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This new Master’s programme is designed to respond to the growing strategic importance of Russia and the former Soviet Union and meet the emerging demand for area-focused academic training. Read more
This new Master’s programme is designed to respond to the growing strategic importance of Russia and the former Soviet Union and meet the emerging demand for area-focused academic training. The programme focuses on the unique and challenging political and social environment of the region and students gain valuable analytical and research skills.

Degree information

This degree offers students a structured, focused programme as well as flexibility to pursue individual interests. Study of Russian and post-Soviet politics is supplemented by a wide range of options on other regions of the former Soviet Union and broad thematic issues such as corruption and governance, ethno-political conflict, sexual identity and security. Students are also encouraged to learn Russian, Ukrainian or Estonian.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (45 credits), optional modules (75 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules - students take one core module in Russian Politics (30 credits) and either a 15 or 30 credit core module on another aspect of Russian or post-Soviet politis.
-Russian Politics

Plus at least one chosen from:
-Baltic Politics and Society
-Corruption and Governance Causes, Consequences and Control
-Informal Practices in Post-Communist Societies
-Making of Modern Ukraine
-Post-Soviet Politics
-Russian Foreign Policy

Optional modules include:
-Advanced Quantitative Methods
-Being Soviet: Typologies of Soviet Identity in Russian Cinema 1917-1956
-Comparative Analysis in Social and Political Research
-Contemporary Russian Cinema and Society since the Collapse of the Soviet Union: The Journey into the Unknown
-Ethno-political Conflict in Central and Eastern Europe
-Governance and Democracy in Central and Eastern Europe
-Introduction to Discourse Analysis
-Politics of South-East Europe
-Qualitative Methods
-Quantitative Methods
-Security, Identity, Polarity
-Sexuality and Society in Russia and Eastern Europe
-Understanding and Analysing Data
-SSEES language module in Russian, Ukrainian or Estonian at beginner's level or at intermediate or advanced level as appropriate

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, laboratory sessions, workshops, presentations, self-study and specialist language classes. Students are assessed by a variety of methods, including unseen examinations, long essays, course work and a dissertation.

Careers

SSEES Master's graduates with expertise in the politics and societies of Russia and the post-Soviet states have achieved success in both public and private sectors. Career destinations include NGOs, think tanks, risk and business consultancies, diplomacy, government and international organisations, journalism and the media; often – but not always - in roles dealing directly with Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union.

Employability
The programme allows students to develop a blend of specialist area knowledge, analytical expertise and language skills tailored to their individual interests and requirements. The programme – together with regular workshops and events such as the weekly Post-Soviet Press Group discussion forum - provides opportunities to develop understanding of current developments in Russia and the post-Soviet region alongside deeper theoretical and historical insights into their politics and societies. This skill set leaves students well placed to meet the requirements of employers and policy-makers, or to move on to further study.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) is a world-leading specialist institution, and the largest UK centre, for the study of Russia and the post-Soviet region.

The school has superb research facilities and can point to expertise in a range of disciplines, including language training. The SSEES Library, in particular, is unequalled in Britain in the scope and size of its specialist collections.

Our central London location, regular workshops and events, and close links with employers and alumni afford excellent opportunities for networking and career development.

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Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives. Read more
Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives.

All of our Anthropology Master’s programmes are recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as having research training status, so successful completion of these courses is sufficient preparation for research in the various fields of social anthropology. Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

We welcome students with the appropriate background for research. If you wish to study for a single year, you can do the MA or MSc by research, a 12-month independent research project.

If you are interested in registering for a research degree, you should contact the member of staff whose research is the most relevant to your interests. You should include a curriculum vitae, a short (1,000-word) research proposal, and a list of potential funding sources.

About the School of Anthropology and Conservation

Kent has pioneered the social anthropological study of Europe, Latin America, Melanesia, and Central and Southeast Asia, the use of computers in anthropological research, and environmental anthropology in its widest sense (including ethnobiology and ethnobotany).

Our regional expertise covers Europe, the Middle East, Central, Southeast and Southern Asia, Central and South America, Amazonia, Papua New Guinea, East Timor and Polynesia. Specialisation in biological anthropology includes forensics and paleopathology, osteology, evolutionary psychology and the evolutionary ecology and behaviour of great apes.

Course structure

The first year may include coursework, especially methods modules for students who need this additional training. You will work closely with one supervisor throughout your research, although you have a committee of three (including your primary supervisor) overseeing your progress. If you want to research in the area of applied computing in social anthropology, you would also have a supervisor based in the School of Computing.

Research areas

- Social Anthropology

The related themes of ethnicity, nationalism, identity, conflict, and the economics crisis form a major focus of our current work in the Middle East, the Balkans, South Asia, Amazonia and Central America, Europe (including the United Kingdom), Oceania and South-East Asia.

Our research extends to inter-communal violence, mental health, diasporas, pilgrimage, intercommunal trade, urban ethnogenesis, indigenous representation and the study of contemporary religions and their global connections.

We research issues in fieldwork and methodology more generally, with a strong and expanding interest in the field of visual anthropology. Our work on identity and locality links with growing strengths in customary law, kinship and parenthood. This is complemented by work on the language of relatedness, child health and on the cognitive bases of kinship terminologies.

A final strand of our research focuses on policy and advocacy issues and examines the connections between morality and law, legitimacy and corruption, public health policy and local healing strategies, legal pluralism and property rights, and the regulation of marine resources.

- Environmental Anthropology and Ethnobiology

Work in these areas is focused on the Centre for Biocultural Diversity. We conduct research on ethnobiological knowledge systems and other systems of environmental knowledge as well as local responses to deforestation, climate change, natural resource management, medical ethnobotany, the impacts of mobility and displacement and the interface between conservation and development. Current projects include trade in materia medica in Ladakh and Bolivia, food systems, ethno-ornithology, the development of buffer zones for protected areas and phytopharmacy among migrant diasporas.

- Digital Anthropology: Cultural Informatics, Social Invention and Computational Methods

Since 1985, we have been exploring and applying new approaches to research problems in anthropology – often, as in the case of hypermedia, electronic and internet publishing, digital media, expert systems and large-scale textual and historical databases, up to a decade before other anthropologists. Today, we are exploring cloud media, semantic networks, multi-agent modelling, dual/blended realities, data mining, smart environments and how these are mediated by people into new possibilities and capabilities.

Our major developments have included advances in kinship theory and analysis supported by new computational methods within field-based studies and as applied to detailed historical records; qualitative analysis of textual and ethnographic materials; and computer-assisted approaches to visual ethnography. We are extending our range to quantitative approaches for assessing qualitative materials, analysing social and cultural invention, the active representation of meaning, and the applications and implications of mobile computing, sensing and communications platforms and the transformation of virtual into concrete objects, institutions and structures.

- Biological Anthropology

Biological Anthropology is the newest of the University of Kent Anthropology research disciplines. We are interested in a diverse range of research topics within biological and evolutionary anthropology. These include bioarchaeology, human reproductive strategies, hominin evolution, primate behaviour and ecology, modern human variation, cultural evolution and Palaeolithic archaeology. This work takes us to many different regions of the world (Asia, Africa, Europe, the United States), and involves collaboration with international colleagues from a number of organisations. We have a dedicated research laboratory and up-to-date computing facilities to allow research in many areas of biological anthropology.

Currently, work is being undertaken in a number of these areas, and research links have been forged with colleagues at Kent in archaeology and biosciences, as well as with those at the Powell- Cotton Museum, the Budongo Forest Project (Uganda) and University College London.

Kent Osteological Research and Analysis (KORA) offers a variety of osteological services for human remains from archaeological contexts.

Careers

Higher degrees in anthropology create opportunities in many employment sectors including academia, the civil service and non-governmental organisations through work in areas such as human rights, journalism, documentary film making, environmental conservation and international finance. An anthropology degree also develops interpersonal and intercultural skills, which make our graduates highly desirable in any profession that involves working with people from diverse backgrounds and cultures.

Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

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The Central and South-East European Studies MA is a multidisciplinary programme that enables students to gain specialist knowledge and understanding of the complex culture, history, literature, politics and society of the region from Western Bohemia to Wallachia and from Mazuria to Macedonia. Read more
The Central and South-East European Studies MA is a multidisciplinary programme that enables students to gain specialist knowledge and understanding of the complex culture, history, literature, politics and society of the region from Western Bohemia to Wallachia and from Mazuria to Macedonia.

Degree information

Students develop an advanced knowledge of central and south-eastern Europe from a multidisciplinary perspective, focusing on aspects of history, politics and culture. They develop generic research skills, interdisciplinary and discipline specific research skills, area specific research skills and language skills oriented towards carrying out research in the region.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of a choice of one of three compulsory modules (30 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits). 90 credits can then be selected from a range of options across SSEES.

Core modules - this is a multi-disciplinary programme. Nevertheless, students are required to gain a thorough methodological and theoretical grounding in disciplinary study and hence must choose between one of the following three courses:
-Literary and Cultural Theory
-Historical Methods and Approaches
-Political Analysis AND Political Sociology

Optional modules - total of 90 credits from options below. Subject to approval, optional courses up to the value of 30 credits may be taken from another SSEES MA programme or from another MA programme within UCL (Anthropology, History, European Studies, Comparative Literature etc.).
-All Quiet on the Eastern Front: Culture, Politics and Everyday Life in Central & Eastern Europe from Stalin to Present
-Little Hitlers? Right Radicalism in Central and Eastern Europe, 1900-1945
-Introduction to Discourse Analysis
-Beyond Stereotypes: The Jews in Polish Culture
-Cities in Eastern Europe
-Contemporary Cultural Studies: Between Post-Communism and Post-Modernism
-The Crisis Zone: Central Europe 1900-1990
-How to Read/Interpret Texts: Introduction to Hermeneutics
-'Metropolis': History of Berlin, 1871-1990
-Nation, Identity and Power in Central and Eastern Europe
-Baltic Politics and Society
-Making of the Modern Ukraine
-Security, Identity, Polarity
-The Self and the World: Theoretical Approaches to Travel Writing
-Language Module
-Ethno-Political Conflict in Central and Eastern Europe
-Informal Practices in Post-Communist Societies
-Directed Reading Module

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, laboratory sessions and workshops. Students are assessed by a variety of methods: including unseen examinations, long essays, course work and the research dissertation.

Careers

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, SSEES Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, charities, diplomacy, international security organisations, the law, and academia.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Self-Employed Translator, Self-Employed Translator
-Charity Manager, The Big Give
-Parliamentary Assistant, MP's Assistant
-Research Analysis Intern, TechnoServe
-Assistant Producer, Global Radio

Employability
Students who have successfully completed this programme have progressed to further academic research on the region, or have obtained employment in such organisations as the European Parliament and the Ministry of Defence, as well as roles in business, think tanks, NGOs, or similar, both in Britain and abroad. Networking is facilitated by two major collaborations led by SSEES: CEELBAS and the International Master's (IMESS). Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) is one of the world's leading specialist institutions, and the largest national centre in the UK, for the study of central, Eastern and south-east Europe and Russia.

Located on the edge of Bloomsbury, SSEES offers an ideal location for scholars. The British Library, British Museum, University of London Library and other similar research centres are all close by.

The SSEES Library is unequalled in Britain for the depth and breadth of its collections, the majority of which are on open access in the SSEES building.

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This MA provides an opportunity to study political and social developments in post-communist Europe in breadth and depth, acquiring a mix of in-depth knowledge, analytical and research skills, and theoretical understanding. Read more
This MA provides an opportunity to study political and social developments in post-communist Europe in breadth and depth, acquiring a mix of in-depth knowledge, analytical and research skills, and theoretical understanding. Regions covered include central and Eastern Europe, the western Balkans and most parts of the former Soviet Union.

Degree information

The programme tackles issues such as democracy and authoritarianism, corruption, ethno-political conflict, foreign policy and security in both thematic and area/country-oriented modules. Students are able to either focus on one region or to study regions across the post-communist world. All students take a core module in political analysis and have the option of learning Russian or another East European language.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), optional modules (90 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules - students take two core modules of 15 credits each, one of which much be 'Political Analysis'
-Political Analysis

And at least one chosen from:
-Qualitative Methods
-Understanding and Analysing Data
-Comparative Analysis in Social and Political Research
-Introduction to Discourse Analysis
-Quantitative Methods
-Advanced Quantitative Methods

Optional modules - choose from a list including the following:
-Causes, Consequences and Control: Corruption and Governance
-Ethnopolitical Conflict in Central and Eastern Europe
-Informal Practices in Post-Communist Societies
-Making of Modern Ukraine
-Nation, Identity and Power in Central and Eastern Europe
-Russian Politics
-Security, Identity, Polarity
-Governance and Democracy in Central and Eastern Europe
-Russian Foreign Policy
-Baltic Politics and Society

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project, which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, laboratory sessions, workshops and classes. Students will be assessed by a variety of methods: unseen examinations, long essays, course work and the research dissertation.

Careers

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, SSEES Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, charities, diplomacy, international security organisations, the law, and academia.

Some graduates advise the Russian, Polish, American, and other governments, and the European Commission.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Parliamentary Researcher, Houses of Parliament
-DPhil Sociology, University of Oxford
-Reporter, Bloomberg L.P
-Research Associate, BCG (The Boston Consulting Group)
-Senior Associate, Business Intelligence Services, Deloitte Forensic UK

Employability
The range of modules offered allows students either to focus on one region or to study regions across the post-communist world. The MA opens up a range of opportunities and previous graduates from this programme have gone on to work in think tanks; political parties; national, European and international private and public sector organisations; and in the media and in NGOs as political analysts. Other graduates have gone on to further academic study. Networking is facilitated by two major collaborations led by SSEES: CEELBAS and the International Master's (IMESS). Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) is a world-leading specialist institution, and the largest national centre in the UK, for the study of central, Eastern and south-east Europe and Russia.

Our MA allows you to study the political development of the region in unparalleled breadth and depth and to develop analytical and research capabilities, language skills and practical insights.

Our nationally unequalled specialist library and central London location provide an ideal environment for research, while our close contacts with employers, policy-makers and alumni afford excellent opportunities for networking and career development.

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This MA provides students with the opportunity to study key concepts and approaches in political sociology and theoretical debates about the relationship between state and society, and identity and power. Read more
This MA provides students with the opportunity to study key concepts and approaches in political sociology and theoretical debates about the relationship between state and society, and identity and power. Graduates acquire a mix of in-depth area knowledge of Russia and Eastern Europe, research skills and theoretical understanding.

[Degree information]]
The programme centres on sociology but is interdisciplinary in nature, combining topics and methods from political science, anthropology, history, cultural studies and economics to analyse the relationships among individuals, groups, institutions, governments and their environments. Students choose two core modules in political sociology and social science methods and can then select thematic or area-based options as well as the options to study Russian or another East European language.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), one of a choice of four modules in social science methodology (15 credits), optional modules (90 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules - students take a 15 credits core module in Political Sociology and a 15 credit course from a list of options in social science methodology.
-Political Sociology
-Methodology
-Qualitative Methods
-Understanding and Analysing Data
-Comparative Analysis in Social and Political Research
-Introduction to Discourse Analysis

Optional modules
-Causes, Consequences and Control: Corruption and Governance
-Cities in Eastern Europe
-Ethno-Political Conflict in Central and Eastern Europe
-Gender and Sexuality in Modern Russian Culture
-Informal Practices in Post-Communist Societies
-Migration in the EU
-Nations, Identity and Power
-Politics of Southeast Europe
-Sexuality and Society in Russia and Eastern Europe
-Sociology of Religion

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, laboratory sessions, workshops, presentations, self-study and specialist language classes. Students are assessed by a variety of methods, including unseen examinations, long essays, coursework and a dissertation.

Careers

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, SSEES Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, charities, diplomacy, international security organisations, the law, and academia.

Some graduates advise the Russian, Polish, American, and other governments, and the European Commission.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Researcher, Saxton Bampfyble Hever Plc
-Global Education Officer, Childreach International
-Marketing Analyst, Business Services International
-Programme Co-Ordinator, Open Society Foundation
-Television News Reporter, ETV (Eesti Televisioon) (Estonian Television)

Employability
The MA opens up a range of opportunities and previous graduates from this programme have gone on to work in think tanks, political parties; national, European and international private and public sector organisations; and in the media and NGOs as political analysts. Other graduates have progressed to further academic study. Networking is facilitated by two major collaborations led by SSEES: CEELBAS and the International Master's (IMESS). Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) is a world- leading specialist institution, and the largest national centre in the UK, for the study of central, Eastern and South-east Europe and Russia.

This MA allows you to study the social and cultural issues in the region in unparalleled breadth and depth and to develop analytical and research capacities, language skills and practical insights.

Our nationally unequalled specialist library and central London location provide an ideal environment for research, while our close contacts with employers, policy-makers and alumni afford excellent opportunities for networking and career development.

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The Master in Middle Eastern Studies (MIMES) is specifically tailored for graduates of various disciplines and backgrounds, who are interested in obtaining a better knowledge of the Middle East region, taking into account its social-historical complexity and cultural plurality. Read more
The Master in Middle Eastern Studies (MIMES) is specifically tailored for graduates of various disciplines and backgrounds, who are interested in obtaining a better knowledge of the Middle East region, taking into account its social-historical complexity and cultural plurality. The program aims to offer solid historical, political and institutional perspectives of the current domestic, regional and international dynamics affecting the stability of the region, as well as a critical outlook on current debates over the Middle East.

Learning objectives

MIMES aims to guide students across this diverse and fascinating region, which, since decades, is at the center of the geostrategic interest of the international system. The program mainly focuses on the contemporary period, through a multi-disciplinary approach ranging over international relations, geopolitics, conflicts and security, economy and energy. Nonetheless, specific sections are devoted to the analysis of the historical and religious foundations of the modern Middle East, from the birth of Islam to the evolution of Islamic thought, law and economy. A dedicated course will offer a linguistic analysis of the political and juridical terminology and a glossary in Arabic. MIMES analyses in details infra-regions and inter-regions peculiarities and relations, from Maghreb to Central-Southern Asia, encouraging a comparative and holistic area studies approach.

Career opportunities & professional recognition

MIMES provides graduate students with a detailed, comprehensive knowledge of the wider Middle East, beneficial to under-take a number of different careers, consistently with their previous training and experience, within international institutions, private companies, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), research centers and area studies, media networks, etc.

Curriculum

The Master in Middle Eastern Studies is articulated in five complementary levels, fostering multidimensional training and cross-fertilization, integrating scientific methodologies and operative competences.

1st level - Propaedeutic Phase: history, power and institution. The conceptual foundation of the Middle East
● Methodological introduction: debates on the Middle East
● History of the Middle East
● Religion, society and thought in the Islamic Middle East
● Islamic law and economy
● Study of political and juridical terminology - glossary in Arabic
● Middle East within the 20th century international order

2nd level - In-depth Analytical Phase: sub-regional contexts
● Maghreb
● Mashreq
● Sub-Saharan Africa
● South-West Asia and the Gulf
● Central-Southern Asia

3rd level - Thematic and Contemporary Issues
● Politics in contemporary Middle East and the current International Relations context
● Global security: jihadism, violent activism, conflicts and nuclear proliferation
● Post-conflict institution-building and human security
● Gender, ethno-religious diversity and pluralism in the Middle East
● Energy and geopolitics of resources
● Contemporary economic trends

4th level - Project Work
Students are required to develop a personal research project on a topic related to Middle Eastern affairs, under the supervision of a MIMES professor and/or a professional from a partner institution. The project work will often be connected to the internship experience.

5th level - Internship
The Master is completed with an internship in Italy or abroad within an institution whose mission and activities are consistent with the Master’s program. This gives students the invaluable opportunity to test and strengthen the competencies acquired during the Master and it usually lasts three months. As an alternative, students who do not carry out an internship may choose to attend an Arabic language course. Students will receive support and tutoring for their internship research.

Faculty & teaching staff

The Master in Middle Eastern Studies offers high quality training to students from all over the world. They will take part in team projects with the guidance of important scholars and leading professionals from the Middle East as well as from Europe and the U.S.

Faculty:
● Prof. Riccardo Redaelli - MIMES Director
● Prof. Paolo Branca - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore
● Dr. Marina Calculli - American University, Beirut
● Prof. Massimo Campanini - Università degli Studi di Trento
● Prof. Martino Diez - Fondazione OASIS and Università Cattoli- ca del Sacro Cuore
● Prof. Wael Faruq - American University, Cairo
● Prof. Ersilia Francesca - Università degli Studi di Napoli l’Orientale
● Prof. Elisa Giunchi - Università degli Studi di Milano
● Prof. Mehran Kamrava - Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service
● Prof. Bahgat Korany - American University, Cairo
● Prof. Marco Lombardi - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore
● Prof. Maurizio Martellini - Landau Network Centro Volta and Insubria Center on International Security
● Prof. Massimo Papa - Università di Roma Tor Vergata
● Prof. Vittorio Emanuele Parsi - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore
● Prof. Paola Rivetti - Dublin City University
● Prof. Mahmood Sariolghalam - Shahid Beheshti University of Tehran
● Prof. Oktay Tanrisever - Middle East Technical University
● Amb. Roberto Toscano - Barcelona Center for International Affairs
● Mr. Franco Zallio - consultant

ASERI - a center of excellence

This Master has been created thanks to the experience of ASERI in the field of graduate education and training. Università Cattolica’s Graduate School of Economics and International Relations combines quality courses with strong connections to the business world. Courses are taught by academic professors, professionals and leaders from all over the world. The high quality of this training is ensured by the presence of an international faculty composed by renowned professors and experts, coming from both Middle East and US/EU universities and research centers.

Theory & practice

The strong theoretical basis is combined with a solid knowledge of the contemporary issues, in order to provide students’ with a specific understanding of one of the most important region in the international scenario and help them to convert their knowledge in professional skills.

A multidisciplinary approach

Thanks to the expertise of its faculty, this innovative program combines several perspectives on the Middle East: international relations, history, economics, law, geopolitics, security and energy. The analysis of the current dynamics, debates and most important topics regarding the role of the Middle East at a regional and international level, as well as dedicated modules on its sub-regions and their peculiarities, are strengthened by the theoretical basis provided during the first part of the program.

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The Master’s Programme in Archaeology at Leiden University offers a truly unique choice of challenging regional and thematic specialisations. Read more
The Master’s Programme in Archaeology at Leiden University offers a truly unique choice of challenging regional and thematic specialisations. The faculty staff are involved in projects all over the world, with a strong emphasis on field archaeology. This means that there is a strong connection between our current research projects and our education, and that you will be able to work with top researchers.

Visit the website: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/programmes/archaeology/en/introduction

Course detail

- Specialisations -

- Archaeobotany and Archaeozoology
- Archaeology and Anthropology of the Americas
- Archaeology of the Near East
- Archaeology of the Roman Provinces, Middle Ages and Modern Period
- Classical and Mediterranean Archaeology
- Digital Archaeology
- Heritage Management in a World Context
- Heritage of Indigenous Peoples
- Human Osteology and Funerary Archaeology
- Material Culture Studies
- Museum Studies
- Palaeolithic Archaeology
- Prehistory of North-Western Europe

- Multidisciplinary focus -

The specialisations offer an additional focus on ecology and geology. This is combined with iconological and historical studies, as well as with ethno-archaeological, anthropological and experimental approaches. As a student of one of our specialisations, you will gain in-depth knowledge of the discipline of your choice. At the same time, you will take part in ongoing debates about general theory, the development of new methods and the use of information technology.

Master of Arts or Master of Science?

Students who choose the Human Osteology and Funerary Archaeology, the Material Culture Studies, or the Archaeobotany/Archaeozoology specialisations, receive a Master of Science degree in Archaeology. For all other specialisations students receive a Master of Arts degree in Archaeology.

How to apply: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/arrange/admission

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In the first academic year of the MSc. Program the students of the 3 main subjects have several courses in common, aiming in giving them all an in-depth knowledge and know-how related to nutrition and rural development related topics, creating a common academic level between all program students of diverse backgrounds. Read more
In the first academic year of the MSc. Program the students of the 3 main subjects have several courses in common, aiming in giving them all an in-depth knowledge and know-how related to nutrition and rural development related topics, creating a common academic level between all program students of diverse backgrounds. The common part of the programme consists on the one hand of basic knowledge, insights and skills in the areas of production, transformation, preservation, marketing and consumption of food products. On the other hand, it contains a practically oriented component that enables the alumni to identify problems by means of quantitative and qualitative research methods and analytical techniques, to assess and rank causes, and to plan, to execute and to evaluate appropriate interventions.

The other part of courses given during the first year are main subject specific courses. The academic second year provides a more in depth understanding of the specific problems and their solutions for the main subject and major chosen and consists of main subject and major specific courses, elective (optional) courses and Master Dissertation research (30 ECTS).

The specific expertise the students receive depends on the main subject, major and optional courses chosen.

Tropical Agriculture

Delivers technical knowledge related to agriculture focussing on developing countries. The students can specialize in animal production or plant production by choosing the specific option. The major on Animal Production delivers in depth knowledge on production biology, animal nutrition, pasture management, animal genetics. The major on Plant Production focuses on themes like ethno-botany, crop protection, plant breeding, plant biotechnology. The courses are applicative and aim at presenting solutions for production problems in developing countries in an interdisciplinary way.

Structure

Semester 1 (Sept-Jan)
-Preceded by introduction courses.
-Common and main subject specific basic courses.
-Fundamental, in depth and high level knowledge.
Semester 2 (Febr-June)
-Main subject specific courses with special attention to ‘in field’ applications.
-Possibility to do internships in summer holidays.
Semester 3 (Sept-Jan) and Semester 4 (Febr-June)
-Specialised courses (fine-tuned individual programme).
-Master dissertation (at Ghent University, other Belgian institutes/organizations/multinationals or one of our partners in the South or Europe).

Learning and Outcomes

Have thorough knowledge and comprehension (theory and practice) l in the interdisciplinary domains: food and feed production, socio-economic, (public health) nutrition and management concepts, theories and skills, and in the main subject specific domains and the chosen major domains. The program additionally focuses on international collaboration.
-Major: Public Health Nutrition : Have profound insights in public health nutrition realities and compare public health nutrition issues, approaches and policies within the international context
-Major Nutrition Security and Management: Have profound insights in different food/nutrition security realities and compare nutrition security issues, approaches and (nutrition) policies within an international context
-Major Plant Production: Have profound insights in plant production realities and compare plant production issues, and approaches within the international context
-Major Animal Production: Have profound insights in animal production realities and compare animal production issues, and approaches within the international context

Apply theories and methodological approaches to characterize and analyse specific problems: food, nutrition and agricultural chains, food sovereignty /safety and security, natural resource management, sustainable production, economic and social problems of rural areas, national and international agriculture.

Design and implement adequate instruments, methods, models and innovative tools to analyse, evaluate and solve interdisciplinary related problems in the context of sustainable development.

Apply the interdisciplinary tools to design, implement, monitor and evaluate national and international agro-nutrition policies and programs. More specifically:
-For Human Nutrition: construct innovative tools and instruments for the development of a better nutritional health status of a country/region/area and its inhabitants/households.
-For Tropical agriculture: a more efficient and economic feasible agricultural balanced, food production guaranteeing a better food security situation per country respecting local environment.

Assess the importance and magnitude of a problem, define strategies for intervention and/or identify knowledge gaps. Develop a research protocol based on the analysis of existing evidence and set up a research plan, analyse and interpret the data and present the findings.

Identify, select and apply appropriate research methods and techniques to collect, analyses and critically interpret data.

Critically reflect on program specific issues, and on ethical and value driven aspects of research and intervention strategies.

Take up a trans-disciplinary role in an interdisciplinary ((inter)national) team dealing with global challenges, and develop a global perspective.

Dialogue and professionally interact with different actors and stakeholders from peers to a general public to convincingly communicate evidence based research findings and project results.

To effectively use appropriate communication and behavioural skills in different language and cultural environments.

Learn to continuously critically reflect (individually and in discussion with others) upon personal knowledge, skills, attitudes, functioning, and develop an attitude of lifelong learning. This includes:
-Design and plan own learning processes.
-Self-Directed Learning: work independently, take initiative, and manage a project through to completion.

Other admission requirements

The applicant must be proficient in the language of the course or training programme, i.e. English. The English language proficiency can be met by providing a certificate (validity of 5 years) of one of the following tests: (TOEFL/IELTS predictive tests and TOEIC will not be accepted)
-TOEFL IBT 80.
-TOEFL PBT 550.
-ACADEMIC IELTS 6,5 overall score with a min. of 6 for writing.
-CEFR B2 Issued by a European university language centre.
-ESOL CAMBRIDGE English CAE (Advanced).

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Why you should choose this course. -You're looking for a course offering an-depth study of cutting-edge compositional techniques, methodologies and associated aesthetics. Read more
Why you should choose this course:
-You're looking for a course offering an-depth study of cutting-edge compositional techniques, methodologies and associated aesthetics
-You want to learn in state-of-the-art facilities, including our £2.5 million electroacoustic studio complex
-You want to pursue a career as a composer working with technology and audio-media, or a PhD in electroacoustic composition

Course description

This course provides an in-depth knowledge of cutting-edge compositional techniques, methodologies and associated aesthetics in creative work that intersects with technology and other artistic or scientific forms. It serves as excellent preparation for a career as a composer working with technology and audio-media, and it provides all the training necessary for embarking on and envisioning novel strands for a PhD in electroacoustic composition, including those informed by other scientific and arts form.

All teaching, research and compositional work is carried out in the NOVARS Research Centre for Electroacoustic Composition, Performance and Sound Art with its state-of-the-art £2.5 million electroacoustic studios. Opportunities for the performance of new works are offered using the 55-loudspeaker sound diffusion system of MANTIS (Manchester Theatre in Sound) and through events such as the Locativeaudio Festival (locativeaudio.org) and Sines and Squares Festival for Analogue Electronics and Modular Synthesis (sines-squares.org). Acousmatic, mixed, live electronic and multimedia works are all possible, with composers able to incorporate the spatialisation of sound and interactive new game-audio media into the presentation of their work.

In addition to the final portfolio, all electroacoustic music and interactive media composition students take the compulsory course unit Composition Project and the further compulsory taught course unit, Fixed Media and Interactive Music . Optional course units normally include Aesthetics and Analysis of Organised Sound, Interactive Tools and Engines, Contemporary Music Studies, Advanced Orchestration, and Historical or Contemporary Performance. There are also choices outside the MusM Composition (subject to course director approval), such as Computer Vision, Mobile Systems, Mobile Communications, Ethno/Musicology in Action: Fieldwork and Ethnography , and Work Placement (Institute of Cultural Practices).

Aims

This programme aims to:
-Build on undergraduate studies, developing skills in electroacoustic composition to Master's level.
-Increase knowledge and a systematic understanding of electroacoustic music.
-Foster the particular creative talents of each individual student.
-Provide all the training necessary for embarking on a PhD in electroacoustic composition.
-Prepare students for a career as a composer and in the wider music industry where critical judgement and developed powers of communication are needed.

Special features

The NOVARS studio complex supports a broad range of activities in the fields of electroacoustic composition and new media. The studios incorporate the newest generation of Apple computers, Genelec, PMC and ATC monitoring (up to 37-channel studios) and state-of-the art licensed software (including Pro Tools HD, Max MSP, GRM Tools, Waves, Ircam's Audiosculpt and Reaper and, for Interactive Media work, Oculus Rift, Unreal Engine 4, Unity Pro and open-source Blender3D). Location and performance work is also supported by a new 64-channel diffusion system.

Postgraduate students at the NOVARS Research Centre play an active role in the planning, organisation and execution of performance events such as the Sines & Squares Festival and MANTIS Festival (over 20 editions since 2004), and projects such as LocativeAudio and our regular Matinée presentations. Relevant training, including rigging and de-rigging the MANTIS system, health and safety, sound diffusion workshops, organisation of Calls for Works when needed, etc., is an important part of the course.

Career opportunities

Graduates of this programme have pursued successful careers in musical and non-musical fields. Some continue to further study via a PhD before securing an academic position. Some go on to teach in schools or further education, both in the UK and overseas. Other areas of work for which advanced compositional training has been directly relevant include recording studios, entrepreneurships, the creative industries, music publishing, music journalism and performance. Careers outside of music have included computer programming, theatre, accountancy, law, social work and human resources.

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This flexible pathway provides a solid masters-level foundation in ethnomusicology. With a strong focus on theory, methodology and current debates in the discipline, together with appropriate research techniques and presentational styles, it offers excellent preparation for doctoral study and also for applied work. Read more
This flexible pathway provides a solid masters-level foundation in ethnomusicology. With a strong focus on theory, methodology and current debates in the discipline, together with appropriate research techniques and presentational styles, it offers excellent preparation for doctoral study and also for applied work. The programme of study consists of four taught course units (each 30 credits) plus a dissertation (60 credits). The combination of core and optional course units allows each student to plot a path that best matches his or her special interests and aspirations. Together, the taught units encompass a wide range of topics and approaches - from gender and ethnicity, music and conflict, music revivals and performance culture, to postcolonial theory and the politics of ethnography. Seminars allow for close collaboration between lecturers and students, with ample opportunity for students to present their own work and receive individual feedback. Discussion and debate forms an important part of most course units.

All students on the MusM Music programme take Advanced Music Studies: Skills and Methodologies as their core unit. Students on the Ethnomusicology pathway also take Studying World Music Cultures: Themes and Debates and, usually, Ethno/Musicology in Action: Fieldwork and Ethnography . Other optional course units normally include Case Studies in Musicology: Texts and Histories ; and Historical or Contemporary Performance (subject to audition). A maximum of 30 credits may be chosen from another MA programme in the arts or social sciences (subject to availability and approval by the course tutor): possible options include Gender, Sexuality and the Body ; Filming History: Making Documentary Films for Research; and Documentary and Sensory Media . Students may also undertake a Work Placement with a local arts organisation or institution (by prior arrangement and subject to availability).

Aims

This programme aims to:
-Build on undergraduate studies of music and society and the cultural study of music, introducing students to a wide range of advanced methodologies, theories, discourses and practices.
-Enable students to refine and develop their individual skills, talents and interests.
-Prepare students for a career, either inside or outside music, where critical judgement and developed powers of communication are needed.
-Foster the skills in critical thinking, argumentation, and effective written and oral communication necessary for further postgraduate study.
-Enable students to gain an expert and detailed knowledge of a specialist topic, and to formulate ideas that can later be pursued within further research programmes.

Teaching and learning

Most taught course units are delivered via weekly seminars and/or tutorials. Full-time students take two 30-credit course units per semester; part-time students take one. The dissertation is supported by one-to-one supervision and is submitted at the beginning of September. (Part-time students may submit in either September or December following their second year of study.)

Seminars feature a range of presentation formats and activities, including presentations by course tutors, student presentations, discussion and debate based on prepared reading or coursework tasks, and workshop-style activities. Members of the academic staff are also available for individual consultations during designated office hours.

Alongside their taught units, students have access to a range of non-assessed seminars, workshops and training sessions offered by the Graduate School of the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures. All postgraduate students are expected to undertake their own programme of self-directed learning and skills acquisition. This may also involve wider reading, language work, computer training and attendance at research seminars in other parts of the university.

Coursework and assessment

There are no formal examinations. Taught course units are assessed by coursework essays or other tasks, normally submitted at the end of each semester (January and May). The precise nature of the assessment varies according to what is appropriate to the course unit in question. In most cases, a choice of questions or topics is offered. All taught units must be satisfactorily completed. The dissertation (12,000-15,000 words) is based on independent research into a topic agreed in consultation with the supervisor. A Research Outline needs to be presented and approved (usually in February) before students proceed with their dissertation. All coursework is double-marked internally and moderated by the External Examiner. Recitals are heard by at least two internal examiners.

Career opportunities

Graduates of this programme have pursued successful careers in musical and non-musical fields. Some continue to further study via a PhD before securing an academic position. Some go on to teach in schools or further education, both in the UK and overseas. Other areas of work for which advanced musical training has been directly relevant include arts management and the culture industries, music publishing, music journalism, librarianship, music therapy and performance. Careers outside of music have included accountancy, law, social work and human resources.

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The Master of Science in Capacity Development and Extension is a unique program in Canada that develops the core competencies of students for facilitating social and environmental change. Read more
The Master of Science in Capacity Development and Extension is a unique program in Canada that develops the core competencies of students for facilitating social and environmental change.

Our program focuses on processes of learning, advocacy, leadership, communication and capacity development for rural/remote and small communities in Canada and around the world. Our “students without borders” engage with society through service learning projects during their course work, and through applied research and a range of professional development activities.

Our graduates are innovators in the public and not-for-profit sectors. Many pursue doctoral studies and achieve important careers in community development, policymaking and academia.

Principles of Our Teaching and Learning

CDE is a learner-centered community which is grounded in practice-based theories. We value social justice through shared-decision making, open communication, respect for difference, and commitment to conflict management. We pursue creative and independent thought in our intellectual pursuits.

Examples of CDE Research

-Living at the Intersection: Exploring the Relationship between Youth Health and Wellbeing, Place, and After-School Programs in Small Urban Towns
-Stitching towards Empowerment: Exploring Empowerment of Women in an Embroidery Co-operative in Uganda. A Case Study of Tabiro Ladies’ Club
-Kahawa Yetu – Our Coffee: A need for better organizational capacity in Kenya’s coffee cooperatives. A case study of New Gatanga Coffee Cooperative
-Ethno-cultural vegetable retail analysis: Pricing structure and market information
-Impact of After-School Programs on Rural Youth: A Case Study of Fusion Youth Centre
-Micro-livestock for livelihoods: Meeting practical and strategic needs of women in Sunyani District, Ghana
-The use of stigma as a marker of otherness by RTLM in the Rwandan Genocide
-Campus/community radio in Canada: Linking listeners to broadcasters with Web 2.0 Technologies
-The potential of Agroforestry for Peace Building: The Case of Jonglei – South Sudan
-After the Tornado: An Exploration of Capacity and Vulnerability on Community Engagement in Goderich

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