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IN BRIEF. Learn from internationally published and performed award winning writers. Develop a highly-innovative approach to creative writing. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Learn from internationally published and performed award winning writers
  • Develop a highly-innovative approach to creative writing
  • Work in a vibrant location that nurtures your creative development
  • Part-time study option
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

Our course encourages you to develop and work at the edge of new and evolving practices. You will be invited to engage with fundamental issues in the theory of literature, producing original creative writing in prose, poetry, hybrid and experimental forms as you develop your personal practice through  critical reflection.

The course will be of particular interest if you are a writer of prose or poetry, but you will not be required to commit to either form.

You may also be interested in taking individual modules from the course syllabus on a pay-as-you-go basis. This way you could either build up to gaining the full qualification or study for your own enjoyment and/or professional development.

COURSE DETAILS

MA Creative Writing: Innovation and Experiment offers you the opportunity to develop your writing and to challenge your creative habits. You will be invited to:

  • Engage with fundamental issues in the theory of literature
  • Produce original creative writing in prose, poetry, hybrid and experimental forms
  • Develop an ongoing personal practice through reflection on creative achievement and speculation on future development.

TEACHING

Your own creative activity is the main driver for learning on this course. It is supported by regular workshops, lectures and seminars, personal tutorials, masterclasses with visiting writers and other activities such as event attendance.

Students on the full-time and part-time routes will study together and have additional opportunities to share and discuss work via the university’s virtual learning environment.

ASSESSMENT

You will be assessed through:

  • Written assignments (creative, critical and reflective) (66%)
  • Final creative project(34%)

EMPLOYABILITY

The aim of this course is to encourage you to challenge and develop yourself creatively as a writer whilst informing you about the contexts and techniques of contemporary literature. Graduates may use it as part of their career development in teaching, publishing or journalism or as a means of access to doctoral study.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Previous graduates have gone onto further study and training and participated in literary culture through organizing literary competitions and publishing creative work in magazines. Two of the 2010-11 cohort are beginning PhDs in Creative Writing in 2011 (at the University of Northumbria and the University of Salford) and one is undertaking an internship at a local small press poetry publisher (The Knives Forks and Spoons Press).

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

The course benefits from a regular programme of visiting writers to the English Subject Group through the ‘Vital Signs’ and ‘Drama Workshops’ series. In addition, at least two workshops per academic year are convened by key figures in innovative writing. Past visitors have included: Robert Sheppard, Phil Davenport, Allen Fisher, Camille Martin, Carrie Etter, Philip Kuhn and Tony Trehy. These events create opportunities for local, national and international networking.

Other local links include the International Anthony Burgess Foundation in Manchester, which hosts an annual showcase of our students’ work; Bury Art Gallery’s Text Festival (curated by Tony Trehy); Community Interest Group arthur+martha (directed by Phil Davenport and Lois Blackburn), The Knives Forks and Spoons Press (Alec Newman) and The Other Room poetry series (co-run by James Davies, Tom Jenks and Scott Thurston). These links benefit students through creating opportunities to engage with the latest contemporary practices, to network with established writers, to perform and publish their work and to learn about teaching and publishing creative writing.



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The UK’s only dedicated degree in narrative non-fiction writing. This master’s programme is designed for those with an ambition to write within the range of non-fiction genres. Read more
The UK’s only dedicated degree in narrative non-fiction writing.

Who is it for?

This master’s programme is designed for those with an ambition to write within the range of non-fiction genres. Running over two years, it attracts students from a wide variety of backgrounds and ages, all of whom work closely within workshop and tutorial settings to produce a publishable work. The unifying factor for all writers on the programme is their intention to deliver their research or story through a narrative structure.

Objectives

Our definition of narrative non-fiction includes biography, travel, history, life writing, true crime, sports and other forms of sustained and structured non-fiction storytelling. The Creative Writing (Non-Fiction) MA provides you with essential skills and a supportive and challenging environment in which to write a full-length work of narrative non-fiction. You will develop your research skills, experiment with different writing styles, reflect on your own and other writer’s work and learn the essentials of the publishing industry.

Teaching and learning

The teaching, all by published authors, across the two years is front-end loaded in terms 1 and 2 with workshops, with workshops, lectures and seminars held two days a week. Here you will extend your writing skills, your understanding of non-fiction genres and your awareness of creative possibilities. You will also analyse the work of leading writers and explore writing through a variety of exercises, encouraging you to experiment with new approaches.

All workshops are based around the students’ own writing assignments which work towards the completion, or opening chapters, of a book. We also closely analyse published works of non-fiction, taking apart books to examine their style, structure and research methods.

Throughout the two years there are readings and workshops with visiting authors. In terms 3, 4, 5 and 6 you work principally on your own book project with the support of one-to-one tutorials.

In term 6 (the final term) the lectures and guest sessions focus on the publishing industry which will provide you with the knowledge to be placed with a literary agent. During the final term you will have the opportunity to read from your work in progress, to contribute to anthology of writing and to submit a full draft of your book.

Modules

Term 1
-CWM 959 The Fundamentals of Non-fiction (core)
-CWM 958 Literary Criticism (core)
-CWM935 Storytelling (core)
-CWM956 Complete Book (core)

Term 2
-CWM957 The Process of Writing (core)
-CWM 958 Literary Criticism (core)
-CWM935 Storytelling (core)
-CWM956 Complete Book (core)

Terms 3,4,5 and 6
-CWM956 Complete Book

Career prospects

The MA creative writing non-fiction is proud of its track record in publishing with students from the programme winning publishing contracts every year.

Graduates include:
-Peter Moore, The Weather Experiment (Chatto and Windus),
-Anne Putnam, Navel Gazing (Faber and Faber)
-Bridge O’Donnell, Inspector Minahan Makes a Stand (Picador).

Graduates have also gone on to work for media outlets and used their transferrable skills in a variety of professions including teaching, political campaigning and in the charity sector.

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Master's specialisation in Physics of Molecules and Materials. Revealing the ‘terra incognita’ between quantum mechanics and the classical world and inspiring new technologies. Read more

Master's specialisation in Physics of Molecules and Materials

Revealing the ‘terra incognita’ between quantum mechanics and the classical world and inspiring new technologies.

As a scientist, you’re a problem solver. But how do you tackle a problem when there are no adequate theories and calculations become far too complicated? In the specialisation in Physics of Molecules and Materials you’ll be trained to take up this challenge in a field of physics that is still largely undiscovered: the interface between quantum and classical physics.

We focus on systems from two atoms to complete nanostructures, with time scales in the order of femtoseconds, picoseconds or nanoseconds. One of our challenges is to understand the origin of phenomena like superconductivity and magnetism. As theory and experiment reinforce each other, you’ll learn about both ‘research languages’. In this way, you’ll be able to understand complex problems by dividing them into manageable parts.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy/physics

Why study Physics of Molecules and Materials at Radboud University?

- At Radboud University there’s a strong connection between theory and experiment. Theoretical and experimental physicists will teach you to become acquainted with both methods.

- In your internship(s), you’ll have the opportunity to work with unique research equipment, like free electron lasers and high magnetic fields, and with internationally known scientists.

- We collaborate with several industrial partners, such as Philips and NXP. This extensive network can help you find an internship or job that meets your interests.

If you’re successful in your internship, you have a good chance of obtaining a PhD position at the Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM).

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Physics

2. A proficiency in English

In order to take part in this programme, you need to have fluency in both written and spoken English. Non-native speakers of English* without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following:

- A TOEFL score of ≥575 (paper based) or ≥90 (internet based

- An IELTS score of ≥6.5

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher.

Career prospects

This Master’s specialisation is an excellent preparation for a career in research, either at a university or at a company. However, many of our students end up in business as well. Whatever job you aspire, you can certainly make use of the fact that you have learned to:

- Solve complex problems

- Make accurate approximations

- Combine theory and experiments

- Work with numerical methods

Graduates have found jobs as for example:

- Consultant Billing at KPN

- Communications advisor at the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM)

- Systems analysis engineer at Thales

- Technical consultant at UL Transaction Security

- Business analyst at Capgemini

PhD positions

At Radboud University, we’re capable of offering many successful students in the field of Physics of Molecules and Materials a PhD position. Many of our students have already attained a PhD position, not just at Radboud University, but at universities all over the world.

Our approach to this field

In this specialisation, you’ll discover the interface between quantum mechanics and the classical world, which is still a ‘terra incognita’. We focus on two-atom systems, multi-atom systems, molecules and nanostructures. This is pioneering work, because these systems are often too complex for quantum calculations and too small for the application of classical theories.

- Theory and experiment

At Radboud University, we believe that the combination of theory and experiments is the best way to push the frontiers of our knowledge. Experiments provide new knowledge and data and sometimes also suggest a model for theoretical studies. The theoretical work leads to new theories, and creative ideas for further experiments. That’s why our leading theoretical physicists collaborate intensively with experimental material physicists at the Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM). Together, they form the teaching staff of the Master’s specialisation in Physics of Molecules and Materials.

- Themes

This specialisation is focused on two main topics:

- Advanced spectroscopy

Spectroscopy is a technique to look at matter in many different ways. Here you’ll learn the physics behind several spectroscopic techniques, and learn how to design spectroscopic experiments. At Radboud University, you also have access to large experimental infrastructure, such as the High Magnetic field Laboratory (HFML), the FELIX facility for free electron lasers and the NMR laboratory.

- Condensed matter and molecular physics

You’ll dive into material science at the molecular level as well as the macroscopic level, on length scales from a single atom up to nanostructure and crystal. In several courses, you’ll get a solid background in both quantum mechanical and classical theories.

- Revolution

We’re not aiming at mere evolution of current techniques, we want to revolutionize them by developing fundamentally new concepts. Take data storage. The current data elements are near the limits of speed and data capacity. That’s why in the IMM we’re exploring a completely new way to store and process data, using light instead of electrical current. And this is but one example of how our research inspires future technology. As a Master’s student you can participate in this research or make breakthroughs in a field your interested in.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy/physics

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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The MRes Art and Design will offer early career research students the opportunity to develop and demonstrate mastery in the theory, methods and practice of research within an Art and Design environment. Read more
The MRes Art and Design will offer early career research students the opportunity to develop and demonstrate mastery in the theory, methods and practice of research within an Art and Design environment. The course will provide early career researchers with the intellectual, technical and professional tools with which to complete high quality research projects within the cultural and creative industry.

Course Overview

The MRes will be delivered through a combination of structured learning comprising of lectures and master classes. You will conduct a significant body of independent research which will facilitate theoretical thinking and creative development in a sustained way leading to the production of a considered and involved body of research. The programme will enhance your ability to manage complex research projects through an indepth independent investigation into an art and design related area identified by you.

The MRes will be staffed by experts across many specialisms in art and design, many of whom have international reputations in research in art and design. In addition, the course is supported through visiting lectures and external cultural industry bodies.

During the first semester The Thought Experiment randomises and radicalises approaches, providing an ‘experimental space’ to explore the boundaries of your current medium-specific practice by finding creative solutions to a research question stimulated by ‘new’ modes of thinking. This is supported by contemporary theoretical discourses focused through the Coexistent Perspectives module, which introduces a broad range of key theoretical concerns and how they can impact and converse with practice. Both the Thought Experiment and Coexistent Perspectives modules underpin the Research Methods and Communication module which explores both practice based and theoretical approaches to research methods. These three modules compliment each other and promote creative thinking, rigorous academic research and will give you the confidence to carry forward an independent research project into part two of the programme.

The culmination of the first semester is a ‘supervised research project’ that is carried into the second and third semester’s. Within part two of the programme (2nd and 3rd semesters) you will be given the option to choose either a Research Through Practice project or a 30,000 word Dissertation. The Research Through Practice option includes a 15,000 word dissertation which is informed and supported by a significant body of practice based work. You will be able to work on a topic of your own choice informed by part one of the programme in agreement with your tutor and Programme Director.

Modules

Part 1:
-The Thought Experiment - 20 credits
-Coexistent Perspectives - 20 credits
-Research Methods and Communication- 20 credits

Part 2:
-Research Through Practice (OR) -120 credits
-Dissertation-120 credits

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Our programme will give you a thorough grounding in the radiation and environmental protection aspects of nuclear physics. Read more

Our programme will give you a thorough grounding in the radiation and environmental protection aspects of nuclear physics.

This includes in-depth knowledge of radiation protection and showing you how the technical and organisational procedures of the discipline may be applied to the broader concept of environmental protection.

The substantial practical element of this programme enables you to relate taught material to real-world applications. Formal lectures are complemented with work in specialist radiation laboratories that were recently refurbished as part of a £1m upgrade to our facilities.

Here you will work with a wide range of radioactive sources and radiation detectors. There is also an extended project in the spring and an eleven-week MSc dissertation project in the summer.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Research-led teaching

The programme material is taught by a combination of academics from the Department of Physics at Surrey and specialists provided by industrial partners. The Surrey academics are part of the Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics which houses the largest academic nuclear physics research group in the UK.

In addition to the formal lectures for taught modules, the programme provides a wide range of experimental hands-on training. This includes a nine-week radiation physics laboratory which takes place in the specialist radiation laboratories within the Department of Physics at the University of Surrey.

These were recently refurbished as part of a £1 million upgrade to the departmental teaching infrastructure. Within the Department, we also have a common room and a departmental library, which contains copies of earlier MSc dissertations.

As well as the laboratory training, you will also undertake a research project at the beginning of the Spring semester as a precursor to the eleven-week research dissertation project which makes up the final part of the MSc.

There are many opportunities for both the spring research project and summer dissertation project to be taken in an external industrial environment.

Careers

The programme has produced over 500 UK and overseas graduates, many of whom have gone on to well-paid positions in companies in the nuclear and radiation sectors. In the UK we need to decommission old reactors and build new ones to provide a low-carbon source of energy.

This, together with, for example, the importance of radioisotopes in fields such as medicine, means that the career prospects of our graduates are excellent.

Educational aims of the programme

The programme integrates the acquisition of core scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills with a focus on professional career development within medical physics and radiation detection, and related industries.

The principle educational aims and outcomes of learning are to provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applied to medical physics, radiation detection instrumentation, radiation and environmental practice in an industrial or medical context.

This is achieved by the development of the participants’ understanding of the underlying science and technology and by the participants gaining an understanding of the legal basis, practical implementation and organisational basis of medical physics and radiation measurement.

Programme learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

  • A systematic understanding of Radiation and Environmental Protection in an academic and professional context together with a critical awareness of current problems and / or new insights
  • A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research project in Radiation and / or Environmental Protection
  • Originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of radiation-based, experimental research projects
  • An ability to evaluate and objectively interpret experimental data pertaining to radiation detection
  • Familiarity with generic issues in management and safety and their application to Radiation and Environmental Protection in a professional context

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • The ability to plan and execute under supervision, an experiment or investigation and to analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions from them. Students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of uncertainty analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions and/or with published data. Graduates should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context
  • The ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline of radiation protection
  • The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non- specialist audiences

Professional practical skills

  • The ability to communicate complex scientific ideas, the conclusions of an experiment, investigation or project concisely, accurately and informatively
  • The ability to manage their own learning and to make use of appropriate texts, research articles and other primary sources
  • Responsibility for personal and professional development. Ability to use external mentors for personal / professional purposes

Key / transferable skills

  • Identify and resolve problems arising from lectures and experimental work
  • Make effective use of resources and interaction with others to enhance and motivate self-study
  • Make use of sources of material for development of learning and research such as journals, books and the internet
  • Take responsibility for personal and professional development

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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This specialist creative writing MA is designed for writers for children, teenagers and young adults who aim to complete a novel, series of picture books or shorter stories for young children. Read more
This specialist creative writing MA is designed for writers for children, teenagers and young adults who aim to complete a novel, series of picture books or shorter stories for young children. It is a practical course, taught by experienced lecturers who are all published children's writers and/or industry professionals.

The course is for writers for children of all ages, from the picture-book age through to young adult (YA). Prose fiction is likely to be the main area studied, but students will have the chance to look at writing in all forms, including poetry, picture book texts and narrative non-fiction for young people.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course supports you to create a significant body of writing, with practical plans for its place in the real world of publishing. It is based on the principle that most writers learn and benefit from working closely with their fellow writers, in a disciplined supportive setting, and with tutors who are practising and published writers in their field. Most of our students aim to complete a novel by the end of the MA.

The writing workshop is at the heart of the course. What you’ll do with tutors and your fellow writers in a workshop situation is learn to see your work through objective eyes and to think clearly about the different strategies you might adopt. You learn from each other’s mistakes and successes as well as your own. You will be urged to try things out, take risks and experiment, and reflect on and discuss the writing process. The context modules help you to see your own writing in the wider context of published children’s writing. The course encourages you to read widely and analytically.

MODULES

In the first trimester’s writing workshop you’ll explore a variety of forms of writing, gaining a sense of different age ranges and styles of writing and experimenting with your own writing. The context module is Writing for Young People: Forms, Ages and Stages and it is concerned with the writer’s relationship with their audience, and will help you understand some of the issues raised by writing for young people.

In the second trimester, you'll be asked to choose your area of writing and use the workshop’s feedback and encouragement to explore it in more depth. You will bring short excerpts from your work-in-progress for discussion and feedback in the group. You may continue to experiment with different ideas for other stories.The second trimester's Context Module is Contemporary Children's Publishing, which aims to give a realistic grasp of the choices open to new writers in the field.

In the third trimester, you'll continue to write your work-in-progress, developing a manuscript as near to publishable quality as possible. The manuscript may be a novel, picture book texts, or a collection of stories or poems.

For more information on module and course structure please go to our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-writing-for-young-people/

TEACHING METHODS

Modules are normally taught via tutor-led writing workshops, with one three-hour session each week for the eleven weeks of each taught trimester, at the Corsham Court campus. We aim to keep the writing workshops small – usually no more than eight students – so that there is sufficient time, support and attention for each person’s work.

ASSESSMENT

The assessed coursework for each Writing Workshop is a folder of creative writing plus a short reflective commentary. The manuscript is 35,000-40,000 words, or the equivalent in poetry or picture book texts.

TUTORS

This course is taught by publishing writers and depending on timetables will include:

• Julia Green: her novels for young adults include Blue Moon, Baby Blue and Hunter’s Heart (Puffin), Breathing Underwater, Drawing with Light and Bringing the Summer (Bloomsbury)and her most recent novel for younger children is Tilly’s Moonlight Fox (Oxford University Press).
• Lucy Chrisopher: prize winning author of Stolen and The Killing Woods for YA readers, and Flyaway for younger teens ( Chicken House).
• Steve Voake: his novels include The Dreamwalker's Child, The Web of Fire, The Starlight Conspiracy, Blood Hunters, Fight Back and Dark Woods (Faber & Faber), plus his Daisy Dawson and Hooey Higgins series for younger readers (Walker Books).

For the full list of our fantastic staff and tutors please visit our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-writing-for-young-people/

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Graduates have achieved publication deals with a range of different mainstream and smaller publishers, and many more students have secured literary agents. Other students have subsequently taught Creative Writing at university level. Some have combined their writing with subsequent careers in journalism, teaching, publishing, television etc.

ALLUMNI SUCCESS

More than 30 graduates of this MA have achieved publication deals since the course began in 2004, with more novels due to be published in 2016-2017. Ways to Live Forever by Sally Nicholls won the Waterstones Children’s Book of the Year Award and the Glen Dimplex New Writers Award in 2008. Marie-Louise Jensen and Elen Caldecott were shortlisted for the 2009 Waterstones Prize. Elen Caldecott, Clare Furniss, Gill Lewis and Jim Carrington have been long-listed for the Carnegie award. Sally Nicholls was short-listed for the Guardian children’s book prize and won the Independent Booksellers’ award in 2015 for her novel An Island of Our Own. David Hofmeyr was short-listed for the Branford Boase award 2016 for his novel Stone Rider.

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The video game industry is a vastly growing sector in both the UK and worldwide and the need for highly skilled and educated individuals is in high demand across the globe. Read more

About the course

The video game industry is a vastly growing sector in both the UK and worldwide and the need for highly skilled and educated individuals is in high demand across the globe. With Brunel’s Digital Games Theory and Design MA programme, individuals will engage in, and experiment with, practical game design focussing on the process of devising the gameplay experience itself, including (but not limited to) the creation of rules, gameplay mechanics, narrative, world design and user experience, among many other aspects that make up the art of game design.

Coupled with a theoretical underpinning that focuses on the formal characteristics of games and analysis as well as the social and cultural contexts that shape the development of games, players, and society, this exciting programme offers students the opportunity to develop a range of skills that are required for success in today’s competitive job market.

Our programme is staffed with seasoned games designers and internationally published scholars who bring with them an extensive understanding of the nature of the video game industry, the importance of networks and the need for scholarly engagement in order to create innovative games for the future.

Aims

You will gain a comprehensive and sophisticated understanding of the advanced academic study of digital games and the techniques and principles used in their design.

You will be provided with the relevant expertise, teaching and learning environment to support your critical and creative engagement with issues at the cutting edge of analysing and designing digital games. You will contribute to the process of defining ‘game studies’ as a new academic discipline.

You will develop skills and knowledge to gain employment in the digital games industry and make contributions to the development of innovative games that go beyond current markets.

You will acquire the skills necessary to undertake doctoral level research.

Course Content

The MA consists of compulsory modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Each module will have a range of assessments; some practical, others written.

Game Design 1 (term 1, 30 credits) - practical group design projects (small); written evaluative case study 2000 words; assessed presentation

Critical Approaches (term 1, 30 credits) - 2 x 3000 word essays

Game Design 2 (term 2, 30 credits) - 1 x practical design project tailored to a specific platform (large); written evaluative case study 3000 words; assessed presentation

Socio-Cultural Contexts (term 2, 30 credits) (1 x 6000 word essays)

Dissertation in Digital Games Design: Theory and Design - either 12,000-18,000 words or 8,000 words with practical component - delivered in either digital format or as a design document (term 3, 60 credits)

Students are expected to use the MA forum for discussions and are encouraged to participate in extra-curricular support activities such as game jams, local game related and networking events in order to practice the creative and technical skills developed throughout the programme and foster conversation and connections that are an invaluable part of the post-graduate experience.

Special Features

Students will engage in, and experiment with, practical games creation, with workshops led by designers working in the industry, as well as explore a range of theories and concepts with which to analyse the values of games, play and pleasure.

This programme offers a unique focus on practical games design, informed by theory that is not offered by any other university. It is not a software or graphics training programme.

We have a team of experienced games researchers teaching on the programme, some of whom have played a pioneering role in making game studies a new academic discipline.

Assessment

Assessment is via a combination of practical games-making work, presentations and essays of varying length.

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MA/MFA Performance Practice as Research is a taught course for performance innovators who wish to investigate and interrogate the concepts and practices within contemporary performance. Read more

ABOUT MA PERFORMANCE PRACTICES AND RESEARCH

MA/MFA Performance Practice as Research is a taught course for performance innovators who wish to investigate and interrogate the concepts and practices within contemporary performance.

Designed for the ‘auteur’, the course provides a laboratory for study and experimentation in the area of contemporary performance, mobilising both practical and conceptual work. Whether students are directors, choreographers, performers, visual artists, composers or designers, they will all be invited to engage with new forms and apply established techniques in innovative ways. The production and making of performance is seen not only as an opportunity to experiment, but also as a process through which academic research might be undertaken.

Students are part of a thriving community of postgraduate scholars and practitioners working within a school-wide framework for research and experimentation. They will be invited to interrogate, test and apply the most recent thinking and practices
within their particular fields, and be encouraged to explore, experiment and innovate by developing their own contemporary performance practice(s), while conducting research into performance and pushing the boundaries within their chosen field.
Throughout, emphasis will be placed on a reciprocal relationship between theory and practice, where one always feeds into and enlivens the other.

ASSESSMENT

This is through presentations, performances, process-work and written submissions, as well as a personal documentation project or dissertation.

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One of the first EdD programmes to be established in the UK and offering a range of pathways, the EdD at Exeter is offered by modular study and is specifically directed to professional development through research. Read more
One of the first EdD programmes to be established in the UK and offering a range of pathways, the EdD at Exeter is offered by modular study and is specifically directed to professional development through research. The programme is of particular relevance to experienced practitioners in education from the UK, EU or overseas and the academic tutors recognise the particular needs, interests and policy contexts of students who are also professionals in their own right.

The EdD is a ‘Professional Doctorate’ which is equivalent in level to a PhD, but includes a modular phase as well as the thesis. It is particularly suited to professionals who aim to link research closely with their existing professional practice. The PhD is more suited to those planning to become professional researchers.

The taught element of the EdD programme introduces different understandings of, and approaches to, educational research, including distinctive methodologies and methods. You can explore, in depth, a particular field of study, together with its implications for your own professional practice.

Pathways include: Generic Pathway; Special Needs and Inclusive Education (SNIE) pathway; Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) pathway; and Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in Dubai pathway.

The EdD will enable you to:

- reflect on, and experiment with, new concepts and ideas, professional understandings of practice, and research skills - all within a safe but challenging environment amongst a supportive community of peers;
- review and evaluate research, theory, policy and practice; examine and challenge your own professional practice and its relationship with theory and policy;
- integrate recent and applicable theory with the latest developments in professional practice;
- make strong links between your assignments/research thesis and professional practice and service needs;
- design and carry out your own ethically-informed research;
- network and share experiences with a worldwide community of professionals and policy-makers practising in a broad range of educational contexts and fields related to education;
- increase your knowledge about other professionals and their organisations and thereby gain a wider perspective on the environment in which you work;
- potentially enhance your opportunities for career progression.

Programme structure

The programme is divided into two ‘phases’. The first ‘pre-thesis phase’ (equivalent to 1 year of full-time study or 2 years of part-time study) offers specialist research-led modules which provide access to current thinking about key issues pertaining to research in your professional field and provide the opportunity to reflect on and experiment with new concepts and ideas, professional understandings of practice, and research skills within a challenging research environment amidst a supportive community of peers. This is followed by a ‘thesis phase’ (equivalent to 2 years of full-time study or 4 years of part-time study) in which you complete a thesis that makes a substantial contribution to knowledge and/or practice within a professional field.

The Doctor of Education programme offers specialisms in the following fields: Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL); Special Needs and Inclusive Education (SNIE); Generic Route, suitable for professionals and policy-makers from across public and private sectors

Generic pathway

The generic EdD route brings together professionals and policy-makers from across sectors that have traditionally been, and mostly remain, separated.
These include:
• early childhood education and care
• schools and further education colleges
• adult and community education
• higher education
• medical education
• health and social care

It encourages the growth of a community of professional scholars with varied but complementary interests in exploring theories, policies and practices associated with education, training, teaching and learning at different stages in the life course, together with the complex, overlapping roles of professionals engaged in these processes. http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/research-degrees/education/eddoctoral/generic/

Special Needs and Inclusive Education (SNIE) pathway

The EdD Special Needs and Inclusive Education focuses on professional and theoretical knowledge and understanding in the area of special and inclusive education. You join a research community of professional and academic scholars and peers with varied but complementary interests in exploring theories, policies and practices associated with special and inclusive education at different stages in the life course and in different contexts. Past and current doctoral students include teachers, school leaders, university lecturers, speech and language therapists, other health professionals and medical educators.

Our international community of researchers has an excellent record of winning external funding, and our research centres provide structure and support, promoting collaboration and impact. The Centre for Special Educational Needs and Disability (http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/education/research/centres/specialeducationalneeds/) is interested in educational aspects (in widest sense) of children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (in various senses of these terms). http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/research-degrees/education/eddoctoral/snie/

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) pathway

The EdD TESOL aims to provide experienced senior professionals within the field of language teaching with an opportunity to study at advanced level for a doctoral degree by means of a taught programme plus a thesis. The course involves an in-depth examination of issues related to language learning and teaching and language teacher education. It also provides a solid grounding in research methodology appropriate for undertaking research at doctoral level within these fields.

We are committed to and actively engaged in undertaking research into a number of different aspects of TESOL and our students have published in a wide variety of journals. We are a very multicultural course, with students from over 30 countries including Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bahrain, Botswana, Cameroon, Cayman Islands, Canada, China, Cyprus, Dominican Republic, England, Finland, France, Greece, Holland, Iraq, Ireland, Japan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Mexico, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Poland, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Scotland, South Africa, Sudan, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates, United States of America and Wales. (http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/research-degrees/education/eddoctoral/tesol)

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Do you want to design innovative products in a sustainable way? Or to imagine and plan the spaces and places of tomorrow? The UK leads the world in the creative industries and we offer the only MA Design course in the country that allows you to specialise in a key area that’s right for you. Read more
Do you want to design innovative products in a sustainable way? Or to imagine and plan the spaces and places of tomorrow? The UK leads the world in the creative industries and we offer the only MA Design course in the country that allows you to specialise in a key area that’s right for you. Join us to foster and focus your skills in a fast-paced environment. Choose to progress into the design industry, further study or personal creative practice. Design is evolving. Play your part in its future.

Key features

-Foster and develop the skills you need to succeed on this interactive course that we designed with industry leaders, to make sure you leave ready to go straight into the workplace as a designer. Many of our students reach positions where they influence design policy in companies from China to Madagascar, Budapest to Bristol.
-Work with public bodies on real-world practice scenarios. In the past we have worked with organisations including Plymouth City Council, The Eden Project, Timber Intent and NHS Trusts.
-Access exclusive talks and insights from industry leaders including Sir Kenneth Grange and from our successful alumni working in some of the world’s prestigious design studios.
-Experiment in your own, personal studio, open until midnight, seven days a week. Take advantage of our equipment hub, staffed by approachable technicians. Here you’ll find image and sound equipment and studios, digital labs, Computer Numerical Control (CNC), a steam bending wood workshop and digital making, including a ceramics 3D printer.
-Benefit from our links to industry leaders including the Royal Society of Arts and the Chartered Society of Designers.
-Build an understanding of the relationship between design, industry and the public for the 21st century. Examine the delicate balance between the needs of consumerism and the problem of diminishing resources. From new technologies and markets to the impact of global politics and the wider sustainability agenda, you’ll analyse and critically evaluate factors influencing design today.
-Contribute to our community of students from different backgrounds and nationalities. Share ideas and collaborate within this diverse melting pot of talent as you study your three core modules and draw on the collective experience as you progress to your final project.
-Be inspired by teaching staff who are internationally renowned design practitioners bringing you the very latest thinking and allowing you the room to experiment and find practical solutions to today’s design problems.
-Distinguish yourself from the competition with the only MA Design course in the UK to offer a choice of four exit awards so you can plot a solid course to your future career. Explore the broad, multiple disciplines of design practice before choosing a specialist focus on sustainable design, spatial design, product design, or maker and materials.

Course details

Study three core modules before selecting a specialist focus leading to your final major project. Opt for a one year full-time programme or study part time over two years. All modules are assessed through coursework, so there are no exams. The core modules are: creative processes - fast-paced mini projects take you through the design cycle from inspiration to innovation, with users at the centre; design thinking - examines products in a broader social, cultural, economic and technical context; design and business - teaches you project management techniques and communication skills with an industry-led design assignment; and the final project - underpins specialist independent study with research, analysis and critical reflection.

Core modules
-MADS703 Design and Business
-MADS701 Creative Processes
-MADS702 Design Thinking
-MADS704 Final Major

Optional modules
-MADS705 Designers Eye
-MADS707 Maker Contexts
-MADS708 Sustainable Futures
-MADS706 Space Topologies

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This programme is for graduate engineers in naval architecture, offshore engineering, mechanical engineering and other related disciplines who wish to pursue a career in offshore engineering. Read more

Why this course?

This programme is for graduate engineers in naval architecture, offshore engineering, mechanical engineering and other related disciplines who wish to pursue a career in offshore engineering.

It provides you with practical knowledge of offshore floating systems. You’ll look at their conceptions, design and installation. You’ll also gain a sound basis of mathematical and engineering fundamentals.

With the world-wide search for offshore oil and gas moving into increasingly hostile areas of ocean and deep and ultra-deep water, floating systems are becoming more widely used. Floating systems must be designed and built to withstand harsh environments with innovative methods and techniques being adopted to develop robust as well as economically efficient and safe structures. In meeting these challenges, concern for the environment is of increasing importance.

The Department of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Marine Engineering (NAOME), a leading institution in Scotland, offers excellent teaching and research facilities in Naval Architecture, Ocean and Marine engineering, which expands your career opportunities in naval architecture, marine, offshore oil and gas industry.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/offshorefloatingsystems/

You’ll study

The programme consists of three components:
- instructional modules
- group project
- individual project (MSc only)

- Group project
You’ll be part of a group of three to five people in ‘consultant teams’ for 10 weeks addressing a practical engineering problem. You’ll then have the opportunity to present the report to a panel of industrial experts.
This project will enhance your team working and communication skills. It also provides valuable access to industrial contacts.
It will give you a good understanding of all aspects of research work. In addition, the technological study must be accompanied by survey of the relevance and applicability of the findings to the maritime industries at large.
You'll learn efficient ways to gather information, to distribute workload and to delegate amongst the group, to analyse their results and to appreciate the broader implications of the whole project. In-depth technological studies will be accompanied by increasingly important competence in managerial skills, quality assurance and a sound appreciation of the economic, political, social and environmental issues crucial to professional success.

- Individual project (MSc only)
MSc students will take on an individual dissertation on a topic of their own interest. The aim of the individual project is to develop your research skills and to combine many of aspects learned from other modules within a specific topic. This will be achieved by you carrying out work into a particular topic relating to your chosen theme and preparing a dissertation.

Facilities

We have excellent teaching facilities including:
- Catalina - our departmental racing yacht
- Kelvin Hydrodynamics Lab - the largest ship-model experiment tank in any UK university
- towing/wave tank exclusively for teaching purposes
- marine engine laboratory
- hydrogen fuel cell laboratory
- cutting-edge computer facilities
- industry standard software

Accreditation

This course is accredited by the Royal Institution of Naval Architects (RINA) and the Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (IMarEST).

Student competitions

NAOME supports and promotes students in various competitions and awards, from cash bursaries for top performing students to the highest of awards from international organisations.

In recent years students from NAOME have been triumphant in the following high profile competitions:
- Science, Engineering & Technology Student of the Year (SET Awards)
- Best Maritime Technology Student (SET Awards)
- Double winner of BP’s Ultimate Field Trip Competition
- Strathclyder of the Year

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

There are two teaching periods (semesters) of 12 weeks each. Some of the second semester subjects are taught over eight weeks. This is so that you can devote as much time as possible to your individual project work.

Course modules are delivered in form of formal lectures supported with tutorials and laboratory experiment.

- Guest lectures
During term time, we arrange weekly seminars in which leaders and pioneers of the maritime, oil and gas and marine renewables industries visit the department and present to students. This is a great way of supplementing your education with the latest developments and gaining industry contacts for your future career.
Industrial visits are also made to a variety of companies.

Assessment

There are two types of method for module assessment. One is course work assessment only, the other is examination assessment. For examined modules the final assessment mark consists of 30-40% course work marks and 60-70 examination marks.

Careers

Graduates will be well-prepared for a challenging career in all sectors of offshore engineering dealing not only with offshore floating systems but also fixed marine structures.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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This course encourages a lively environment where as a budding writer you can experiment, be imaginative and ambitious, as well as critically reflect on your practice. Read more

Why take this course?

This course encourages a lively environment where as a budding writer you can experiment, be imaginative and ambitious, as well as critically reflect on your practice.

You will have the opportunity to write literary novels, historical fiction, crime, science fiction, children’s stories, as well as screenwriting or short fiction – we encourage and respect all genres.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Be taught by lecturers with professional experience, many of whom are established practising writers
Complete a major project in the form of your own novel, screenplay or poem and learn about the market and current debates within differing genres in the process
Tap in to our Library’s vast selection of electronic resources, which can be accessed from anywhere with an internet connection

What opportunities might it lead to?

We continuously encourage you to seize as many opportunities as possible to make your writing visible to publishers and the public. Strengthening your creative writing skills on this course can lead to a variety of different creative career paths from roles in publishing to writing children’s books.

Alternatively, many of our graduates find roles within a variety of media industries and a number of them have gone on to study for PhDs or teaching qualifications.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Teaching
Writing
Journalism
PR

Module Details

The course consists of units focusing on creative practice, academic contexts and critical understanding. For the final stage of the course you will write a creative dissertation which can take the form of a novel (or portion thereof – 30,000 to 40,000 words in length), a collection of prose, poetry or a screenplay.

Here are the units you will study:

Writer's Workshop – Exploration: In this unit, you will be encouraged to experiment in differing genres to build confidence in writing and research.

Writer's Workshop – Resolution: During the course of this unit, you will research your chosen genre or idea and write a proposal and first chapters for the major project (dissertation). Your research and writing practice will be led by reading, discussion, debate and some substantial formative work that will eventually lead to the written proposal and/or opening chapters of a novel or pages of a screenplay or poetry.

Critical Reading for Creative Writers: This is an essay-based unit, in which you will explore critical approaches to the written word with oral presentations and researched essays.

Critical Thinking for Creative Writers: This unit allows you to approach a critical theory by relating it to your own creative writing, with reference to your major creative project. This unit is also essay-based.

The Final Project – The Creative Writing Dissertation: This unit will allow you to complete a major work in any genre (prose, poetry or screenplay) of up to 30,000 words (or equivalent). You will receive guidance and support from tutors throughout this unit of study.

Programme Assessment

Your learning will primarily be via workshop-based sessions where you will explore and develop your own writing as well as constructively contribute to the work of other writers around you. We aim to create a friendly atmosphere in which you will receive feedback to continually help evolve your creative writing style.

Your progress will be assessed by regularly submitted work and a final creative writing project in the form of a literary form or genre of your choice and geared to a specific market.

Student Destinations

You are encouraged to attend and read at ‘open mic’ sessions to develop performance skills. Previous students have found this invaluable not only when reading their own work aloud but also in professional practice. You are also encouraged to build a portfolio of work to show publishers and exhibit your work in other ways through creative blogs, or by submitting your work to online magazines and competitions.

On graduating, many of our students are equipped with the skills and confidence to continue to write and publish after the course has ended. This MA in Creative Writing can lead to a range of employment opportunities in publishing, editing, journalism and education.

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Do you have a passion and talent for writing? Want to develop your confidence and ability as a writer and dream of being published?. Read more
Do you have a passion and talent for writing? Want to develop your confidence and ability as a writer and dream of being published?

Our MA in Creative Writing at Northumbria offers you the opportunity to explore your writing craft at an advanced level. You’ll gain a solid grounding in the techniques and skills of writing fiction, learn how to critique your own work and experiment with your writing voice.

A combination of core and option modules gives you the chance to develop your critical and analytical thinking. This course builds on your passion for creative writing, enhancing your career prospects as you develop a portfolio that reflects a broad range of genres.

You’ll graduate as a critical thinker with skills that will help you make a big difference in your chosen area of work and creative practice.

This course can also be taken part time, for more information, please view this web-page: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/creative-writing-dtpcwr6/

Learn From The Best

Creative Writing at Northumbria enjoys international recognition for the quality of teaching and research, and our publications in Creative Writing and English Studies are ranked 15th in the country for their quality, by the 2014 Research Excellence Framework.

Our Creative Writing team is made up of award-winning novelist and poets, who are major figures in their field. Furthermore, through our partnership with New Writing North, the foremost literary promotion agency in the north of England, we give you opportunities to meet and learn from agents, publishers, and writers from across the country.

Teaching And Assessment

We aim to challenge you, to offer new insights and ways of thinking, while providing a firm grounding in creative writing techniques. You’re encouraged to experiment with and develop your own writing voice while being aware of the demands of the writing industry.

Workshops, seminars, critiquing sessions and small groups led by writers and editors provide an intellectually stimulating environment within which you can develop confidence in literary forms and techniques.

You’ll produce a portfolio of creative writing, including an accompanying commentary for assessment for each module. This is a substantial body of work that demonstrates your ability to develop your own writing voice and edit your own work.

You will build up your skills through core and option modules assessed by formative (non-graded) and summative (graded) assignments. A virtual learning platform (Blackboard) offers you space to share ideas, engage with interactive tasks and access online resources including reading lists.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
EL7010 - Approaches to Writing (Optional, 30 Credits)
EL7011 - Creativity (Core, 30 Credits)
EL7012 - Experiments in Form (Optional, 30 Credits)
EL7020 - Professional Practice: Writing in an Industry Context (Core, 30 Credits)
EL7023 - Writing Research 1 (Optional, 30 Credits)
EL7024 - Writing Portfolio (Core, 60 Credits)
EL7025 - Writing Research 2 (Optional, 30 Credits)

Learning Environment

Humanities at Northumbria is composed of three subject teams: History, Literature & Creative Writing, and English Language & Linguistics, and is also developing strengths in the fields of American Studies and Heritage Studies.

The Humanities department is made up of a community of learners all the way through from first year undergraduate to final year PhD level. All Humanities staff are engaged in research and actively create the knowledge that is taught in the department. Our Creative Writing team are all published and highly acclaimed for their work.

Creative Writing students, as part of Northumbria’s Humanities department, have access to the new Institute for Humanities which houses a range of specialist research resources. You’ll also get the chance to work with a range of cultural partners including New Writing North, who provide unique opportunities for creative writers.

The research of the Institute brings together the disciplines of Art History, American Studies, Creative Writing, English Language and Linguistics, English Literature, History and Media Studies.

Research-Rich Learning

We are recognised for world-leading research in all our Humanities’ disciplines. Our staff have attracted major funding from Research Councils UK as well as the British Academy, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

Northumbria is rated in the UK top 15 for the quality of its English Literature, Language and Creative Writing publications. You can explore some of the key themes here.

The Creative Writing team work across a range of genres and their interests encompass everything from identity, displacement and narratives of cultural difference to astronomy and visual perception, and how we represent animals in language.

You will join a lively community that regularly gives public readings and, through our association with the regional writing agency New Writing North, is formally involved with the Durham Book Festival and the Northern Writers' Awards.

Furthermore, you will have the opportunity to engage with the activities of the Institute for Humanities, which is home to five international journals and which regularly hosts an exciting range of seminars, symposia and conferences on topics as varied as Memory, Heritage and Identity; Transnationalism and Societal Change; Digital Humanities; Medical Humanities; and American Studies.

Give Your Career An Edge

Employability, in the form of critical and creative skills, presentation skills and reflective and evaluative abilities, is embedded into your course. You will be able to demonstrate that you are self-motivated, show initiative and personal responsibility, and possess a thirst for independent learning.

During your course, you’ll be in constant contact with a range of professionals working in the arts and creative industries, helping you to build up networks and gain relevant experience.

All modules play a crucial role in developing the advanced skills and attributes necessary for employment, including effective time and workload management, oral and written communication, teamwork and creative analysis of complex problems. The core module, Professional Practice, is designed to give you insight into the world of literary publishing.

You will graduate with a qualification which may enhance your promotion prospects in professions such as the literary industries, partnerships and agencies, marketing and advertising.

Your Future

Given the postgraduate nature of this course the tutors (all published writers themselves) will be looking for signs of the ability to write at a professional level.

MA graduates have achieved notable success. Dan Smith publishes novels for adults and younger readers, most recently Boy X. Celia Bryce is an acclaimed novelist whose book Anthem for Jackson Dawes was nominated for the Carnegie Medal in 2014.

Helen Laws is a highly successful TV scriptwriter who originated 32 Brinkburn Street for BBC TV and has written for Casualty, Eastenders, Two Pints of Lager and a Packet of Crisps, Shameless and Doctors. She says the MA taught her the importance of story and gave her the confidence to keep trying.

There are also opportunities for you to advance your studies further with advice in writing PhD and funding applications available.

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MA Multi-Disciplinary Printmaking at UWE Bristol is best known for its experimental, forward-thinking approach to printmaking today and the future of the printed artefact. Read more
MA Multi-Disciplinary Printmaking at UWE Bristol is best known for its experimental, forward-thinking approach to printmaking today and the future of the printed artefact. With a focus on making, you can explore and experiment with a diverse mix of traditional and emerging fine art printmaking media and develop ideas through processes such as laser cutting, enamelling, electronics, wood engraving and lithography.

This degree is an ideal springboard for professional artist-printmakers looking to extend their practice and also for those with less print-based experience to explore and experiment creatively, and gain valuable real world experience through the Professional Practice module.

Active links with the CFPR brings research expertise, opportunities for placements and access to associated symposia, conferences and exhibitions.

Key benefits

You will have the opportunity to explore your practice through a self-initiated placement/project/experience as part of the Practice in a Professional Context module. You will gain valuable insight into the professional arena and use your knowledge and skills to further develop your practice and future career aspirations.

Course detail

You will study alongside a broad base of students with diverse backgrounds in a professional, well-connected, research-active environment with full access to specialist facilities (some of the best in the country) and support from highly regarded master printers, practicing artists and researchers.

You will study in a creative, vibrant city with active arts communities and opportunities for collaboration and public engagement and gain valuable industry-insight from high profile visiting speakers from creative industries including Emma Stibbon, Sue Gregor and Otto Graphic.

Structure

The full masters course comprises 180 credits divided into three 60 credits stages: Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma, and Masters. Students work incrementally through the three stages and must pass all modules at each stage in order to progress to the next.

Modules

• Introduction to Multi-Disciplinary Printmaking (30 credits)
• Research Practice (30 credits)
• Developing Practice (30 credits)
• Practice in a Professional Context (30 credits)
• Extended Practice (60 credits)

Format

Students are taught through a combination of seminars, technical workshops, lectures and independent self-directed study. Students learn from each other through presentations and open portfolios and guest speakers bring valuable real-world insight to the course.
There is strong emphasis on developing your creative, conceptual, technical and professional skills with support and guidance on careers and developing your own practice.

Assessment

You will be assessed on your body of practical work, contextually supported by the critical journal. For the Research Practice module you will be assessed on a presentation and written essay.

Careers / Further study

Our students are taught by practicing artists and researchers, bringing skills and expertise exclusively to those at Postgraduate level.

Many of our graduates enter or continue employment in the creative industries in professional studios, as self-employed artists, illustrators and designers running their own businesses or in teaching in both formal and community education programmes.

Spike Print Studio in Bristol, the largest open-access print studio in the South West, employs four alumni (including the studio manager). Others are employed at national studios including Curwen Studio and Lazarides Editions in London. Alumni have also established their own professional studios, for example John Lynch's Stereograph workshops or David Abbott's Chesapeake Ltd, Bristol.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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This course was developed response to the demand for design engineers who can design and assess new ships and offshore structures. Read more

Why this course?

This course was developed response to the demand for design engineers who can design and assess new ships and offshore structures.

This programme is designed for graduate engineers in naval architecture, offshore engineering, mechanical engineering and other related disciplines.

You'll be introduced to ultimate strength, fatigue and design concepts for structural components of ships and offshore floating systems. You'll also gain the knowledge of material behaviour together with factors influencing the dynamic behaviour of offshore installations.

The Department of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Marine Engineering (NAOME), a leading institution in Scotland, offers excellent teaching and research facilities in Naval Architecture, Ocean and Marine engineering, which expands your career opportunities in naval architecture, marine, offshore oil and gas industry.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/shipoffshorestructures/

You'll study

Your course is made up of three components:
- instructional modules
- group project
- individual project (MSc only)

- Group project
You’ll be part of a group of three to five people in ‘consultant teams’ for 10 weeks addressing a practical engineering problem. You’ll then have the opportunity to present the report to a panel of industrial experts.
This project will enhance your team working and communication skills. It also provides valuable access to industrial contacts.
It will give you a good understanding of all aspects of research work. In addition, the technological study must be accompanied by survey of the relevance and applicability of the findings to the maritime industries at large.
You'll learn efficient ways to gather information, to distribute workload and to delegate amongst the group, to analyse their results and to appreciate the broader implications of the whole project. In-depth technological studies will be accompanied by increasingly important competence in managerial skills, quality assurance and a sound appreciation of the economic, political, social and environmental issues crucial to professional success.

- Individual project (MSc only)
MSc students will take on an individual dissertation on a topic of their own interest. The aim of the individual project is to develop your research skills and to combine many of aspects learned from other modules within a specific topic. This will be achieved by you carrying out work into a particular topic relating to your chosen theme and preparing a dissertation.

Facilities

We have excellent teaching facilities including:
- Catalina - our departmental racing yacht
- Kelvin Hydrodynamics Lab - the largest ship-model experiment tank in any UK university
- Towing/wave tank exclusively for teaching purposes
- Marine engine laboratory
- Hydrogen fuel cell laboratory
- Cutting-edge computer facilities
- Industry standard software

Teaching staff

You’re taught by dedicated staff with diverse expertise and research activities.

Accreditation

All of our degree programmes are and to be (2014) professionally by the Royal Institution of Naval Architects (RINA) and The Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology, (IMarEST) on behalf of the UK Engineering Council.

Student competitions

NAOME supports and promotes students in various competitions and awards, from cash bursaries for top performing students to the highest of awards from international organisations.

In recent years students from NAOME have been triumphant in the following high profile competitions:
- Science, Engineering & Technology Student of the Year (SET Awards)
- Best Maritime Technology Student (SET Awards)
- Double winner of BP’s Ultimate Field Trip Competition
- Strathclyder of the Year

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

There are two teaching periods (semesters) of 12 weeks each. Some of the second semester subjects are taught over eight weeks. This is so that you can devote as much time as possible to your individual project work.

Course modules are delivered in form of formal lectures supported with tutorials and laboratory experiment.

- Guest lectures
During term time, we arrange weekly seminars in which leaders and pioneers of the maritime, oil and gas and marine renewables industries visit the department and present to students. This is a great way of supplementing your education with the latest developments and gaining industry contacts for your future career.

Industrial visits are also made to a variety of companies.

Assessment

There are two types of method for module assessment. One is course work assessment only, the other is examination assessment. For examined modules the final assessment mark consists of 30-40% course work and 60-70% examination.

Careers

Career destinations include:
- Naval Architect
- Marine Engineer
- Graduate Engineer
- Marine Surveyor
- Offshore Renewables Engineer
- Project Engineer

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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