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Masters Degrees (Ethnicity)

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This programme is principally concerned with explaining the importance of ethnicity and multiculturalism, race, racism, diaspora and communalism in contemporary societies. Read more
This programme is principally concerned with explaining the importance of ethnicity and multiculturalism, race, racism, diaspora and communalism in contemporary societies. It has a particular focus on the nature of multicultural and multi-ethnic societies, the issues surrounding culture in a modern and postmodern world, and the growing public policy implications of addressing ethnic, cultural, linguistic and religious diversity within modern nation-states.

It also examines the discrimination, exclusion, marginality and unfair treatment of minority groups, and the violation of their civil rights in different societies.

Programme structure

The MSc programme comprises six 12-week taught units and six assessed essays, followed by a dissertation.

Core units
-Theories of Ethnicity and Racism
-Dissertation

Optional units - You will choose at least four further units from a list of sociology units. Options vary each year but may include:
-Contemporary Sociological Theory
-Theories of Ethnicity and Racism
-Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods
-Philosophy and Research Design
-Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
-Understanding Culture
-Narrating the Self
-The Theory and Politics of Multiculturalism
-Interpreting Gender
-Advanced Qualitative Research
-Advanced Quantitative Research
-Popular Music and Society
-Nations and Nationalism
-Care, Labour and Gender
-Religion and Politics in the West
-Understanding Risk

A maximum of one unit can be chosen from the other optional units that are offered by the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies in the academic year.

Third term
Independent study for dissertation.

Careers

Bristol graduates are in high demand and have an excellent record of employment following graduation. Students from our MSc programmes go on to pursue varied and interesting careers.

Many sectors - such as the civil service, NGO and charity work - require an MSc and some volunteer/internship experience. Graduates from our programmes have gone on to work for Refugee UK, Shelter, Barnardos, Oxfam, Amnesty International, government departments and the European Parliament, among others. Further details can be found on our careers and alumni website: http://www.bris.ac.uk/spais/prospective/prospectivepgt/ppgtcareersandalumni/

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We offer a unique opportunity to explore the civilizations of the ancient Mediterranean and the Near East. Read more

General Information

We offer a unique opportunity to explore the civilizations of the ancient Mediterranean and the Near East. Our remarkably diverse faculty includes world experts who both teach, and conduct path-breaking research on, the archaeology, history, languages, literatures, and religions of ancient Egypt, the Near East, Greece and Rome, including Judaism, Christianity, and early Islam. Our programs, which can be individually tailored to fit specific interests, foster interdisciplinary study, at the same time developing the relevant skill sets to prepare our students for future study and employment.

What makes the program unique?

Every program is unique and students have the option to design a perfect curriculum for them. Our strengths include rigorous training in the primary languages, Ancient Greek, Latin, Hebrew, Middle Egyptian, and Classical Arabic; broad coverage of the mythic systems of ancient civilizations; in-depth study of the dramatic, historical, legal, literary and religious texts produced by those civilizations; advanced training in practical methods of archaeology and epigraphy; and exploration of the traditions and receptions of antiquity by later eras.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts
- Specialization: Ancient Culture, Religion and Ethnicity
- Subject: Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Major Project/Essay required
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts

Ancient Language Requirement

Candidates will be required to demonstrate reasonable competence in one of the classical languages. The minimum standard required is a grade of B-/68% in 6 credits of one of the following: GREK 301/302 (Greek Literature of the Classical Period) or LATN 301 (Latin Literature of the Classical Period) or HEBR 479 (Readings in Biblical Hebrew) or ARBC 420 (supervised study in Classical Arabic) or their equivalents. These 6 credits may form part of the course requirements for the M.A. program.

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This multidisciplinary Master's programme explores debates on 'race' and racism, multiculture and postcoloniality. Read more
This multidisciplinary Master's programme explores debates on 'race' and racism, multiculture and postcoloniality. It explores connections between histories of empire and contemporary social formations and inequalities in the UK, and considers how local debates on 'race' and racism are shaped by the global geopolitics of the twenty-first century.

The programme explores debates on empire and the formation of modern Britain and contemporary transnational political communities, social identities and urban cultures. The MA aims to draw connections between interlocking colonial histories across the globe and our ordinary, local, everyday life here in contemporary Britain.

The programme focuses on subjects such as histories of colonisation, systems of slavery, the concept of 'race' and the invention of 'the West'; colonial cultures, class, nationalisms, 'respectability' and the invention of 'whiteness'; histories of criminalisation and imprisonment; human rights; 'the war on terror'; diaspora, place and belonging; psychoanalysis and 'race', 'hybridity', 'mixedness', 'whiteness', 'race' and 'beauty' and 'race', gender, sexuality and desire. It offers the opportunity to study a wide range of different subjects in this broad multidisciplinary area.

The MA is convened by academics who have interests in racialisation, postcoloniality, urban multiculture and psychoanalysis. You can also choose from a range of option modules convened by other academics in other departments across the College.

This innovative, interdisciplinary postgraduate programme will be of interest to those who want to develop careers in social research, education, law, journalism, youth and community work, urban planning, housing, politics, the arts and cultural industries, health and social care, and numerous other areas. It will also be of interest to those who wish to pursue an academic career in sociology, cultural studies, postcolonial studies, urban studies, psychosocial studies, or in the social sciences or humanities more generally and to those who simply wish to develop an advanced understanding of 'race' and racism, multiculture and postcoloniality.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

The programme introduces you to different historical and political debates and theoretical perspectives in the broad multidisciplinary area of 'race' and racism, multiculture and postcoloniality.
You will participate in a vibrant, stimulating and diverse intellectual environment. There is a Race Forum and several other research institutes at Birkbeck that focus on relevant subject areas.
The programme is flexibly designed for students from all backgrounds to pursue their own particular research and professional interests.
The MA draws from sociology, cultural studies, history, urban studies, literary studies, psychosocial studies, philosophy and politics.
The Department of Psychosocial Studies has a formal link with the University of São Paulo, Brazil. This link enables students on this programme to undertake an optional module at the University of São Paulo as part of their programme of study at Birkbeck.
You will join a flourishing and diverse postgraduate student community and a growing research culture. Birkbeck Library has an extensive teaching collection of books, journals and learning resources in sociology, cultural studies, postcolonial studies, psychosocial studies and related disciplines. You will also be able to use the rich research resources nearby including Senate House Library, the British Library of Political and Economic Science (the LSE Library), the SOAS Library and the British Library.
There are also research institutes which focus on relevant subject areas such as the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities, Birkbeck Law School Centre for Law and the Humanities and the Centre for Media, Culture and Creative Practice and reading groups such as the Postcolonial Studies Reading Group.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), Sociology at Birkbeck was ranked 13th in the UK.

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You will explore and reflect upon the latest thinking and research in criminology. Study race, ethnicity and gender and investigate the causes and prevention of crime, criminality and victimisation. Read more
You will explore and reflect upon the latest thinking and research in criminology. Study race, ethnicity and gender and investigate the causes and prevention of crime, criminality and victimisation.

You will explore the different methods of criminological research before completing an independent dissertation.

You will study a range of interesting, innovative and challenging modules, taught by world-leading experts who are actively engaged in publication and research. Our teaching staff includes Professor Colin Webster, renowned for his work on ethnicity and crime.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including social work and social policy.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/criminology_msc

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

The course will further your career prospects across a range of crime and criminal justice related fields including youth justice, the police and prison system, probation service, victim support, child protection, crime prevention and other statutory, private and voluntary sector agencies.

- Police Officer
- Prison Officer
- Probation Officer
- Community Worker

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

Our course has been designed in consultation with statutory, charitable and voluntary crime related agencies in the region. It therefore reflects the ongoing need for agencies to upgrade the knowledge and skills of professionals and practitioners. We also introduce advanced criminological knowledge to graduates who wish to further their knowledge or interests.

Our course is taught by nationally and internationally renowned experts in the field who are actively engaged in scholarship, publication and research funded by national bodies such as the Home Office, Joseph Rowntree Foundation and the Research Councils. Among others teaching the course, Professor Terry Thomas is renowned for his work on Violent and Sexual Offending, and Professor Colin Webster is renowned for his work on Youth Crime and Justice, and Ethnicity and Crime.

Modules

Rethinking Policing
Gain an understanding of the social, historical and economic development of policing within national and international contexts.

Race, Ethniticy and Justice
Develop a critical understanding of theories about race, ethnicity and criminal justice, focusing specifically on the intersections between race, ethnicity, gender and class.

Understanding the Sex Industry
Critically explore the complexities of the sex industry, from men who buy sex, to women who work as sex workers, third parties that own and manage businesses, and those who are exploited through unregulated markets.

Dissertation
Specialise in a chosen area of advanced criminological research through workshops and independent study, resulting in a 15,000 word dissertation.

Mental Health and Crime

Engendering Criminology
Explore major topics and debates relating to gender, crime and victimisation by undertaking an in-depth analysis of the development of feminist criminology.

War, Crime and Violence
Explore acts of war, political violence and crimes of aggression through the lens of criminological discourse, looking at war and its relationship with 'crime'.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Clinical Skills Suite
The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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This interdisciplinary Master’s programme provides an opportunity for you to deconstruct the American experience at an advanced level. Read more
This interdisciplinary Master’s programme provides an opportunity for you to deconstruct the American experience at an advanced level.

It interrogates, challenges and moves beyond the Exceptionalist rhetoric and nation-states ideology of traditional American Studies to consider the USA, and its neighbours, in an insightful, challenging and relevant way.

You develop specialist knowledge and research skills in a range of disciplines by navigating complex historical, cultural, geo-political and environmental issues. A sophisticated awareness of the reach (and the limitations) of US hegemony, as well as issues of cultural collision, media penetration, region and identity, give our graduates an intellectual grounding well-suited to many careers, in addition to a solid foundation for graduate work at MPhil or PhD level.

About the Centre for American Studies

American Studies at Kent dates back to 1973 and, over the last few decades, has developed a strong research culture; this matches the commitment of the University to interdisciplinary study as well as the mandate of American Studies to explore the American experience in ground-breaking ways.

Our team of scholars maintains close links with a number of North and South American research institutions and archives, and the University’s Templeman Library houses impressive collections on slavery, Native American culture, and photography/visual materials.

We treat the American experience in a critical and reflective manner, and offer an extremely good base for postgraduate study. While able to supervise a wide range of American topics, the Centre currently operates three specialist research clusters of particular interest to candidates:

- The American West
- The Study of US Environmental Issues
- The Study of Race, Ethnicity and Borders.

Course structure

You take a compulsory 30 credit module ‘Transnational American Studies: Research and Approaches’. This is a year-long module designed to introduce key modes of analysis in transnational and interdisciplinary study as well as consider different methodologies, themes and intellectual debates. Assessment includes an extended essay, seminar presentation and a critical review of an academic research paper.

You also select 90 credits from a range of optional modules, spread across at least two disciplines. Optional modules vary year to year and below is a selection of recent modules on offer:

- American Cold War Propaganda

- Geiger Counter at Ground Zero: Explorations of Nuclear America

- From Wounded Knee to the Little Bighorn Casino: The Vietnam War in American History

- American Narrative in the Age of Postmodernism

- American Modernism

- Boundary Busting and Border Crossing

- Myth, Image, Fashion and Propaganda in the Cuban Revolutionary Era

- History and Memory

- American Foreign Policy

The remaining 60 credits are made up with a Dissertation. Written over the summer term, this 12,000 word extended study allows students to work on their own research project based on primary research. You have the opportunity to present your ideas as part of workshop sessions on researching American Studies in the core course and receive supervision from an academic specialist.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Assessment

Assessment for this course includes an extended essay, seminar presentation and a critical review of an academic research paper.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a thorough grounding in the techniques and approaches necessary for advanced research in American Studies.

- promote interdisciplinarity as a conceptual mode of theory and analysis (encourage you to ‘operate across disciplines, learning how to integrate a variety of approaches in formulating and solving problems, and using diverse materials and information sources.’

- encourage critical reflection and engagement with public debates relating to aspects of American society.

- consolidate the strengths of our long-running undergraduate programmes whilst interrogating, challenging, and moving outside the exceptionalist rhetoric and nation-state ideology of conventional American Studies (develop a ‘synthesising impulse…which can work across, as well as interrogate traditional discipline boundaries in innovative ways’.

- promote a curriculum supported by scholarship, staff development and a research culture that provides breadth and depth of intellectual inquiry and debate.

- assist you to develop cognitive and transferable skills relevant to their vocational and personal development.

Research areas

Staff interests broadly fit within the parameters of American literature, American history, American film and American politics, although we actively welcome interdisciplinary projects that investigate several areas of study. Current strengths in American Studies at Kent are: Native American literature and culture; African-American history; slavery and the Atlantic world; the American West; US environmental issues; US visual culture; Disney and recreation; American realist fiction; modern American poetry; US immigration politics; American science fiction; Hollywood; US foreign policy.

The American West
Kent is the only UK institution to operate a research cluster on the American West, with five members of the Centre specialising in trans-Mississippi studies. The research cluster engages in pioneering work on Native American literature, Western films and video games, female frontiering and several other elements of the Western experience.

The Study of US Environmental Issues
US environmental history is a relatively new field of study, but of increasing importance. Our two environmental specialists work on wildlife management, animal studies, nuclear protest and concepts of ecological doomsday.

The Study of Race, Ethnicity and Borders
The Centre has a long history of studying race and ethnicity. Currently, six members of the team cover a range of topics that include African-American political, cultural and social history, Native American literature, Latin American relations and immigration writing and politics.

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The postgraduate programme in Cultural History, Memory and Identity is concerned with the cultural practices and media of ‘history-making’; with the cultural representation and interpretation of ‘history’; and with the role of constructions of ‘the past’ within cultural and social formations. Read more
The postgraduate programme in Cultural History, Memory and Identity is concerned with the cultural practices and media of ‘history-making’; with the cultural representation and interpretation of ‘history’; and with the role of constructions of ‘the past’ within cultural and social formations. It is grounded in current interdisciplinary methodologies informed by cultural and critical theory, and draws on the course team’s specific areas of expertise within social, cultural and political history, cultural studies, literary studies, film and visual studies and the history of ideas. The programme develops a connection between critical understanding and analysis of the past, with a practical, ‘hands-on’ emphasis upon the skills and methods involved in the making of new historical accounts and representations. The programme incorporates interests and expertise spanning a wide range of cultural forms and practices, including oral history, life-story work and auto/biography, drama and performance, material artefacts, monuments, exhibitions, museums, written histories, imaginative literature, archival documents and records, painting, graphic design, photography, film, television, video, digital media, commemoration, and heritage.

These concerns are developed in relation to three pathways, each of which explores a particular field of enquiry with its own distinctive thematic and methodological focus: Cultural Memory; Making Histories; ‘Race’, Nation and Ethnicity. MA students enrol on one of these pathways; not all run every year. [For further details of the three pathways, see separate entries under these titles on this website.]

Each pathway comprises four component elements:

1: A compulsory core course unit that runs throughout the year and establishes the themes, issues and questions that characterize the field of enquiry, the theories and methods of its investigation and applies these to particular case studies:

For Cultural Memory the core course comprises: Cultural Memory: Concepts, Theories and Methods; Holocaust Memory; and Cultural Memory in Ireland.

For Making Histories the core course comprises: Public History, Heritage and the Representation of Brighton & Hove; Making the History of Slavery in the Atlantic World; and Making the History of the Second World War

For ‘Race’, Nation and Ethnicity the core course comprises: Constructions of Britishness: Histories, Cultures and Identities; The Making of the Black Atlantic; and Memory and Identity in Postcolonial Cultures.

2: Two optional units of 20 credits each, or one optional unit of 40 credits. These are usually taken from within the MA Humanities Programme, or from MA Programmes running elsewhere in the School of Humanities.

NB: these units may vary, and not all will be available in any one year. For up-to-date information, contact the Course Leader.

3. A Research Methods unit introducing relevant methods in cultural studies, historical inquiry, literary (textual) analysis, and cultural and critical theory; and guiding the formulation of a research topic with clear aims, methodology, sources, and a rationale for the intended treatment of the topic.


4: The Research Project enables students to investigate in depth a topic of their choice - a critical debate, or a body of cultural material, or an historical context - relevant to the broad concerns of the MA. Research normally leads to the production of a 20,000-word dissertation. The use of alternative modes of presentation - for example, the production of a video, an exhibition or a CD-Rom - may also be negotiated
.

Full-time students usually take two elements per term, part-time students usually take one. The pattern of study is flexible in order to allow all students to take advantage of the full range of options. Potential applicants are advised to discuss their particular interests with the Course Leader to explore how these might be accommodated. In cases where students’ preferred pathways or units are not available, there is usually scope to pursue these interests elsewhere on the programme, whether in relation to other units or through the Research Project.

A part-time student should expect to dedicate some 20 hours a week to their studies and a full-time student some 40 hours, mostly taken up by independent reading and writing. Teaching for all Core Courses normally takes place on weekday evenings and lasts 2 - 3 hours. Research Methods timetabling is negotiated with each group. The Research Project involves individual tuition at times agreed between student and supervisor.

The interdisciplinary course team are active researchers and leaders in their respective research fields. Please see their individual staff pages for further details of areas of research expertise and interest.
Visit Cultural History, Memory and Identity MA page on the University of Brighton website for more details!

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In this Research Master's programme, you will learn to critically analyse how gender and ethnicity intersect with other social and historical categories. Read more

Reconfigure identity constructions and power differences in our globalized world

In this Research Master's programme, you will learn to critically analyse how gender and ethnicity intersect with other social and historical categories.

In the two-year Research Master in Gender Studies (Research), you will analyse and problematise various structurally embedded conceptions about gender and ethnicity while considering other axes of difference, such as religion, age, and sexuality. Together with the academic staff and fellow students representing different academic fields—ranging from anthropology to literary studies—you will investigate gendered and racialised phenomena in a highly interdisciplinary setting.

Utrecht University’s Research Master in Gender Studies is one of Europe’s most advanced interdisciplinary teaching and research programme in Gender Studies. Our research-focused programme prepares students for postgraduate or PhD work in Gender Studies and related fields.

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The study of identity is a burgeoning area of sociological and cultural studies. Over a range of units, this programme provides an introduction to key themes in this field, with identity explored in both theoretical and substantive ways. Read more
The study of identity is a burgeoning area of sociological and cultural studies. Over a range of units, this programme provides an introduction to key themes in this field, with identity explored in both theoretical and substantive ways.

On the one hand, there has been an exciting and innovative strand of work to explore and re-theorise the ideas of subjectivity and selfhood in the context of changes brought about by late modern and postmodern society. On the other, the question of identity has come under scrutiny from within substantive areas of sociology, such as the sociology of race and ethnicity, the sociology of religion and the sociology of gender relations. There are also important discussions concerning the ways in which identities are recorded and observed, including debates over new narrative and other qualitative methodologies.

Programme structure

The MSc programme comprises six 12-week taught units and six assessed essays, followed by a dissertation.

Core units
-Contemporary Identities and Inequalities
-Dissertation

Optional units
You will also choose at least four further units from a list of sociology units. Options vary each year but may include:
-Contemporary Sociological Theory
-Theories of Ethnicity and Racism
-Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods
-Philosophy and Research Design
-Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
-Understanding Culture
-Narrating the Self
-The Theory and Politics of Multiculturalism
-Interpreting Gender
-Advanced Qualitative Research
-Advanced Quantitative Research
-Popular Music and Society
-Nations and Nationalism
-Care, Labour and Gender
-Religion and Politics in the West
-Understanding Risk

A maximum of one unit can be chosen from the other optional units that are offered by the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies in the academic year.

Third term
Independent study for dissertation.

Careers

Bristol graduates are in high demand and have an excellent record of employment following graduation. Students of our MSc programmes go on to pursue varied and interesting careers.

Many sectors - such as the civil service, NGO and charity work - require an MSc and some volunteer/internship experience. Graduates from our programmes have gone on to work for Refugee UK, Shelter, Barnardos, Oxfam, Amnesty International, government departments and the European Parliament, among others. Further details can be found on our careers and alumni website: http://www.bris.ac.uk/spais/prospective/prospectivepgt/ppgtcareersandalumni/

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This programme provides an introduction to a range of debates located within the so-called 'cultural turn' in sociological studies. Read more
This programme provides an introduction to a range of debates located within the so-called 'cultural turn' in sociological studies. Increasingly, sociologists are looking to the concept of culture as a source of explanation - and questioning - in their studies of contemporary social formations.

Both theoretical and substantive elements of this cultural turn are addressed. Therefore, the works of key thinkers within social and cultural theory (Pierre Bourdieu, Michel Foucault and others) are explored, while the role of cultural explanations within theories of race and ethnicity, gender relations and the sociology of religion (among others) is also given both theoretical and empirical consideration.

These issues are situated within the framework of analyses and critiques of wider debates and discourses in social and cultural theory on questions such as postmodernism, postfeminism and postcolonialism.

Programme structure

The MSc programme comprises six 12-week taught units and six assessed essays, followed by a dissertation.

Core units
-Understanding Culture
-Dissertation

Optional units - You may choose four optional sociology units. Options vary each year but may include:
-Contemporary Sociological Theory
-Theories of Ethnicity and Racism
-Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods
-Philosophy and Research Design
-Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
-Understanding Culture
-Narrating the Self
-The Theory and Politics of Multiculturalism
-Interpreting Gender
-Advanced Qualitative Research
-Advanced Quantitative Research
-Popular Music and Society
-Nations and Nationalism
-Care, Labour and Gender
-Religion and Politics in the West
-Understanding Risk

A maximum of one unit may be chosen from the other optional units that are offered by the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies in the academic year.

Third term
Independent study for dissertation.

Careers

Bristol graduates are in high demand and have an excellent record of employment following graduation. Graduates of our MSc programmes go on to pursue varied and interesting careers.

Many sectors - such as the civil service, NGOs and charity work - require an MSc and some volunteer/internship experience. Graduates from our programmes have gone on to work for Refugee UK, Shelter, Barnardos, Oxfam, Amnesty International, governement departments and the European Parliament, among others. Further details can be found on our careers and alumni website: http://www.bris.ac.uk/spais/prospective/prospectivepgt/ppgtcareersandalumni/

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This programme gives you the opportunity to extend your core sociological knowledge and understanding. It will also consolidate familiarity with the discipline for those with a background in a related subject, but without specialised knowledge of sociology. Read more
This programme gives you the opportunity to extend your core sociological knowledge and understanding. It will also consolidate familiarity with the discipline for those with a background in a related subject, but without specialised knowledge of sociology.

The key learning goals are to develop critical use and comprehension of social theory, gain a grounding in methodologies and techniques of enquiry, and focus on distinctive, substantive sociological topics, such as ethnicity, multiculturalism, gender, sexuality, religion and culture.

The dissertation gives you the opportunity to pursue a sociological project of your choice in greater depth, while still providing close academic supervision.

Programme structure

The MSc programme comprises six 12-week taught units and six assessed essays, followed by a dissertation.

Core units
-Contemporary Sociological Theory
-Dissertation

And either:
-Qualitative Social Research
OR
-Quantitative Social Research

Optional units - You may choose four units from the list of sociology options. Options vary each year but may include:
-Contemporary Sociological Theory
-Theories of Ethnicity and Racism
-Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods
-Philosophy and Research Design
-Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
-Understanding Culture
-Narrating the Self
-The Theory and Politics of Multiculturalism
-Interpreting Gender
-Advanced Qualitative Research
-Advanced Quantitative Research
-Popular Music and Society
-Nations and Nationalism
-Care, Labour and Gender
-Religion and Politics in the West
-Understanding Risk

You will also study a maximum of one unit from the remaining optional units that are offered by the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies in the academic year.

Third term
Independent study for dissertation.

Careers

Bristol graduates are in high demand and have an excellent record of employment following graduation. Students of our MSc programmes go on to pursue varied and interesting careers.

Many sectors - such as the civil service, NGOs and charity work - require an MSc and some volunteer/internship experience. Graduates from our programmes have gone on to work for Refugee UK, Shelter, Barnardos, Oxfam, Amnesty International, government departments and the European Parliament, among others. For further information, see our careers and alumni website: http://www.bris.ac.uk/spais/prospective/prospectivepgt/ppgtcareersandalumni/

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Migration in today's globalised world stands at the heart of key national and international debates; including migrants' and asylum seekers' rights and citizenship; state security and border management; and the globalisation of skilled labour markets. Read more
Migration in today's globalised world stands at the heart of key national and international debates; including migrants' and asylum seekers' rights and citizenship; state security and border management; and the globalisation of skilled labour markets. This interdisciplinary MSc offers the best of migration teaching from across UCL's Faculties.

Degree information

The programme combines theoretical and policy debates about migration. Students are equipped with the advanced skills, methods, concepts and theories essential for the study of global migration and gain the opportunity to apply them in both general and more specialised contexts relating to the processes, policies and politics of migration.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), a compulsory methods module (15 credits), and five elective modules (75 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Interdisciplinary Approaches to Global Migration
-Issues in Global Migration
-Social Science Research Methodologies and Methods I

Elective modules - students choose a range of modules for courses offered across UCL which offer specialisation on migration which may include the following:
-Social Science Research Methodologies and Methods II (essential only if intending further research training)
-Thinking Space
-Migration and Urban Multiculture
-Mining Social and Geographic Datasets
-Globalisation and Security
-Gender, Generation and Forced Migration
-Ethnicity, Migration and Health
-Migration in the European Union
-International Human Rights Law
-Gender, Generation and Forced Migration
-Anthropology of Nationalism, Ethnicity and Race
-Anthropology and Development
-Postcolonial Cultural Geographies
-Comparative Human Rights Law
-Globalisation in the Twentieth Century
-Equality, Justice and Difference
-Population and Development
-Economics of Migration (Economics prerequisites)

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, presentations, discussions, independent reading, practicals and workshops. The majority of modules are assessed through coursework although a small number are assessed by examination.

Careers

Graduates of this programme will be well equipped to work with migrants and asylum seekers in different parts of the world, and gain posts in UN, EU, national policy think-tanks, government research and policy departments, NGOs, community-based and grassroots organisations. The programme provides an excellent foundation for students wishing to pursue doctorates in the interdisciplinary field of migration studies.

Employability
Graduates have gone on to work in a range of careers related to migration. The recent destinations of students who graduated from this programme include law, research, policy making and campaigning work. One recent graduate is now a trainee barrister specialising in migration law, another works for a government agency for refugees in Norway. Other recent graduates have found employment in local government posts in the UK and in international organisatiosn such as the Migration Policy Institute. A number of graduates have also successfully received funding to complete further degrees.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has internationally recognised expertise in the field of migration. It has two established research units, the Migration Research Unit and the Centre for Research on Economic Analysis of Migration. Cutting-edge research on migration also takes place across UCL in many different disciplines including law, public policy, anthropology, development planning, area studies, humanities and health. The involvement of such a wide range of disciplines in teaching on the MSc in Global Migration MSc is unique.

Students benefit from the consolidation of migration expertise across UCL which is complemented by a departmental migration seminar series, and a vibrant and expanding body of PhD students in this field.

Migration research at UCL has a strong international dimension, benefiting from networks across Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas.

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The MA Programme in Education is a unique opportunity for experienced professionals to gain a practice-focused higher degree. Specialisms in Autism and SEND are also available. Read more
The MA Programme in Education is a unique opportunity for experienced professionals to gain a practice-focused higher degree. Specialisms in Autism and SEND are also available. Individual MA modules can also be taken as Continued Professional Development (CPD).

The MA engages with education across the age range from early years to adulthood and is relevant to a wide diversity of educational settings. Students will gain much from working with a diverse group of peers and tutors from a wide range of educational backgrounds. The close association between the Centre for Educational Research and the MA provides opportunities to work with like-minded research-active peers within a lively and supportive learning community. Opportunities for accreditation of prior learning are available to participants with an appropriate background and this should be discussed with the admissions tutor who will also explain the CPD processes on request.

Modes of study:
- Within a partnership school as part of a school cohort.
- As an independent student.

The programme's distinctive and innovative feature is its school-based character. For most participants their schools and colleges have always been the context of their study. This programme allows the work that participants do, as they write about issues of central concern to themselves and their institutions, to be properly valued. It places much importance upon the value of a professional practice approach to study at Masters level, allowing all aspects of this practice to inform and to be informed by critical reading of the literature, by theory and by relevant research.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/education-ma

Modules

Core modules:
- Teaching and learning
This module will focus on the implications of developments in teaching and learning and changing beliefs about curriculum and assessment -within the school and its local and national context - which have accompanied them. A central aim is that discussion, planning and development, both within the school and across related common modules, will be both encouraged and informed by a shared critical understanding of such changes in practice. Furthermore, this activity will take place within an agreed framework designed specifically to provide the support that participants need.

- Researching education
In this module you will reflect on the purpose of educational research and deepen the understanding of what we mean by knowledge. Also in this module you'll question the ways of producing knowledge and learn to critically evaluate published research. You'll practice formulating researchable questions and identifying appropriate methodologies to answer those questions. You'll also learn how to plan, implement and evaluate educational intervention. You'll write a research design for the Dissertation project.

- Dissertation

Optional modules:
- Equality and Achievement
This module focuses on problematic definitions and teachers' understandings of the words in a rapidly changing political climate. You'll explore issues of equality (and inequality), broadly in relation to social class, 'race' and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, disability and inclusion, as well as linguistic diversity. You'll also explore current debates as well as some of the historical antecedents. The context of the module is the UK, with comparisons where appropriate, and awareness of local influences as well as attitudes of and priorities for the young people, their parents/carers, and communities are reflected in the Module.

- Language and Literacy across the Curriculum
In this module you will focus on aspects of language use across the curriculum central to pupils' cognitive and social development, including consideration of pupils' writing, reading and speaking/listening. Exploration of the relationship between language, class, gender, culture, ethnicity and learning will underpin the whole module. You'll be encouraged to consider these theoretical frameworks in the context of your specific school and to identify potential areas for practical exploration at department/whole-school level.

- Leadership and Management
In this module you will critically examines the challenges of school leadership in the urban context. You will explore conceptions of leadership and considers the implications for participants working at different levels within your institution. Within the module a central aim is to examine theoretical conceptions of educational leadership situated in the political contexts within which we work.

- School Effectiveness and School Improvement
In this module you'll critically examine the contemporary interest in the claims of the School Effectiveness and School Improvement discourses and their influence on practice. A shared critical understanding of these influences on practice will inform discussion, development and planning within areas of the work of the school.

- Implementing Change in the School: Theories, Perspective, And Analysis

- Framework Module – this is a module negotiated with the school and tutors
You'll understand how to ensure that your research and development activity is rooted in teachers' professional practice and so be of value to the young people you work with, and to your school. This module provides you and your school with opportunities to research and develop your own educational practice, policy, and research skills through looking outwards, but in ways that can be specifically tailored to address your needs.

Assessment

You'll be assessed by essays, portfolios of school-based work, critiques of research, action research studies, formal presentations, seminar presentations and annotated bibliographies.

Employability

The programme is designed to complement and support all current career and professional development initiatives and frameworks. It will naturally extend to the provision of evidence required for addressing the Professional Standards for teachers and hence progression throughout the teaching profession.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

The course has been designed and developed in partnership with schools, Southwark Local Authority and other Educational stakeholders in the London area. The MA would provide an excellent pathway to the LSBU's Doctorate in Education (EdD), which has a special focus on equality, diversity and sustainability.

We are continually reviewing, in partnership with participating schools and students, the provision of units, developing the course to meet the ongoing needs of participants.

Colleagues from the School of Law and Social Sciences, in particular the Families and Social Capital Group, are regular contributors as guest lecturers. Speakers from a range of external organisations also contribute to units across the course. Recent guest lectures have been given by disabled academics and parents of pupils who have experienced special education.

The department has wide professional links within and beyond the university and the UK. Examples include:

- The Equality Challenge Unit
- The Alliance for Inclusive Education
- Equality and Diversity Forum Research Network
- The Leadership Foundation
- Research Autism
- Theorising Autism Project
- Teacher Education for Equality and Sustainability Network (TEESNet)
- National Association of Disability Practitioners
- Commonworks (for a just and sustainable world)

Placements

Access to the workplace (including voluntary work) is essential for most of the modules within the MA.

Teaching and learning

Students also have the opportunity of benefiting from engagement with the research profile of the Education Department, with its particular expertise in global citizenship and sustainable development education, equality and inclusion, and the personal and social development of young people in schools.

You'll benefit from an up to date Virtual Learning Environment via Moodle and be actively encouraged to make use of the extensive range of support services across the university. You'll have access to a supervisor during the dissertation phase.

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Developing an eye for the diversity in backgrounds and for the difference in treatments and policies these diversities require. Girls discuss the same problems differently to boys. Read more
Developing an eye for the diversity in backgrounds and for the difference in treatments and policies these diversities require.
Girls discuss the same problems differently to boys. Immigrants frequently exhibit pathology different to natives. How can this be? And how do you deal with this? This Master’s specialisation focuses on the diversities in youth care. Diversities in the area of ethnicity, religion, gender and social-economic class. You will develop an eye for the diversity in backgrounds and for the difference in treatments and policies these diversities require.
The Master’s specialisation in Diversities in Youth Care challenges you to look differently at care giving and welfare policies. You will gain specific knowledge and develop a sixth sense on the health care needs of young people. You will broaden your vision. How come fewer immigrants accept (certain forms of) help? How can you make homosexuality a subject of discussion in certain cultures? You will look beyond your own values and differentiate between your own ethical beliefs and cultural values and universal beliefs.
Upon graduating you will be an expert in the area of diversities in youth care. Besides plenty of knowledge, skills and – if you want – experience abroad, you will have a dose of cultural relativism. Why do we do it like that? How could we do it differently? You can use this in your work as remedial educationalist or policy maker. After graduating you will be able to work in and outside of the Netherlands at (development) organisations and institutions in the fields of youth care, education, adoption and refugee relief.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/youthcare

Why study Diversities in Youth Care at Radboud University?

- You may pick electives from different Master’s programmes like Religious Studies, Cultural Anthropology and Management Science. These electives fit in well with the programme Diversities in Youth Care. More information can be found on the programme outline page.

- There is plenty of opportunity to go abroad for an elective or an internship. Our network includes a university and relief organisations in Bangladesh, foster homes and orphanages in Romania and the Ukraine and schools in several African countries.

- Radboud University has the only education and research institute in the Netherlands within the field of social sciences which specialises in gender and sexuality: Institute for Gender Studies (IGS). This means you will have access to the latest and most relevant research.

- The programme collaborates with the knowledge centre Sekse en Diversiteit in Medisch Onderwijs (SDMO) (i.e. Gender and Diversity in Medical Education) of Radboudumc. We exchange case studies and give one another guest lectures. You will profit from this exchange of knowledge!

Change perspective

This programme will continually challenge you to adjust your point of view. To look beyond your own values. What is the dividing line between your ethical beliefs and those of the other people? And at what point have universal values been seriously affected?
You are taught to look at it from the point of view of a child growing up in poverty, of a homosexual youth, of someone with a Moroccan father and a Dutch mother, of a child living in a reconstituted family or in a family with strong religious beliefs. You are taught to continually look at issues from someone else’s perspective. In other words, to be flexible when it comes to making judgements and having expectations. Changing your perspective is the very core of this programme.

Career prospects

Upon completing this Master’s specialisation, you will be an expert in youth care concerning diverse backgrounds and personal traits. There is a large need for professionals who know how to deal with homosexual immigrants, with children who don’t speak the local language or youths that have been traumatised by war. Such knowledge and experience are gained in this programme. You will have a flexible view of diverse backgrounds and be critical of your own area of expertise. After graduating you will be a remedial educationalist or policy maker with an expertise that organisations are desperately in need of!

Job positions

As a professional in Diversities in Youth Care you can work in and outside of the Netherlands in the area of youth care and development. You can work as a policy maker or researcher in organisations as Unicef, adoption agencies, the EU, local governments or research institutions. You can also work as a remedial educationalist for mental health care organisations, refugee centres or with specific groups of children like refugees or LGBT children.

Our approach to this field

The political and media interest for problems regarding ethnicity, gender and sexuality is huge. How do you deal with it? How do you develop policies? This requires specialist knowledge. Knowledge that goes beyond the borders of a country, a culture and a set of beliefs. The Dutch have a very individualistic approach to happiness while other cultures believe that a happy family unit is more important for one’s own happiness. You will not learn what is wrong and what is right, but how things can be different. This will ensure that the policies you will develop will also be different.

The Master’s specialisation in Diversities in Youth Care will train you to become a specialised caregiver. The programme focuses on social issues in the area of diversity. You can develop a clinical or policymaking approach within youth care and diversities of youth. After graduating you will have knowledge on the role of different backgrounds. Whether it’s about culture, religion or gender, you will be flexible enough to identify various problems and to judge and treat them from the right perspective.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/youthcare

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The Department of Geography's master of arts program educates qualified students for work toward the PhD degree, and for professional careers in government service, federal agencies, health departments, industry and regional or urban planning. Read more
The Department of Geography's master of arts program educates qualified students for work toward the PhD degree, and for professional careers in government service, federal agencies, health departments, industry and regional or urban planning. The department's goals are to provide students quality academic instruction in geography; to foster and advance teaching, research and publication in the field of geography; and to provide the expertise of geographers to the community at large so that decision-makers in both the public and private sectors may enhance the quality of their decisions.

The program offers theoretical foundation and computer applications in
- Resource Management and Sustainability
- Water Resources
- Flooding and Watershed Impacts
- Environmental Hazard Assessment
- Race and Ethnicity
- Population Health GIS
- Urban and Retail Planning

The program also allows students to specialize in one of five tracks, each of which offer a mix of theory, practice, tools and techniques:
- Cartography and Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
- Environmental and Resource Management
- Population Health and GIS
- Urban Planning and Applied Geography
- Race and Ethnicity

There is a thesis option for each of the five tracks. Each track requires a total of 40 credits, as well as defense of a project or a thesis.

Applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university you have attended
- Two letters of recommendation
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

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The own-group biases are indicated by superior recognition for faces of one’s own group relative to another group. These groups include ethnicity (Meissner & Brigham, 2001), gender (Wright & Sladden, 2001), age (Anastasi & Rhodes, 2007), and even university (Hugenberg, Millar, & Claypool, 2008). Read more
The own-group biases are indicated by superior recognition for faces of one’s own group relative to another group. These groups include ethnicity (Meissner & Brigham, 2001), gender (Wright & Sladden, 2001), age (Anastasi & Rhodes, 2007), and even university (Hugenberg, Millar, & Claypool, 2008). There are two broad theories explaining these biases: socio-cognitive motivational theories (Sporer, 2001) and perceptual theories (Valentine & Endo, 2002). Eye-tracking has been used to find evidence for both theories but using different groups thereby making any general conclusions about the own-group biases impossible. Evidence suggests that ethnicity determines how faces are viewed (Caldara et al., 2010; Hills, Cooper, & Pake, 2013). However, Hills & Willis (2016) and Man & Hills (in press) have found that people view own- and other-age and gender faces differently. This, therefore, suggests that these biases may be based on different mechanisms.

The proposed study will employ eye-tracking to explore four own-group biases described above using within-participant designs in order to rule out confounding variables and participant effects. Participants view 40 faces (half inverted to measure the face-inversion effect, Yin, 1969) and after a delay view 80 faces (half new) in a standard old/new recognition paradigm, repeated for each type of face.

How to apply: Applications are made via our website using the Apply Online button below. If you have an enquiry about this project please contact us via the Email NOW button below, however your application will only be processed once you have submitted an application form as opposed to emailing your CV to us. Application deadline: 24 July 2017.

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