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Masters Degrees (Esrc Recognised)

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This Masters will examine when and why humans develop social relations with other individuals or social groups, and the psychological consequences of these social relations. . Read more

This Masters will examine when and why humans develop social relations with other individuals or social groups, and the psychological consequences of these social relations. 

The programme offers a social-developmental psychology training that will advance the careers of anyone who's interested in the people professions – diverse careers related to education, work, health, government and non-profit organisations.

Humans have a fundamental ‘need to belong’ and form relationships. Positive relationships lead to higher well-being, personal development and well-functioning societies, whereas a lack or dysfunctional relationships lead to poor psychological well-being, unhealthy development and conflict or violence within society. 

The programme will teach you about the different psychological approaches to studying social relations in children, adolescents and adults, drawing from different areas of study within psychology (eg social and personality psychology, developmental psychology, educational psychology, clinical psychology, social neuroscience).

These approaches are relevant to anyone interested in understanding social relations between individuals (ie families and friendships) and social groups within a variety of settings (eg schools, the workplace, social movements). The programme will also introduce different strategies aimed at improving social relations between individuals and groups (eg intergroup contact, bullying interventions, mentoring schemes).

Research methods training

The programme will offer ESRC recognised research methods training, which will be useful for students wishing to pursue doctoral training or work in careers where such skills will be appreciated by employers in private and public sectors.

Diverse career opportunities

Given the importance of social relationships for motivation and well-being and given societal issues that arise out of social and racial inequalities and conflicting cultural values, this programme will offer useful insights for diverse careers related to counselling, education, businesses, and government/non-profit organizations. Moreover, you will benefit from conducting research in cosmopolitan London, where diverse socio-cultural groups co-exist in relative harmony.

Modules & structure

The programme is made up of a total of 180 credits, comprised of:

  • four core modules (totalling 105 credits)
  • two core optional module (30 credits)
  • three other optional modules (totalling 45 credits)

Core modules

The following modules are all required: 

  • Critical Issues in the Psychological Study of Social Relations
  • Statistical Methods
  • Research, Design and Analysis
  • Independent Research Project of your choice, supervised by leading experts in the field

Core optional modules

You select two of the following core optional modules which focus on child relationships, adult close relationships, or group relations:

  • Social-Moral Development
  • The Interpersonal Self
  • Social Psychology of Social Problems

For the 2017-2018 academic year, The Interpersonal Self will not be offered, so you will need to take both Social Moral Development and Social Psychology of Social Problems.

Optional modules

Three other optional modules may be selected from a range offered in the Department of Psychology, including the remaining core optional module listed above. Other possible modules include:

  • Addictive Behaviours 
  • Psychology and Education - For 2017-18 academic year this module will not be offered
  • Investigative Forensic Psychology
  • Psychology of the Arts, Aesthetics and Attraction
  • Advanced Quantitative Methods
  • Statistical Data Analysis Project
  • Theoretical Issues in Psychology

The following options are also available to students in this MSc programme from the Institute of Management Studies (IMS). There is a possibility that some of these modules are not available as they may be offered at the same time as one of the Psychology modules above.

  • Organisational Behaviour and Health
  • Leadership and Talent Management 
  • Psychology of Marketing and Advertising 
  • Training, Coaching and Counselling

Skills

The programme will:

  • develop your knowledge and understanding of psychological approaches and common psychological methods for studying social relations in children and adults
  • enable you to develop a thorough knowledge of psychological theories and interventions in relation to improving social relations in a range of social settings
  • equip you with transferable knowledge and skills required to undertake psychological research, including the design, implementation and interpretation of studies and communication of outcomes

Careers

As a graduate of this programme you'll be able to use your knowledge of social relations in the workplace. This will help you advance your career in a wide variety of settings (including clinical, health, educational and work organisations) that involve human relationships, at both the individual and group level.

With the help of the tutors, you'll also be encouraged to work with one or more of the many organisations (private, public, or third sector) available in greater London for your independent research project, which will help you establish a professional network.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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The ESRC recognised MSc Economics aims to provide students with a thorough knowledge and understanding of the concepts, tools and methods of modern economics, together with the application of these methods to the analysis of economic problems. Read more

The ESRC recognised MSc Economics aims to provide students with a thorough knowledge and understanding of the concepts, tools and methods of modern economics, together with the application of these methods to the analysis of economic problems.

Introducing your course

Are you fascinated by the constant regulatory failure in the real economy? Apply for the Masters in Economics course at the University of Southampton and study economic theory and econometric methods to evaluate economic policy. This Masters in Economics degree is recognised by the ESRC, and will train you in a wide range of economic topics, culminating in a dissertation on a subject within this area of your choosing.

Overview

The full-time programme lasts 12 months, with nine months of taught modules between October and June of the academic year, followed by three summer months of supervised research for a Masters’ dissertation.

Part-time programme lasts 27 months and consists of the same components as the full-time version. Students consult with the Head of Masters to establish a detailed plan of studies to fulfil the programme requirements.

You can expect to enjoy predominantly small-group teaching and a considerable degree of individual attention from members of staff. MSc students are strongly encouraged to attend our seminars and research workshops. Our MSc students usually form a lively and cohesive group which plays an active role in the Division's academic and social life.

View the programme specification document for this course



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Our MSc Economics and MSc Economics and Econometrics are designed to equip you to undertake independent research in economics and also to provide the training necessary for a career as an economist in the public and the private sector. Read more

Our MSc Economics and MSc Economics and Econometrics are designed to equip you to undertake independent research in economics and also to provide the training necessary for a career as an economist in the public and the private sector. They are ESRC-recognised research training programmes.

Introducing your course

Become fluent in quantitative methods with a Masters in Economics and Econometrics degree. This masters course, provided by the University of Southampton by one of the largest and most active econometric theory groups in the UK, will give a rigorous training in economic and econometric analysis to students with a strong mathematical and statistical background.

This ESRC recognised Masters in Economics and Econometrics degree will provide advanced training within this field and is highly recommended to students wishing to progress to a research degree.

Overview

The full-time programme lasts 12 months, with nine months of taught modules between October and June of the academic year, followed by three summer months of supervised research for a Masters’ dissertation.

Part-time programme lasts 27 months and consist of the same components as the full-time version. Students consult with the Head of Masters to establish a detailed plan of studies to fulfil the programme requirements.

You can expect to enjoy predominantly small-group teaching and a considerable degree of individual attention from members of staff. MSc students are strongly encouraged to attend our seminars and research workshops. Our MSc students usually form a lively and cohesive group which plays an active role in the Division's academic and social life.

View the programme specification document for this course



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The MRes is a research training Masters programme which provides rigorous training in socio-legal research skills to enable you to carry out doctoral-level research using legal and socio-legal methodology or, alternatively, to embark on a career as a specialist socio-legal researcher. Read more
The MRes is a research training Masters programme which provides rigorous training in socio-legal research skills to enable you to carry out doctoral-level research using legal and socio-legal methodology or, alternatively, to embark on a career as a specialist socio-legal researcher.

The programme is ESRC-recognised. This means it meets the research training requirements of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and that you are eligible to apply for ESRC funding for PhD research. Only a handful of Law Schools in the UK offer ESRC recognised programmes in this field.

The taught programme offers research training in generic social-science skills, providing you with a solid basis in social science theory and methodology through modules offered to all social science postgraduates across the University. These are then built on within the socio-legal context through two skills-based modules offered by the Law School. Specialist modules reflect the socio-legal research expertise of staff. The supervised research dissertation will allow you to bring together the conceptual and practical skills acquired in the taught modules and demonstrate your understanding by applying them to your own research ideas in the socio-legal context. Teaching is mainly seminar and workshop based.

For further information on this programme please visit our website: http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/law/sociolegalmres

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The MA in Political Economy programme at Manchester University offers a cross-disciplinary curriculum of study in political economy. Read more
The MA in Political Economy programme at Manchester University offers a cross-disciplinary curriculum of study in political economy. The MA is housed in the Centre for the Study of Political Economy, which brings together the world-class research strengths in the field of political economy at Manchester University. The programme is taught from members across the Faculty of Humanities in the School of Social Sciences, the School of Environment and Development, and the Alliance Manchester Business School.

Each student will pursue their particular interests in political economy through one of four pathways:
-Theoretical Political Economy
-Political Economy of Society, Space and Environment
-Political Economy of Finance, Business and Work
-Political Economy of Development.

Each pathway offers courses drawn from across the different disciplines in the schools, offering the student a unique exposure to the full breadth of the field of political economy. The research route is an ESRC recognised 1 + 3 programme which offers training in both quantitative and qualitative research methods that prepare students for doctoral research.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director.

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This ESRC recognised research-training programme provides a broad and in-depth grounding in the study and methodologies of the most challenging problems our world currently faces, such as international conflict and instability, terrorism, climate change, or rapid globalisation. Read more
This ESRC recognised research-training programme provides a broad and in-depth grounding in the study and methodologies of the most challenging problems our world currently faces, such as international conflict and instability, terrorism, climate change, or rapid globalisation. Building on a thorough understanding of international relations theory, our programme trains you in how to apply and leverage methods and research design to answer the most pressing societal questions of our time.

Why this programme

◾If you are planning to pursue a research-intensive career or doctoral studies, including under the ESRC 1+3 scheme, this programme is designed for you. This degree provides a pathway to ESRC sponsored postgraduate fellowships.
◾This programme offers training in what international relations has to say about some of the most challenging problems in international politics and equips you with the appropriate methods and a good understanding of research design to analyse political data.
◾The MRes covers common material with the MSc in International Relations and provides in-depth methodological training for those who seek to continue their studies with a PhD degree at doctoral level. It draws on expertise in the fields of international relations theory, normative international theory, international security, international organisations, non-state actors, human rights, humanitarian intervention, and international political economy.
◾You will have the opportunity to approach the subject from a variety of disciplinary approaches through courses across the School of Social & Political Sciences, School of Law, history and other subjects.
◾You will benefit from a number of research and teaching initiatives which touch on important international issues, including Global Security Roundtable, Global Security Network, Glasgow Centre for International Development, Glasgow Refugee, Asylum & Migration Network; and Glasgow Human Rights Network.
◾You will gain a wide range of transferrable skills, including how to convey complex ideas and information effectively both orally and in writing, or how to analyse problems in international politics to inform the public debate.

Programme structure

You will take five core and one optional course. You will attend lectures, seminars and tutorials and undertake independent research in the form of a dissertation.

Core courses
◾International relations research
◾International relations theory
◾Qualitative research methods
◾Quantitative data analysis
◾Research design.

Optional courses
◾China's international politics
◾Chinese politics and society
◾Comparative public opinion
◾Critical perspectives on human rights
◾Environmental policies and problems in China
◾EU in international politics and development
◾Human rights and global politics
◾Humanitarian intervention
◾International security and strategic thought
◾International organisations
◾International relations and development
◾Internet and civil society
◾Media and democracy
◾Politics of foreign policy.

You may also be able to choose from courses in the other subjects in the School of Social & Political Sciences (subject to programme convener's approval).

Career prospects

The programme is ideal for students interested in pursuing studies at doctoral level and obtain a PhD degree. Outside academia, the programme provides you with key knowledge and analytical tools relevant to a career in a variety of settings related to international relations, such as international and domestic non-governmental organisations, international organisations such as the United Nations or the European Union, government agencies, media, think tanks. Our programme is supported by the College Employability Office to help students with collaborative dissertation projects, professionalisation of their web presence, job applications and placement. These offerings are supplemented by efforts to build active networks through speaker events, social activities, and alumni events.

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The MA in Geography (Research Methods) - or MARM - aims to give a broad training in social science research methodology as well as more specific training in the approaches and techniques used in human geography. Read more

The MA in Geography (Research Methods) - or MARM - aims to give a broad training in social science research methodology as well as more specific training in the approaches and techniques used in human geography. There is a balance between theory and practical application. The degree programme includes skills training and reflection on personal experience, and those students who are going on to MPhil/PhD work are encouraged to relate what they learn to their future research. Most of the teaching is in small groups and emphasises student engagement and discussion. The MARM is an ESRC recognised Masters training course and all modules are designed and delivered in line within the ESRC's requirements. All modules include formative and summative assessment. The teaching programme is delivered in Terms 1 and 2. From Easter onwards students work on their dissertation with the support of an allocated supervisor.

Course Structure

The MARM is composed of six core (compulsory) modules and a choice from three optional modules. The core modules total 150 credits and, in addition, students take 30 credits from the optional modules adding up to a total of 180 credits. The course is delivered by the Department of Geography, the Department of Anthropology, the Department of Psychology and the School of Applied Social Sciences (SASS).

Core Modules

  • Philosophy and Theory in Contemporary Human Geography
  • Research Frontiers in Human Geography
  • Using Geographical Skills and Techniques
  • Perspectives on Social Research
  • Fieldwork and Interpretation: Qualitative Research Methods
  • Dissertation

Optional Modules available in previous years include:

  • Statistical Exploration and Reasoning
  • Applied Statistics
  • Quantitative Methods in Social Science.


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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The Department of Criminology at Swansea University has run a successful MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology since 1997. Students of the Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology will have the opportunity to learn about crime, the criminal justice system and cutting edge themes in criminology from leading experts in the field. The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology specialises in the application of criminological knowledge to the workings of the Criminal Justice System and this is strongly reflected in the exciting range of diverse and cutting-edge modules on offer.

The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology focuses mainly on the application of knowledge to the operation of the criminal justice system, reflecting the policy/ practice orientation of members of the staff team.

Whether you are a practitioner working in the criminal justice system, a researcher wishing to gain a firm foundation for a research degree in an ESRC recognised Doctoral Training Centre, or an undergraduate aspiring to a career in criminal justice, our Masters-level degree in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology is for you! The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology offers you:

• an up-to-date and high quality programme which includes some of the most important theory and research in criminal justice and criminology

• an opportunity to develop your ability to apply criminal justice and criminological knowledge to research and the operation of the criminal justice system

• an opportunity to develop and apply research methods knowledge and skills

• enhanced employability for those wishing to pursue a career in the criminal justice system and for those interested in an academic or research career

Modules

Modules on the MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology typically include:

• Ethics and Philosophy of Social Research

• Quantitative Methods

• Qualitative Methods

• Case Studies in Applied Social Research

• Data Visualisation

• Crime, Drugs and Alcohol

• Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice

• Applied Criminal Justice

• Understanding Policing

• Youth Justice: Research, Policy & Practice

• Criminal Justice System in England and Wales

• Sexual Abuse and Exploitation of Children

• Human Trafficking

Careers and Employability

The MA in Applied Criminal Justice & Criminology will open the door to a range of careers, including: Local Government, Police Force, Prison Service, Social Work, Victim Support, Teaching, and Probation Service to name a few. Enhancing your career prospects whilst studying on this course, you will have a wealth of opportunities to take advantage of in order to boost your CV and form important employment links for the future.

Additional Information

Every student is allocated a Personal Tutor who offers academic and pastoral care throughout the student’s stay in Swansea. Several lecturers invite senior criminal justice practitioners, managers, and policy makers to deliver lectures on key aspects of criminal justice policy and practice. The Department of Criminology also ensures that MA in Applied Criminal Justice & Criminology students participate in social events through the Criminology Society which organises events that give students opportunities to socialise and meet others in the Department of Criminology. There may also be placement and research internship opportunities available to students (subject to availability). Research internships provide opportunities for students to observe practices in a criminal justice agency and then produce their dissertation on a topic that is relevant to the work of the agency.

Student Quotes

- Christie Owen, MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology graduate 2010 -11

“There are a range of different modules covering a broad spectrum of subjects. Helpful tutoring means that those who have not studied Criminology previously will find the subject easy to pick up. There are plenty of approachable staff and lecturers to seek advice if you are unsure. Lectures are well structured with scope for debate with your peers and lecturers, as well as informative media such as videos and power point presentations. There is continuous mentoring while completing dissertations, with supervisors engaging well with students and aiding them in making it more manageable. Supervisors are continuously available to answer any questions or solve any problems that arise while writing such a large piece of work. The library services are also extremely helpful, with access to many books, journals and the internet with a room specifically for postgraduates which is very much needed during busier periods.

The Masters degree in Criminology encouraged me to pursue a career in the Prison Service. After graduating I was offered a position following my first interview and the course has given me skills to use in my new position.”

- Peter Doyle, MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology graduate

Retired Detective Chief Inspector and Senior Investigating Officer Peter, from Kenfig near Porthcawl, had specialised in Homicide and Serious Crime Investigation and has an extensive background in Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) investigation.

“The course was challenging for me as I do not possess a first degree – a particular challenge was writing in an academic style. I overcame the challenges by applying practice and more practice – plus support from those within the College and my family. I believe the key is not worrying about every mistake you make but learning from them instead.

“I chose Swansea University because it has an excellent reputation for criminology studies and I also worked in Swansea for many years as a police officer. It was a great honour to meet people on my course from such a wide spectrum and of all ages – this was very inspiring, I was made to feel welcome by everyone involved.”



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This programme trains you in the fundamental aspects of quantitative and qualitative research, including research design, data collection and data analysis, and provides practical, ‘hands-on’ experience. Read more

This programme trains you in the fundamental aspects of quantitative and qualitative research, including research design, data collection and data analysis, and provides practical, ‘hands-on’ experience.

The programme will appeal to you if you would like to develop your career in experimental research, or to enhance your ability to apply research skills in either the public or the private sector.

The programme will enable you to:

  • gain a thorough knowledge of a range of behavioural and social science methodologies
  • understand the principles of quantitative and qualitative research
  • correctly apply advanced statistical and computing techniques
  • enhance your skills in critical analysis and evaluation of research findings
  • consider philosophical and ethical issues in relation to science in general and to psychological research in particular
  • develop expertise in data collection, handling large data sets and data analysis
  • appropriately plan and design, present and evaluate, effective psychological research studies

You also complete a research project leading to a dissertation, and you participate in general research skills training modules with students from other departments at Goldsmiths.

For more than ten years now, the programme has been recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council(ESRC) as providing the generic and specific research training required by students in receipt of ESRC studentship awards.

Since 2011, the programme has been the research methods training masters for the psychology pathway within the Goldsmiths and Queen Mary ESRC-funded Doctoral Training Centre (2011-2015).

Students in receipt of an ESRC 1+3 PhD studentship in the psychology pathway have to take this course as the first year of a 4-year PhD programme; students who have completed the Masters self-funded, are eligible to bid for an ESRC funded +3 PhD studentship in the psychology pathway at Goldsmiths or Queen Mary. 

Structure

The MRes runs for one academic year full-time or two years part-time. Most of the lectures, seminars and workshops on the programme run in the first two terms, but you are expected to pursue your studies beyond formal term times, particularly in respect of your research project.

Lectures, seminars and workshops for the programme are timetabled mainly for Mondays and Tuesdays, but you may occasionally be required to attend other seminars and workshops held by the Department and College. You must take all the modules listed in the syllabus.

The list below provides an overview of the topics covered in each module. All modules include a strong practical component.

In addition to these modules, you will also complete:

Research Project (60 credits)

You will produce an empirical piece of research leading to a research project, supervised by at least one member of the lecturing staff in the Department. The project provides invaluable, practical ‘hands on’ experience of evaluating a particular research question. You have the opportunity to set your research question, determine and apply the methods to obtain the answers, and present, discuss and interpret the results. You normally start your project in the second term, together with necessary literature reviews and research design. Work on your project will continue full-time following the formal examinations in May up until project submission in mid-September. 

Additional workshops and seminars

You are also required to attend some of the Department’s programme of Invited Speakers’ talks given by distinguished academics in psychology, and to produce a written critique on one of these. You are welcome to attend the Department’s other seminar series, which are hosted by eminent academics and practitioners.

Assessment

Written examinations; coursework; dissertation. 

Skills

The programme aims to equip you with a sound understanding of methods and skills necessary to conduct high-level research in psychology, using a wide range of approaches and techniques.

Careers

The programme provides the ideal preparation for a research career. Many students go on to do a PhD, or to conduct experimental research in a wide variety of settings.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.



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This course prepares students for undertaking social research and evaluation, leading to careers in research, research management and commissioning or using research. Read more

Introduction

This course prepares students for undertaking social research and evaluation, leading to careers in research, research management and commissioning or using research. Our MSc is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the research training guidelines for undertaking a PhD in Sociology, Social Policy, Social Work or Socio-legal Studies, as well as preparing you for an ESRC-recognised interdisciplinary PhD in Families, Relationships and Demographic Change and Social Care. A course on Applied Social Research (Criminology) is also available.

Accreditation

The course is recognised as research training by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) for those who are studying or going on to study for a PhD (+3), and is also recognised by the ESRC for Master’s Course plus Research Studentship (1+3) purposes.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time
- Start date: Full-time: September Part-time: September/January See
- Course Director: Richard Simmons

Course objectives

- Provide you with the skills and knowledge base required to collect, analyse and report qualitative and quantitative data, taking account of ethics, reliability and validity
- Enable you to examine critically the theoretical foundations that underpin social scientific research
- Enable you to examine issues concerning comparative social research
- Develop your understanding of the relationship between research and policy, and the meanings of evaluation, its terminology, practice and use

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

The MSc/Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Social Research comprises six compulsory taught core modules, and (for the MSc) a dissertation.
The modules are: The Nature of Social Enquiry; Research Design and Process; Introduction to Information Technology and Library Services (not formally assessed); Quantitative Data Analysis; Qualitative Data Analysis; Comparative Social Research; Policy Analysis and Evaluation Research.
These modules comprise a series of reading groups in which a number of central ideas are debated.

In addition to the modules, you will complete the following:
- Research Dissertation: MSc students must undertake an original social science research study and complete a research dissertation with academic supervision.

Examples of recent dissertation topics include:
- A Study of High Risk Behaviour
- Young People and National Identity
- Substance Use Prevalence and Looked-after Young People in Scotland
- Women’s Decisions about Returning to Work After Childbirth

Delivery and assessment

Teaching methods are designed for each module to facilitate your acquisition of skills and progressive development. You are expected to participate in lectures, seminars, tutorials, computer-based workshops and group work.
Full-time and part-time MSc/Diploma students experience a range of different forms of assessment across the compulsory taught modules. These include essays, critical review essays, book reviews, research proposals, a computer lab-based assessment for quantitative data analysis and the research dissertation. There are no examinations.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), 95 percent of the research in Applied Social Science at Stirling was ‘Internationally Excellent’ with the top 10 percent of that judged to be ‘World-leading’.

Career opportunities

Over the past five years, over half of our graduates have entered social research-related careers in the public, voluntary and private sectors, for example, a manager commissioning research for a local authority, a research fellow at a university and a senior research executive for a European-wide commercial research organisation.
In general, one in ten graduates have enhanced their practice in current posts by undertaking studies in Applied Social Research, with support from their employer. Over one third of our graduates continue with academic study and undertake a PhD.

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Cognitive psychology and neuropsychology bring together a range of different theoretical frameworks. This MSc programme provides an overview and critical evaluation of the major issues, investigative strategies, and empirical findings of recent attempts to integrate these different approaches to 'brain cognition'. Read more
Cognitive psychology and neuropsychology bring together a range of different theoretical frameworks. This MSc programme provides an overview and critical evaluation of the major issues, investigative strategies, and empirical findings of recent attempts to integrate these different approaches to 'brain cognition'.

Examine how cognitive psychological, neuropsychological, neurobiological and computer science approaches can be combined to understand how the human mind/brain solves a variety of complex problems, such as recognising objects, remembering previous experiences, reading, speaking and reasoning.

The programme gives you a detailed understanding of the major analytic techniques and research methodologies employed by cognitive psychologists and neuropsychologists. Study a range of general, historical, theoretical and philosophical issues underlying the discipline that will equip you with specialist knowledge and systematic understanding and prepare you for a career in academia or as a practising psychologist.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/65/cognitive-psychology-neuropsychology

About the School of Psychology

As a student within the School of Psychology at Kent, you benefit from our supportive, dynamic and diverse environment for creative research and learning.

All of our taught Master’s (MSc) programmes have been recognised by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the nationally recognised criteria for preparation training for PhD research.

Conducting both basic and applied research in several areas, Psychology at Kent is highly regarded as a leading European centre for postgraduate research. Our long-established international reputation in social psychology is complemented by our strengths in cognitive, developmental and forensic psychology. We attract excellent visiting scholars and postgraduate students from both within the UK and overseas.

Some of our PhD students are self-funded, and others are funded by grants or awards either from the School, UK or their countries of origin. Some are also paid to undertake part-time teaching within the School. We have a strong track record of attracting ESRC research studentship funding, which involves partnerships with external organisations such as Age UK and the Equality and Human Rights Commission and collaborative studentships with partners such as People United.

Modules

The modules below are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

SP801 - Statistics and Methodology (40 credits)
SP827 - Current Issues in Cognitive Psychology and Neuropsychology (40 credits)
SP998 - Advanced Research Project in Psychology (60 credits)
SP846 - Cognitive Neural Networks (20 credits)
SP850 - Advanced Cognitive (Neuroscience) Methods in Practice (20 credits)
SP851 - Advanced Topics in Cognitive Development (20 credits)
SP853 - The Psychology of Eyewitness Testimony (20 credits)
SP854 - Advanced Topics in Developmental Psychopathology (20 credits)
SP829 - Advanced Topics in Cognition in Action (20 credits)

Assessment

The programme mainly involves lecture and seminar based teaching. In addition, particular option units (such as computational modelling) require 'hands-on' experience and learning of particular skills. Staff contact time is eight hours per week. You are expected to study for 1,800 hours over 45 weeks.

Assessment is mainly by coursework assignment (4-6,000 word essays), examination (for the Advanced Statistics and Methodology module only), plus the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- foster your intellectual development by providing you with specialised knowledge of a range of theoretical approaches to cognitive psychology/neuropsychology and statistical and methodological expertise in order that you should be well equipped to make your own original contribution to psychological knowledge

- provide teaching that is informed by current research and scholarship and that requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- help you to develop research skills and transferable skills in preparation for entering academic or other careers as psychologists
satisfy the academic requirements of the knowledge base specified by the British Psychological Society

- enable you to manage your own learning and to carry out independent research

- help you to develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Research themes

The School of Psychology is highly regarded as a leading European centre for postgraduate research, with an international reputation for excellence in social psychology (including group processes and intergroup relations); cognition and neuroscience; developmental psychology; and forensic psychology. We have staff who can supervise research degrees in all of these areas. The research environment is designed to sustain a strong, vibrant research culture, encourage collaboration, and unite staff and students with shared research interests. Our themes ensure critical mass and create a highly energetic and stimulating intellectual climate.

Research activity is supported by:

- centrally co-ordinated provision and use of laboratories and technical support

- selection of speakers for our weekly departmental research colloquia

- weekly research meetings within each theme

- developing, reporting and analysing research, and hosting our many visiting scholars

- several monthly small meeting series on specific areas of cross-cutting research (such as forensic, social development, emotion, social cognition and health).

Careers

Our postgraduate students commonly go into the fields of health, teaching or further education. For instance, many of our graduates take up roles as assistant psychologists in the NHS with a view to becoming a professional clinical or forensic psychologist. Upon completing our Master’s courses, graduates have also pursued doctoral study and academic careers at higher education institutions.

The programmes we offer help you to develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Professional recognition

All of our taught Master’s (MSc) programmes have been recognised by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the nationally recognised criteria for preparation training for PhD research.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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The MSc in Forensic Psychology at Kent is accredited by The British Psychological Society as providing the first (academic) year of professional training for those who wish to qualify as Chartered Forensic Psychologists. Read more
The MSc in Forensic Psychology at Kent is accredited by The British Psychological Society as providing the first (academic) year of professional training for those who wish to qualify as Chartered Forensic Psychologists.

The programme was introduced in October 1995, and the School of Psychology has a long tradition of research in the area of criminal justice and legal psychology. Currently, several members of the School are actively involved in research and consultancy, and several PhD students are currently conducting research under their supervision.

This MSc is the only programme that offers an entire module on offender cognition, which helps you to understand how offence-supportive thinking can increase the chances of sexual offenders, firesetters and other individuals committing offences. With the support of forensic psychology staff you will also gain real-world writing skills such as journal writing, risk assessment reports, court reports and government research reports.

We are particularly interested in receiving applications from suitably qualified graduates who have direct experience of the application of psychological principles in custodial or other forensic settings, although such experience is not essential. As a significant element of the programme involves training in advanced methodological and statistical techniques, we are unable to consider applications from candidates who do not qualify for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) with the BPS - Graduate Membership of the BPS is insufficient.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/69/forensic-psychology

About the School of Psychology

As a student within the School of Psychology at Kent, you benefit from our supportive, dynamic and diverse environment for creative research and learning.

All of our taught Master’s (MSc) programmes have been recognised by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the nationally recognised criteria for preparation training for PhD research.

Conducting both basic and applied research in several areas, Psychology at Kent is highly regarded as a leading European centre for postgraduate research. Our long-established international reputation in social psychology is complemented by our strengths in cognitive, developmental and forensic psychology. We attract excellent visiting scholars and postgraduate students from both within the UK and overseas.

Some of our PhD students are self-funded, and others are funded by grants or awards either from the School, UK or their countries of origin. Some are also paid to undertake part-time teaching within the School. We have a strong track record of attracting ESRC research studentship funding, which involves partnerships with external organisations such as Age UK and the Equality and Human Rights Commission and collaborative studentships with partners such as People United.

Modules

The modules below are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

The MSc in Forensic Psychology is composed of the following six compulsory modules:

SP801 - Statistics and Methodology (40 credits)
SP809 - Research Project in Criminology,Legal or Forensic Psychology (60 credits)
SP805 - Psychology of Criminal Conduct (20 credits)
SP806 - Psychology of Law and Justice (20 credits)
SP825 - Assessment and Treatment of Offenders in Forensic Settings (20 credits)

Assessment

The MSc in Forensic Psychology aims to satisfy the academic component of professional training in forensic psychology (that is, to become a Chartered Forensic Psychologist). Throughout the programme, you attend non-assessed seminars and go on site visits.

The programme includes lecture, workshop and seminar-based teaching, as well as an individually supervised empirical research project.

Advanced Statistics and Methodology is assessed by examination. All other taught modules are assessed by written work and presentations. Research is assessed by two articles: one empirical paper and one review article on your chosen topic.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- foster your intellectual development by providing you with specialised knowledge of a range of theoretical approaches to forensic psychology and statistical and methodological expertise in order that you should be well equipped to make your own original contribution to psychological knowledge

- provide teaching that is informed by current research and scholarship and that requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- help you to develop research skills and transferable skills in preparation for entering academic or other careers as psychologists

- satisfy the academic requirements of the knowledge base specified by the British Psychological Society

- enable you to manage your own learning and to carry out independent research

- help you to develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Careers

Our postgraduate students commonly go into the fields of health, teaching or further education. For instance, many of our graduates take up roles as assistant psychologists in the NHS with a view to becoming a professional clinical or forensic psychologist. Upon completing our Master’s courses, graduates have also pursued doctoral study and academic careers at higher education institutions.

The programmes we offer help you to develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Professional recognition

All of our taught Master’s (MSc) programmes have been recognised by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the nationally recognised criteria for preparation training for PhD research.

The MSc in Forensic Psychology at Kent is accredited by The British Psychological Society as providing the first (academic) year of professional training for those who wish to qualify as Chartered Forensic Psychologists. Graduates from the programme are then required to gain the equivalent of a further two years' relevant experience under the supervision of a Chartered Forensic Psychologist before qualifying for Chartered status themselves. You should contact the BPS directly if you have enquiries about the nature of the supervised practice element of qualification.

Please note that only students who gain a mark of 40% or above in every module, with an overall mark of at least 50%, are eligible for accreditation by the British Psychological Society.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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The MSc in Group Processes and Intergroup Relations is a specialist version of our existing MSc in Social and Applied Psychology that focuses on social psychological theory and research in intergroup and group behaviour. Read more
The MSc in Group Processes and Intergroup Relations is a specialist version of our existing MSc in Social and Applied Psychology that focuses on social psychological theory and research in intergroup and group behaviour.

Group processes and intergroup relations have become an increasingly central part of the discipline of social psychology, addressing issues of prejudice, discrimination, conflict reduction, persuasion and social influence, power, group decision making and ethnic loyalty.

This programme explores major and current research covering issues such as intergroup contact, social and cognitive processes underlying prejudice, discrimination, collective protest, group decision-making, leadership and group performance. Suitable students are encouraged to go on to register for PhD degrees.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/70/group-processes-and-intergroup-relations

About the School of Psychology

As a student within the School of Psychology at Kent, you benefit from our supportive, dynamic and diverse environment for creative research and learning.

All of our taught Master’s (MSc) programmes have been recognised by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the nationally recognised criteria for preparation training for PhD research.

Conducting both basic and applied research in several areas, Psychology at Kent is highly regarded as a leading European centre for postgraduate research. Our long-established international reputation in social psychology is complemented by our strengths in cognitive, developmental and forensic psychology. We attract excellent visiting scholars and postgraduate students from both within the UK and overseas.

Some of our PhD students are self-funded, and others are funded by grants or awards either from the School, UK or their countries of origin. Some are also paid to undertake part-time teaching within the School. We have a strong track record of attracting ESRC research studentship funding, which involves partnerships with external organisations such as Age UK and the Equality and Human Rights Commission and collaborative studentships with partners such as People United.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

SP801 - Statistics and Methodology (40 credits)
SP802 - Current Issues in Social and Applied Psychology Part 1 (20 credits)
SP813 - Advanced Topics in Intergroup Relations (20 credits)
SP844 - Advanced Topics in Group Processes (20 credits)
SP998 - Advanced Research Project in Psychology (60 credits)
SP852 - Developmental Psychology in Professional Practice (20 credits)
SP853 - The Psychology of Eyewitness Testimony (20 credits)
SP817 - Current Issues in Social and Applied Psychology II :Applications (20 credits)
SP842 - Advanced Developmental Social Psychology (20 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is mainly by coursework assignment (4-6,000-word essays), examination (for the Advanced Statistics and Methodology module only), plus the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide the opportunity for the advanced study of group and intergroup processes, with particular emphasis on the context of social psychological theory, different analytical perspectives in social psychological theory, different ways of applying social psychological theory, and the methodological advantages and disadvantages of social psychological investigation

- provide teaching that is informed by current research and scholarship and that requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- help you to develop research skills and transferable skills in preparation for entering academic or other careers as social psychologists

- enable you to manage your own learning and to carry out independent research

- help you to develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Careers

Our postgraduate students commonly go into the fields of health, teaching or further education. For instance, many of our graduates take up roles as assistant psychologists in the NHS with a view to becoming a professional clinical or forensic psychologist. Upon completing our Master’s courses, graduates have also pursued doctoral study and academic careers at higher education institutions.

The programmes we offer help you to develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Professional recognition

All of our taught Master’s (MSc) programmes have been recognised by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the nationally recognised criteria for preparation training for PhD research.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. Read more
The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. All MaRes students are assigned a supervisor at the start of the year, who will help the student choose other relevant course options. Candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words of assessed work. All students write an MA dissertation, but for students progressing on to a PhD, the MA dissertation will take the form of a research report that will constitute the first part of the upgrade document for the PhD programme.

The MaRes is recognised by the ESRC.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/

Aims and Outcomes

The MA is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will:

- Have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools;
- Have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods.

In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including:

- Interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing.

- Social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis (including chi-square tests, the T-test, F-test, and the rank correlation test).

Discipline specific training in anthropology includes:

- Ethnographic methods and participant observation;
- Ethical and legal issues in anthropological research;
- The logistics of long-term fieldwork;
- Familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures;
- Writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and
- Language training.

The Training Programme

In addition to optional courses that may be taken (see below), the student must successfully complete the following core course:

- Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011).

This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15PPOH035, a 0.5 unit course hosted by Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

Dissertation

MA/MPhil Students meet regularly with their supervisor to produce a systematic review of the secondary and regional literature that forms an integral part of their dissertation/research proposal. The dissertation, Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (15 PAN C998), is approximately 15,000 words and demonstrates the extent to which students have achieved the key learning outcomes during the first year of research training. The dissertation takes the form of an extended research proposal that includes:

- A review of the relevant theoretical and ethnographic literature;
- An outline of the specific questions to be addressed, methods to be employed, and the expected contribution of the study to anthropology;
- A discussion of the practical, political and ethical issues likely to affect the research; and
- A presentation of the schedule for the proposed research together with an estimated budget.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. Two soft-bound copies of the dissertation, typed or word-processed, should be submitted to the Faculty of Arts and Humanities Office by 16:00 and on Moodle by 23:59 on the appropriate day.

Exemption from Training

Only those students who have clearly demonstrated their knowledge of research methods by completing a comparable program of study in qualitative and quantitative methods will be considered for a possible exemption from the taught courses. All students, regardless of prior training, are required to participate in the Research Training Seminar.

Programme Specification 2013/2014 (msword; 128kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/file39765.docx

Teaching & Learning

This MA is designed to be a shortcut into the PhD in that two of its components (the Research Methods Course and the Research Training Seminar, which supports the writing of the dissertation) are part of the taught elements of the MPhil year. Students on this course are also assigned a supervisor with whom they meet fortnightly as do the MPhil students. The other two elements of the course are unique to each student: and might include doing one of the core courses from the other Masters degrees (Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Development, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of Media, Migration and Diaspora, or Anthropology of Food), as well as any options that will build analytical skills and regional knowledge, including language training. The MaRes can also be used to build regional expertise or to fill gaps in particular areas such as migration or development theory.

The dissertation for the MaRes will normally be assessed by two readers in October of the following year (that is, after the September 15th due date). Students who proceed onto the MPhil course from the MA will then have the first term of the MPhil year to write a supplementary document that reviews the dissertation and provides a full and detailed Fieldwork Proposal. This, along with research report material from the original MA dissertation, is examined in a viva voce as early as November of the first term of the MPhil year by the same examiners who have read the dissertation. Successful students can then be upgraded to the PhD in term 1 and leave for fieldwork in term 2 of the first year of the MPhil/PhD programme. This programme is currently recognised by the ESRC and therefore interested students who are eligible for ESRC funding can apply under the 1+3 rubric. (ESRC)

Destinations

Students of the Masters in Anthropological Research Methods develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Our Planning and Environment Research MA provides strong research training. You will develop your research skills and receive professional accreditation. Read more
Our Planning and Environment Research MA provides strong research training. You will develop your research skills and receive professional accreditation. It will suit those looking to specialise in environmental or landscape planning research. The course is Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) recognised.

The course will prepare you for a PhD in the field of environmental or landscape planning. It will also equip you with the knowledge, skills and understanding to pursue a research career. The research skills that you will develop are relevant to a variety of organisations in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

You will develop:
-Understanding of a range of contemporary and specialised issues in environmental planning research
-Strong research skills including data collection and analysis
-Awareness of ethical issues in research
-Practical skills for planning, managing and disseminating research, including bibliographic, IT and communication skills
-Expertise in specialist areas relating to your personal research interests
-A broad understanding of qualitative and quantitative research methods

Our research-active staff will deliver your teaching and research training. Our staff have extensive practice experience. They are also experienced supervisors and examiners of doctoral level research students. This has considerable benefits if you wish to carry on to PhD at Newcastle. It provides opportunities to develop research proposals in close association with potential supervisors.

Delivery

You will take compulsory modules in research methods and skills development. These are delivered by the Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate School.

The School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape will deliver optional modules. Optional modules include specialised modules related to your personal research interests. You can choose from a wide range of subjects, enabling you to customise your course. You can also take optional modules from other academic schools within the University.

Your dissertation will enhance and enable you to show your research skills and training.

Accreditation

This course is accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI). This is a professional accreditation and allows membership to RTPI. This will enhance your career whether you are a student just starting out on your professional journey or an experienced planner.

The course is also recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). It is recognised under the 1+3 system (Master's plus PhD) for postgraduate studies. This provides UK students with a route to ESRC-funded doctoral study.

Facilities

The School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape has excellent studio teaching facilities. Our research suite provides designated space and equipment for each postgraduate researcher. Our facilities include:
-Studios
-Exhibition spaces
-Print room
-Seminar rooms
-IT suites

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