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The joint MA degree in art history builds upon the combined resources of Alabama’s two premier institutions of higher learning. The University of Alabama and The University of Alabama at Birmingham. Read more
The joint MA degree in art history builds upon the combined resources of Alabama’s two premier institutions of higher learning: The University of Alabama and The University of Alabama at Birmingham.

One Program, Two Campuses

Students enroll on one of the two campuses and take the majority of their courses on that campus, but they also take 6 hours of art history on the other campus and have access to the library holdings (including in the visual arts) of both campuses.

An art history symposium offered each year on alternating campuses provides the students in the program with an opportunity to present a formal paper in an informal setting. A highlight of our annual symposium is the visit by a renowned art historian who participates by meeting the students and discussing the papers.

After Graduation

The MA degree in art history is an appropriate terminal degree for positions that are open in museums, galleries, libraries, and archives, and in the fields of teaching at the junior college level. Graduates of the program have secured positions in area museums, including the Birmingham Museum of Art, the Montgomery Museum of Arts and the Mobile Arts Museum, and as visual arts curators and teachers of art history in area colleges and universities, including Livingston College, Shelton State College, and Jefferson State College. Students interested in pursuing a teaching career at the University level are encouraged to continue their study of art history in a doctoral program; graduates of the joint MA program in art history have been accepted into the PhD programs of Rochester University, Emory University, Kansas University, and Florida State University.

Degree Requirements

The MA in art history requires completion of 24 semester hours in art history, a comprehensive exam, and a written thesis.

Coursework

The MA requires 24 semester hours of art history coursework, of which 6 hours may be taken in a related field, such as history, religion, or anthropology. Courses are grouped into seven general areas: Early Modern (Renaissance and Baroque), 19th-century, Modern, Contemporary, American (including African American) and South Asian.* Students must identify a major area and a minor area.

A required course, ARH 550, Literature of Art, is offered once a year on alternating campuses. A maximum of 6 hours of 400-level courses may be taken for graduate credit. Students enrolled on The University of Alabama campus must take 6 hours of coursework at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

*Students may take classes in South Asian art, but it cannot be their major field.

Comprehensive Exam

A reading knowledge of French or German must be demonstrated before the student is eligible to take the comprehensive written exam. The language requirement may be satisfied either by completing both semesters of the graduate reading proficiency sequence offered by the Department of Modern Languages and Classics or by scheduling a written exam with the appropriate language area in the Department of Modern Languages and Classics.

The student who has completed 24 semester hours of graduate coursework and satisfied the language requirement is ready to be examined in a written comprehensive exam administered in the fall and spring semesters. The written comprehensive exam is divided into two parts: (1) a slide exam that tests the student’s broad knowledge of the history of Western art, and (2) an essay portion that tests for expertise in two fields of concentration.

The student must declare intent to take the exam in writing to the director of graduate studies in art history at least one month prior to the exam date. At that time an exam committee is formed that includes at least two art history professors from the Tuscaloosa campus and one art history professor from the Birmingham campus. The committee members represent the two areas of concentration declared by the student. The committee evaluates the written exam and notifies the candidate of the results. An exam must be judged to be of at least “B” quality in order to be considered a pass. A student who does not pass the exam may take it once more at the normally scheduled exam time.

Thesis

The MA degree also requires a written thesis submitted to the Graduate School. In consultation with a professor, the student identifies a thesis topic. (Often, a thesis topic originates with a written seminar paper.) The thesis proposal is a brief statement of the topic for research, a summary description of the individual thesis chapters, and a working bibliography. The thesis advisor circulates the thesis proposal among the committee members for their approval. The thesis committee is usually but not always identical to the student’s exam committee. The student writes the thesis while enrolled in thesis hours (ARH 599) for up to 6 hours. When the thesis is completed to the satisfaction of the thesis advisor it is distributed to the thesis committee for comments. The final step in the completion of the thesis is the oral defense. In the oral defense the student justifies the methodology and the conclusions of the thesis to the committee.

The student must complete all of the required revisions and corrections to the thesis to the satisfaction of the committee before submitting the finished thesis to the Graduate School. The final written thesis must conform to the requirements of the Graduate School for it to be accepted. The student must provide an electronic copy of the thesis for The University of Alabama at Birmingham.

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LSBU has been successfully producing Accountants for over 40 years. Our tutors are knowledgeable and experienced and our approach to ACCA is simple. Read more
LSBU has been successfully producing Accountants for over 40 years. Our tutors are knowledgeable and experienced and our approach to ACCA is simple: we focus on exam preparation to give you the confidence you need to achieve a pass.

[[Our exam focused delivery ]]
We offer exam focused teaching using exam style questions to deliver the syllabus and constantly improve your exam technique. This method not only embeds theory it also means you get used to tackling exam questions, once you understand what the examiner is really asking it is easier to maximise marks.

Our four week exam preparation programme

We deliver a four week Exam Preparation Programme as standard. This is designed to highlight your weaker areas and give you plenty of time to address them before the exam. It includes: a mock exam a mock exam feedback week two revision weeks in the run up to the exam, with tutor support throughout. Being properly prepared allows you to approach your exam in a calm and focused way; using time effectively and maximising marks.

Excellent travel connections

We are centrally located and well served by the London Underground making it practicable to juggle work and study.

Start dates

The ACCA part-time Professional Accountancy Programme will be available in September 2016 for the December sitting of the ACCA Professional papers. Please email us with your details and we can make sure that you are informed of the dates of the classes, fees and all other relevant information. In the meantime if you require any further information, please contact Ivor Pingue, Director of Studies, ACCA Professional Accountancy Course.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/acca-professional-papers-programme

Modules

There are three compulsory papers:
- P1 Governance, risk and ethics
- P2 Corporate reporting
- P3 Business analysis

And four optional papers of which two must be selected:
- P4 Advanced financial management
- P5 Advanced performance management
- P6 advanced taxation
- P7 Advanced audit and assurance

Employability

The ACCA Qualification will provide you with skills and knowledge relevant to any business, which means you are free to choose which type of accountancy role and organisation you want to work for. It is expected that these papers will be taken to either establish or enhance a career in accounting in public practice, industry or commerce.

Career in accounting

One of the most popular jobs on graduating is to go on to train as a chartered accountant. There are many different directions to pursue, specialising in financial reporting, taxation, auditing or forensic accounting. They provide professional advice, aiming to maximise profitability on behalf of their client or employer. Strong analytical skills, a developed understanding of business and good mathematical instincts are all necessary key skills.

Although accountancy has four large firms: Deloitte LLP, Ernst & Young, KPMG and PwC, there are many small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) which provide plenty of opportunities on graduation, such as professional training and development.

Recent graduates from this course have gone onto jobs such as: Accountant Assistant, Personal Banker, Financial Analyst, Payroll Assistant and Graduate/Trainee Accountant.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

This course carries ACCA accreditation and offers you the opportunity to simultaneously gain maximum exemptions from the Knowledge and Skills modules of ACCA Fundamentals level. This is the maximum number of exemptions permitted by the ACCA and currently there are only a limited number of educational institutions offering degree courses that are accredited with this status.

Facilities

Specialist industry software prepares our students with the digital skills that employers' value Students on our programmes have access to Bloomberg, Thomson One Banker, SAGE, Blueprint, FAME, NVivo, and SPSS.

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This programme is aimed at anyone interested in learning more about the design and operation of low energy buildings with the added attraction of three modules dedicated to computer modelling of building performance – an essential skill for anyone wishing to work in today’s rapidly changing world of building engineering consultancy. Read more
This programme is aimed at anyone interested in learning more about the design and operation of low energy buildings with the added attraction of three modules dedicated to computer modelling of building performance – an essential skill for anyone wishing to work in today’s rapidly changing world of building engineering consultancy.

Modules are taught by world-leading experts in the field who have designed some of the world’s most innovative low energy buildings. These design experiences provide unique case study material which students find exciting and invaluable for their own research and design work.

The programme is accredited for further learning for CEng and professional membership by CIBSE and the Energy Institute and benefits from its links with the Royal Academy of Engineering Centre of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design.

The course attracts students from all over the world, including countries such as Greece, Iran, China, France, Germany and Colombia. This is attractive to potential employers who often have international offices around the world.

Key Facts

- An outstanding place to study. The School of Civil and Building Engineering is ranked 2nd in the UK for Building in the Times Good University Guide 2015

- Research-led teaching from international experts. 75% of the School’s research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the latest Government Research Excellence Framework.

- The programme is accredited by the two main institutions representing energy and buildings – the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers and the Energy Institute. On successful completion of the course, students are deemed to meet the education requirements for both institutions and their applications can be endorsed by course tutors.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/low-carbon-building-design/

Programme modules

- Building Energy Consumption [70% exam, 10 credits]
The aim of this module is for the student to understand the impact that climate, people, equipment selection and design have on energy consumption on a range of building sizes from domestic to large commercial.

- Renewable Energy and Low Carbon Technologies [70% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the principles of renewable energy and low carbon technologies and their integration into buildings, and to be given a perspective on the potential benefits and applications of these technologies.

- Building Control & Commissioning [70% exam, 10 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the application of automatic control in energy monitoring and commissioning and to examine the control problems in buildings and develop control strategies that will improve thermal comfort and building energy use.

- Concept Design [0% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to be introduced to the process within which buildings are conceived and designed by undertaking the architecture design of a major building using multi-disciplinary input. Students will develop team skills through working in design groups to generate schematic concepts before developing the best. They will apply previous knowledge of building services and low carbon design in the selection process and carry out performance analysis. Students will work with 3D architectural and 3D mechanical, electrical and plumbing (MEP) systems within BIM software to further develop their concepts.

- Low Carbon Building Design [50% exam, 15 credits]
The module aims to introduce the principles of low and zero carbon building with special attention to the process of design and decision-making.

- Advanced Thermal Modelling [50% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the principles of building thermal modelling and HVAC plant simulation, and be given a perspective on the applications of these techniques to the design process.

- Advanced Airflow Modelling [50% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the principles of building airflow and ventilation modelling with respect to comfort and energy efficiency, and be given a perspective on the applications of these techniques to the design process.

- Advanced Lighting Modelling [50% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the principles of lighting modelling in buildings with respect to comfort and energy efficiency, and be given a perspective on the application of these techniques to the design process.

- Research Project [0% exam, 60 credits]
The aim of this module is to provide the student with experience of the process and methodology of research by defining and studying (on an individual basis) a complex problem in a specialised area relating to Building Energy

- Research Methods in Building Performance [0% exam, 10 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to become familiar with and comprehend the wide range of research methods and skills needed to investigate, understand and communicate building performance.

Facilities

All masters students have access to a wide range of building simulation codes which include commercial software, as well as bespoke codes developed in-house. Students can run these codes on their personal laptops or access any one of our computer laboratories, including access to our recently commissioned 2000-node high performance computer cluster.

One of our key strengths at Loughborough is our experimental facilities which enable us to validate computer models. Our masters students have access to a vast range of experimental facilities, some of which are used during the taught modules and all of which are available for use by students during their research dissertations.

These include: a fully controllable environmental chamber; sophisticated thermal and breathing manikins; an indoor solar simulator; a 'darkroom' facility to carry out optical and high dynamic range measurements; and full-scale houses for pressure testing and studying innovative heating and control strategies. A recent investment of £360k was made to purchase an extensive array of monitoring and measuring equipment for use during field studies.

How you will learn

You will learn through a carefully balanced combination of lectures, in-class guided workshops, hands-on computer modelling, field measurements and independent research. Students have access to a wide range of air flow, thermal and daylight modelling software as well as extensive laboratory facilities. Following nine taught modules, students pursue a research dissertation of their choice which draws on the skills developed during the taught modules.

Students are assessed by a combination of traditional written exams, coursework and assignments. This split is typically 70/30 (exam/coursework) or 50/50, although some modules, such as research methods and concept design are assessed entirely based on coursework which comprises individual presentations and group work.

Careers and further study

Previous students have gone on to work for leading consulting engineering companies such as Arup, Pick Everad, Hoare Lea, Hulley and Kirkwood and SE Controls. Some of these companies offer work placements for students to undertake their research dissertations. Many visit the university to deliver lectures to our MSc students providing ideal opportunities for students to discuss employment opportunities.

Accreditation

The programme is accredited for further learning for CEng and professional membership by the CIBSE and Energy Institute.
The 'SE Controls prize for best overall performance' is awarded to the student graduating from this course with the highest overall mark. This presentation is made on graduation day.

Scholarships

The University offers over 100 scholarships each year to new self-financing full-time international students who are permanently resident in a county outside the European Union. These Scholarships are to the value of 25% of the programme tuition fee and that value will be credited to the student’s tuition fee account.
You can apply for a scholarship once you have received an offer for a place on this programme.

Why choose civil engineering at Loughborough?

As one of four Royal Academy of Engineering designated Centres of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design, the School of Civil and Building Engineering is one of the largest of its type in the UK and holds together a thriving community of over 60 academic staff, 40 technical and clerical support staff and over 240 active researchers that include Fellows, Associates, Assistants, Engineers and Doctoral Students.

Our world-class teaching and research are integrated to support the technical and commercial needs of both industry and society. A key part of our ethos is our extensive links with industry resulting in our graduates being extremely sought after by industry and commerce world-wide,

- Postgraduate programmes
The School offers a focussed suite of post graduate programmes aligned to meet the needs of industry and fully accredited by the relevant professional institutions. Consequently, our record of graduate employment is second to none. Our programmes also have a long track record of delivering high quality, research-led education. Indeed, some of our programmes have been responding to the needs of industry and producing high quality graduates for over 40 years.

Currently, our suite of Masters programmes seeks to draw upon our cutting edge research and broad base knowledge of within the areas of contemporary construction management, project management, infrastructure management, building engineering, building modelling, building energy demand and waste and water engineering. The programmes are designed to respond to contemporary issues in the field such as sustainable construction, low carbon building, low energy services, project complexity, socio-technical systems and socio-economic concerns.

- Research
Drawing from our excellent record in attracting research funds (currently standing at over £19M), the focal point of the School is innovative, industry-relevant research. This continues to nurture and refresh our long history of working closely with industrial partners on novel collaborative research and informs our ongoing innovative teaching and extensive enterprise activities. This is further complemented by our outstanding record of doctoral supervision which has provided, on average, a PhD graduate from the School every two weeks.

- Career Prospects
Independent surveys continue to show that industry has the highest regard for our graduates. Over 90% were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Recent independent surveys of major employers have also consistently rated the School at the top nationally for civil engineering and construction graduates.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/low-carbon-building-design/

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This programme is aimed at graduates of building services engineering and other science and engineering disciplines who wish to extend their technical expertise in the field of building services engineering. Read more
This programme is aimed at graduates of building services engineering and other science and engineering disciplines who wish to extend their technical expertise in the field of building services engineering. With energy consumption within the design and operation of buildings becoming an ever increasingly important factor this programme is designed to combine building services engineering knowledge with specific energy considerations in their design.

The programme is accredited for further learning for CEng and professional membership by the Energy Institute and CIBSE. CIBSE has praised the programme as ‘one of the leading MSc courses of its kind in the UK’.

Areas studied include low energy building design, designing for suitable indoor air quality and thermal comfort, state-of-the-art control systems, and the design of building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems.

The course attracts students from all over the world, including countries such as Greece, Iran, China, France, Germany and Colombia. This is attractive to potential employers who often have international offices around the world.

Key Facts

- An outstanding place to study. The School of Civil and Building Engineering is ranked 2nd in the UK for Building in the Times Good University Guide 2015
- Research-led teaching from international experts. 75% of the School’s research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the latest Government Research Excellence Framework.
- The programme is accredited by the two main institutions representing energy and buildings – the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers and the Energy Institute. On successful completion of the course, students are deemed to meet the education requirements for both institutions and their applications can be endorsed by course tutors.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/low-energy-building-services/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer & Fluid Flow [70% exam, 10 credits]
The aim of this module is to provide students from related engineering backgrounds with an understanding of the fundamentals of heat transfer, fluid flow and thermodynamics for application to buildings and their engineering systems.

- Thermal Comfort & Indoor Air Quality [70% exam, 15 credits]
The aim of this module is for the student to understand the principles and practice involved in the design of indoor environments, with respect to occupant thermal comfort and air quality.

- Building Thermal Loads & Systems [70% exam, 15 credits]
The aim of this module is for the student to understand the principles of building thermal load analysis and required systems for medium to large buildings.

- Building Energy Supply Systems [70% exam, 15 credits]
The aim of this module is for the student to be provided with a practical foundation in system design and analysis, by developing the students' understanding of thermal plant in buildings including air conditioning systems and systems for heat recovery.

- Building Control & Commissioning [70% exam, 10 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the application of automatic control in energy monitoring and commissioning and to examine the control problems in buildings and develop control strategies that will improve thermal comfort and building energy use.

- Concept Design [0% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to be introduced to the process within which buildings are conceived and designed by undertaking the architecture design of a major building using multi-disciplinary input. Students will develop team skills through working in design groups to generate schematic concepts before developing the best. They will apply previous knowledge of building services and low carbon design in the selection process and carry out performance analysis. Students will work with 3D architectural and 3D mechanical, electrical and plumbing (MEP) systems within BIM software to further develop their concepts.

- Low Carbon Building Design [50% exam, 15 credits]
The module aims to introduce the principles of low and zero carbon building with special attention to the process of design and decision-making.

- Advanced Thermal Modelling [50% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the principles of building thermal modelling and HVAC plant simulation, and be given a perspective on the applications of these techniques to the design process.

- Research Project [0% exam, 60 credits]
The aim of this module is to provide the student with experience of the process and methodology of research by defining and studying (on an individual basis) a complex problem in a specialised area relating to Building Energy

- Research Methods in Building Performance [0% exam, 10 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to become familiar with and comprehend the wide range of research methods and skills needed to investigate, understand and communicate building performance.

Facilities

All masters students have access to a wide range of building simulation codes which include commercial software, as well as bespoke codes developed in-house. Students can run these codes on their personal laptops or access any one of our computer laboratories, including access to our recently commissioned 2000-node high performance computer cluster.

One of our key strengths at Loughborough is our experimental facilities which enable us to validate computer models. Our masters students have access to a vast range of experimental facilities, some of which are used during the taught modules and all of which are available for use by students during their research dissertations.

These include: a fully controllable environmental chamber; sophisticated thermal and breathing manikins; an indoor solar simulator; a 'darkroom' facility to carry out optical and high dynamic range measurements; and full-scale houses for pressure testing and studying innovative heating and control strategies. A recent investment of £360k was made to purchase an extensive array of monitoring and measuring equipment for use during field studies.

How you will learn

You will learn through a carefully balanced combination of lectures, in-class guided workshops, hands-on computer modelling, field measurements and independent research. Students have access to a wide range of air flow and thermal modelling software as wells as extensive laboratory facilities. Following nine taught modules, students pursue a research dissertation of their choice which draws on the skills developed during the taught modules.

Students are assessed by a combination of traditional written exams, coursework and assignments. This split is typically 70/30 (exam/coursework) or 50/50, although some modules, such as research methods and concept design are assessed entirely based on coursework which comprises individual presentations and group work.

Careers and further study

Previous students have gone on to work for leading consulting engineering companies such as Arup, Pick Everad, Hoare Lea, Cundall, Foster & Partners, and Atkins. Some of these companies offer work placements for students to undertake their research dissertations. Many visit the university to deliver lectures to our MSc students providing ideal opportunities for students to discuss employment opportunities.

Scholarships

The University offers over 100 scholarships each year to new self-financing full-time international students who are permanently resident in a county outside the European Union. These Scholarships are to the value of 25% of the programme tuition fee and that value will be credited to the student’s tuition fee account.
You can apply for a scholarship once you have received an offer for a place on this programme.

Why choose civil engineering at Loughborough?

As one of four Royal Academy of Engineering designated Centres of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design, the School of Civil and Building Engineering is one of the largest of its type in the UK and holds together a thriving community of over 60 academic staff, 40 technical and clerical support staff and over 240 active researchers that include Fellows, Associates, Assistants, Engineers and Doctoral Students.

Our world-class teaching and research are integrated to support the technical and commercial needs of both industry and society. A key part of our ethos is our extensive links with industry resulting in our graduates being extremely sought after by industry and commerce world-wide,

- Postgraduate programmes
The School offers a focussed suite of post graduate programmes aligned to meet the needs of industry and fully accredited by the relevant professional institutions. Consequently, our record of graduate employment is second to none. Our programmes also have a long track record of delivering high quality, research-led education. Indeed, some of our programmes have been responding to the needs of industry and producing high quality graduates for over 40 years.

Currently, our suite of Masters programmes seeks to draw upon our cutting edge research and broad base knowledge of within the areas of contemporary construction management, project management, infrastructure management, building engineering, building modelling, building energy demand and waste and water engineering. The programmes are designed to respond to contemporary issues in the field such as sustainable construction, low carbon building, low energy services, project complexity, socio-technical systems and socio-economic concerns.

- Research
Drawing from our excellent record in attracting research funds (currently standing at over £19M), the focal point of the School is innovative, industry-relevant research. This continues to nurture and refresh our long history of working closely with industrial partners on novel collaborative research and informs our ongoing innovative teaching and extensive enterprise activities. This is further complemented by our outstanding record of doctoral supervision which has provided, on average, a PhD graduate from the School every two weeks.

- Career Prospects
Independent surveys continue to show that industry has the highest regard for our graduates. Over 90% were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Recent independent surveys of major employers have also consistently rated the School at the top nationally for civil engineering and construction graduates.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/low-energy-building-services/

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Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students. Read more
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students.

- Master of Science–Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#thesis)
- Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#nonthesis)
- Timetable for the Submission of Graduate School Forms for an MS Degree (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#timetable)

Visit the website http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit for coursework, plus a 6-hour thesis under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

Credit Hours
The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research: Thesis Research.

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory). These courses must be taken within the department and selected from the following:
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, including the following courses completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit for coursework, which may include a 3-hour non-thesis project under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory).
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, as follows:

- The following courses will be completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

TIMETABLE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS FOR AN MS DEGREE
This document identifies a timetable for the submission of all Graduate School paperwork associated with the completion of an M.S. degree

- For students in Plan I students only (thesis option) after a successful thesis proposal defense, you should submit the Appointment/Change of a Masters Thesis Committee form

- The semester before, or no later than the first week in the semester in which you plan to graduate, you should “Apply for Graduation” online in myBama.

- In the semester in which you apply for graduation, the Graduate Program Director will contact you about the Comprehensive Exam.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The Law Conversion Course - Legal Studies Common Professional Exam (CPE) is an accredited conversion course for non-law graduates aiming for a professional career in law. Read more
The Law Conversion Course - Legal Studies Common Professional Exam (CPE) is an accredited conversion course for non-law graduates aiming for a professional career in law. It satisfies all the requirements of the professional bodies including the Bar Standards Board and Solicitors Regulation Authority.

Transform your career

With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students. Study law in the heart of the capital - connected and convenient, with excellent transport options and a short walk from the Royal Courts of Justice.

Steps to becoming a solicitor or barrister

On successfully completing the CPE you are eligible to enter the Legal Practice Course (for intending solicitors) or the Bar Professional Training Course (for intending barristers), which has some additional entry requirements including an aptitude test and English language proficiency.

Experienced tutors

The course is taught by an experienced team of tutors most of whom are solicitors or barristers which provides you with invaluable insight into the details of legal principals and real case examples.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/law-conversion-legal-pgdip-cpe

Modules

You'll study seven modules required by the professional bodies for students intending to apply for the Legal Practice Course (LPC) or Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC):

- Introduction to the English legal system
You'll be introduced to the basic structure of the English Legal System and the essential aspects of civil and criminal litigation. You'll explore sources of law and key skills such as statutory interpretation, reading of law reports and the concept of judicial precedent. This introductory course will assist you in the study of the core modules, where legal skills will be developed further.

- Law of the European Union
Law of the European Union reflects the importance of EU law in the English Legal system. It is important to the management of the UK economy and relevant to the financial practitioners in the City. Business leader's decisions are influenced by EU competition law. It is important to migrants and practitioners of immigration law, to consumers and trading standards officials, to all employees through employment law and to all of us in relation to the environment.

- Obligations 1 (law of contract)
This module covers the principles of English contract law, sources, development, application in context and reform and includes reference to European developments. Contract is treated from formation to discharge and remedies with underlying concepts, rationales and influences and its relation to other forms of liability. Through the subject treatment, particularly examination of judicial reasoning and legislative technique, knowledge and skills are taught and/or developed. Skills include problem-solving, critical evaluation, reasoned argument and communication.

- Obligations 2 (law of tort)
You'll learn about civil liability in tort, focusing on an in-depth analysis of negligence, employers' liability for accidents at work, occupiers' liability for dangerous premises, manufacturers' liability for dangerous products, defences and vicarious liability. You'll develop your legal skills by reading and critically analysing cases and will apply your knowledge to complex, yet everyday, problem scenarios. You'll be encouraged to become critical and independent thinkers, and to communicate your ideas and awareness of the role of policy and the need for reform in the law of tort. In addition to its importance as an area of academic interest, tort is of practical significance to the intending practitioner, featuring heavily in the case scenarios of Legal Practice and Bar Professional Courses, as well as in everyday legal practice.

- Public law
You'll study the fundamental laws, practices and principles of Public law which define and influence the relationship between the individual and the state as characterised by various governmental institutions in the UK. Detailed consideration is given to the fundamental mechanisms by which human rights are protected and government is subject to legal and political accountability. Various skills are developed including those of analysis, critical evaluation and problem solving.

- Land law
Land law is a study of relationships. You'll study the relationship between the land and the rights which can exist in or over it, the relationship between the various persons who own an estate or interest over the land or want to defeat the competing interests in or over the land. You'll look at the rights and duties of each party to that relationship, how these relationships co-exit and what happens when the relationships come into conflict. Land Law governs the relative priorities enjoyed by two or more interests concerning the same piece of land. Land Law creates clear rules and formalities as to how the owner of an interest in land can acquire, transfer or extinguish that interest in land. You'll study the interests over land which Land Law is prepared to recognise and how these interests must be protected to ensure enforceability against third parties.

- Criminal law
This module aims to develop your ability to analyse and critically evaluate problems in Criminal Law so that you become independent and reflective legal practitioners able to contribute to public debate on legal issues. The main areas taught are: murder, manslaughter, non-fatal offences against the person including sexual offences and a variety of property offences including theft and fraud, accomplice liability and inchoate offences. You'll have additional support by way of on-line quizzes and narrated summaries.

- Equity and trusts
Principles of Equity are vital in the administration of justice. The 'trust' is a legal doctrine developed from those principles of equity which is fundamental to the commercial, business and employment worlds (pensions) and to individuals in the gifting of their property (personal trusts; wills).

- Project module
The project module satisfies the requirement of the academic stage of legal education that one other area of legal study must be successfully undertaken in addition to the seven modules which constitute the "Foundations of Legal Knowledge." It comprises the completion of a 4000 word extended essay, under the supervision of a member of the academic staff, based on the analysis of legal literature which takes differing interpretations over an issue related to law or its underlying theories. Its aim is to foster the development of the key elements of legal reasoning and legal method, research methods used in the conduct of autonomous research in law or law related topics as well as the development of skills in relation to the review and evaluation of journal articles, advanced texts and other secondary legal material.
Dissertation for the award of LLM

- Dissertation (LLM only)
This is an optional module as it is not required to complete the academic stage of legal education and so is not required to obtain the postgraduate diploma in legal studies and the common professional examination. Its successful completion is required to obtain the LLM. A prerequisite to undertake this module is the successful completion and award of the postgraduate diploma in legal studies and the common professional examination. It comprises the completion of a 15,000 word Master's level dissertation under the supervision of an appropriate academic member of staff. It requires the student to independently conceive, plan and execute an appropriate piece of research based on firm academic and theoretical foundations. The module builds upon the research skills already acquired in the successful completion of the postgraduate diploma in legal studies and common professional examination.

Assessment

Most modules are assessed by exams, exams plus coursework or presentations.

Award
X8 modules = PgDip + CPE
X8 modules and dissertation = LLM

Employability

- Solicitor or Barrister
This course can lead to one of many careers in law from a professional qualification as solicitor or barrister to a wide variety of careers in both public and private sectors.

While our graduates may go on to join professional courses leading to qualification as a solicitor or barrister, the Diploma is also useful for numerous jobs that value skills in analysis, clear communication, efficient organisation and reasoned persuasion.

- BSB and SRA
This course is fully recognised by the Bar Standards Board and Solicitors Regulation Authority and constitutes completion of the Academic Stage of Training for the purposes of further study on either the Legal Practice Course (for intending solicitors) or the Bar Professional Training Course for intending barristers (with additional entry requirements including an aptitude test and English language proficiency).

LLM Progression

Unlike a Graduate Diploma in Law our PgDip Legal Studies plus CPE is a postgraduate level qualification. After successfully completing the course you'll accumulate sufficient postgraduate credits to be eligible to submit for the further award of LLM by dissertation.

The LLM is an optional qualification additional to your Postgraduate Diploma in Legal Studies. To obtain the LLM you must successfully complete a supervised 15,000 word dissertation for which preparation has already been undertaken by your successful completion of the project module forming part of the programme leading to the PgDip Legal Studies plus CPE. The Masters dissertation is usually submitted in the semester following completion of the PgDip Legal Studies plus CPE. You'll not be required to attend classes when researching and writing your dissertation and you'll therefore be able to enrol on the Legal Practice Course or Bar Professional Training Course in the September following the successful completion of the PgDip in Legal Studies.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Teaching and learning

The primary aims of the course are to ensure that you achieve a sound understanding of English law covered in the seven foundation subjects, which provides a solid grasp of the structure and operation of the English legal system.

Classes consist of a mixture of lectures and smaller group meetings where exam technique and problem solving approaches are practiced. The course is well supported by online materials and search resources, which can be accessed off-campus.

You'll have free access to OUP Law TROVE to access books for all foundation subjects.

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IN BIOFORCE. 1) Opening Sessions. Objectives. To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme. Read more

Modules Contents and Objectives

IN BIOFORCE

1) Opening Sessions

Objectives: To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme.

Contents: Bioforce presentation. Introduction of the learning programme and objectives.

2) Immersion Internship

Objectives: To facilitate group cohesiveness and participant involvement within the programme.
To make a detailed presentation of the components of the MSc in HPM.
To encourage a joint reflection about humanitarian and development issues.
Show awareness of its own strengths and limitations as a humanitarian programme manager.

Contents: Presentation, preparation and organization of the immersion internships. Discussion and group work on Humanitarian topics.

3) Framework of Humanitarian Aid

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with thorough knowledge of the humanitarian sector and issues at stake: stakeholders, systems, coordination mechanisms, legal and ethical framework, Q&A initiatives and applications relating to programme management.

Contents: Humanitarian actors, systems and challenges. International humanitarian law, ethics & principles. Quality & Accountability initiatives, methods & practical tools.

4) Managing People & Organisations

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage themselves, other people, and organisations involved in humanitarian programmes.

Contents: Strengthening organisational capacity. Change management. Quality & Accountability in people management. Creating & developing trust in diverse teams. HR processes : HR organisation, recruitment, performance management, staff development. How to lead: leadership, management & delegation. Managing team safety and security.

5) Managing Programmes & Projects

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage all stages of the project cycle in humanitarian contexts.

Contents: Programme Cycle Management (PCM):

- Assessment & analysis
- Planning & implementation
- Monitoring & evaluation

Cross-cutting issues in PCM (participation, targeting...) Quality & Accountability in programme management.

6) Managing Finance & Funding

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the critical skills and confidence required to raise funds for humanitarian programmes, and to manage financial resources accountably.

Contents: Donors & donor strategies. Quality & Accountability in finance management. Budgeting & proposal writing. Funding strategies & opportunities. Key principles & concepts of financial management. Practical aspects of financial management.

7) Training of Trainers for Capacity Building in the Sector

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the appropriate methods & tools to develop, facilitate, monitor & evaluate capacity building activities.

Contents: Designing & implementing training activities.

8) Field Exercise

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Develop, through a field scenario-based exercise, operational capacity and autonomy of the trainees.

Contents : Within an operational framework, students will have to implement capabilities developed during the training period. The exercise is based on 5 days role play scenario. Students are placed in the position of aid actors in a context of humanitarian/emergency intervention. They have to implement several programs in the field on behalf of different NGOs. They operate in a complex emergency context where multiple players are involved.

IN ESC GRENOBLE

NB : For the ESC Students it is possible to follow “English track programme” described bellow or to follow a second semester in an English spoken abroad university.
For the other students, they must follow the “English track programme”.

1) Advanced Decision Techniques

Objectives/Learning outcomes: Good knowledge of quantitative tools for decision-making.

Contents: This course presents the main quantitative modelling and simulation tools to help in decision-making.

2) Strategy, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

This course focuses on the strategic choices: the decisions that shape the future of an organization. This course will address first the strategic choices that the manager must operate in an entrepreneurship environment (opportunity, business model design), then different options for development and growth patterns (growth internal / external growth, mergers and acquisitions, alliances).

3) Corporate Governance

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, the students:

- will know how to position and use concepts and techniques in finance, accounting, management control and law learnt during the common core subjects in a more global framework of analysis,
- will have learnt the legislation covering corporate governance,
- will be aware of the present developments in practice and the principal discussions concerning corporate governance,
- will be able to establish a diagnosis on the quality of a company's corporate governance.

Contents: It is essential for every manager to understand who determines the objectives of corporations and of other organizations, how they are governed and how their managers are incentivized and monitored. The course covers the following themes: value creation, the legal rules and the practices of company management(remuneration, ethics, social responsibility, governance "codes"), the legal rights and the behaviour of shareholders, the impact of financial markets on governance (shareholders activism, takeovers, LBOs). In addition the students have the opportunity to apply the main concepts and techniques of finance, accounting and management control to the case of a listed company.

4) Geopolitics

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, students will be able to:

- acquire the basics of a geopolitical culture allowing them to develop a reading list for current geopolitical and economic affairs,
- understand the geopolitical conditions for undertaking business in certain emerging and/or risk-laden geopolitical situations.

Contents: The object of this course is to allow students to acquire knowledge about geopolitical and economic affairs in certain zones and emerging and risk-related countries in the world. During the course, the following themes will be covered:

- the globalisation of the economy and its players, notably national States, and international and non-governmental organisations,
- geopolitical and economic analysis of certain countries and zones: Brazil, Russia, China, the Mediterranean and Africa,
- the problems of Afghanistan and Pakistan will also be discussed,
- Europe will be studied through analysis of the different themes mentioned above.

5) Global Marketing and Strategy

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Students will be able to:

- critically analyse and propose well-justified solutions to key Global Marketing Strategy issues.
- develop a Strategic Marketing plan to go global.

Contents: This module takes a decision-making perspective to Marketing Strategy issues, specifically in the global context.

The course will cover:

- Globalization decision and process,
- International market selection,
- International marketing research,
- International market entry strategies and expansion,
- Standardization versus Adaptation of 4 Ps.

6) Leadership and Responsible Management

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of this course, students will:

- understand the organizational and managerial specificities of contemporary organizations,
- know about recent developments in organizational thinking relating to institutional theory, power and politics, routines, and organizational cognition,
- be able to reflect on the specific challenges to leadership and corporate social responsibility in contemporary organizations.

Contents: This course addresses key issues for understanding and managing contemporary organizations. It seeks to move beyond simple managerialist views by integrating recent developments in organizational thinking with the dual challenges of organizational leadership and corporate social responsibility. Topics covered in this course include institutionalized environments, innovation and entrepreneurship, social movements, networks and social capital, power and politics in contemporary organizations, organizational routines and decision making, sense making and cognition in organizations, and organizational change. Each topic will be introduced through case studies alongside theoretical readings, and each of the course sessions will discuss the consequences of these topics for both leadership processes and corporate social responsibility.
The course will be demanding in terms of class preparation, contribution and after-class work, and hopefully rewarding in terms of generating novel insights into contemporary organizational and managerial challenges.

Applied Research Project

During the whole training period, the students, divided into sub-groups of 2-3 students, work on a problematic related a strong issue in the humanitarian and development sector. It is an applied research which leads to a written report in English and its presentation before a jury composed by the tutor and the partner if possible and relevant. This applied research is an integral part of the training programme and it is monitored by a tutor.
The month of December will be specifically dedicated to work on this project.
During the second semester, even if students are abroad, they have to organize themselves to work on this project.
The grade given on this work will be included in the final transcript.

OBJECTIVE

To work as a team during the whole training period to sort out a humanitarian and/or development management issue.

This project will require:

- To write a report in English (20,000 – 25,000 words) which may remain confidential; it is possible to write a summary for the organisation in a foreign language if required. Students have to submit the final report to the tutor 15 days before the oral presentation. The deadline for the oral presentation is mid-november 2014 (15 November 2014);
- To write a case study-based summary;
- To prepare the oral presentation to the jury in English.

STUDENTS’ PROFILES

Students involved in this applied research are from the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management delivered by ESC Grenoble and Bioforce.

EXPECTED RESULTS

- A specific humanitarian and/or development management issue is defined.
- A bibliographical research is consolidated.
- Concrete proposals and outlooks are drawn up.
- A critical analysis is provided.
- Relevant recommendations are made.

The definition of the issue has to be validated by both Bioforce and ESC Grenoble. A specific deadline will be communicated by Bioforce.

Rigor in diagnostic, analysis and facts interpretations, as well as recommendations will be required.
This work aims to support organizations in their development and functioning. In this way, we expect students to be creative (while being realist) and to practice benchmarks. This research work is neither an operational mission nor a counseling one. The report presented is not an internship report.

EXEMPTION OF “GRAND MÉMOIRE” – FOR THE ESC STUDENTS

Usually, ESC Grenoble students have to write a “Grand mémoire” during their enrollment. As they already write a specific applied research report, they benefit from an exemption of this “Grand mémoire”.

Assignment

Students from the MSc in HPM have to realize an assignment, after their study period, during 20 weeks at least. The presentation before a jury must be done before the 15th of November 2014.
The aim of this assignment is to reinforce students’ autonomy and to further develop their skills as a humanitarian programme manager in the humanitarian and development sector.

Students are to submit to Bioforce assignment terms of reference in order to be validated. As a second step, the ESC Grenoble will give the final validation.

The ESC Grenoble is in charge of all administrative issues regarding the assignment.

The evaluation process for the assignment is the following:

- A written report including :
- a context (region, country, organisation, programme, …) presentation,
- a description and analysis of the objectives and results obtained,
- an analysis of the key challenges faced during the assignment,
- an analysis of the impact of the training period on their professional capacities as a humanitarian programme manager.

- An oral presentation before a jury.

The final mark will be a global mark including the written report and the oral presentation.

Assessment Process

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN BIOFORCE

The assessment process includes the following exams:

- An individual written exam for the “Managing people and organizations” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing programmes and projects” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing finance and funding” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN GRENOBLE ECOLE DE MANAGEMENT

It is a two-stage process:

- For each module, a continuous assessment is managed by a Grenoble Ecole de Management’s permanent professor.
- For some modules, an exam is organized.

To be successfully completed, the student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20. Each module’s responsible define the share of continuous assessment and exam.

CONDITIONS OF GRADUATION

The diploma is delivered to the students:

- Having obtained a minimum of 10 out of 20 to all exams;
- Having produced and supported the presentation of a report demonstrating analysis and synthesis skills.

Admission

To participate to the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management, the prerequisites are the following:

- Master 1 level or Bachelor’s degree (four years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying at least 1 year of professional experience as a project coordinator, administrator or logistician in international solidarity
- By special dispensation, a L3 (licence) level or Bachelor’s degree (three years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying an outstanding work experience (more than one year).
- have an English language proficiency level of B2 (according to European language levels - Self Assessment Grid).
- Have a profesional project in programme management (Programme coordinator, Logistics coordinator…)

Please note that these prerequisites provide a base for any validation of the application form. The final decision lies with the Coordinators of the training programme.”

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The master of science in accounting is designed to satisfy New York state requirements for students with an undergraduate degree in accounting to sit for the CPA exam and attain CPA licensure. Read more

Progam overview

The master of science in accounting is designed to satisfy New York state requirements for students with an undergraduate degree in accounting to sit for the CPA exam and attain CPA licensure. Students may complete the program on a full- or part-time basis, with the full-time program beginning exclusively in the fall semester.

Plan of study

The program consists of 10 courses and a comprehensive exam based on the finance courses completed by the student. The exam is administered at the end of the student’s last term. Students must pass the exam to earn their degree.

Accounting, MS degree, typical course sequence

-Accounting Profession
-Accounting Information Systems
-Advanced Accounting
-Auditing and Professional Responsibility
-Advanced Taxation
-Information Systems Auditing and Assurance Services
-Comparative Financial Statement Analysis
-Financial Accounting Theory and Research
-Electives
-Field Exam

Other admission requirements

-Submit official transcripts (in English) from all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit the results of the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or Graduate Record Exam (GRE) (GMAT preferred),
-Submit a personal statement.
-Submit a current resume.
-Complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 580 (paper-based) or 92 (Internet-based) are required. Scores from the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are accepted in place of the TOEFL exam. The minimum acceptable score is 7.0. The TOEFL or IELTS requirement is waived for native speakers of English or for those submitting transcripts from degrees earned at American institutions. For additional information on the IELTS, visit http://www.ielts.org.

http://saunders.rit.edu/programs/graduate/ms_accounting.php

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This is an intensive postgraduate conversion course designed for graduates in subjects other than law who wish to qualify to take either the Legal Practice Course (to become solicitors) or the Bar Vocational Course (to become barristers). Read more
This is an intensive postgraduate conversion course designed for graduates in subjects other than law who wish to qualify to take either the Legal Practice Course (to become solicitors) or the Bar Vocational Course (to become barristers). In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The course aims to develop an understanding of the English legal system, to provide a thorough grounding in the foundations of legal knowledge and to train you in the professional skills of legal research, analysis and presentation in a friendly and nurturing environment. You may choose your own title for your research dissertation, subject to approval, which gives you the early opportunity to specialise in an area of particular interest to you.

Assessment includes an examination in each of the seven foundation subjects (each worth 10% of the total assessment); a research essay in a legal area entirely of the student's own choice. (worth 10%); four short essays covering different areas of the foundation subjects (worth a total of 10%); and a case and statute analysis exercise (worth 10%).

There is also a test on the English legal system, which you must pass but which does not normally count towards your final assessment.

Modular structure

Following a two-week induction, the course comprises seven taught modules plus a research dissertation in a subject of your own choice. There are additional coursework essays and a case and statute analysis test.

The seven taught modules are the foundation subjects prescribed by the Joint Academic Stage Board on behalf of the Law Society and General Council of the Bar:
-Criminal Law
-Obligations A (Contract)
-Obligations B (Tort)
-Property Law A (Land Law)
-Property Law B (Equity and Trusts)
-UK Public Law and Human Rights
-Law of the European Union
-Eighth Area of legal Study (dissertation)

In the first year, part-time students for the following examinations:
-Obligations A (Contract)
-Obligations B (Tort)
-UK Public Law and Human Rights
-Law of the European Union

After the course

On graduation you will be eligible to undertake either the Legal Practice Course or the Bar Vocational Course, and from there to proceed either to a training contract with a firm of solicitors or a pupillage in a barrister's chambers.

The CPE is a well-recognised route to a legal career, and many employers in the legal field actively favour postgraduate students who have a proven expertise outside the area of law.

Success on the CPE will also enable you to apply to take an LLM if you wish to pursue an academic career or simply to expand your legal knowledge.

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See the department website - https://www.rit.edu/cast/ectet/ms-telecommunications-engineering-technology. The telecommunications industry has driven technological innovation and provided outstanding career opportunities for people with the right technical and leadership skills. Read more
See the department website - https://www.rit.edu/cast/ectet/ms-telecommunications-engineering-technology

The telecommunications industry has driven technological innovation and provided outstanding career opportunities for people with the right technical and leadership skills. New services offered through the internet, mobility offered by wireless technology, and extreme capacity offered by fiber optics, as well as the evolution of policy and regulation, are shaping the telecommunication network of the future. The MS in telecommunications engineering technology focuses on developing the advanced level of skill and knowledge needed by future leaders in the industry. The program is designed for individuals who seek advancement into managerial roles in the dynamic telecommunications environment.

Plan of study

The program requires 33 semester credit hours of study and includes eight core courses that introduce essential fundamental concepts and skills. Each student is required to complete a comprehensive exam or, with faculty approval, a capstone project or a master’s thesis. The remaining credits consist of technical electives or other approved graduate courses.

Comprehensive Exam/Project/Thesis options

All students are required to complete a comprehensive exam at the conclusion of their course work. The comprehensive exam focuses on knowledge of the core competencies, theory and foundation principles, and application of this knowledge to a variety of scenarios. Students who wish to complete a graduate project or thesis under the supervision of a faculty adviser (in place of the comprehensive exam) must have the approval of the faculty and the graduate program director.

Additional information

- Transfer credit

A limited number of credit hours may be transferred from an accredited institution to the program. Please consult the department chair for more information.

- Other approved electives

All students may take three credit hours of graduate elective course work from other graduate programs subject to the approval of the graduate program director. Students often choose to include courses from Saunders College of Business, B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences, or Kate Gleason College of Engineering. The number of elective credits depends on which completion strategy faculty have approved for the student, the student's choice of thesis, project, or comprehensive exam option.

- Research and cooperative education

Students have the opportunity to apply for research projects or a cooperative education experience. While not a requirement of the program, these opportunities increase the value of the program and the marketability of its graduates.

International Students

International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based), or 88-89 (Internet-based) are required. Applicants with a lower TOEFL score may be admitted conditionally and may be required to take a prescribed program in English and a reduced program course load. International applicants from universities outside the United States must submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

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The master of science degree in finance prepares students for managerial careers in corporate finance, investment analysis and portfolio management, financial consulting, and financial institutions. Read more

Program overview

The master of science degree in finance prepares students for managerial careers in corporate finance, investment analysis and portfolio management, financial consulting, and financial institutions. Courses prepare students to sit for the Certified Financial Analyst exam. To complete the program in one year, full-time students must begin their studies in the fall semester.

Plan of study

The program of study consists of 10 courses and a field exam. Candidates must successfully complete the comprehensive field exam.

Curriculum

Finance, MS degree, typical course sequence:
-Accounting for Decision Makers
-Financial Analysis for Managers
-Securities and Investment Analysis
-Finance in a Global Environment
-Financial Management II
-Options and Futures
-Financial Modeling and Analysis
-One 700-level Statistics Course
-One 700-level Economics Course
-One 700-level Finance Course
-Field Exam

Other admission requirements

-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit scores from the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or Graduate Record Exam (GRE) (GMAT preferred for international applicants and those applying for scholarships).
-Submit a personal statement.
-Submit a current resume.
-Complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Minimum scores of 580 (paper-based) or 92 (Internet-based) are required. Scores from the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are accepted in place of the TOEFL exam. The minimum acceptable score is 7.0. The TOEFL or IELTS requirement is waived for native speakers of English or for those submitting transcripts from degrees earned at American institutions. For additional information on the IELTS, visit http://www.ielts.org.

Completed applications for admission should be on file in the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services at least four weeks prior to registration for the next academic semester for students from the United States, and up to 10 weeks prior for international students applying for student visas. Accepted students may defer enrollment for up to one year. After one year, a new application must be submitted and will be re-evaluated based on the most current admission standards.

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Click Here (http://nursing.ua.edu/?page_id605) to view the states from which the Capstone College of Nursing currently accepts applications for admission. Read more

State Authorizations

Click Here (http://nursing.ua.edu/?page_id=605) to view the states from which the Capstone College of Nursing currently accepts applications for admission.

Visit the website http://nursing.ua.edu/?page_id=184

Transfer of Graduate Credit for MSN:

Acceptable graduate credit of up to twelve credit hours, earned in a regionally accredited institution in which the student was enrolled in that institution’s graduate school, may be transferred and applied to the requirements for a master’s degree if approved by the CCN and Graduate School.

Consideration of credit does not guarantee transfer. Evaluation of credit for transfer will not be made until after the student has enrolled in the Graduate School of The University of Alabama.

Further information can be found in the UA Graduate Student Catalog (http://graduate.ua.edu/academics/doctoral.html#credit).

Admission Requirements for MSN:

Admission requirements are consistent with those of the Graduate School. Applicants for the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) will be considered on a competitive basis.

- Nurses who are interested in the Case Management Program, NP Concentration, and CNL Program are encouraged to contact the Capstone College of Nursing (CCN) Graduate Recruitment and Retention Liaison. Currently only residents of Alabama and Mississippi are eligible for the Nurse Practitioner Concentration.

Note: Currently, only baccalaureate prepared registered nurses who are residents of Alabama and Mississippi are eligible for admission to the NP concentration. There is no post-master’s certificate option. Please check this site in the future for changes in the residency requirement.

Application Process for MSN:

Enrollment into the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) program is available for fall semester each year. Your completed application must be received by the April 1st deadline.

MSN Application Process

1. Begin your graduate application at the Graduate School’s Application Center.

2. Request transcripts following the Graduate School’s transcript instructions.

3. Submit supporting documents. Within 48 hours of submitting the initial part of your application, you will receive an e-mail with your Campus-Wide Identification (CWID) number. It is very important that you safeguard this number. Once you have received this e-mail, you will need to submit the following documents through Manage Supporting Documents.

- Statement of purpose
- Resume or curriculum vitae
- Contact information for two references – The references should be professionals who can provide insight regarding your potential for success in the doctoral program. The Graduate School will contact these references via e-mail.
- Copy of active RN license from every state in which you are licensed. Note: Licensure must be maintained throughout the program.

Additionally, we may require the following:

- Official MAT or GRE score – If your grade point average (GPA) is lower than a 3.0, based on a 4.0 sytem, either overall or in your last 60 hours, an acceptable Miller Analogies Test (MAT) or Graduate Record Exam (GRE) or must be submitted by the testing service to the Graduate School, Box 870118, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487. Test scores may not be older than 5 years of the application date. Use school code 1012 for MAT and 1830 for GRE.

- English proficiency exam score – Whether an international or a permanent resident, if your first language is not English, you must submit an official score report from one of the following proficiency examinations: Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS), or Pearson Test of English (PTE).

Upon admission, you will receive written notification of admission from the Dean of the Graduate School. You will also receive a letter from the Assistant Dean of Graduate Programs at CCN outlining requirements for entry into the MSN program.

Documents Required Prior to Registration (after admitted)

Documents below should be completed and signed where appropriate and sent to Christina Horen at or faxed to 205-348-6674. A hold will be placed on your student record until all documents have been received. You are responsible for keeping all documents current throughout enrollment including annual health requirements (see CCN Graduate Student Handbook).

- Current RN license verification
- Current CPR certification for healthcare professionals
- Program of Study
- OSHA Training for Infection Control, Bloodborne Pathogens, and Safety
- HIPAA Privacy and Security Training
- Information Literacy for the 21st Century Training
- Nursing Student Health and Physical Exam Form
- Graduate Student TB Test and Immunization Form
- Substance Abuse Policy and Drug/Alcohol Testing Policy
- Academic Dishonesty Form
- Progression Policy
- Consent to Release and Disclose Form

MSN Degree Requirements:

The MSN will be awarded to the student who has met the following requirements:

- GPA of 3.0 or higher
- Good standing at the time of graduation
- Successful completion of the required coursework

In addition for CNL only:

- Completion of CNL Self-assessment Exam and CNL Certification Exam

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The Department of Archaeology and History of Art offers a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of archaeology, the history of art and visual culture, cultural heritage management, and museum studies by employing the most recent theoretical and methodological approaches and a hands-on approach to learning. Read more
The Department of Archaeology and History of Art offers a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of archaeology, the history of art and visual culture, cultural heritage management, and museum studies by employing the most recent theoretical and methodological approaches and a hands-on approach to learning. Our faculty consists of specialists in the archaeology and history of art of the civilizations that have flourished in the area of modern Turkey. Students will learn about prehistoric Anatolian archaeology, the Greek and Roman eras, Late Antique and Byzantine studies, and the Ottoman period, and can decide to focus more specifically on one of these time periods. Cultural heritage management practices and museum operations are inseparable from the study of archaeology and the history of art, and students will also be instructed in these areas during their four-year undergraduate program. Students in our department have the opportunity to take courses in ancient languages of the Mediterranean and Anatolian worlds such as Greek, Latin, and Ottoman Turkish. Our lectures are enriched through field trips to archaeological sites and museum excursions, and participation in conferences and workshops organized by visiting lecturers and specialists from Turkey and abroad. We provide hands-on training in methods of analysis and conservation in our archaeological laboratory. Our students are also encouraged to participate in one of our archaeological excavation projects during the summer or to complete internships with museums or cultural heritage organizations.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Archaeology: Archaeology of the Neolitic, Chalcolithic, Bronze or Iron Ages.
• Hellenistic and Roman Art, architecture and archeology.
• Late Antique and Byzantine Art, architecture and archeology.
• Museum studies and cultural heritape management.

Entry Requirements

1. GPA: 2.5 minimum

2. GRE (foreign students) score with the following minimum scores.
GRE: 149 (new exam format), or 610 (older exam format), the minimum scores refer only to the quantitative section

3. English proficiency exam. Applicants need to have taken one of the following exams and have at least the minimum score listed below. Native English speakers do not need to take an English exam.
TOEFL: Paper based (550/4), IBT (80/120)
IELTS: 6.5

4. Statement of purpose: In addition to telling us about your academic background, try to be as specific as possible about which topics you would like to study and research while at Koç University.

5. Two letters of recommendation
Two recommendation letters are required for M.A. applications.

6.Writing Sample
The writing sample should be at least eight pages and could be a research paper or an article. We would prefer the writing sample to be in English, but if your previous academic training has been in another language, we can accept a sample in another language.

7. Interviews
A short list of candidates will be invited for an interview, either in person or through Skype.

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The MSc is designed to meet the demand for health economics’ quantitative, theoretical and analytical skills for decision-making in the healthcare sector, both in developed and in developing countries. Read more
The MSc is designed to meet the demand for health economics’ quantitative, theoretical and analytical skills for decision-making in the healthcare sector, both in developed and in developing countries.

Who is it for?

This course is designed for anyone with an economics background interested in developing a career as a health economist working for the public and private sectors, as well as international health organisations and NGOs.

Objectives

The aim of this course is to develop your analytical and modeling abilities and enable you to apply microeconomics and econometrics tools to understand the health care sector and the demand for health. This course will provide you with the experience and the skills you need to work as a health economists in private or public of institutions doing health economics.

Placements

Companies and organisations are invited to meet our students and propose subjects for their dissertation to be done during a placement. Organisations and students liaise directly with the approval of the academic supervisor.

Placements can be for instance with: Boehringer-I, Janssen –Cilag, Eli Lilly, Campbell Aliance, Office of Health Economics, Otsuka, Celgene, Curo, IMS Health, and many others.

Placements provide a unique opportunity to apply the skills learned during the MSc and acquire experience in the workplace.

Academic facilities

You will benefit from state of the art student-geared facilities, including a bright new gym and meeting points. Most importantly, you will benefit from City’s central London location.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by research active academic staff, teaching assistants and industry and visiting lecturers.

We also have invited speakers that come to present specialised topics in health economics.

Assessments are typically a combination of unseen written examinations (70% for each module) and coursework (30% for each module) but this can vary by module. About two thirds of our students secure a placement at a firm. The placement is used to learn about the sector while writing the dissertation.

Assessment

The teaching takes place over two terms, from September to June. Full time: 20 weeks of lectures plus dissertation/literature review and examination periods over one year. Full-time students who pass all the taught modules during the main exam sessions will finish the programme at the end of September, when they submit their literature review/dissertation. Full-time students who successfully complete the taught modules in the August re-sit exam session will submit their literature review/dissertation in December.

Part time: 20 weeks of lectures plus dissertation/literature review and examination periods spread over one year and 3 months. Part-time students complete all modules over the course of four terms, from September to June, before undertaking their literature review/dissertation. Part-time students who successfully pass all the taught modules during the main exam sessions will finish the programme in December when they submit their literature review/dissertation. Part-time students who successfully pass all the taught modules in August will submit in March of the following year.

Modules

The teaching takes place over two terms from September to June. Full-time students who pass all the taught modules during the main exam sessions finish the programme at the end of September when they submit their dissertation or literature review. Full-time students who successfully complete the taught modules in the August resit exam session submit their dissertation or literature review in December.

Note: for part-time students, the modules are taught on weekdays during the daytime, alongside the students who are studying on the full-time Master’s programme. Please contact us for further details.

We are introducing a revised programme structure for students who join from September 2016. You will take three core modules, then subsequent modules are tailored to your chosen pathway.

Core modules for all students
-Economic Evaluation (15 credits)
-Advanced Economic Evaluation (15 credits)
-Health Economics (15 credits)

Core modules for the dissertation path
-Microeconomic Theory (30 credits)
-Econometrics (30 credits)
-Economics Research Project (60 credits)

Core modules for the literature survey path
-Microeconomic Analysis (30 credits)
-Quantitative Methods Health (30 credits)
-Economics Literature Survey (30 credits)

Elective Modules - on the Dissertation route you will take one elective, on the literature survey route you will take three.
-Health Economics
-Economic Evaluation Workshops (15 credits)
-Welfare Economics (15 credits)
-Epidemiology (15 credits)
-Development Economics (15 credits)
-Economics of Regulation and Competition (15 credits)
-The Economics of Micro-Finance (15 credits)
-Experimental Economics and Game Theory (15 credits)
-History of Economic Thought (15 credits)

Career prospects

This MSc prepares you for career opportunities in economic consultancies, think-tanks, the pharmaceutical industry, professional associations, governmental bodies and non-governmental organisations.

It also prepares you for a PhD in health economics, or teaching and research positions in academic institutions.

Examples: Abacus International, NICE, Optum, IMS Health, Research International, NHS, Kovis, Eli-Lilly, OHE, United Nations, Fidelity, Oxford Outcomes, Gallaher, Johnson&Johnson, Novo Nordisk, Synovate, Tomtah, as well as PhDs at UCL, York, City University London and Warwick.

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The Accounting & Finance MA programme offers you the opportunity to gain the essential knowledge and skills in the area of Accounting, Finance and Financial Management through a structured and focused programme of academic studies. Read more
The Accounting & Finance MA programme offers you the opportunity to gain the essential knowledge and skills in the area of Accounting, Finance and Financial Management through a structured and focused programme of academic studies.

The Accounting & Finance MA Programme also enables you to develop a professional accountancy career and study CIMA through the Master’s Gateway route.

The Master’s Gateway route involves sitting CIMA’s Gateway exam/ Management Case Study Exam. (The content of the MA in Accounting and Finance programme prepares you to sit this examination during the course). Once you have passed this three hour exam, you’ll be granted 12 exam exemptions from the certificate, operational and management levels and you’ll also gain the intermediary award ‘CIMA Advanced Diploma in Management Accounting’.

You can then start studying the strategic level of CIMA’s Professional Qualification and work towards completing it to gain the full Chartered Global Management Accountant (CGMA) designation.

PROGRAMME AT A GLANCE

The Accounting & Finance MA Programme enables you to develop a professional accountancy career and join CIMA through the accelerated ‘gateway’ route.

The Accounting & Finance MA programme prepares and enables you to sit the external CIMA ‘Gateway Examination’. Passing the one three hour examination allows you to claim 11 exemptions from CIMA’s certificate, operational and management level papers, and you will be awarded the CIMA ‘Advanced Diploma in Management Accounting’.

You then only need to sit and pass 3 strategic level examinations, the case study, and fulfil the work based practical experience, before being eligible for full CIMA membership.

Many of our Accounting and Finance staff have extensive industry experience through working in the private and public sectors and third sector organisations. Our academics have also gained advanced qualifications at some of the leading academic institutions in the world and are committed to delivering academic learning of the highest quality, helping you to stretch your mind and fulfil your university ambitions.

INDUSTRY LINKS

This is a Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA) Gateway Exam focused programme to enable students to gain CIMA Advanced Diploma in Management Accounting whilst studying for the MA in Accounting and Finance.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Assessment by means of examinations, coursework and practical assignments.

FURTHER INFORMATION

The Accounting & Finance MA programme offers you the opportunity to gain the essential knowledge and skills in the area of Accounting, Finance and Financial Management through a structured and focused programme of academic studies. The MA in Accounting & Finance is linked to and approved by the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA).

We seek to enable our graduates to gain a competitive edge in pursuing managerial, management consultancy and professional careers in accounting and finance and to make an outstanding contribution to the performance of their employing organisations.

The Programme builds on our reputation for providing employer-relevant postgraduate education in business and management and finance and addresses the development of those key skills that are sought by employers throughout the world.

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