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This postgraduate course is designed for students who wish to develop their knowledge and understanding of history across a range of periods, regions and theoretical perspectives. Read more
This postgraduate course is designed for students who wish to develop their knowledge and understanding of history across a range of periods, regions and theoretical perspectives.

The MA in History provides students with opportunities to study the subject at an advanced level. It allows students to undertake detailed study of a range of periods and processes – from Britain’s experience of warfare to the material culture of the English country house. By studying particular topics in depth, students are encouraged to think not only about the diversity of the past, but also how history itself is constructed.

Students will develop the skills necessary to understand, critique, utilise and communicate concepts and theories used within the discipline of History. They will acquire methodological skills for historical research, particularly the selection, evaluation and interpretation of primary sources.

The course comprises 120 credits of taught modules and a 60 credit dissertation. Students must take the History Research Methods module and complete a dissertation. The remainder of the programme is made up from a selection of specialist modules (normally three 30 credit modules) which reflect staff research expertise.

Course content

The MA is taught on a full time and part time basis, with the opportunity to complete in one and two years respectively. The year is split into three trimesters.

Full time students take 60 credits in each of the first two trimesters, running from September to January and February to May. They then complete their dissertation over the spring and summer trimesters, from February to September.

Part time students take 60 credits of modules in their first year (normally two 30 credit modules in each of the first two trimesters) and 60 credits of modules in their second years, plus the 60 credit dissertation.

Modules are normally fourteen weeks in duration – alternating fortnightly between evening classes on campus (typically 6pm to 9pm on a weekday) and online learning activities. Students are also encouraged to attend the History Research Seminar, which runs monthly in the evening. All students must take History Research Methods before proceeding to their dissertation.

Course modules (16/17)

-History Research Methods
-British Colonialism and Islamic Politics, c. 1800-1970
-Men at Arms: Masculinity and War in Britain, 1756-1918
-Consumption and the Country House, 1660-1830
-Exploring English Society, 1500-1750
-Medicine and Healing Through the Ages
-Violence and the Law in English Society
-Britain and the First World War
-From Privilege to Pressure: English Landed Society, 1850-1950
-Breeding Supermen: Eugenics in Britain, America and Germany
-Narrating the Nation: Rethinking Modern British History
-Dissertation
-Fascism and Anti-Fascism in Britain from 1945 to the Present Day

Methods of Learning

At Master’s level study, we aim to encourage student-led debates and exchange of ideas. Modules will typically alternate fortnightly between classes on campus and online learning activities. Each module incorporates a variety of teaching methods in class, including workshops, student presentations and discussions of primary and secondary materials (such as film, images, documentary sources and online resources). Online learning activities include online seminars, discussion boards, podcasts and blogs.

Full-time students get six hours of timetabled contact per week, part-time students will have three hours. This does not include individual tutorials or dissertation supervision.

Independent study and assessment time equate to approximately 18 hours per week full time or nine hours part time.

Schedule

One year full time or two years part time.

Assessments

Assessment is by coursework only, consisting of assessments such as essays, student presentations, book reviews and seminar portfolios.

For the award of Master’s, students must accumulate a total of 180 credits, including a 15,000 word dissertation, undertaken under the supervision of an appropriate member of the course team. A Postgraduate Certificate is awarded for 60 credits and a Postgraduate Diploma for 120 credits.

Facilities and Special Features

-Teaching takes place in evening classes, blended with online learning activities, providing a convenient programme for postgraduate learners.
-Students study a range of specialist topics in-depth with staff who are engaged in research and publication.
-Much of the teaching is centred on the use and interpretation of primary sources, giving students the opportunity to engage in active learning.

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The Haskayne MBA program aims to transform Canada’s business landscape by enabling our students to make significant contributions as individuals, and as leaders. Read more
The Haskayne MBA program aims to transform Canada’s business landscape by enabling our students to make significant contributions as individuals, and as leaders.

For mid-career professionals, the Evening MBA program is designed to enhance your business acumen, critical thinking skills and leadership capacity to achieve your professional goals.

Accelerated Options

Students who have completed an undergraduate business degree in Canada may be eligible for up to 9 course waivers (post curriculum review). A minimum of 15 courses are required to complete the program; any student with more than 5 core course waivers would substitute additional electives for the remaining courses. In addition to completing the program in less time, this option also saves you money as tuition is charged on a per course basis.

Students may also choose to accelerate their program by opting to complete additional courses during the Spring and Summer semesters.

Advance Your Career

Many MBA students are seeking to accelerate their career or achieve a career transition in terms of function, industry or location. Our dedicated career team supports students through the career development cycle from developing awareness of strengths, development needs and preferences through to identifying and securing their next career transition. Services offered include:

Career Services
-Résumé and cover letter review
-Personal branding support
-Informational, behavioural and case interview preparation
-Job search support

Networking Opportunities
-Informational interview connections with alumni and other members of business community
-Management consulting panel
-Finance industry panel
-MBA specialization event

Our graduates achieve significant success in both the short term and long term. Illustrative career statistics for recent graduates include:
-More than 7 out of 10 of Haskayne MBA graduates are employed within 3 months of graduation
-The most popular industries for our graduates are energy, finance and consulting
-Graduates have an average starting salary of $91k, an increase of nearly 20% of their pre-MBA salary

Diverse Cohort

The students in the Haskayne Evening MBA program bring a diverse mix of industry, functional and educational backgrounds.

By studying the core curriculum as a cohort, the Evening MBA students form strong relationships with their classmates. They have the opportunity to expand their network with other MBA students through shared elective classes with other Evening students and the Daytime MBA and through experiential opportunities such as the Leadership Development Program.

Evening MBA Class Profile
-3.3 average GPA
-610 average GMAT
-6 years’ average work experience
-30% female and 70% male

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These programmes are designed to address contemporary issues in inclusion/special education. If you are a teacher involved in inclusive education/special education, this programme is designed to promote your understanding of the issues and practices relevant to this area. Read more
These programmes are designed to address contemporary issues in inclusion/special education. If you are a teacher involved in inclusive education/special education, this programme is designed to promote your understanding of the issues and practices relevant to this area.

Why this programme

-Our research-informed courses will help you to think about practice and policy in the light of current educational thinking and enable you to consider how an inclusive education system might operate in schools and other educational institutions.
-You will discuss recent theories related to many of the conditions and labels associated with special educational needs/additional support needs and have the opportunity to develop practice that takes account of these within an inclusive framework.
-You can tailor research projects to provide the maximum relevance and benefit to your interests and work.

Programme structure

Day and evening classes take place on the main campus of the University. The Distance Education programme includes structured materials and a face to face session on campus (usually a Saturday).

On the PgCert you will take three courses including two core courses and one optional course. Students who continue onto the PgDip builds will take one additional optional course and a practitioner enquiry based research course.

Core courses
-The evolving concept of inclusion
-The learner and the curriculum

Optional courses
-Developing literacy
-Highly able learners
-Inclusive classrooms, inclusive pedagogies
-Identities, relationships and behaviours

Career prospects

The programme will support your career development as a class teacher, lecturer, policy developer, special education professional, head teacher, education administrator or researcher.

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The thematic components and cross-regional perspectives typically suit students with the following interests and/or aspirations. - Experienced practitioners of yoga and meditation who wish to gain a deeper understanding of the historical and cultural contexts that shaped their traditions. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The thematic components and cross-regional perspectives typically suit students with the following interests and/or aspirations:

- Experienced practitioners of yoga and meditation who wish to gain a deeper understanding of the historical and cultural contexts that shaped their traditions.

- Students with a background in psychology seeking to gain knowledge of meditation and mindfulness for their clinical work.

- Students planning to pursue further research which may involve, at a subsequent stage, the acquisition of a doctoral degree and a career in higher education.

- Students seeking to pursue a career or professional activity for which advanced knowledge of the yoga and meditation traditions of Asia is required.

- Students who wish to pursue the academic study of these traditions as a complement to their personal experience.

This MA offers an in-depth introduction to the yogic and meditational techniques and doctrines of India, Tibet, China and Japan within the historical and cultural context of their formation. Furthermore, it explores the nature of spiritual experience that arises from yoga and meditation through a cross-cultural, inter-regional perspective.

Classes are held three evenings per week with Full-time and Part-time Study Available.

The thematic, but inter-regional, focus of this MA programme promotes the academic study of the different traditions through the deployment of a wide range of regional perspectives. Its core unit explores the methodological foundations at the heart of yoga/meditation practice. The specialist components integrated within this MA are organised to serve as platform for further (MPhil/PhD) graduate research; the more general components of the programme provides those students who do not intend to pursue doctoral research with an advanced introduction to the physiological dynamics, doctrinal foundations, history, regional context and theoretical presuppositions that shaped the traditions of yoga and meditation. The programme thus offers students (a) advanced knowledge of the background to, and understanding of, yoga and meditation, from their origin in ancient India to their apex in mediaeval Japan; (b) advanced skills in research and writing on topics that pertain to yoga/meditation, drawing on both primary sources (in translation) and secondary sources; (c) advanced skills in presentation and communication of their knowledge of the topics covered in the lectures.

This MA is taught through evening classes, typically running between 18.00h and 20.00h on weekdays, at the SOAS Russell Square Campus in Central London.

The reading materials connected to all four courses of this MA programme are largely disseminated through online resources. Essay submission takes place either in hard copy or electronically.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/programmes/ma-traditions-of-yoga-and-meditation/

Teaching & Learning

Students are required to follow taught units to the equivalent of three full courses and to submit a dissertation of 10,000 words. All courses in this MA are assessed through a combination of short and long essays. An overall percentage mark is awarded for each course, based on the marks awarded for individual assessment items within the course. The MA may be awarded at Distinction, Merit or Pass level in accordance with the common regulations for MA/MSc at SOAS.

The MA ‘Traditions of Yoga and Meditation’ is designed both as an end qualification in itself and as a platform preparing students for more advanced graduate work.

Programme Learning Outcomes:

Knowledge:

- Students will learn how to assess data and evidence critically, locate and synthesise source materials, critically evaluate conflicting interpretations and sources, use research resources (library catalogues, journal databases, citation indices) and other traditional sources.

- Subject specific skills, for instance, text analysis, comparative investigations, interpretation of art-historical evidence, familiarity with the study of the traditions of yoga and meditation as a field of critical enquiry in its various regional and historical contexts.

- Aspects of literature in the study of yoga and meditation with its manifestations in philosophy, religion, iconography and history, as well as the impact of these traditions on religious societies.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- Students should become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence, and to understand through practice what documents can and cannot tell us.

- Students will develop the capacity to discuss theoretical and epistemological issues in an articulate, informed, and intellectual manner.

- Students will learn to become precise and critical in their assessment of scholarly arguments and to question interpretations, however authoritative, in order to reassess evidence for themselves.

- Students will learn to present complex theoretical arguments clearly and creatively.

- Students will acquire both theoretical and regional expertise in order to develop and apply self-reflexive approaches to the issues raised by the cross-cultural study of yoga and meditation traditions.

Subject-based practical skills:
The programme aims to help students with the following practical skills:

- Academic writing
- IT-based information retrieval and processing
- Presentational skills
- Independent study skills and research techniques
- Reflexive learning

Transferable skills:
The programme will encourage students to:

- Write concisely and with clarity.
- Effectively structure and communicate ideas (oral and written).
- Explore and assess a variety of sources for research purposes.
- Work to deadlines and high academic standards.
- Assess the validity and cogency of arguments.
- Make judgements involving complex factors.
- Develop self-reflexivity.
- Develop an awareness of the ethical complexity of representational practices.
- Question the nature of social and cultural constructs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Among all universities in Europe and North America SOAS host the biggest concentration of research and teaching staff working on Iranian history, politics, economics, religions, art and archeology, linguistics, Persian language and literature, media, film, anthropology and music. Read more
Among all universities in Europe and North America SOAS host the biggest concentration of research and teaching staff working on Iranian history, politics, economics, religions, art and archeology, linguistics, Persian language and literature, media, film, anthropology and music. SOAS has the resources to offer a comprehensive, critical perspective on a variety of aspects of Iranian society and culture and go beyond the contemporary public debates around this country.

The MA in Iranian Studies enables students to critically assess the historical development of Iranian society, economics and culture within the context of the wider west Asian area and to appreciate the complexity of the history and cultural make up of Iran.

The flexible study programme and interdisciplinary curriculum will enrich students knowledge about the religious and politico-cultural influences affecting contemporary Iran and the region it is embedded in. Students will develop a critical understanding of the literature and/or of Iran and the diaspora and gain an understanding of Iran in the context of the Middle East with respect to gender, politics, Islam, music, and migration (minor course options). Persian language and literature will also be studied.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/ma-in-iranian-studies/

Programme Specification

MA in Iranian Studies- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 29kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/ma-in-iranian-studies/file80796.pdf

Employment

As a postgraduate student specialising in Iranian Studies, you will gain competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature and culture (which can include literature, film, music, art and religion) of various parts of the Middle East.

Graduates leave SOAS not only with linguistic and cultural expertise, but also with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers in both business and the public sector. These include written and oral communication skills, attention to detail, analytical and problem-solving skills, and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;

- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;

- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA Postcolonial Studies Programme offers a focus on the historical relationships of power, domination and practices of imperialism and colonialism in the modern period (late nineteenth-century to the present) through the study of literature and culture. Read more
The MA Postcolonial Studies Programme offers a focus on the historical relationships of power, domination and practices of imperialism and colonialism in the modern period (late nineteenth-century to the present) through the study of literature and culture.

The core module will introduce a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches to the literature, film and media of these areas. A range of literary, filmic and theoretical texts from Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and the Near and Middle East will normally be included in the reading list. These will address representations of colonialism and decolonisation, neo-colonialism, nationalism in postcolonial societies and diasporic experiences, allowing us to explore the heterogeneous meanings, intersections and strategies of analysis that have emerged with reference to postcolonial studies.

Attention will be paid to colonial and postcolonial constructs such as: the Oriental, the Global, the Cosmopolitan, the Third World and the multicultural. The core module of the programme introduces and analyses interdisciplinary theories and ideological practices around a set of historical and current issues from various regions of Asia and Africa. The range of minors offers students more opportunities to explore interdisciplinarity and regional specificities.

Why this programme is special at SOAS

Postcolonial MA Programmes offered in London and other UK institutions are located within the field of English Studies or the Social Sciences. The Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) is uniquely positioned to offer an inter-disciplinary Postcolonial Studies MA programme which gives students an opportunity to understand and negotiate the field of postcolonial studies with recourse to interdisciplinarity and to theoretical explications from the regions of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. SOAS offers a unique range of regional expertise available amongst the CCLPS’s faculty membership. The Programme also offers a timely intervention at a time when there is a national and international crisis in the understanding of multiculturalism, race relations and religious and national affiliations.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/degrees/mapostcolstud/

Programme Specification

MA Postcolonial Studies Programme Specifications 2012-13 (pdf; 39kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/degrees/mapostcolstud/file68679.pdf

Employment

MA Post Colonial Studies graduates gain competency in intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the subject wiill be developed through the study of literature, film and media of these areas. Graduates leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers, both in business and in the public sector. These include:written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem-solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Do you want to enhance your understanding of the cultural, political and economic history of Pakistan? The MA in the Study of Contemporary Pakistan provides a comprehensive and critical approach to Pakistan. Read more
Do you want to enhance your understanding of the cultural, political and economic history of Pakistan? The MA in the Study of Contemporary Pakistan provides a comprehensive and critical approach to Pakistan: its complex and vibrant culture, politics, economics, law, religious history and current trends. SOAS hosts one of the biggest concentration of research and teaching staff who specialise on Pakistan related topics. You will have an opportunity to interact and work closely with them. The Programme of Study will introduce you to the latest research topics, methods and debates in the field. It will prepare you to critically assess the diverse complexities of one of the most reported on countries in the world.

Optional language training is available for those who aspire to a research degree.

The degree is enhanced by the activities of a Research Centre dedicated to the Study of Pakistan. The Centre is part of the wider South Asian research cluster at SOAS.

- Centre for the Study of Pakistan:
Students are encouraged to join in the activities of the vibrant centre (http://www.soas.ac.uk/csp/), which runs fortnightly seminars and workshops, and an Annual Lecture.

- MUSA:
The Centre for Pakistan supports MUSA, recently launched, a postgraduate research forum for the study of Muslim South Asia.

- Internships:
Several summer internships are currently available to run alongside the MA degree. Please contact the convenors or the SOAS careers office for details.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/southasia/programmes/ma-in-the-study-of-contemporary-pakistan/

Structure

The programme will consist of three course units (1 core + 2 options) and a dissertation.

The core course (Imagining Pakistan) will introduce the main topics, approaches and possible lines of enquiry for a cultural history of Pakistan from 1947 to the present.

Students will choose two courses from a list of options that includes courses on modern Muslim thinkers and Contemporary Islamism in South Asia, Law and Society in South Asia, Urdu language, and Urdu literature in Pakistan.

Students will also write a 10,000 dissertation on the Study of Contemporary Pakistan, applying and developing the knowledge acquired in the core courses to an independent topic of research.

MA in the Study of Contemporary Pakistan - Programme Specifications 2013/14 (msword; 88kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/southasia/programmes/ma-in-the-study-of-contemporary-pakistan/file85899.doc

Employment

The MA prepares students for a wide range of career destinations. Graduates will benefit from interdisciplinary cultural and linguistic training that is widely sought after in the business and public sector. It is suited for those seeking employment as management consultants, policy advisers in Government and the Civil Service, Think Tanks, Charities, NGOs, as well as journalism and media related openings, more broadly in the culture industry, or for those who aspire to a Research degree.

- Standard Chartered - International Bank
- Bestway – Food Wholesaler
- Gallager Heath - Insurance Broker
- Citizen’s Foundation – Education Support in Pakistan Charity

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;

- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;

- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Why you should choose this course. -You would like to attend workshops by our leading novelists and poets. -You want to engage with and learn from practising writers, editors and agents. Read more
Why you should choose this course:
-You would like to attend workshops by our leading novelists and poets
-You want to engage with and learn from practising writers, editors and agents
-You are interested in internships with arts institutions in the surrounding region

The MA in Creative Writing offers aspiring fiction writers and poets a one-year apprenticeship (or two years part-time) during which time they will study literary technique through reading and discussing the work of other contemporary writers in seminars, and will have the opportunity to develop their own work via regular workshops and individual tutorials.

Writers may choose to work on writing a novel and/or short stories and/or poems.

All students will have the opportunity to attend weekly workshops and masterclasses taught by Professor Jeanette Winterson.

Please note that both the full and part-time options are taught between 9am to 5pm. We do not offer evening classes.

Coursework and assessment

Students take 60 credits worth of courses in semester one and 60 credits worth of courses in semester two. To complete the MA, students are required to take 180 credits in total;
-All poetry and fiction writing workshops meet for two hours per week, and are worth 30 credits. Students will also be offered three individual half-hour tutorials per semester in order to discuss the progress of their writing. Each workshop is assessed by a portfolio of poetry or fiction.
-Seminars also meet for two hours per week and are also worth 30 credits. They will usually be assessed by one 6,000 word essay or the equivalent.
-Over the summer students complete a 15,000 word 'dissertation' which consists of a group of poems, a selection or short stories, or an extract from a novel. This is worth 60 credits.

Course unit details

In semester one, students may choose to take two workshops - one in fiction writing and one in poetry -- or they may take one workshop and one seminar - typical seminars will be 'The Art of Short Fiction' and 'Poetics'.

In semester two students wishing to focus on poetry writing will take a poetry workshop and a seminar on Contemporary Poetry; students wishing to focus on fiction writing will take a fiction writing workshop and a seminar in Contemporary Fiction.

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The Masters programme in Applied Linguistics. Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) at York St John University gives you the opportunity to reflect on the similarities between your experience of learning and/or teaching English and the work of other applied linguists, including. Read more
The Masters programme in Applied Linguistics: Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) at York St John University gives you the opportunity to reflect on the similarities between your experience of learning and/or teaching English and the work of other applied linguists, including: translators and interpreters, speech and language therapists, dictionary writers, literacy teachers, language planners and forensic linguists.

Course detail

The programme is designed for both qualified and intending teachers of English to speakers of other languages. It attracts students from different parts of the world, who bring with them a diverse mix of educational backgrounds and experiences. This gives us a chance to increase our cross-cultural understanding and knowledge of teaching and learning contexts globally. Furthermore, using online forums, we aim to provide practical opportunities for you to interact with language professionals around the world.

We critically reflect on theories of, and research into, the problem of how best to learn and teach an additional language. We aim to help you improve your own research skills and encourage you to present and publish your findings to the English language teaching and applied linguistics community.

You will be taught by an experienced team of staff, including the authors of a ground-breaking new introduction to applied linguistics aimed at advanced students of the discipline (Hall, Smith & Wicaksono, 2011).

Our students tell us that the York St John University MA Applied Linguistics: TESOL is a challenging and useful experience. I look forward to welcoming you onto our programme in the near future.

Format

The programme is designed to be studied either full-time over 12 months or part-time (through evening classes or day release) over a maximum of 5 years. If you are unable to complete the Masters degree, you may work for the intermediate award of Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma in TESOL. The programme offers a September or January start.

Modules

• Themes in Applied Linguistics
• Second Language Acquisition
• Language Teaching Methodology
• Research in Applied Linguistics
• Dissertation

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please see the following link:
https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

Other sources of funding

Information on alternative sources of funding can be found here:
https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/student-services/money/funding-my-course/postgraduate-/postgraduate-funding-/

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The SOAS MA in Ancient Near Eastern Languages offers an intensive programme of text-reading and language-learning for those who already have a good knowledge of the Akkadian language - usually at least two years' experience. Read more
The SOAS MA in Ancient Near Eastern Languages offers an intensive programme of text-reading and language-learning for those who already have a good knowledge of the Akkadian language - usually at least two years' experience. The degree is intended to widen the student's experience in the vast legacy of written documentation in Akkadian and other languages from ancient Mesopotamia and Anatolia. The programme is tailor-made to serve as an intermediate level between SOAS's three-year BA in Ancient Near Eastern Studies (or an equivalent qualification) and postgraduate Assyriological research at the level of MPhil and PhD. It can, of course, be taken for its own sake.
Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maanel/

Structure

The degree comprises three taught courses chosen from the MA list and a dissertation on an agreed subject. The courses that are avaliable at SOAS in Akkadian, Sumerian and Hittite are in the list below.

Instead of one of these SOAS courses candidates may, if qualified, take one of the following topics from MA programmes run by University College London:

- Hebrew and other North-West Semitic languages (MA in Hebrew and Jewish Studies)
- Ancient history, currently Change and Continuity in the Ancient Near East (MA in Ancient History, 91AHG003)
- Archaeology (MA in Archaeology of the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East)

Not all the courses listed are available every year. Entry to courses run by University College is subject to the approval of the academic department in question (the Department of Hebrew and Jewish Studies, the Department of History, and the Institute of Archaeology).

Courses avaliable at SOAS
- Mesopotamian Languages and Literature A: the third millennium - 15PNMC021 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
- Mesopotamian Languages and Literature B: the second millenium BC - 15PNMC022 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
- Mesopotamian Languages and Literature C: the first millenium bc - 15PNMC023 (1 Unit) - Full Year
- Sumerian Language - 15PNMC024 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
- Christians and Muslims in Syriac Texts - 15PSRC175 (1 Unit) - Full Year
- Hittite Language - 15PNMC025 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017

MA Ancient Near Eastern Languages- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 24kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maanel/file80794.pdf

Teaching & Learning

- Course Information
Courses are listed under the menu item Programme Structure on the left-hand side of this page. Each course is taught two or three hours weekly in small classes of usually one to five students. Courses in language and literature comprise the reading, translation and discussion of set texts. Thorough preparation is essential.

- Dissertation
The dissertation will be on a topic agreed with the student's teachers and will extend to about 10,000 words. It may take the form of an extended essay on an approved topic or an edition with introduction and commentary of a previously unedited text or group of texts. The deadline for submission is 15 September in the year of examination.

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA offers the students the opportunity to concentrate on the Qur'an, the Hadith and other Islamic texts, and so provides a unique training in the translation of Islamic religious material. Read more
The MA offers the students the opportunity to concentrate on the Qur'an, the Hadith and other Islamic texts, and so provides a unique training in the translation of Islamic religious material. The degree is designed to benefit academics, teachers of Islam in other institutions, translators of Islamic material into English in research centres, government departments and da'wa centres. It provides excellent research training and is a useful qualification for those who wish to progress to higher postgraduate degrees.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maislstud/

Structure

Students take three taught units (one major, two minor) and write a 10,000 word dissertation.

Two courses, including the major, must be taken from Group A. The third unit can be from Group A or B. Normally no more than two translation items may be taken.

English language requirements - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/international/englishrequirements/

MA Islamic Studies- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 28kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maislstud/file80798.pdf

Employment

As a postgraduate student specialising in Islamic Studies, you will gain competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature and culture (which can include literature, film, music, art and religion) of various parts of the Middle East.

Graduates leave SOAS not only with linguistic and cultural expertise, but also with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers in both business and the public sector. These include written and oral communication skills, attention to detail, analytical and problem-solving skills, and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;

- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;

- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA Israeli Studies is an interdisciplinary degree which explores the history, culture, politics, language and music of Israel. Read more
The MA Israeli Studies is an interdisciplinary degree which explores the history, culture, politics, language and music of Israel. The programme is based on a modular system, so the subjects covered can be as diverse as the political thought of Vladimir Jabotinsky, Christian Zionism, the poetry of Yehuda Amichai, the rise of Palestinian nationalism, the struggle of Soviet Jews for emigration, the writings of Mendele Moykher-Sforim, the music of the hasidim, Palestinian Islamism, the teachings of the Rambam and the Ramban.

Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maisrstud/

Structure

The programme consists of:

- Three taught courses - one major subject and two minor - which start in October and finish in April
- Two essays - to be completed by the end of the winter and spring terms respectively
- A three-hour examination in May or June
- A dissertation in the major subject to be completed by the following September

Course Options

Two Israeli Studies courses (one major and one minor) from:

Zionist Ideology
Israel, the Arab World and the Palestinians
Modern Israel through its Culture
A Historical Approach to Israeli Literature

AND either one further minor from the above lists or one from the following:

Religion, Nationhood and Ethnicity in Judaism, term 2, 0.5 unit (not available 2010-11)
The Holocaust in Theology, Literature and Art, term 2, 0.5 unit
Family, Work, and Leisure in Ancient Judaism, term 1, 0.5 unit
Judaism and Gender, term 2, 0.5 unit (not available 2010-11)
Elementary Hebrew
Intermediate Hebrew
Intensive Modern Hebrew
Advanced Hebrew
Arabic language courses (Masters)
(Language courses are offered at different levels of competence)
African and Asian Diasporas in the Contemporary World
Social and Political Dimensions of Modern Arabic Literature
End of Empire in the Middle East and the Balkans
Modern Palestinian Literature (PG)

MA Israeli Studies- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 30kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maisrstud/file80799.pdf

Employment

As a student specialising in Israeli Studies, you will gain competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature and culture (which can include literature, film, music, art and religion) of various parts of the Middle East.

Graduates leave SOAS not only with linguistic and cultural expertise, but also with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers in both business and the public sector. These include written and oral communication skills, attention to detail, analytical and problem-solving skills, and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;

- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;

- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This degree is designed either to prepare the student for advanced graduate work in a wide range of subjects related to Korea or as an end/qualification in itself. Read more
This degree is designed either to prepare the student for advanced graduate work in a wide range of subjects related to Korea or as an end/qualification in itself.

The programme explores the history, politics, art, music and literature of Korea, as well as providing opportunities to study the languages of the region.

The MA in Korean Studies consists of four components. Students choose one major course and two minor courses from the lists on the Course Detail page.

Students who plan to go on to further research can take a higher-level Korean language course as a minor.

Students take three taught courses and must also complete a 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/makorstud/

Programme Specification

MA Korean Studies - Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 27kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/makorstud/file80729.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Students are exposed to a wide range of topics through participation in the seminars, general lectures and specialised workshops.

- Lectures and Seminars

In most courses there is one 2-hour class each week. This may be an informal lecture followed by a discussion or student presentation.

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

- Dissertation

The 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic linked with one of the taught courses.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Employment

As a student specialising in Korean, you will gain competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature and culture (which can include literature, film, music, art and religion) of various parts of Korea.

Graduates leave SOAS not only with linguistic and cultural expertise, but also with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers in both business and the public sector. These include written and oral communication skills, attention to detail, analytical and problem-solving skills, and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Today, there are around 6-7,000 languages spoken in the world and it is widely agreed that at least half of those are under threat of extinction within 50 to 100 years. Read more
Today, there are around 6-7,000 languages spoken in the world and it is widely agreed that at least half of those are under threat of extinction within 50 to 100 years. Language documentation is a new sub-discipline within linguistics that has emerged as a response to the growing crisis of language endangerment. It emphasises data collection methodologies, in two ways: first, in encouraging researchers to collect and record a wide range of linguistic phenomena in genuine communicative situations; and secondly, in its use of high quality sound and video recording to make sure that the results are the best possible record of the language.

The MA programme in Language Documentation and Description is intended for students who wish to specialise in the documentation and description of languages, with a focus on minority and endangered languages. This specialist MA is characterised by an integrated core of subject offerings that are oriented around issues in language documentation and description, plus a series of options in linguistics, applied linguistics, and language studies.

The programme is formulated with two main pathways:

MA Language Documentation and Description [Language Support and Revitalisation] provides an introductory overview of the study of language as well as courses geared at enabling students to support endangered and minority language communities in a number of ways. This pathway is open to students with or without a background in linguistics.

MA Language Documentation and Description [Field Linguistics] provides students with a sound knowledge of state-of-the-art methods and technology for language documentation and description with an emphasis on endangered and minority languages. This pathway is open to students who already hold an undergraduate major in linguistics/applied linguistics, or an MA in linguistics.

This course is part of the Endangered Languages Academic Programme (ELAP), which specifically aims to advance the documentation and description of endangered languages. ELAP also runs seminars, workshops, and intensive courses on the documentation of endangered languages. The programme is funded by the Lisbet Rausing Charitable Fund, and forms part of the Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (http://www.hrelp.org/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/malangdocdesc/

Structure

The MA Language Documentation and Description (LDD) consists of three components: core courses, option courses and dissertation research. This degree programme is formulated with two different pathways; one specialising in Language Support and Revitalisation and the other specialising in Field Linguistics.

Regardless of the pathway they chose, all students take the equivalent of 2 full units as core courses, and the equivalent of 1 full unit as option courses and submit a Masters dissertation at the end of the year. The MA may be taken part-time, over two or three years, and there is a possibility for transferring between the two pathways for part-time students.

- MA Language Documentation and Description [Language Support and Revitalisation]

This pathway is open for full-time study to students with or without a BA in linguistics and provides an introductory overview of the study of language as well as courses geared at enabling students to support endangered and minority language communities in a number of ways. For part-time options and details please see the MA Handbook.

- MA Language Documentation and Description [Field Linguistics]

This pathway is open to students with a BA in Linguistics and equivalent and provides students with a sound knowledge of state-of-the-art methods and technology for language documentation and description with an emphasis on endangered and minority languages. For part-time options and details please see the MA handbook.

- Optional Courses

Any course/s to the value of 1 unit from the list of running Linguistics PG courses.

Programme Specification

MA Language Documentation and Description - Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 29kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/malangdocdesc/file80773.pdf

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Department of Linguistics

The department is a centre for linguistic study in an unparalleled range of languages, many of which we are documenting for the first time. They include languages of Africa, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, Central Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and Siberia. The department has close academic ties to the rest of our faculty, the Departments of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, as well as the Language Centre.

The research interests of members of staff cover a wide range of theoretical and applied aspects of linguistics, including syntax, phonology, semantics, information structure, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, linguistic typology, language documentation and description, language contact and multilingualism, language support and revitalisation, language archiving, lexicography, language pedagogy, translation studies, and the studies of individual languages and language families.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This degree provides a coherent combination of courses in South Asian languages and their associated literatures and cultures; it leads to an advanced level of understanding of one aspect of South Asian civilization, together with a broader appreciation of the linguistic and literary culture of the subcontinent. Read more
This degree provides a coherent combination of courses in South Asian languages and their associated literatures and cultures; it leads to an advanced level of understanding of one aspect of South Asian civilization, together with a broader appreciation of the linguistic and literary culture of the subcontinent. The ‘Directed Readings’ courses, available in several modern languages, have a flexible curriculum which allows them to accommodate the interests of individual students or groups of students. The MA will provide, inter alia, an appropriate training for students wishing to proceed to postgraduate research in South Asian studies; its focus on South Asian language, culture and literature distinguishes it from the interdisciplinary perspective of the MA in South Asian Area Studies on the one hand and the MA in Comparative Literature on the other.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/southasia/programmes/malangcultsa/

Structure

Students take three taught courses, one of which is considered a major, and complete a 10,000 word dissertation related to the major.

Candidates who wish to take a language at other than introductory level will be assessed at the start of the term to determine the most appropriate level of study.

Part-time students (two years) will take two courses in the first year (normally their Minors) and the Major and dissertation in the second year; part-time students (three years) take one course per year, and their dissertation in the third year.

- Choosing the Courses
Applicants are asked to specify their preferred major subject and to give an alternative, as not all courses are available every year and practical considerations such as timetabling may limit choices.

Once enrolled, students have two weeks to finalise their choice of subjects, during which time they may sample different subjects through attending lectures etc.

Programme Specification

MA Languages and Cultures of South Asia- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 29kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/southasia/programmes/malangcultsa/file80816.pdf

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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