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This course has been designed to offer a genuinely creative methodology and understanding of current and future potential for film experimentation in artists' moving image. Read more
This course has been designed to offer a genuinely creative methodology and understanding of current and future potential for film experimentation in artists' moving image. This places the programme at the forefront of postgraduate studies exploring moving image in its most creative form. The course offers a range of input from staff in filmmaking, and will enable you to develop a major body of practical work created within the context of a critical understanding of contemporary experimental film theory.

You will have access to our moving image resources and specialised filmmaking equipment, augmented by excellent technical and academic support. To complete a specific project brief, other materials will also be provided, enabling you to meet the learning outcomes of the course and/or project. However, if you choose to develop your own film options requiring additional resources, then you will have to meet any further costs associated with that. View a full list of our current moving image resources.

Key features
-The course provides an exploration of the relationship between film, moving image, sound and critical frameworks. This is supported by the excellent moving image resources at the Knights Park campus, including a moving-image studio, post-production facilities and high-end film equipment. One-to-one tutorials, seminars, exhibitions and discussion all feature in the programme.
-Taught by filmmakers, creative practitioners, curators and writers, including many off-site visits and visits by professional artists, filmmakers and curators. This includes the opportunity to participate in a public screening programme at BFI Southbank, and a seminar forum at FID Marseille International Film Festival.
-Every year, the course nominates a graduate to participate in the European workshop on artists' moving image at the Schermo dell'Arte film festival in Florence, where they receive professional mentoring.

What will you study?

The curriculum offers three distinct areas of critical and practical inquiry options, supported by a specialised seminar/lectures series: artists' moving image; independent film; and the materiality of film.

You will undertake self-initiated research supported by taught modules and an experienced group of research-active staff, and will explore the critical and historical frameworks within which experimental film work can be understood and conceptualised.

Assessment

Presentation and exhibition/screening/documentation, tutorials and seminar/discussion.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Core modules
-Project 1
-Theory – Seminar
-Experimental Filmmaking Practices
-Experimentation in Moving Image
-Masters Project (Exhibition and Research Publication)

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This course is currently under suspension for the current academic session. However, it may return. Please see the website for updates. Read more
This course is currently under suspension for the current academic session. However, it may return. Please see the website for updates: https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/

Aberystwyth University’s MA in Film Studies focuses upon the advanced study of cinema. Normally, you will already have attained a degree of expertise in film studies or in a cognate area before starting the course and you will be ready to study film at a more advanced level by mastering theoretical, historical and empirical approaches to the subject.

This MA in Film Studies course is designed to give you a comprehensive overview of the development of film and film theory, taking in the development and intersections of both Hollywood and European cinemas and popular and 'alternative' cinemas. You will also have the opportunity to study specific movements within cinema, such as the changing manifestations of German Expressionism, American film noir and avant-garde movements; you will do so by studying philosophical, aesthetic, social and cultural influences.

This course will enable you to interrogate a wide range of factors which inform the production, distribution and reception of film, including a range of cultural and aesthetic contexts, the representation of class, ethnicity and gender, changing and shifting film marketing and distribution practices, and the study of a range of film fans and audiences. You will also receive a thorough grounding in key theoretical traditions and research methods within film studies which will prepare you for the production of a 15,000 word dissertation (on a topic of your choice) at the end of the course.

The MA in Film Studies will provide you with essential research, historical and analytical skills designed to support your future career progression either in the cultural and critical industries or in academia. Throughout the MA, staff will be happy to advise you on potential progression, after your MA, to PhD study. For profiles of previous MA Film Studies students, which outline their experiences on the MA and their subsequent career progression, see: http://www.aber.ac.uk/en/tfts/study-with-us/masters/former-ma-profiles/

The Department of Theatre, Film and Television Studies at Aberystwyth is the highest rated Arts and Humanities Department in Wales, according to the results of the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, with 60% of research submitted being rated world-leading.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/film-studies-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you wish to engage in the advanced study of cinema.
- If you are ready to take on the subject in theoretical, historical and empirical terms;
- If you aim to pursue a career in film journalism, criticism or analysis, film historical work or arts administration, or if you wish to progress to PhD study;
- If you wish to sharpen your academic rigour and develop a cache of critical evaluative, communication, and time and project management skills.

Course detail

The MA in Film Studies focuses on the importance of film within an ever-changing global environment. As a student, you will be encouraged to investigate the ways in which technologies and social changes have impacted, and continue to impact upon different aspects of film, including filmic representation and the ways in which film has been taken up within broader cultural contexts. You will also receive a thorough grounding in key theoretical traditions and research methods within film studies, and will be alerted to the historical developments that have marked film as a medium, focusing on historical case studies in order to think about changes and continuities throughout film history. While you will be introduced to a broad array of filmmaking traditions, you will focus particularly on the interrelations between Hollywood and European cinemas.

The MA will introduce you to different ways of understanding film: as entertainment, as art, as an industry, and as a cultural medium through which identities, histories and ideologies are both represented and negotiated. You will be taught by active researchers in the field of film studies, with a broad array of expertise and knowledge particularly in British, French, Russian and Hollywood cinemas, avant-garde, experimental and cult film, film history and representation, film genre and star studies, and fan, audience and reception studies. As such, the MA aims to enrich your knowledge of film’s importance through different methodological and theoretical approaches to the subject, and to sharpen your own research and study skills in the process.

The MA in Film Studies is run by the Department of Theatre, Film and Television Studies, one of the largest and most significant departments of its kind in the UK, and has a particularly vibrant postgraduate and research culture (including an annual postgraduate conference). Based in Aberystwyth University’s Parry-Williams Building, the Department boasts superb facilities including: 36 digital and HD editing suites; over 40 industry standard HD and digital cameras: a new HD, digital television studio; three fully-equipped theatre spaces (seating approximately 100 people each); and much more. We also maintain close links with Aberystwyth Arts Centre's digital 3D cinema. The cinema has a vibrant and lively film programme including the annual Abertoir horror film festival of Wales.

Format

The course is taught over one year (if taken full time), and three years (if taken part time). The MA encompasses a total of six (out of a choice of seven) taught modules (120 credits in total) covering film theory, research methods, film history, film representation, documentary and avant-garde film, film marketing and distribution, and film audiences. In order to complete your MA, you will then apply your learning in the individual dissertation worth an additional 60 credits. The dissertation is a substantial piece of scholarly research totalling no more than 15,000 words. It will be on a subject of your own choice, informed by discussions with your designated dissertation supervisor in the Department.

Assessment

The taught part of the course is delivered and assessed through lectures, seminars, oral presentations and essays. Successful completion of your dissertation leads to the award of an MA.

Employability

Every aspect of the Aberystwyth Master’s in Film Studies programme is designed to enhance your employability. The benefits of the course for employment are twofold: not only will you possess first-rate, subject-specific knowledge of film history and theory, but you will also be equipped with widely applicable skills and abilities that will suit many employment contexts.

Alongside the development of your subject-specific knowledge, an especially noteworthy strength of this course is its emphasis on group discussion and individual student presentations (which will enable you to develop your team work and communication skills). As an emerging film academic your strengthened research and critical faculties will make you a strong candidate for any post where ideas and topics need research, analysis, discussion, expansion and classification. The pattern of research and analysis you will undertake in this course creates highly marketable skills which will, upon graduation, stand you in excellent stead for entry into employment. The course will also provide you with the training and skills you will need if you decide to progress to PhD study.

The dissertation element of the course will enable you to develop and demonstrate an array of professional qualities and skills. You will do this by reflecting on the methods and approaches you have encountered in the study programme and then identifying and creating appropriate methodologies for your own research work. Success in this area of study proves to prospective employers that you take the initiative to develop and improve your research and project management skills.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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The MA Film with Practice is a taught programme suitable for graduates in film, practitioners who want to advance their practice in an intellectually stimulating environment and non-film graduates with a passion for film practice demonstrated though amateur filmmaking. Read more
The MA Film with Practice is a taught programme suitable for graduates in film, practitioners who want to advance their practice in an intellectually stimulating environment and non-film graduates with a passion for film practice demonstrated though amateur filmmaking.

The programme is taught by award-winning filmmakers, internationally recognised film scholars and includes masterclasses from film industry professionals.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/343/film-with-practice

About the Department of Film

The Film Department at the University of Kent is known for its excellence in research and teaching. Arts at Kent (including Film) was ranked 1st in the UK for research power in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF). One of the largest European centres for the study of film, it has an established reputation going back 35 years. Approaching film as a dynamic part of our cultural experience, we encourage thinking about film as it emerges at the intersections of art, document and entertainment. Through theory and practice, individual research, student-led seminars and visiting speakers, we promote an environment in which postgraduate students are able to engage with the continuing vibrancy of cinema.

Studying film as a postgraduate at the University of Kent will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise, library facilities and a campus-based film culture. We currently offer expertise in North American, European and Latin American cinemas. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives, as well as with digital media and practice by research.

In 2014, the University opened a new 62-seat cinema named after the pioneering female film director Ida Lupino, which students can enjoy as part of their experience during their studies. The Lupino has state-of-the-art digital projection and sound, and has been created to provide an intimate atmosphere for film viewing.

Course structure

This programme includes two dedicated film practice modules and a dissertation by Film Practice that includes the making of a fiction film. You also choose two modules from the existing Film MA to create a practice-theory mix that accommodates your own interests.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

FI819 - Digital Film Practice: Key Skills (30 credits)
FI820 - Independent Project Development (30 credits)
FI812 - Advanced Film Theory (30 credits)
FI813 - Film History (30 credits)
FI815 - Film and Modernity (30 credits)
FI811 - Conceptualising Film (30 credits)
FI899 - Dissertation by Film Practice (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment at MA level is 100% course work: that means you will be assessed through essays, treatments, project proposals, seminar participation and a dissertation by film practice.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- Develop the understanding and skills possessed by students entering the programme to a notably higher level of sophistication and achievement (appropriate to an M-level award) than would be expected at degree level, such that all leave the programme with a substantial analytic, critical and practice-based understanding of Film.

- Develop the ability of students to think independently, argue with clarity and force, initiate and complete creative work and to discern areas of research and practice-led research within the field.

- Provoke reflection on practical, critical and theoretical approaches to Film and its context.

- Nurture intellectual and creative skills through written work (essays, dissertations, treatments, scripts), creative practice (DV films) as well as in the context of interpersonal interaction (seminars, research papers, supervision, filmmaking processes).

- Develop existing and new areas of teaching informed by and in response to developments in film practice, research and scholarship.

- Provide an excellent quality of higher education

- Attract outstanding students irrespective of race, background, gender, and physical disability, from both within the UK and from overseas.

- Support national and regional economic success by producing graduates in possession of key knowledge and skills, with the capacity to learn.

- Provide opportunities for the development of personal, communication and research skills and other key skills appropriate for both graduate employment in industry or further study.

- Provide learning opportunities that are enjoyable experiences and involve realistic workloads, based within a combined research and practice-led framework

- Offer appropriate support for students from a diverse range of backgrounds

- Provide high quality teaching in a supportive environment with appropriately qualified and trained staff?

Research areas

Research in both theory and practice is currently centred in five broad areas:

- national cinemas – form and history: North American, European, Latin American
- the moving image in a digital context
- documentary film
- film aesthetics
- avant-garde and experimental cinema.

Centre for the Interdisciplinary Study of Film and the Moving Image
The Centre draws together scholars from across the University who use film and the moving image as an integral part of their research. We are open to ideas that extend the reach of the Centre and seek to support projects that promote collaboration between individuals and other research centres. Our aim is to produce a more proactive engagement with other disciplines, to open new lines of communication and to produce innovative knowledge formations through the activity of pioneering research projects.

Careers

Arts graduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to film journalists and theatre technicians. Our graduates have found work at Universal Pictures, the London Film Festival and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations, as well as in film production, as editorial assistants and as web designers.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The programme offers a thorough grounding in postgraduate-level film and is suitable both for graduates in the subject and those new to it. Read more
The programme offers a thorough grounding in postgraduate-level film and is suitable both for graduates in the subject and those new to it.

It is taught by experts in Film and seeks to engage you with the key elements that make up the diverse nature of film and moving images.

The programme allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent academic and recreational facilities, before relocating to our Paris centre for the spring term, studying in the heart of historic Montparnasse.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/19/film-paris

About the Department of Film

The Film Department at the University of Kent is known for its excellence in research and teaching. It was ranked second in the UK for research power in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). One of the largest European centres for the study of film, it has an established reputation going back 35 years. Approaching film as a dynamic part of our cultural experience, we encourage thinking about film as it emerges at the intersections of art, document and entertainment. Through theory and practice, individual research, student-led seminars and visiting speakers, we promote an environment in which postgraduate students are able to engage with the continuing vibrancy of cinema.

Studying film as a postgraduate at the University of Kent will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise, library facilities and a campusbased film culture. We currently offer expertise in North American, European and Latin American cinemas. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives, as well as with digital media and practice by research.

In 2014, the University opened a new 62-seat cinema named after the pioneering female film director Ida Lupino, which students can enjoy as part of their experience during their studies. The Lupino has state-of-the-art digital projection and sound, and has been created to provide an intimate atmosphere for film viewing.

Studying film as a postgraduate at the University of Kent in Paris will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise, library facilities and a campus-based film culture. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives.

Modules

During the first term, you take two 30-credit taught-course modules from your chosen MA pathway. You then spend the second term in Paris, studying two modules from a choice which varies from year to year.

Modules available on this programme may include:
FI812 - Advanced Film Theory (30 credits)
FI813 - Film History: Research Methods (30 credits)
FI821 - Film and Modernity (Paris) (30 credits)
FI998 - Dissertation:GPMS (60 credits)

During the spring term you are free to construct your own programme from across the range of modules available, making it as focussed or as inter-disciplinary as you like. You have plenty of time during the autumn term to make informed decisions about your programme of studies in Paris.

You are encouraged to make full use of the city’s cultural resources and to integrate these into your studies which means you will be able to explore and discover connections between history, literature, the visual arts and other media.

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework and the dissertation.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- develop your understanding and skills to a notably higher level of sophistication and achievement (appropriate to an Master’s level award) than would be expected at degree level, such that you leave the programme with a substantial analytic and critical understanding of film and film studies

- develop your understanding and skills to the level necessary for entry into a research programme in film

- develop your ability to think independently, argue with clarity and force, to discern areas of research interest within the field and be able to frame viable research questions

- allow you to spend your first term in Canterbury, studying modules in film, and to spend your second term in Paris developing your interest in cinema within the context of city often seen to be central to the aesthetic developments of filmmaking and critical approaches central to the history of the discipline

- consider the impact of French critics and filmmakers on the wider discipline of film

- provoke reflection on areas of critical and theoretical approaches to French cinema and its context

- nurture the intellectual skills cited above in the context of written work (essays and dissertations) as well as in the context of interpersonal interaction (seminars, research papers, supervision)

- provide access to enhanced intercultural awareness and understanding through the opportunity to study in Paris

- provide opportunities for the development of personal, communication and research skills and other key skills appropriate for graduate employment both in industry and in the public sector.

Research areas

Research in both theory and practice is currently centred in five broad areas:

- national cinemas – form and history: North American, European, Latin American
- the moving image in a digital context
- documentary film
- film aesthetics
- avant-garde and experimental cinema.

Centre for the Interdisciplinary Study of Film and the Moving Image
The Centre draws together scholars from across the University who use film and the moving image as an integral part of their research. We are open to ideas that extend the reach of the Centre and seek to support projects that promote collaboration between individuals and other research centres. Our aim is to produce a more proactive engagement with other disciplines, to open new lines of communication and to produce innovative knowledge formations through the activity of pioneering research projects.

Careers

Arts graduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to film journalists and theatre technicians. Our graduates have found work at Universal Pictures, the London Film Festival and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations, as well as in film production, as editorial assistants and as web designers.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The programme offers a thorough grounding in postgraduate-level film. We will be pleased to consider applications from applicants with either a background in Film or a related humanities subject. Read more
The programme offers a thorough grounding in postgraduate-level film. We will be pleased to consider applications from applicants with either a background in Film or a related humanities subject.

It is taught by experts in Film and seeks to engage you with the key elements that make up the diverse nature of film and moving images.

The Film MA can also be studied between Canterbury and Paris, with the first term at our Canterbury campus and the spring term at our centre in Paris. It is also available in Paris only where you spend the entire year in the French capital.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/paris/programmes/index.html

About the Department of Film

The Film Department at the University of Kent is known for its excellence in research and teaching. It was ranked second in the UK for research power in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). One of the largest European centres for the study of film, it has an established reputation going back 35 years. Approaching film as a dynamic part of our cultural experience, we encourage thinking about film as it emerges at the intersections of art, document and entertainment. Through theory and practice, individual research, student-led seminars and visiting speakers, we promote an environment in which postgraduate students are able to engage with the continuing vibrancy of cinema.

Studying film as a postgraduate at the University of Kent will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise, library facilities and a campusbased film culture. We currently offer expertise in North American, European and Latin American cinemas. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives, as well as with digital media and practice by research.

In 2014, the University opened a new 62-seat cinema named after the pioneering female film director Ida Lupino, which students can enjoy as part of their experience during their studies. The Lupino has state-of-the-art digital projection and sound, and has been created to provide an intimate atmosphere for film viewing.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

FI811 - Conceptualising Film (30 credits)
FI812 - Advanced Film Theory (30 credits)
FI813 - Film History (30 credits)
FI815 - Film and Modernity (30 credits)
FI998 - Dissertation:GPMS (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework and the dissertation.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- develop your understanding and skills to a notably higher level of sophistication and achievement (appropriate to an Master’s level award) than would be expected at degree level, such that you leave the programme with a substantial analytic and critical understanding of film and film studies

- develop your understanding and skills to the level necessary for entry into a research programme in Film Studies

- develop your ability to think independently, argue with clarity and force, to discern areas of research interest within the field and be able to frame viable research questions

- provoke reflection on areas of critical and theoretical approaches to cinema and its context

- nurture the intellectual skills cited above in the context of written work (essays and dissertations) as well as in the context of interpersonal interaction (seminars, research papers, supervision)

- attract outstanding students irrespective of race, background, gender, and physical disability, from both within the UK and from overseas

- develop existing and new areas of teaching in response to the advance of research and scholarship within the subject, as well as new developments in filmmaking practice.

Research areas

Research in both theory and practice is currently centred in five broad areas:

- national cinemas – form and history: North American, European, Latin American
- the moving image in a digital context
- documentary film
- film aesthetics
- avant-garde and experimental cinema.

Centre for the Interdisciplinary Study of Film and the Moving Image
The Centre draws together scholars from across the University who use film and the moving image as an integral part of their research. We are open to ideas that extend the reach of the Centre and seek to support projects that promote collaboration between individuals and other research centres. Our aim is to produce a more proactive engagement with other disciplines, to open new lines of communication and to produce innovative knowledge formations through the activity of pioneering research projects.

Careers

Arts graduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to film journalists and theatre technicians. Our graduates have found work at Universal Pictures, the London Film Festival and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations, as well as in film production, as editorial assistants and as web designers.


Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Postgraduate students are supervised via a research team through regular meetings. Read more
Postgraduate students are supervised via a research team through regular meetings. Research supervision draws on wide staff interests in North American, European, and Latin American cinemas, offering opportunities to study projects based in aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives on film and digital media, as well as practice by research. For further details, see staff research interests (https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/352/film-practice-by-research#!staff-research).

Research students participate in a series of regular events. These include work-in-progress seminars and professional development workshops, both of which are organised at School level. You are also able to enrol on the Graduate School’s Researcher Development Programme (https://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html).

Our research students also actively participate in a research seminar, which brings leading scholars and practitioners to Kent. We also hold an annual postgraduate presentation day.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/352/film-practice-by-research

About the Department of Film

The Film Department at the University of Kent is known for its excellence in research and teaching. Arts at Kent (including Film) was ranked 1st in the UK for research power in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF). One of the largest European centres for the study of film, it has an established reputation going back 35 years. Approaching film as a dynamic part of our cultural experience, we encourage thinking about film as it emerges at the intersections of art, document and entertainment. Through theory and practice, individual research, student-led seminars and visiting speakers, we promote an environment in which postgraduate students are able to engage with the continuing vibrancy of cinema.

Studying film as a postgraduate at the University of Kent will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise, library facilities and a campusbased film culture. We currently offer expertise in North American, European and Latin American cinemas. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives, as well as with digital media and practice by research.

In 2014, the University opened a new 62-seat cinema named after the pioneering female film director Ida Lupino, which students can enjoy as part of their experience during their studies. The Lupino has state-of-the-art digital projection and sound, and has been created to provide an intimate atmosphere for film viewing.

Research areas

Research in both theory and practice is currently centred in five broad areas:

- national cinemas – form and history: North American, European, Latin American
- the moving image in a digital context
- documentary film
- film aesthetics
- avant-garde and experimental cinema.

Centre for the Interdisciplinary Study of Film and the Moving Image
The Centre draws together scholars from across the University who use film and the moving image as an integral part of their research. We are open to ideas that extend the reach of the Centre and seek to support projects that promote collaboration between individuals and other research centres. Our aim is to produce a more proactive engagement with other disciplines, to open new lines of communication and to produce innovative knowledge formations through the activity of pioneering research projects.

Careers

Arts graduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to film journalists and theatre technicians. Our graduates have found work at Universal Pictures, the London Film Festival and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations, as well as in film production, as editorial assistants and as web designers.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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MA in Film and Screen Studies offers a unique combination of critical and creative approaches to the past and the future of audiovisual media- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-film-screen-studies/. Read more
MA in Film and Screen Studies offers a unique combination of critical and creative approaches to the past and the future of audiovisual media- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-film-screen-studies/

The 21st century is when everything about the moving image changes.

MA Film and Screen Studies will equip you with skills and knowledge to address current transformations of moving image media in a globalised world, from the media in your pocket to architectural screens.

It explores both the old and the new, philosophy and history, theory and practice, to help you understand the challenges of the 21st century's culture of moving images, changing artistic and political contexts as well as ever developing technologies.

Innovative approach

What distinguishes the MA in Film and Screen Studies is its innovative approach to learning and research. It takes you well beyond the borders of traditional film studies. It encourages you to think critically and imaginatively, across media forms, disciplinary boundaries as well as conceptual and creative work.

You'll have the option of two pathways:

-Moving Image Studies Pathway
-Media Arts Pathway

Students taking the Media Arts pathway will have the opportunity to submit some work in non-traditional forms.

Globally renowned academics

Teaching and supervision draw on the diverse research strengths of the globally renowned academics at one of the world's leading media and communications departments, which also has strong traditions in audiovisual practice.

You'll be taught by scholars of international standing who have expertise in the interface between film criticism and creation; new screen technologies; in early cinema and the media archaeology of modernity; in artist’s film; and in non-fiction film (eg documentary and avant-garde).

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Rachel Moore.

Pathways

The MA offers two pathways:

MA Film and Screen Studies: Moving Image Studies Pathway:
The moving image media today are a concentrated form of culture, ideas, socialisation, wealth and power. 21st-century globalisation, ecology, migration and activism fight over and through them. How have the media built on, distorted and abandoned their past? How are they trying to destroy, deny or build the future? This pathway explores new critical approaches that address the currency of moving image media in today's global context – their aesthetics, technology and politics. It seeks to extend the boundaries for studying moving images by considering a wider range of media and introducing students to a wider range of approaches for investigating moving images' past and present.

MA Film and Screen Studies: Media Arts Pathway:
The most intense and extreme forms of media, experimental media arts, test to breaking point our established ideas and practices. From wild abstraction and surrealist visions to activist and community arts, they ask the profoundest questions about high art and popular culture, the individual and the social, meaning and beauty. This pathway explores these emerging experimental practices of image making and criticism. Students on this pathway are encouraged not just to study but to curate and critique past, present and future media arts by building exhibitions and visual essays of their own. Short practical workshops will enable students to make the most of the skills you bring into the course.

Structure

The MA consists of:

two core modules (60 credits in total) comprising one shared and one pathway-specific core module
option modules to the value of 60 credits
a dissertation (60 credits) on a topic agreed in conjuction with your supervisor (on the Media Arts pathway up to 50% of the dissertation can be submitted in audiovisual form)

Core modules

The core modules will give you a foundation to the subject. The shared core module in Archaeology of the Moving Image introduces current debates in film and screen studies through the key notion of media history.

Pathway-specific cores develop new ways of conceptualising the cinematic today, focusing respectively on the political aspects of media forms and styles in Politics of the Audiovisual (the Moving Image Studies pathway) and on artists' use of various screen media in Experimental Media (the Media Arts pathway).

Option modules

We offer a wide range of option modules each year. Below are some examples of modules that are currently running. For a full list, please contact the Media and Communications department.

Intercollegiate options

Students on the MA in Film and Screen Studies can also take one option from the MA Film & Media programmes at other University of London colleges. Please consult the Screen Studies Group website for further details of other programmes and the Film and Screen Studies Convenor at Goldsmiths for more details on how to take part in options at other colleges. Options taken under this scheme are deemed to count for 30 credits at Goldsmiths.

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills

You will develop skills enabling you to analyse, contextualise, historicise and theorise current and future developments in screen-based media and to communicate your ideas in written and, on the Media Arts pathway, in audiovisual form.

Careers

Possible careers include film and video distribution, film exhibition, museums, film and television criticism, new media criticism, new media art, and other jobs associated with screen culture, as well as further academic study.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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-Film and TV degree production provides an exciting opportunity to learn advanced producing, directing and screenwriting techniques and to build professional links within the UK and international film and television industry. Read more
-Film and TV degree production provides an exciting opportunity to learn advanced producing, directing and screenwriting techniques and to build professional links within the UK and international film and television industry
-This postgraduate degree provides a practical and intensive study of filmmaking in an environment that encourages experimentation, professional development and cutting edge ideas. Students work with up to date professional equipment and facilities and, as part of their Masters Degree, produce, direct or write a major film project with an individually tailored marketing and distribution strategy
-The University of Hertfordshire film programmes and post-graduate school regularly host industry professionals who lecture and conduct workshops, seminars and tutorials. We work closely with the industry to enable students to connect directly with their future employers and mentors
-The combination of creative, technical, practical and management skills make this course unique and our graduates highly successful, as employees or as independent filmmakers

Why choose this course?

The MA Film and Television production programme offers an opportunity for students to initiate, develop and realise original film and television work in directing, producing and screenwriting. Students enhance their creative practice in film and television to professional levels, with the aim of pursuing a successful career in the industry. The programme commences with a series of taught modules, intended to augment the student's critical judgment and technical capability, before embarking on a major project, in the form of a substantial screenplay or digital film.

The project offers a setting in which the student can increase confidence in creative decision making, whilst expanding awareness of the requirements of film style and technology, finance, marketplace and audience. Students broaden their knowledge and experience to gain a better understanding of film and television production and its professional and commercial practices. They undertake a programme of screenings, master classes and seminars, to extend their knowledge of film and television histories, genres, aesthetics and narrative processes and to develop a range of research and communication skills. Students are encouraged to develop the aesthetic and conceptual awareness required to analyse and critically situate their work within current theoretical, cultural and commercial contexts, whether as a director, producer or scriptwriter.

The modules focus on script development, working with actors, camerawork, lighting, sound recording, post production techniques, funding, distribution and other relevant areas. You will benefit from the expertise and creative ideas of students working in specialised areas elsewhere in the School (eg Visual FX, Special FX, Animation or Music) whose input can enhance the professionalism of your major projects.

Careers

You will also have the opportunity to exhibit your work at the University and there are good opportunities to develop your teaching experience by mentoring undergraduate students in your subject area. When you successfully complete your MA, you will have made a very substantial addition to your CV and have a clear understanding of the next steps in the development of your career.

Teaching methods

You are taught in an intensive mix of lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials, masterclasses and industry guest sessions. Tutorial support is offered in small groups and one-to-one, with further support available online and by email.

All students on the PG Media programme engage in an interdisciplinary project as a part of their MA study, giving them an opportunity to work with students from other disciplines in an experimental and creative way.

Structure

Core Modules
-Creative Economies
-Discourse/Reflection: Professional Project Development
-Major Study: Film and Television Production
-Practice 1: Script Development
-Practice 2: Camera, Sound and Editing
-Research and Enquiry

Optional
-Creative Economies (Online)
-Research and Enquiry (Online)

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See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/film-animation/graduate-film-and-animation. The MFA program in film and animation enjoys state-of-the-art facilities. Read more
See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/film-animation/graduate-film-and-animation

The MFA program in film and animation enjoys state-of-the-art facilities. Students can create live-action production, screens, 2D, 3D or stop motion animation that is unique. The program is housed in a School of Film and Animation with full production facilities, as well as the additional support of highly specialized faculty in photography, imaging science, computer science, information technology, and printing.

Goals

The program provides students with the opportunity to use animation, filmmaking, and other imaging arts as a means to:

- pursue a career and earn a livelihood,
- enrich their personal lives and society as a whole, and
- encourage a sense of community, creativity, scholarship, and purpose.

Plan of study

The MFA in film and animation offers four options:

1. 2D animation concentrates on traditional forms drawn by hand, a mixture of both traditional and digital, or all digital origination. Students may concentrate their studies on stop motion puppet animation.

2. 3D animation courses focus on advanced 3D modeling, lighting, texturing, and animating in a 3D space.

3. Production allows students to develop and refine their creative approach to fictional narrative, documentary, and experimental work.

4. Screenwriting is an opportunity for students to complete short films with a concentration in creating feature length screenplays.

All four options require two years of course work and a thesis project. A complete film is required of all the first year students, a complete film or script is required in the second year, and a more ambitious thesis film or feature length script is required in the third year, which is a part-time student status focused only on the thesis film.

A minimum of 63 semester credit hours of graduate work is outlined below.

Electives

SOFA elective courses are available in animation, film, video, multimedia, screenwriting, printmaking, painting, sculpture, communication design, museum studies, crafts, bookmaking, typography, color photography, new media, studio photography, advertising photography, perception, sensitometry, computer graphics, art history, and archival preservation and conservation. There are also opportunities for independent studies, internships, and concentrations.

Thesis

Specific instructions pertaining to the thesis are available in the “MFA Guide for Students and Faculty: Policy Regarding Student Work.” The School of Film and Animation reserves the right to retain copies of student-produced films to be used for educational purposes, to show to prospective students, and as examples of student productions.

Admission requirements

Scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) are not required for admission. International students are required to submit English language test scores such as TOEFL. Applicants who are capable of good academic work as well as artistic visual expression, and who demonstrate an interest in the exploration of new artistic ideas and experiences, will be favored. The graduate faculty makes recommendations based on the above interlocking criteria.

Students who are evaluated to have MFA potential but need additional study in preparation for graduate courses will be advised to take such courses either prior to entrance or during their first year of study.

All correspondence concerning applications or catalogs should be addressed to the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services. Students interested in the program should have their application process completed by January 15. Applications received later than January 15 are considered on a space-available basis.

- Portfolio

The review committee is looking for work that is original in concept and content. It does not need to necessarily be motion media, but should be visual or aural. Examples include films/videos, photos, drawings, paintings, sculpture, stop motion puppets, scripts, storyboards, and original music.

Applicants must present what they consider to be the best of their work, not all of their work. Films or videos should total 12-minutes or less. A short, complete piece of work is preferable to a demo reel. If there are no short works then a 12-minute excerpt of a longer piece is acceptable.

Applicants must place their portfolios on a Web or FTP site, such as Vimeo or YouTube, which can be easily accessed by RIT faculty for review. Your application should include a URL Web or FTP address to your online portfolio. If your portfolio is placed on a shared Web or FTP site that contains other files, be sure the file name contains your full name (which must match the name used on your application materials). When applicable, please include any usernames and/or passwords necessary for access to your portfolio. Please provide an inventory sheet or table of contents with your portfolio, and if it is not obvious, clearly indicate what your combination was to group and collaborative pieces. This can be a separate description or can be included in the portfolio presentation.

Applicants are also required to produce a 2 to 3 minute video self-portrait to accompany the online portfolio. This should include information about the applicant such as why you want to attend the School of Film and Animation, which concentration you wish to pursue, and why. Please include information about one significant accomplishment you have made. Sound and picture quality should be clear. The online portfolio and self-portrait must be mounted on Slideroom.com once a Slideroom account is established.

For more information about portfolio guidelines as well as assistance in uploading an online portfolio, contact Graduate Enrollment Services.

- Transfer credit

Graduate-level course work taken prior to admission should be submitted for approval upon entrance into the program. Up to 8 semester credit hours of graduate work with a grade of B or better is transferable and may be counted toward the MFA degree, with the approval of the graduate faculty.

- Grades

Students must maintain a B (3.0) average GPA to meet graduation requirements for the MFA. Thesis hours are usually completed over several semesters. Acceptance or rejection of the thesis is made by the candidate’s thesis board and the graduate faculty.

- Maximum time limit

University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

- Screenings

Screenings are required for all student-produced films and are coordinated through the professor or the thesis chair.

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This practice-led MA offers the opportunity to advance your practical and theoretical understanding of media production processes in a professional and creative environment. Read more
This practice-led MA offers the opportunity to advance your practical and theoretical understanding of media production processes in a professional and creative environment.

The programme is informed by industry professionals and our academic team who are actively engaged in research, professional practice, film making and publishing. You will have the chance to develop the professional skills required by senior managers and professionals in the media and to cover the ethics, laws and regulatory frameworks that govern and affect the industry.

You will have the opportunity to develop your practical production skills in our Media Broadcast Centre. You will have the chance to tailor your learning to your interests and career aspirations by choosing to focus on the creative production of programmes in fiction, documentary or experimental forms across a wide range of media platforms.

How You Study

This course is designed to provide an educational context through practical workshops in production techniques, lectures and seminars, through which you will have the opportunity to develop an advanced level of creative, conceptual, technical, critical, organisational and research skills, all of which can be appropriate to employment in the media industries. Independent working engages with production projects, research and the completion of academic assignments.

Weekly contact hours on this programme may vary depending on the individual module options chosen and the stage of study.

Postgraduate level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

For more detailed information please contact the programme leader.

How You Are Assessed

Assessment is conducted using a range of strategies which include media productions, programme pitches, presentations, case studies and essays.

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

International students may require evidence of a media portfolio posted online.

Modules

-Final Project (MA Media, Film and Television Production)
-Human and Inhuman in the 21st Century (Option)
-Media Ecologies 1
-Media Ethics, Law and Regulation
-Media, Film and Television Production 1
-Media, Film and Television Production 2 & Final Project Pitch
-The Art and Craft of Film and Television

Special Features

Research
Media academics conduct internationally recognised research in a variety of topics, including Spielberg studies, film and medievalism, exploitation studies, and film and gender.

Industry Links
Many academic staff are current media practitioners who are engaged with professional bodies, such as the Royal Television Society, the British Society of Cinematographers and the British Association of Film, Television and Screen Studies, ensuring that course content is informed by the latest industry developments. BAFTA-winning television dramatist Neil McKay and documentary-maker Nick Gray are visiting professors in the School.

Visiting Speakers
Students on this course have the opportunity to hear from visiting guest speakers from many parts of the Film and TV industries. See here for details: http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/fm/abouttheschool/visitingspeakers/

Facilities
Students are based in our award-winning Media and Broadcast Production Centre, a specialist production environment with television and radio studios, video and audio editing suites, digital imaging, design and multimedia suites, a sound dubbing theatre, writers’ room, green screen room, colour finishing facility and photography studio.

Career and Personal Development

This programme aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop the high-level technical skills and knowledge required to establish careers in the media, film and television industries in roles including programme making, post-production and project management. Some students may choose to pursue careers in teaching or undertake a research degree at doctoral level.

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing your course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual and website resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities.
The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

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This programme is ideal for engineering or science graduates planning a career in research, development, production and/ or business involving thin film technologies and continuing personal development of current industry professionals. Read more
This programme is ideal for engineering or science graduates planning a career in research, development, production and/ or business involving thin film technologies and continuing personal development of current industry professionals.

About the programme

Thin film technologies are key enablers in a wide range of global research, development, manufacturing, industrial and high technology applications and products. This unique programme has appeal for a global audience.

The programme provides up-to-date coverage of evolving thin film technologies and latest developments in the field. It develops the multi-disciplinary skills needed for professional development within this rapidly expanding field and forms the basis for future professional chartered engineer and/or physicist status.

Programme delivery is provided by staff within the University’s Institute of Thin Films, Sensors and Imaging. The programme delivery also includes input from an industrial advisory group thus ensuring that the programme content is aligned with industrial requirements, applications and includes the latest technological developments.

Your learning

Core topics include thin film materials science, metrology and characterisation, theoretical modelling, physical and chemical-based thin film deposition methods including deposition system engineering and control, plasma processing, thin film devices and applications and research and project management. The programme content reflects the multidisciplinary nature of advanced thin film technologies and provides students with the necessary broad skill set. MSc students undertake experimental project work, providing practical skills in thin film deposition, characterisation and modelling, utilising the extensive range of equipment within the Institute of Thin Films, Sensors and Imaging.

Students are required to complete a dissertation, selecting a specialism in order to achieve a greater understanding of the implementation and advanced application of thin films. There may be scope to integrate this dissertation with industry, where an engineering supervisor will be allocated to assist your MSc journey and to advise and introduce you to industrial contacts.

On successful completion of the Postgraduate Diploma, students would then be invited to join the MSc programme.

Our Careers Adviser says

Graduates are equipped for a career in research, development, manufacturing and/or business, with global opportunities for employment. Most organisations that implement thin film based technologies employ fully trained, qualified technologists, consultants and technical marketing specialists throughout their lifecycle, with a consequent high global demand for such personnel across a wide range of applications, products and markets.

Professional recognition

We will seek accreditation for this programme in the near future from the Institute of Physics.

Industry-standard facilities

Our recently upgraded facilities will ensure you’re equipped to deal with the requirements of industry:
• Recent investment in new laboratories for engineering and physics will further enhance our reputation for applied interdisciplinary research
• Paisley Campus – fully equipped manufacturing workshop; materials testing and analysis facilities; metrology laboratory; rapid prototyping centre; and assembly and welding laboratories
• Significant investment in facilities for thin film technologies, micro-scale sensors and nuclear physics research
• Lanarkshire Campus – £2.1 million engineering centre, with particular focus on the design and engineering disciplines opened in 2008
• Both Lanarkshire and Paisley campuses have modern, dedicated IT facilities utilising a range of industrial applications software such as PRO/Engineer, Ansys, Fluent, WITNESS and MS Project.

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The MPhil in Film and Screen Studies at Cambridge provides advanced training in study of the theory and history of film and other screen media in a vibrant interdisciplinary context. Read more
The MPhil in Film and Screen Studies at Cambridge provides advanced training in study of the theory and history of film and other screen media in a vibrant interdisciplinary context. The moving image is explored in relation to the development of modern and contemporary culture, and to the history and theory of other media (literature, music, the visual arts, architecture, the digital). Students are immersed in a research environment that emphasises work on geopolitics, early cinema, art cinema and the avant garde, theory, aesthetics, and gender and sexuality. The programme consists of a core course, taken in the first term, which provides the foundation for further study; two optional modules, taken in the second term, which combine the analysis of film and screen media with the analysis of their social and cultural milieus, or else undertake the study of these forms in a comparative context; and a dissertation. Although not all students may wish to progress to higher research, this MPhil programme is designed to prepare for continuation to PhD work. This preparation includes the academic and research training provided by the course content itself but also advice and support with PhD applications, funding applications and the drafting of a research proposal.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/mmmmmpsmc

Course detail

By the end of the programme students will have:

1. developed a deeper knowledge of the history and theory of film and other screen media in cultural context;
2. developed an understanding of the debates which have shaped that field of study, and of current research methods;
3. acquired and consolidated intensive specialist knowledge of their chosen research areas and skills appropriate to advanced study in those areas;
4. demonstrated independent judgement, based on their own research
5. participated effectively in seminar discussions and research events;
6. learnt how to plan independent research in order to produce written work of a high standard to a clearly defined deadline.

Format

The Screen Media MPhil is a nine-month course that runs from October to June of any given academic year. It is classified as a research Master's. Students are expected to submit coursework and a thesis during the year, as follows:

Michaelmas Term: Core Course

During the first term of study, students attend weekly seminars and film screenings designed to give them a broad insight into moving image theory and culture. Half of the Core Course focuses on combining the study of classical and contemporary film and visual theory; the other half hones in on specialized historiographic and theoretical problems in the study of moving image media. The Course is, thus, both intensively grounding and intellectually expansive. At the end of this term, students submit one 4,500-word essay. The essay focuses on a specific theoretical framework or critical approach. Two hours of individual supervision are provided.

Lent Term: Modules

Screen Media students can choose from a range of module options. Some focus on the moving image, others are shared with different MPhils (e.g. European Literature & Culture, or Criticism and Culture) and other departments and Faculties within the University, such as Architecture & History of Art, Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, English, and Latin American Studies, among others. (The list of modules can change from year to year depending on the availability of academic staff.)

During Lent Term, students attend weekly group seminars led by the module covenor, lasting around 1.5 to 2 hours per week per module. In addition, two hours of individual supervision (per essay) will be provided as students draft their module essays. Essays are submitted at the end of Lent Term.

Lent term modules may include:

- Modern and Contemporary French and Francophone Culture: Articulations of the Real
- Avant Garde and Experimental Cinemas
- The Modern City
- New Commitments: Literature, Cinema and Culture in Italy, 1960 to present
- Urban Cinematics
- Deconstructing Film
- Online Video: Creation, Consumption, Revolution
- Surveillance
- Latin American Film and Visual Arts

Assessment - Easter Term

During this term, students write a thesis. Theses must, according to the criteria laid down by the Board of Graduate Studies, 'represent a contribution to learning'. Theses must be written in English. The arrangements for their preparation are similar to those for the essays. Titles are chosen by students, in consultation with module convenors and/or prospective supervisors, and then have to be approved by the Faculty Degree Committee.

Topics and precise thesis titles must be submitted by a specific deadline in Lent Term. Up to this point the Course Director is the titular supervisor of MPhil students, but once the thesis topics are approved, a specialist supervisor is appointed for each student. Students are entitled to up to four hour-long sessions with their supervisor. (In the event that a thesis is co-supervised, a candidate may expect two hours of individual teaching from each supervisor. Only one supervisor should comment on the full draft of the thesis.)

Research Events

Students are expected to take part in fortnightly research events that take place across the Michaelmas and Lent Terms. Leading scholars in film and screen studies will deliver lectures and also meet with students in master class seminars. Students are asked to compile an (unassessed) dossier of critical responses to these events. Participation in these events allows students to engage intensely but also informally with innovative researchers.

Continuing

For those applying to continue from the MPhil to PhD, the minimum academic standard is a distinction on the MPhil.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Funding may be available from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC).
Applications to the MPhil are automatically considered for AHRC funding, however you must apply by the relevant funding deadline.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Immerse yourself in hands-on filmmaking and real production budgets on this unique course. Creativity and collaboration are at the heart of our teaching, which takes place in our very own Northern Film School (http://www.northernfilmschool.co.uk/), giving you access to state-of-the-art equipment and facilities. Read more
Immerse yourself in hands-on filmmaking and real production budgets on this unique course.

Creativity and collaboration are at the heart of our teaching, which takes place in our very own Northern Film School (http://www.northernfilmschool.co.uk/), giving you access to state-of-the-art equipment and facilities. Designed to mirror real international, independent film production, this course gives you the opportunity to gain specialist knowledge of seven main areas - producing, screenwriting, directing, cinematography, production design, sound and editing.

The course is driven by filmmaking itself, but you will also focus on theory - we want you to think, research, discuss and watch films. We encourage ideas based around independent filmmaking and look for inspired stories and concepts on which to base our productions. We will also supply funding for your masters' project.

Whether your passion lies in making fiction, documentaries or experimental films, you will have the support of a teaching team with ongoing and extensive industry experience.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: 38% of our research was judged to be world leading or internationally excellent in the Communication, Culture and Media Studies, Library and Information Management unit.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/filmmaking_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

Our course aims to give you a competitive edge in a challenging industry. We offer a route into film and television through working with tutors, mentors and visiting professionals and by developing your own creative abilities and work. We promote our graduation films on the international festival circuit, as well as giving you the opportunity to attend film festivals during the course.

- Creative Producer
- Cinematographer
- Screenwriter
- Director

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

As film financing, production and distribution move away from old models our course prepares you for an industry that expects you to be self reliant and self-employed.

You will be taught by practising filmmakers with experience across documentary and fiction, from cinematography to editing, some of whom can boast BAFTA and Oscar nominations. As a consequence of relationships between staff and the industry, you will have the opportunity to learn from visiting filmmakers during guest lectures and workshops. The Northern Film School (http://www.northernfilmschool.co.uk/) is also a member of The International Association of Film and Television Schools (CILECT), an organisation of only the best film schools worldwide.

The School is the first and only film school in the UK to receive JAMES accreditation, in recognition of the professional expertise of our staff, the professional level of our facilities and the opportunities for our students to crew on professional shoots. JAMES represents creative and technical organisations across the media industries sector such as the Association of Professional Recording Services (APRS), the Music Producers Guild (MPG), UK Screen and UK Drama. On our JAMES approved course, you will be studying the latest in industry practice and gain access to professional contacts and work experience opportunities. JAMES described us as 'a benchmark against which all other film courses need to be measured'.

At the Electric Press in Leeds city centre where the School is based, you will have access to an impressive range of facilities. These include both 16mm and digital production equipment, two production studios, professional level edit suites, production offices, screening facilities, a props store and film and script archive.

Keith Dando

Senior Lecturer

"Our course aims to empower you to not just get into the industry but to 'be' the industry on a creative as well as business level, and to leave the course having made long lasting collaborative relationships."

Keith’s career has included work on short and feature films, television series and computer games in projects for the BBC, Channel Four, Channel Five and many independent film and TV companies. Keith has also co-written screenplays that have reached the finals in the prestigious Zoetrope and Final Draft screenwriting contests, and worked with upcoming and respected filmmakers such as Clio Barnard and Penny Woolcock.

Facilities

- Film Studios
Based in the Electric Press, our two expansive production studios, East and West Side enable the building of substantial film sets. This affords film students the opportunity to fully explore set design and prop building.

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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This course will enable you to develop film production skills with both digital and analogue equipment, as well as knowledge of the theories of contemporary cinema. Read more
This course will enable you to develop film production skills with both digital and analogue equipment, as well as knowledge of the theories of contemporary cinema. The focus is placed firmly on developing clear and simple storytelling techniques that go beyond arbitrary formal categorisations of drama, documentary or genre. The course takes its inspiration from forms of cultural production that have challenged conformity, including the work of artists, musicians, painters and performers, and the movements of Italian neo-realism and the developing cinemas of Africa, Latin America, South Korea and Iran.

Key features
-This course encourages you to synthesise your personal experience, critical knowledge and craft skills to express yourself through moving pictures.
-Your studies will be split broadly into 75 per cent practice and 25 per cent theory.
-As well as the personal tutor scheme, we also run a pioneering peer-mentoring scheme in which recent MA graduates provide one-to-one assistance in the use of equipment and software.
-Staff on this course are practising filmmakers.
-The course is informed by practice and research in black music and cinema, neo-realist cinema, experimental filmmaking, performance and dance, storytelling, participative documentary and ghetto cinema.

What will you study?

You will study the basic principles of filmmaking, develop an understanding of the nature and potential of visual storytelling, and discover the importance of sound, lighting and the screenplay. You will also gain a sound knowledge of theories and ideas that can help in the interpretation of your own work and that of other filmmakers. You will produce a portfolio of moving-image projects to illustrate your technical ability in cinematography, sound recording, editing and writing/direction.

You will be able to use high-definition digital video camcorders, DSLRs and Macs running Final Cut Pro and Adobe Creative Cloud to apply classical and independent principles with contemporary technology; 8mm, super8 and 16mm film cameras are also available to explore analogue forms of filmmaking (students who wish to use our analogue cameras will have to cover their own stock and processing costs).

Assessment

Film production projects, critical journal, essays, and seminar presentations.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Film Making 1
-Film Making 2
-Film Making 3 (Dissertation)
-Film Writing
-Sound and Vision

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Develop as a producer/director of factual programmes and extend your creative skills and technical knowledge. With talks by industry professionals, and access to a broad range of equipment, you’ll create a portfolio of work that will help you stand out from the crowd. Read more
Develop as a producer/director of factual programmes and extend your creative skills and technical knowledge. With talks by industry professionals, and access to a broad range of equipment, you’ll create a portfolio of work that will help you stand out from the crowd.

Overview

No matter what experience you have of filmmaking, our course will develop your knowledge of factual UK TV and digital media content production, and your creative skills, to an advanced level. Along the way, you’ll make seven films of different lengths and write a dissertation on a media subject that excites and interests you.

Focusing on two key roles, the director and the producer (which in current factual programming are merged into one), you’ll explore the dynamics of this ever-changing industry, and what it takes to succeed. You’ll learn to become a visual storyteller, a communicator, a collaborator, a motivator and a problem solver. You’ll also develop skills in scheduling, production managing, budgeting and marketing programmes. Although the emphasis is on factual programming, there is scope and flexibility to develop more creative films.

With specialist technical workshops on camera operation, sound, lighting and editing, you’ll develop professional skills in screen-based production. This will be supported by tutorials, diary work, and independent research, giving you a strong critical and contextual grounding for your practical work.

You’ll be encouraged to collaborate with other students on this course and others, becoming a flexible media professional who can produce and deliver high-quality video content for many different clients.

All our teaching staff have backgrounds in the film and television industries, and they're supported by industry specialists and visiting lecturers.

Teaching times:
Trimester 1: Wednesdays & Thursdays, 10am - 1pm (full time); Wednesdays, 10am - 1pm (part time).
Trimester 2: Wednesdays 10am – 4pm, Thursdays 10am – 1pm (full time); Wednesdays 10am – 4pm (part time).
Trimester 3: Tuesdays 10am – 12pm for 4 weeks & then tutorials by arrangement (full time).
Trimester 4: Thursdays 10am – 1pm (part time)
Trimester 5 & 6: Tuesdays 10am – 12pm for 4 weeks & then tutorials by arrangement (part time)

Careers

Our course will prepare you for a career in TV or in the broader media, and help you to decide which areas of the industry attract you the most. Although the emphasis is on directing and producing, you might choose to move into cinematography, production management or even television programme sales once you graduate. You might also develop a particular interest in observational documentary, natural history films or science programming, and decide to follow a career in these fields.

Here at Cambridge School of Art, you’ll gain specialist skills that will be useful for traditional, experimental and creative documentary making, or films for education, training, public relations, current affairs, marketing and campaigning. Our course will prepare you to forge a portfolio or freelance career, and give you the ability to make high-quality content for broadcast, web, film festivals or cinema.

Core modules

Process and Practice as Research
Visual Storytelling
Understanding the Audience
Master's Dissertation Art and Design
Master's Project: Art and Design

Assessment

You’ll demonstrate your learning, and ensure you’re developing the knowledge and skills to complete the course, through:
• Producing and directing films of different lengths and styles
• Working in a team on a TV Studio production
• Written production analyses and reflective commentaries
• Essays
• Filming schedules & budgets
• Film pitches
• Final Masters Project: this film is your “calling card” for the industry

Your assignments are usually submitted at the end of each term. You’ll also be assessed informally and given feedback during the term to help you achieve to the highest level. Feedback could be on a film, a presentation or group participation; it will be given by your tutor and your fellow students.

Events

Our Wired events are specialist lectures and workshops run by industry professionals, where you’ll learn about up-to-date practices and get invaluable advice. Our past speakers have included Sean Bobbitt (cinematographer: 12 Years a Slave, The Place Beyond the Pines, Hunger), Peter Strickland and Nic Knowland (director and cinematographer: Berberian Sound Studio), Cilla Ware (freelance drama director of Silk, Spooks, Primeval), Kathy Lee (film editor: Abuelas, A Letter to Dad), and Larry Sider (sound designer, The Piano Tuner of Earthquakes, Mirrormask).

Our Creative Front Futures events, run by Creative Front Cambridgeshire, will give you a broader taste of the creative industries, and let you find out more about the world of film and television production as well as explore other career options.

You’ll also get first-hand experience of the industry at informal work placements throughout the course and benefit from our close links with Cambridge Arts Picturehouse, where we hold regular student and industry events.

Specialist facilities

When shooting your projects you’ll benefit from our fully-equipped TV studio with full lighting rig; professional-standard gallery; mixer; autocue; multi-purpose scenic backdrops suitable for current affairs, magazine programmes and dramas; a large four-waller film stage with overhead lighting, tracks, dollies and green screens and sets for flats; a full range of HD and SD location cameras (including Steadicam); location lighting; and sound-recording equipment.

For your post-production work you’ll get access to over 30 Final Cut editing suites, Pro Tools and the Adobe Creative Suite master collection. You’ll be trained on all our equipment by a team of experienced technical staff, who also maintain and manage the facilities.

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