the critical and historical frameworks within which experimental film work can be understood and conceptualised.

Assessment

Presentation and exhibition/screening/documentation, tutorials and seminar/discussion.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Core modules
-Project 1
-Theory – Seminar
-Experimental Filmmaking Practices
-Experimentation in Moving Image
-Masters Project (Exhibition and Research Publication)

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This course is currently under suspension for the current academic session. However, it may return. Please see the website for updates. Read more
This course is currently under suspension for the current academic session. However, it may return. Please see the website for updates: https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/

Aberystwyth University’s MA in Film Studies focuses upon the advanced study of cinema. Normally, you will already have attained a degree of expertise in film studies or in a cognate area before starting the course and you will be ready to study film at a more advanced level by mastering theoretical, historical and empirical approaches to the subject.

This MA in Film Studies course is designed to give you a comprehensive overview of the development of film and film theory, taking in the development and intersections of both Hollywood and European cinemas and popular and 'alternative' cinemas. You will also have the opportunity to study specific movements within cinema, such as the changing manifestations of German Expressionism, American film noir and avant-garde movements; you will do so by studying philosophical, aesthetic, social and cultural influences.

This course will enable you to interrogate a wide range of factors which inform the production, distribution and reception of film, including a range of cultural and aesthetic contexts, the representation of class, ethnicity and gender, changing and shifting film marketing and distribution practices, and the study of a range of film fans and audiences. You will also receive a thorough grounding in key theoretical traditions and research methods within film studies which will prepare you for the production of a 15,000 word dissertation (on a topic of your choice) at the end of the course.

The MA in Film Studies will provide you with essential research, historical and analytical skills designed to support your future career progression either in the cultural and critical industries or in academia. Throughout the MA, staff will be happy to advise you on potential progression, after your MA, to PhD study. For profiles of previous MA Film Studies students, which outline their experiences on the MA and their subsequent career progression, see: http://www.aber.ac.uk/en/tfts/study-with-us/masters/former-ma-profiles/

The Department of Theatre, Film and Television Studies at Aberystwyth is the highest rated Arts and Humanities Department in Wales, according to the results of the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, with 60% of research submitted being rated world-leading.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/film-studies-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you wish to engage in the advanced study of cinema.
- If you are ready to take on the subject in theoretical, historical and empirical terms;
- If you aim to pursue a career in film journalism, criticism or analysis, film historical work or arts administration, or if you wish to progress to PhD study;
- If you wish to sharpen your academic rigour and develop a cache of critical evaluative, communication, and time and project management skills.

Course detail

The MA in Film Studies focuses on the importance of film within an ever-changing global environment. As a student, you will be encouraged to investigate the ways in which technologies and social changes have impacted, and continue to impact upon different aspects of film, including filmic representation and the ways in which film has been taken up within broader cultural contexts. You will also receive a thorough grounding in key theoretical traditions and research methods within film studies, and will be alerted to the historical developments that have marked film as a medium, focusing on historical case studies in order to think about changes and continuities throughout film history. While you will be introduced to a broad array of filmmaking traditions, you will focus particularly on the interrelations between Hollywood and European cinemas.

The MA will introduce you to different ways of understanding film: as entertainment, as art, as an industry, and as a cultural medium through which identities, histories and ideologies are both represented and negotiated. You will be taught by active researchers in the field of film studies, with a broad array of expertise and knowledge particularly in British, French, Russian and Hollywood cinemas, avant-garde, experimental and cult film, film history and representation, film genre and star studies, and fan, audience and reception studies. As such, the MA aims to enrich your knowledge of film’s importance through different methodological and theoretical approaches to the subject, and to sharpen your own research and study skills in the process.

The MA in Film Studies is run by the Department of Theatre, Film and Television Studies, one of the largest and most significant departments of its kind in the UK, and has a particularly vibrant postgraduate and research culture (including an annual postgraduate conference). Based in Aberystwyth University’s Parry-Williams Building, the Department boasts superb facilities including: 36 digital and HD editing suites; over 40 industry standard HD and digital cameras: a new HD, digital television studio; three fully-equipped theatre spaces (seating approximately 100 people each); and much more. We also maintain close links with Aberystwyth Arts Centre's digital 3D cinema. The cinema has a vibrant and lively film programme including the annual Abertoir horror film festival of Wales.

Format

The course is taught over one year (if taken full time), and three years (if taken part time). The MA encompasses a total of six (out of a choice of seven) taught modules (120 credits in total) covering film theory, research methods, film history, film representation, documentary and avant-garde film, film marketing and distribution, and film audiences. In order to complete your MA, you will then apply your learning in the individual dissertation worth an additional 60 credits. The dissertation is a substantial piece of scholarly research totalling no more than 15,000 words. It will be on a subject of your own choice, informed by discussions with your designated dissertation supervisor in the Department.

Assessment

The taught part of the course is delivered and assessed through lectures, seminars, oral presentations and essays. Successful completion of your dissertation leads to the award of an MA.

Employability

Every aspect of the Aberystwyth Master’s in Film Studies programme is designed to enhance your employability. The benefits of the course for employment are twofold: not only will you possess first-rate, subject-specific knowledge of film history and theory, but you will also be equipped with widely applicable skills and abilities that will suit many employment contexts.

Alongside the development of your subject-specific knowledge, an especially noteworthy strength of this course is its emphasis on group discussion and individual student presentations (which will enable you to develop your team work and communication skills). As an emerging film academic your strengthened research and critical faculties will make you a strong candidate for any post where ideas and topics need research, analysis, discussion, expansion and classification. The pattern of research and analysis you will undertake in this course creates highly marketable skills which will, upon graduation, stand you in excellent stead for entry into employment. The course will also provide you with the training and skills you will need if you decide to progress to PhD study.

The dissertation element of the course will enable you to develop and demonstrate an array of professional qualities and skills. You will do this by reflecting on the methods and approaches you have encountered in the study programme and then identifying and creating appropriate methodologies for your own research work. Success in this area of study proves to prospective employers that you take the initiative to develop and improve your research and project management skills.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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This highly-regarded taught programme offers the opportunity to engage in cross-disciplinary investigation of various aspects of cinema and moving image culture, and has diverse routes available via theoretical, vocational and practice-based perspectives to provide a uniquely flexible course. Read more

This highly-regarded taught programme offers the opportunity to engage in cross-disciplinary investigation of various aspects of cinema and moving image culture, and has diverse routes available via theoretical, vocational and practice-based perspectives to provide a uniquely flexible course. These routes allow students to combine vocational, theoretical and practice-based modules as preferred.

Theoretical modules involve study of British, American, European, Far Eastern and Middle Eastern Cinemas. Here, students will examine how film and television texts produced in these regions relate to their historical, social, and cultural contexts through a variety of critical and theoretical approaches, which range from aesthetics as cinematic discourse to the implications of terrorism for film and its audiences.

Vocational choices, which are available throughout, include Teaching Film and Media, Becoming an Academic, Film Festivals, Film Festivals Independent Study (that offer opportunities to attend a film festival, and to be involved in film festival organisation) and Film Journalism, supported by expert film critics, that develops skills required for the writing of film reviews and articles in journals such as Sight and Sound.

There are practice-based options to undertake experimental and documentary film production, and scriptwriting.

What happens on the course?

Full time students normally attend lectures for 9-11 hours per week, and part-time students attend 3-6 hours per week, depending on module choices. Most modules run on Thursdays so that a full time student might expect to attend from 10am – 9pm on Thursdays

Students are assessed via a diverse range of assignments including:

  • Formal Essay
  • Film Review
  • Film Festival Analysis
  • Film Festival Organisation
  • Student led seminar
  • Student presentation
  • Journal article
  • Lesson plan
  • Construction of ‘A level’ teaching plan
  • Annotated bibliography
  • Essay Plan
  • Conference Paper Proposal
  • Research/Funding Proposal
  • Submission of draft thesis chapters
  • Film Production
  • Scriptwriting
  • Thesis

Course Specific Cost:

Course costs are at the usual MA rate with 20% discount for UoW graduates. The module Film Festivals requires an additional flat rate cost of £350 to over hotel, travel and festival entrance fee to a national/international Film Festival. Any additional cost for attendance at a film festival will be met by the university

Why Wolverhampton?

Most of the modules are delivered at Light House Media centre which houses 2 purpose built cinemas. Otherwise, teaching is at other appropriate venues on City Campus. All teaching on the MA Film and Screen is informed by staff expertise, with their research directly underpinning each module. This expertise is reflected in the significant number of high-quality publications produced by Film and Media Staff who contributed successfully to REF2014.

Who will teach you on this course:

  • Dr Fran Pheasant-Kelly, Reader in Screen Studies, Faculty of Arts and Course Leader MA Film and Screen: teaches Space, Place and Culture in American Cinema, Screens of Terror, Becoming an Academic, and Far Eastern Cinemas
  • Dr Stella Hockenhull, Reader in Film and Television Studies, Faculty of Arts: teaches Picturing Britain and Screening Horror
  • Dr Eleanor Andrews, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies, Course Leader BA Film and Television Studies, Faculty of Arts: teaches Screening the Holocaust and Beyond
  • Dr Gavin Wilson, Lecturer in Film and Television Production, Faculty of Arts; teaches Film Festivals
  • Dr Peter Robinson, Principal Lecturer and Head of Marketing, Innovation, Leisure and Enterprise, University of Wolverhampton Business School
  • Dr Aleksandra Galasinska, Reader in Discourse and Social Transformation, Faculty of Arts: teaches Poetics and Practices of Polish Cinema
  • Dr Maria Urbina, Senior Lecturer in Multi-media Journalism, Faculty of Arts; teaches Film Journalism

What our students think

One student commented on module 7FI014 Teaching Film and Media: This course was the best course I have attended - the teaching was comprehensive and I found the content to be some of the most useful I have experienced throughout my time at university. This was a relatively new subject and I found the work challenging - dealing with new concepts and ideas, but the most important parts for me was to understand where students are educationally before they arrive in University and to develop some of the skills to engage students in their learning experience. I can't express how useful, engaging and interesting this was, I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in teaching at higher education as well as further education.

Career path

In addition to facilitating competence in a range of intellectual and social skills that will be advantageous to the majority of occupations, an MA in Film and Screen is academically relevant to careers in the arts and media, leading to employment in arts administration, film archiving, film and media research, film journalism, film festival management, lecturing and teaching. A specific and unique advantage of this course is a module enabling new lecturers to deliver Film Studies and Media to AS/A2 level. It also provides suitable grounding for doctoral research in film, television and film history.

What skills will you gain?

The course offers theoretical, vocational and practice-based options throughout and you will gain a broad range of academic, vocational and transferable skills that are vital to academic employability and to the screen industries, such as the ability to organise film festivals, present papers at conferences, and publish both journalistic film reviews and scholarly publications. Core modules include Teaching Film and Media which offers unique training for teachers and lecturers in Film and Media Studies, and Becoming an Academic whereby you will acquire a range of academic skills entailing, for example, the ability to write a journal article, academic book, and funding bids. As part of your MA programme, you will independently conduct a research project to a publishable standard, which will provide good opportunities for research-based writing in various contexts. You will also develop event management skills for academic events, such as film festival programming, film curation and the organisation of post-graduate symposia.



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The MA Film with Practice is a taught programme suitable for graduates in film, practitioners who want to advance their practice in an intellectually stimulating environment and non-film graduates with a passion for film practice demonstrated though amateur filmmaking. Read more
The MA Film with Practice is a taught programme suitable for graduates in film, practitioners who want to advance their practice in an intellectually stimulating environment and non-film graduates with a passion for film practice demonstrated though amateur filmmaking.

The programme is taught by award-winning filmmakers, internationally recognised film scholars and includes masterclasses from film industry professionals.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/343/film-with-practice

About the Department of Film

The Film Department at the University of Kent is known for its excellence in research and teaching. Arts at Kent (including Film) was ranked 1st in the UK for research power in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF). One of the largest European centres for the study of film, it has an established reputation going back 35 years. Approaching film as a dynamic part of our cultural experience, we encourage thinking about film as it emerges at the intersections of art, document and entertainment. Through theory and practice, individual research, student-led seminars and visiting speakers, we promote an environment in which postgraduate students are able to engage with the continuing vibrancy of cinema.

Studying film as a postgraduate at the University of Kent will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise, library facilities and a campus-based film culture. We currently offer expertise in North American, European and Latin American cinemas. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives, as well as with digital media and practice by research.

In 2014, the University opened a new 62-seat cinema named after the pioneering female film director Ida Lupino, which students can enjoy as part of their experience during their studies. The Lupino has state-of-the-art digital projection and sound, and has been created to provide an intimate atmosphere for film viewing.

Course structure

This programme includes two dedicated film practice modules and a dissertation by Film Practice that includes the making of a fiction film. You also choose two modules from the existing Film MA to create a practice-theory mix that accommodates your own interests.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

FI819 - Digital Film Practice: Key Skills (30 credits)
FI820 - Independent Project Development (30 credits)
FI812 - Advanced Film Theory (30 credits)
FI813 - Film History (30 credits)
FI815 - Film and Modernity (30 credits)
FI811 - Conceptualising Film (30 credits)
FI899 - Dissertation by Film Practice (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment at MA level is 100% course work: that means you will be assessed through essays, treatments, project proposals, seminar participation and a dissertation by film practice.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- Develop the understanding and skills possessed by students entering the programme to a notably higher level of sophistication and achievement (appropriate to an M-level award) than would be expected at degree level, such that all leave the programme with a substantial analytic, critical and practice-based understanding of Film.

- Develop the ability of students to think independently, argue with clarity and force, initiate and complete creative work and to discern areas of research and practice-led research within the field.

- Provoke reflection on practical, critical and theoretical approaches to Film and its context.

- Nurture intellectual and creative skills through written work (essays, dissertations, treatments, scripts), creative practice (DV films) as well as in the context of interpersonal interaction (seminars, research papers, supervision, filmmaking processes).

- Develop existing and new areas of teaching informed by and in response to developments in film practice, research and scholarship.

- Provide an excellent quality of higher education

- Attract outstanding students irrespective of race, background, gender, and physical disability, from both within the UK and from overseas.

- Support national and regional economic success by producing graduates in possession of key knowledge and skills, with the capacity to learn.

- Provide opportunities for the development of personal, communication and research skills and other key skills appropriate for both graduate employment in industry or further study.

- Provide learning opportunities that are enjoyable experiences and involve realistic workloads, based within a combined research and practice-led framework

- Offer appropriate support for students from a diverse range of backgrounds

- Provide high quality teaching in a supportive environment with appropriately qualified and trained staff?

Research areas

Research in both theory and practice is currently centred in five broad areas:

- national cinemas – form and history: North American, European, Latin American
- the moving image in a digital context
- documentary film
- film aesthetics
- avant-garde and experimental cinema.

Centre for the Interdisciplinary Study of Film and the Moving Image
The Centre draws together scholars from across the University who use film and the moving image as an integral part of their research. We are open to ideas that extend the reach of the Centre and seek to support projects that promote collaboration between individuals and other research centres. Our aim is to produce a more proactive engagement with other disciplines, to open new lines of communication and to produce innovative knowledge formations through the activity of pioneering research projects.

Careers

Arts graduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to film journalists and theatre technicians. Our graduates have found work at Universal Pictures, the London Film Festival and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations, as well as in film production, as editorial assistants and as web designers.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The programme offers a thorough grounding in postgraduate-level film and is suitable both for graduates in the subject and those new to it. Read more
The programme offers a thorough grounding in postgraduate-level film and is suitable both for graduates in the subject and those new to it.

It is taught by experts in Film and seeks to engage you with the key elements that make up the diverse nature of film and moving images.

The programme allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent academic and recreational facilities, before relocating to our Paris centre for the spring term, studying in the heart of historic Montparnasse.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/19/film-paris

About the Department of Film

The Film Department at the University of Kent is known for its excellence in research and teaching. It was ranked second in the UK for research power in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). One of the largest European centres for the study of film, it has an established reputation going back 35 years. Approaching film as a dynamic part of our cultural experience, we encourage thinking about film as it emerges at the intersections of art, document and entertainment. Through theory and practice, individual research, student-led seminars and visiting speakers, we promote an environment in which postgraduate students are able to engage with the continuing vibrancy of cinema.

Studying film as a postgraduate at the University of Kent will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise, library facilities and a campusbased film culture. We currently offer expertise in North American, European and Latin American cinemas. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives, as well as with digital media and practice by research.

In 2014, the University opened a new 62-seat cinema named after the pioneering female film director Ida Lupino, which students can enjoy as part of their experience during their studies. The Lupino has state-of-the-art digital projection and sound, and has been created to provide an intimate atmosphere for film viewing.

Studying film as a postgraduate at the University of Kent in Paris will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise, library facilities and a campus-based film culture. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives.

Modules

During the first term, you take two 30-credit taught-course modules from your chosen MA pathway. You then spend the second term in Paris, studying two modules from a choice which varies from year to year.

Modules available on this programme may include:
FI812 - Advanced Film Theory (30 credits)
FI813 - Film History: Research Methods (30 credits)
FI821 - Film and Modernity (Paris) (30 credits)
FI998 - Dissertation:GPMS (60 credits)

During the spring term you are free to construct your own programme from across the range of modules available, making it as focussed or as inter-disciplinary as you like. You have plenty of time during the autumn term to make informed decisions about your programme of studies in Paris.

You are encouraged to make full use of the city’s cultural resources and to integrate these into your studies which means you will be able to explore and discover connections between history, literature, the visual arts and other media.

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework and the dissertation.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- develop your understanding and skills to a notably higher level of sophistication and achievement (appropriate to an Master’s level award) than would be expected at degree level, such that you leave the programme with a substantial analytic and critical understanding of film and film studies

- develop your understanding and skills to the level necessary for entry into a research programme in film

- develop your ability to think independently, argue with clarity and force, to discern areas of research interest within the field and be able to frame viable research questions

- allow you to spend your first term in Canterbury, studying modules in film, and to spend your second term in Paris developing your interest in cinema within the context of city often seen to be central to the aesthetic developments of filmmaking and critical approaches central to the history of the discipline

- consider the impact of French critics and filmmakers on the wider discipline of film

- provoke reflection on areas of critical and theoretical approaches to French cinema and its context

- nurture the intellectual skills cited above in the context of written work (essays and dissertations) as well as in the context of interpersonal interaction (seminars, research papers, supervision)

- provide access to enhanced intercultural awareness and understanding through the opportunity to study in Paris

- provide opportunities for the development of personal, communication and research skills and other key skills appropriate for graduate employment both in industry and in the public sector.

Research areas

Research in both theory and practice is currently centred in five broad areas:

- national cinemas – form and history: North American, European, Latin American
- the moving image in a digital context
- documentary film
- film aesthetics
- avant-garde and experimental cinema.

Centre for the Interdisciplinary Study of Film and the Moving Image
The Centre draws together scholars from across the University who use film and the moving image as an integral part of their research. We are open to ideas that extend the reach of the Centre and seek to support projects that promote collaboration between individuals and other research centres. Our aim is to produce a more proactive engagement with other disciplines, to open new lines of communication and to produce innovative knowledge formations through the activity of pioneering research projects.

Careers

Arts graduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to film journalists and theatre technicians. Our graduates have found work at Universal Pictures, the London Film Festival and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations, as well as in film production, as editorial assistants and as web designers.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The programme offers a thorough grounding in postgraduate-level film. We will be pleased to consider applications from applicants with either a background in Film or a related humanities subject. Read more
The programme offers a thorough grounding in postgraduate-level film. We will be pleased to consider applications from applicants with either a background in Film or a related humanities subject.

It is taught by experts in Film and seeks to engage you with the key elements that make up the diverse nature of film and moving images.

The Film MA can also be studied between Canterbury and Paris, with the first term at our Canterbury campus and the spring term at our centre in Paris. It is also available in Paris only where you spend the entire year in the French capital.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/paris/programmes/index.html

About the Department of Film

The Film Department at the University of Kent is known for its excellence in research and teaching. It was ranked second in the UK for research power in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). One of the largest European centres for the study of film, it has an established reputation going back 35 years. Approaching film as a dynamic part of our cultural experience, we encourage thinking about film as it emerges at the intersections of art, document and entertainment. Through theory and practice, individual research, student-led seminars and visiting speakers, we promote an environment in which postgraduate students are able to engage with the continuing vibrancy of cinema.

Studying film as a postgraduate at the University of Kent will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise, library facilities and a campusbased film culture. We currently offer expertise in North American, European and Latin American cinemas. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives, as well as with digital media and practice by research.

In 2014, the University opened a new 62-seat cinema named after the pioneering female film director Ida Lupino, which students can enjoy as part of their experience during their studies. The Lupino has state-of-the-art digital projection and sound, and has been created to provide an intimate atmosphere for film viewing.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

FI811 - Conceptualising Film (30 credits)
FI812 - Advanced Film Theory (30 credits)
FI813 - Film History (30 credits)
FI815 - Film and Modernity (30 credits)
FI998 - Dissertation:GPMS (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework and the dissertation.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- develop your understanding and skills to a notably higher level of sophistication and achievement (appropriate to an Master’s level award) than would be expected at degree level, such that you leave the programme with a substantial analytic and critical understanding of film and film studies

- develop your understanding and skills to the level necessary for entry into a research programme in Film Studies

- develop your ability to think independently, argue with clarity and force, to discern areas of research interest within the field and be able to frame viable research questions

- provoke reflection on areas of critical and theoretical approaches to cinema and its context

- nurture the intellectual skills cited above in the context of written work (essays and dissertations) as well as in the context of interpersonal interaction (seminars, research papers, supervision)

- attract outstanding students irrespective of race, background, gender, and physical disability, from both within the UK and from overseas

- develop existing and new areas of teaching in response to the advance of research and scholarship within the subject, as well as new developments in filmmaking practice.

Research areas

Research in both theory and practice is currently centred in five broad areas:

- national cinemas – form and history: North American, European, Latin American
- the moving image in a digital context
- documentary film
- film aesthetics
- avant-garde and experimental cinema.

Centre for the Interdisciplinary Study of Film and the Moving Image
The Centre draws together scholars from across the University who use film and the moving image as an integral part of their research. We are open to ideas that extend the reach of the Centre and seek to support projects that promote collaboration between individuals and other research centres. Our aim is to produce a more proactive engagement with other disciplines, to open new lines of communication and to produce innovative knowledge formations through the activity of pioneering research projects.

Careers

Arts graduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to film journalists and theatre technicians. Our graduates have found work at Universal Pictures, the London Film Festival and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations, as well as in film production, as editorial assistants and as web designers.


Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Do you have a desire to pursue a specific research project in film and video?. On this ResM you’ll receive a grounding in the research processes which are common to work generally in the arts, humanities, creative and cultural industrial fields. Read more
Do you have a desire to pursue a specific research project in film and video?

On this ResM you’ll receive a grounding in the research processes which are common to work generally in the arts, humanities, creative and cultural industrial fields. Explore research questions and methodologies specific to film and video and learn how these relate to both practice and/or theory.

Programme structure

You'll get to focus on practice or theory, in any combination of your choice, in one of the following areas:
-Artists’ film and video, experimental film and video (including fiction, documentary, drama documentary, animation)
-Histories of autobiographical, experimental, avant-garde film and video
-Contemporary theoretical discourses about independent film (including film practice as research, film as philosophy)
-The study and use of archive film (including home movies) in different contexts and practices; the relationship of film and video to new forms of dissemination (with particular reference to the digital)
-Collaborative projects involving different disciplines (for example, performance); and community-based and activist video.

Programme content

-Critical screenings: mapping out the interconnecting territories of independent film/video making
-Research in the arts and humanities: development of generic research skills and methods
-Masters thesis: presenting a substantial piece of work, either practice- or theory-based, chosen by you

The ResM in Film and Video leads to either a traditional written thesis or one that combines critical writing and creative/professional practice. You have the flexibility to submit your thesis any time between 24–36 months or, if you are making excellent progress, you may apply to transfer directly into our PhD programme after two years, rather than submitting a ResM thesis.

Choosing a ResM

The Research Masters (ResM) is classed as a postgraduate research programme – it enables you to engage in a focused, self-negotiated research project over the period of two years. As well as being a satisfying creative and professional endeavour in itself, it provides high-quality preparation for doctoral research, including practice as research, in the interdisciplinary field of independent film and video. You will study current debates and approaches, as well as the theories, skills and methodologies necessary for contemporary film and video research. Your thesis may be assessed entirely through written work or through written work in addition to a substantial practical project that addresses particular research questions.

The ResM is suitable for:
-People in employment in the cultural and creative industries or recent graduates who wish to proceed to doctoral (PhD) research
-Those in, or who wish to be employed in, the cultural and creative industries (such as publishing, teaching, design, the media, galleries and museums, the heritage industry, journalism, theatre, dance) who wish to gain a self-directed academic qualification to lead to further career enhancement
-Anybody who wishes to further develop academic skills, pursue particular subject enthusiasms, or carry out a cherished research project with specialist guidance.

Features of the ResM

-It focuses almost entirely on an individual research project of your own choice
-Largely self-directed with tutorial guidance and clear milestones and expectations
-Includes taught modules (60 credits) that must be passed to develop and evidence your research skills
-It prepares you specifically to be a researcher in the arts and humanities, to do an extended research project within a professional context, or to do a PhD.

What’s different about the ResM?

Because it’s classed as a postgraduate research programme:
-You’ll follow the same milestones and processes as MPhil/PhD candidates in the Doctoral Training Centre, including annual monitoring, the appointment of examiners, formal acceptance of your proposal by the University, and adherence to research ethics
-You’ll be able to attend any sessions within the University’s Graduate School Researcher Development Programme
-You’ll have a supervisory team (Director of Studies plus a second supervisor) assigned once your proposal has been accepted
-You may have the option to apply to transfer straight into our PhD programme, subject to certain conditions, rather than submitting for a ResM award.

The final thesis is examined in a different way:
-There’s a flexible submission date - between 24-36 months
-It’s assessed by an internal examiner, who is not your supervisor, and an external examiner from another institution
-You’ll need to attend a viva voce. This is an oral examination where you’ll discuss your thesis with your examiners. It usually takes place between one to three months following the submission of written elements
-You won’t receive a percentage grade for the ResM degree
-You may be asked to make corrections to your thesis before being allowed to submit a final electronic version of it and being awarded your degree.

The award title will be a ResM and the certificate will include the title of your thesis, with no grade classification.

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Why study at Roehampton. Study film, television, and new media alongside world-leading scholars in the field. Undertake innovative research alongside regular study trips to film festivals, galleries and cinemas across London. . Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • Study film, television, and new media alongside world-leading scholars in the field.
  • Undertake innovative research alongside regular study trips to film festivals, galleries and cinemas across London. 
  • Learn to produce ‘video essays’, in which you may opt not only to write about films but also to edit footage and create your own original audio-visual criticism.
  • Roehampton is ranked best modern university in London (Complete University Guide 2018).

Course summary

Study film and screen cultures while immersing yourself in the creative culture of London at film festivals, studios, galleries and pop-up cinemas. Our MA combines the study of mainstream and experimental film, contemporary television and the video-essay form, and includes the option to produce either a written or audio-visual dissertation.

This cutting-edge MA offers the opportunity for advanced studies in television and new media. Taught by leading figures in the field, the course allows you to engage with the most up-to-date research and to explore new approaches to audio-visual scholarship. 

The programme includes first-hand engagement with cultural institutions across the city. Building on our links with festivals, studios, cinemas and galleries, this MA is not only about studying film theory but also about immersing yourself in the wealth of screen-related events and institutions the capital has to offer. In recent years, our students have been on trips to the London Film Festival, the British Film Institute, the Scalarama Cult Film Festival, the British Artists' Film & Video Study Collection, and the Tate Modern. 

As a student you will also become a member of the Centre for Research in Film and Audiovisual Cultures (CRFAC) which means you will be able to engage with new and emerging research by attending a range of guest talks, conferences, media masterclasses and research seminars led by industry professionals. In recent years students have attended an exclusive preview of comedian and producer Omid Djalili’s film We Are Many, and gained advice on how to be a success in the filmmaking industry from BBC producer and director Jonathan Taylor, and the producer of Woody Allen’s Vicky Cristina Barcelona, Gareth Wiley.

Content

You’ll develop your independent critical thinking by engaging in the programme’s four main areas:

1.Screen Cultures of London

In a series of visits to festivals, studios, cinemas and galleries, you will gain first hand engagement with cultural institutions across London.

2.Cult and Quality Television

You will interrogate the dynamic role of television within the shifting media landscape, focusing on contemporary US television drama.

3.Essay Films and Video Essays

You will combine history, theory and practice, be introduced to the Essay Film form and be equipped with the necessary skills to make your own video essays.

4.Transnational Cinemas from the Multiplex to the Web

You will undertake an in-depth examination of contemporary cinema through a global lens, taking in a variety of international films from big budget spectacles through to online films and mash-ups. 

You will also choose between an academic dissertation and an audio-visual dissertation. The academic dissertation gives you the opportunity to deepen your research skills and knowledge about a topic of particular interest to you. The audio-visual dissertation will provide the opportunity to undertake an innovative combination of theory and practice through the production of an extended audio-visual essay alongside a written critical reflection.

Here are some of the varied range of modules we currently offer:

  • Screen Cultures of London
  • Cult and Quality Television
  • Essay Films and Video Essays
  • Transnational Cinemas from the Multiplex to the Web
  • Dissertation

Career options

Careers in cinema and festival programming, media research, curatorship and distribution. The MA also functions as a pathway to a PhD for those pursuing a career in academia.

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On the MA Film Production, the learning experience is built around practical production modules, underpinned by theory that explores key developments in the history of cinema.Our aim is to nurture filmmakers who can critically reflect on the form and content of both their own work, and the work of others in the field. Read more

On the MA Film Production, the learning experience is built around practical production modules, underpinned by theory that explores key developments in the history of cinema.Our aim is to nurture filmmakers who can critically reflect on the form and content of both their own work, and the work of others in the field

Course detail

The course is predominantly practical, with almost 70% of learning geared towards enabling you to produce documentary and experimental films. For those whose interest is academic, there is also the possibility to replace the double project practice module with a dissertation. The course closely tracks contemporary developments in digital cinematography and sound design, actively encouraging students to create transformative cinematic responses which cross the boundaries between documentary, experimental and fictive forms. This includes:

• lyrical

• Montage

• self-reflexive

• guerrilla

• poetic

• drama-documentary

approaches which challenge the existing output of broadcast, festival and on-line exhibition. Students produce several video sequences, plus two short films and one longer film.

The course examines the 'founding' traditions of documentary and experimental fiction associated with the Lumiere Brothers and Melies and explores overlaps and points of contact between them. The learning experience is built around practical production modules, underpinned by theory exploring key developments in the history of cinema. Our aim is to nurture filmmakers who can also critically reflect on the form and content of both their own work and the work of others in the field.

Modules

• Documentary Practice

• Film Theory

• Experimental Film and Video Practice

• Film and Media Cultures

• Project or Dissertation.

Format

The course blends theory and practice and is designed to help you build creative and critical bridges between the two, so each area of study informs and supports your other learning.

Almost 70% of the course is made up of practical workshops. These typically combine an examination of relevant film clips and approaches with discussions relating to their pros and cons. You will receive regular feedback with discussion on work in progress, test viewings with peers and staff, exhibition visits, and production of a final major piece of work. Throughout these modules, you will receive regular technical input and support.

Theory modules combine a range of approaches, including lectures, visits to the London Film Festival, student-led seminars, presentations and class discussions.

Assessment

The course combines elements of formative assessment with summative approaches, so you can draw insights from peers and tutors.

Career and study progression

Our alumni have gone on to showcase work and win awards in film festivals in the UK and internationally and secure broadcasts of their work in a range of territories.

In recent years many alumni from the course found work with production companies, broadcasters or as independent filmmakers, either in the UK, in their own country or elsewhere. We encourage our alumni to be involved with students and staff on the course and have developed a detailed database of student and alumni production expertise, to facilitate networking and the formation of crews for professional and student productions.

We also offer students the opportunity to pursue more in-depth research interests by undertaking a PhD with us.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course.

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here.



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This innovative new course offers the opportunity to gain both the vital skills and critical awareness necessary to pursue a career in the diverse areas of contemporary film curation and exhibition, whether within the industry or within the field of research. Read more

This innovative new course offers the opportunity to gain both the vital skills and critical awareness necessary to pursue a career in the diverse areas of contemporary film curation and exhibition, whether within the industry or within the field of research. This could include curation within a museum or arts centre; festival management; exhibition, both theatrical and online; or cinema programming.

A range of placements with industry partners including The Tetley, a leading centre for contemporary art housed in the former Tetley brewery, and Leeds International Film Festival, will allow you to see this in action, providing you with the practical skills you need to successfully curate and exhibit films.

Classroom-based modules will explain the theory behind programming, archiving and film exhibition using case studies including cinemas, art galleries and festivals amongst others.

Course Benefits

You will be joining the Northern Film School, one of the best-known film and television schools in the UK, whose staff and students have been making innovative and award-winning films for more than 25 years. In this collaborative environment, you will work alongside filmmaking students, sharing ideas and inspiration with fellow creative professionals.

Industry visitors and successful alumni will visit to share their experiences and you will have the opportunity to build your networks through film festival visits and events at the University. Previous students have visited CineYouth Film Festival in Chicago and regularly show their work at Sheffield DocFest. Our academic staff have premiered their films at FrightFest. Leeds is also home to the Leeds International Film Festival, so you will have ample opportunity to see how a professional event is run by experiencing it yourself.

The School's research expertise will feed into your learning, helping you to understand the context of different audiences. For example, the Film School's CINAGE project which began in 2013, explores the EU's recommendations for healthy, active ageing by engaging older people in contemporary cinema.

You will be taught by expert staff including Visiting Lecturer Jason Wood who helped to develop the course. Jason is the Artistic Director of Film at HOME, Manchester. He is also a Research Professor of Film at Manchester School of Art and the co-director (with Simon Barker) of the experimental Ballard adaptation Always (crashing). Previous publications for Faber include: The Faber Book of Mexican Cinema, Nick Broomfield: Documenting Icons and The Curzon Faber Book of New British Cinema (with Ian Haydn Smith). He is currently completing a memoir with Green Gartside/Scritti Politti and writing a history of recent Iranian Cinema (both for Faber).

Keith Dando, who heads the School's taught postgraduate programmes, has an extensive range of experience in film marketing, distribution and exhibition. Keith has curated a nimber of film screenings, including Northern Film School showcases at the Leeds International Film Festival and The Royal Armouries, and was co-founder, director and programmer of the Liverpool Lesbian and Gay Film Festival.

Dr Steven Gerrard has spent many years developing collaborative projects with partners as diverse as Swansea Football Club, the Musuem of Welsh Life, and the National Trust.

There will also be guest lecturers and masterclasses by current industry film curators and programmers who will ensure that you are kept up to date with the latest developments in the sector as they are happening.

Core modules

  • Archive - Curation - Exhibition
  • Contextual Study: British Cinema
  • Experiential Learning
  • Developing Research in Film Curation & Exhibition
  • Enterprise & Creativity, Innovation & Cultural Economy
  • Critical Review
  • Final Project / Dissertation

Job prospects

With your specialist knowledge, you could enter a range of diverse careers with film and moving image at their heart. Areas such as film festival programming, archiving and restoration, museum curation, film exhibition and distribution (theatrical and online), community arts and cinema management will all be open to you.

  • Cinema / Festival Programmer
  • Museum Curator
  • Archive Researcher
  • Event Organiser


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We offer a tailored, individual doctoral research programme within an area of expertise covered by a wide range of staff interests. Read more
We offer a tailored, individual doctoral research programme within an area of expertise covered by a wide range of staff interests. In addition to individual supervision, students participate in an extensive study skills programme; an ongoing series of international level seminars, symposia and conferences; the Department’s Postgraduate Methods Reading Group and an informal Postgraduate Research Group.

Research Interests

Film and television aesthetics, history and theory; classical and contemporary Hollywood cinema; European cinema (especially British, Italian, French, and Spanish); British and US television; documentary film and television; silent cinema; feminist film and television theory, history and criticism; world cinema; gay and lesbian film cultures; film and philosophy; experimental film and video; film and television genre; film and modernity; film technology and innovation; cities and landscapes in film and television; critical studies of the archive; transnational cinemas.

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Postgraduate students are supervised via a research team through regular meetings. Read more
Postgraduate students are supervised via a research team through regular meetings. Research supervision draws on wide staff interests in North American, European, and Latin American cinemas, offering opportunities to study projects based in aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives on film and digital media, as well as practice by research. For further details, see staff research interests (https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/352/film-practice-by-research#!staff-research).

Research students participate in a series of regular events. These include work-in-progress seminars and professional development workshops, both of which are organised at School level. You are also able to enrol on the Graduate School’s Researcher Development Programme (https://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html).

Our research students also actively participate in a research seminar, which brings leading scholars and practitioners to Kent. We also hold an annual postgraduate presentation day.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/352/film-practice-by-research

About the Department of Film

The Film Department at the University of Kent is known for its excellence in research and teaching. Arts at Kent (including Film) was ranked 1st in the UK for research power in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF). One of the largest European centres for the study of film, it has an established reputation going back 35 years. Approaching film as a dynamic part of our cultural experience, we encourage thinking about film as it emerges at the intersections of art, document and entertainment. Through theory and practice, individual research, student-led seminars and visiting speakers, we promote an environment in which postgraduate students are able to engage with the continuing vibrancy of cinema.

Studying film as a postgraduate at the University of Kent will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise, library facilities and a campusbased film culture. We currently offer expertise in North American, European and Latin American cinemas. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives, as well as with digital media and practice by research.

In 2014, the University opened a new 62-seat cinema named after the pioneering female film director Ida Lupino, which students can enjoy as part of their experience during their studies. The Lupino has state-of-the-art digital projection and sound, and has been created to provide an intimate atmosphere for film viewing.

Research areas

Research in both theory and practice is currently centred in five broad areas:

- national cinemas – form and history: North American, European, Latin American
- the moving image in a digital context
- documentary film
- film aesthetics
- avant-garde and experimental cinema.

Centre for the Interdisciplinary Study of Film and the Moving Image
The Centre draws together scholars from across the University who use film and the moving image as an integral part of their research. We are open to ideas that extend the reach of the Centre and seek to support projects that promote collaboration between individuals and other research centres. Our aim is to produce a more proactive engagement with other disciplines, to open new lines of communication and to produce innovative knowledge formations through the activity of pioneering research projects.

Careers

Arts graduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to film journalists and theatre technicians. Our graduates have found work at Universal Pictures, the London Film Festival and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations, as well as in film production, as editorial assistants and as web designers.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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With its academic base on the Ayr Campus, our course is also delivered from Film City Glasgow, the bespoke industry hub for twenty independent production companies and post-production facility houses. Read more

With its academic base on the Ayr Campus, our course is also delivered from Film City Glasgow, the bespoke industry hub for twenty independent production companies and post-production facility houses. Film City Glasgow also boasts Scotland’s only Dolby sound mixing studio.

Our MA Filmmaking course will provide a stimulating, supportive and professional environment in which you can freely yet rigorously develop your unique individual voice. Throughout your course you will be mentored by leading film practitioners from around the world. This support includes our very own multi award-winning tutors, Professor Nick Higgins and Sam Firth.

Our distinctive course also boasts an international guest faculty programme, who complement our core tutors, support staff, and technical facilities, to ensure that from the moment they walk through the door, our students no longer feel as though they are “students”, but are already operating at the highest professional level, as creative collaborators in a context that replicates the conditions of the industry in which they intend to work. Previous guest tutors have included Oscar and BAFTA winners.

Students completing the MA will graduate with three short films (including both documentary and fiction) to add to their portfolio, having been through a process that provides space for both creative experimentation and professional rigour.

Placement Opportunities

Our MA Filmmaking course allows you exclusive access to strands within the context of film festivals. It provides you with privileged access to industry visitors, and takes advantage of their presence in the country to run special industry events with our partners.

There will also be opportunities for you to learn from the professionals who work in Film City, and to make use of their facilities (which no university in the UK can rival).

Placement opportunities are also likely to emerge through the Scottish Film Talent Network.

Course Details

Topics of study on our MA Filmmaking course will include:

  • Advanced Fiction Film Practice
  • Advanced Documentary Film Practice
  • Film as an Industry
  • Development Lab
  • Master's project

Upon completing the MA you will graduate with three short films, including both documentary and fiction.

Topics

Your study and assessment will involve the topics below:

ADVANCED FILM DOCUMENTARY PRACTICE:

You will make a documentary film under the direction of the core course team, exploring the boundaries of documentary film practice, and its intersection with:

  • Fiction
  • Essay film
  • Transmedia practice

FILM AS AN INDUSTRY:

You will gain a professional insight into the contemporary film industry. You will study every aspect of the planning and logistics of complex low-budget film shoots, from concept to new distribution models and marketing, placing these key activities within their economic and artistic context.

ADVANCED FICTION FILM PRACTICE:

You will make a short fiction film under the direction of an invited filmmaker, who will launch the module with an intensive one-week workshop, and remain available over the rest of the trimester to follow your progress and mentor your project.

DEVELOPMENT LAB:

You will undertake an industry-standard development process, in which you prepare your final Masters film project under the supervision of leading professionals active in the practice of the short film form.

MASTER'S PROJECT:

You will undertake a major creative project – either fiction or documentary or immersive film – under the guidance of the course team.

Career Prospects

Our MA Filmmaking degree will support your development of working professionally in the independent and world cinema sectors of the film industry either in:

  • Fiction
  • Documentary
  • Experimental filmmaking
  • Virtual Reality productions


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Our MSc in Advanced Thin Film Technologies is ideal for engineering or science graduates planning a career in research, development, production and/or business involving thin film technologies and continuing personal development of current industry professionals. Read more

Our MSc in Advanced Thin Film Technologies is ideal for engineering or science graduates planning a career in research, development, production and/or business involving thin film technologies and continuing personal development of current industry professionals.

Thin film technologies are key enablers in a wide range of global research, development, manufacturing, industrial and high technology applications and products.

Our unique course provides up-to-date coverage of evolving thin film technologies and latest developments in the field. It develops the multi-disciplinary skills needed for professional development within this rapidly expanding field and forms the basis for future professional chartered engineer and/or physicist status.

Core topics include thin film materials science, metrology and characterisation, theoretical modelling, physical and chemical-based thin film deposition methods including deposition system engineering and control, plasma processing, thin film devices and applications and research and project management. The programme content reflects the multidisciplinary nature of advanced thin film technologies and provides students with the necessary broad skill set.

Course Details

Core topics you will study include:

  • thin film materials science
  • metrology and characterisation
  • theoretical modelling
  • physical and chemical-based thin film deposition methods

Course content reflects the multidisciplinary nature of advanced thin film technologies and provides you with the necessary broad skill set. When studying towards your MSc you will undertake experimental project work, providing practical skills in:

  • thin film deposition
  • characterisation
  • modelling

The extensive range of equipment within the Institute of Thin Films, Sensors and Imaging will be at your disposal throughout your studies.

You are required to complete a dissertation, selecting a specialism in order to achieve a greater understanding of the implementation and advanced application of thin films. There may be scope to integrate your dissertation with industry, where an engineering supervisor will be allocated to assist your MSc journey and to advise and introduce you to industrial contacts.

Teaching & Assessment

Opportunities for industry focused learning activities have been built into all modules enabling you to engage with employers.

These include:

  • ‘live’ case studies
  • problem-solving scenarios
  • study visits to thin film facilities
  • individual work-related projects

You will be taught by staff within the University’s Institute of Thin Films, Sensors and Imaging. This is in addition to input from an industrial advisory group thus ensuring that course content is aligned with industrial requirements, applications and includes the latest technological developments.

Our Advanced Thin Film Technologies degree uses a variety of assessment methods. The below list provides a guide to the types of assessment methods you can expect:

  • written examinations
  • oral presentation
  • written reports
  • coursework
  • academic posters

Career Prospects

Jobs

You will be equipped for global opportunities for employment and a career in:

  • research
  • development
  • manufacturing
  • business

Most organisations that implement thin film based technologies employ fully trained, qualified technologists, consultants and technical marketing specialists throughout their lifecycle, with a consequent high global demand for such personnel across a wide range of applications, products and markets.



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-Film and TV degree production provides an exciting opportunity to learn advanced producing, directing and screenwriting techniques and to build professional links within the UK and international film and television industry. Read more
-Film and TV degree production provides an exciting opportunity to learn advanced producing, directing and screenwriting techniques and to build professional links within the UK and international film and television industry
-This postgraduate degree provides a practical and intensive study of filmmaking in an environment that encourages experimentation, professional development and cutting edge ideas. Students work with up to date professional equipment and facilities and, as part of their Masters Degree, produce, direct or write a major film project with an individually tailored marketing and distribution strategy
-The University of Hertfordshire film programmes and post-graduate school regularly host industry professionals who lecture and conduct workshops, seminars and tutorials. We work closely with the industry to enable students to connect directly with their future employers and mentors
-The combination of creative, technical, practical and management skills make this course unique and our graduates highly successful, as employees or as independent filmmakers

Why choose this course?

The MA Film and Television production programme offers an opportunity for students to initiate, develop and realise original film and television work in directing, producing and screenwriting. Students enhance their creative practice in film and television to professional levels, with the aim of pursuing a successful career in the industry. The programme commences with a series of taught modules, intended to augment the student's critical judgment and technical capability, before embarking on a major project, in the form of a substantial screenplay or digital film.

The project offers a setting in which the student can increase confidence in creative decision making, whilst expanding awareness of the requirements of film style and technology, finance, marketplace and audience. Students broaden their knowledge and experience to gain a better understanding of film and television production and its professional and commercial practices. They undertake a programme of screenings, master classes and seminars, to extend their knowledge of film and television histories, genres, aesthetics and narrative processes and to develop a range of research and communication skills. Students are encouraged to develop the aesthetic and conceptual awareness required to analyse and critically situate their work within current theoretical, cultural and commercial contexts, whether as a director, producer or scriptwriter.

The modules focus on script development, working with actors, camerawork, lighting, sound recording, post production techniques, funding, distribution and other relevant areas. You will benefit from the expertise and creative ideas of students working in specialised areas elsewhere in the School (eg Visual FX, Special FX, Animation or Music) whose input can enhance the professionalism of your major projects.

Careers

You will also have the opportunity to exhibit your work at the University and there are good opportunities to develop your teaching experience by mentoring undergraduate students in your subject area. When you successfully complete your MA, you will have made a very substantial addition to your CV and have a clear understanding of the next steps in the development of your career.

Teaching methods

You are taught in an intensive mix of lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials, masterclasses and industry guest sessions. Tutorial support is offered in small groups and one-to-one, with further support available online and by email.

All students on the PG Media programme engage in an interdisciplinary project as a part of their MA study, giving them an opportunity to work with students from other disciplines in an experimental and creative way.

Structure

Core Modules
-Creative Economies
-Discourse/Reflection: Professional Project Development
-Major Study: Film and Television Production
-Practice 1: Script Development
-Practice 2: Camera, Sound and Editing
-Research and Enquiry

Optional
-Creative Economies (Online)
-Research and Enquiry (Online)

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