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The Space Physiology & Health MSc course is a unique study programme that provides training for biomedical scientists and physicians with an interest in the biomedical issues associated with space exploration. Read more

The Space Physiology & Health MSc course is a unique study programme that provides training for biomedical scientists and physicians with an interest in the biomedical issues associated with space exploration. International experts from academia, contractors and space agencies (including NASA) contribute to the course through lectures, seminars, extensive laboratory practicals and visits to the RAF and Space Agency (ESA & DLR) facilities. 

Key benefits

  • The course provides experiences with external partners including the Space Medicine Office at the European Astronaut Centre in Cologne.
  • Specialist subjects delivered by professionals from within the Space industry.
  • Highly specialist study pathway that's the first of its kind in Europe.

Description

The Space Physiology & Health MSc will provide you with advanced theoretical and practical training in the physiology, psychology and operational medicine of humans exposed to or working in the Space environment.

You will complete the course in one year, studying September to September and taking modules totalling 180 credits, including 60 credits from a research project and dissertation.

This course will provide opportunities for you to develop and demonstrate advanced knowledge, understanding and skills in the following areas:

  • The physiological effects of the space environment upon humans and of the methods employed to mitigate such effects.
  • Experimentation methods appropriate to investigate the physiological effects of the space environment.
  • Instrumentation, calibration, data acquisition and the analysis of results while applying the appropriate statistical methods.
  • The effect of the space environment upon human behaviour and performance.
  • The characteristics and practices associated with medical and life science research environments in space.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We use lectures, seminars and group tutorials to deliver most of the modules on the programme. You will also be expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study.

Assessment

You are assessed through a combination of:

  • Unseen written examinations
  • Laboratory reports
  • Oral and Poster Presentations
  • Essay
  • Literature Review
  • Dissertation

The study times and assessment methods detailed above are typical and are designed to provide you with a good indication of what to expect. However, they are subject to change.

Location

This course is primarily taught at the King’s College London Guy’s Campus. We try to arrange trips to the European Space Agency, and other related facilities whenever possible to enhance your learning experience.

King’s and partner organisations organise summer research projects depending on applicability and availability.

Career prospects

The course provides a range of multidisciplinary skills and will help those wishing to pursue a career in human physiology in its broadest sense, either in academic research i.e. PhD, in industry, in Ministry of Defence research laboratories or National/International Space agencies including ESA.



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Our Masters programme in Satellite Communications Engineering is designed to give you the specialist multidisciplinary skills required for careers in the satellite and space industries. Read more

Our Masters programme in Satellite Communications Engineering is designed to give you the specialist multidisciplinary skills required for careers in the satellite and space industries.

We have an exceptional concentration of academic staff experienced in the satellite area, in addition to well-established contacts with all the major satellite manufacturers, operators and service providers.

Industry participates in the MSc programme in both lecturing and projects, and facilitates excellent engagement for our students. Graduation from this programme will therefore make you very attractive to the relevant space-related industries that employ over 6,500 people in the UK alone.

Read about the experience of a previous student on this course, Thanat Varathon.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a project.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Facilities, equipment and support

Through consistent investment, we have built up an impressive infrastructure to support our students and researchers. The University of Surrey hosts Surrey Space Centre – a unique facility comprising academics and engineers from our own spin-out company, Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd.

Our mission control centre was designed and developed by students to support international CubeSat operations as part of the GENSO network, and it also supports the development of the University’s own educational satellites.

Our teaching laboratories provide ‘hands-on’ experience of satellite design and construction through the use of EyasSAT nano-satellite kits. They also house meteorological satellite receiving stations for the live reception of satellite weather images.

Elsewhere, our fully equipped RF lab has network analyser, signal and satellite link simulators. The Rohde and Schwartz Satellite Networking Laboratory includes DVBS2-RCS generation and measurement equipment, and roof-mounted antennas to communicating live with satellites.

A security test-bed also exists for satellite security evaluation. We have a full range of software support for assignments and project work, including Matlab, and you will be able to access system simulators already built in-house.

Satellite Communications Engineering students can also make use of SatNEX, a European Network of Excellence in satellite communications supported by ESA; a satellite platform exists to link the 22 partners around Europe. This is used for virtual meetings and to participate in lectures and seminars delivered by partners.

Our own spin-out company, Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd, is situated close by on the Surrey Research Park and provides ready access to satellite production and industrial facilities. In addition, we have a strategic relationship with EADS Airbus Europe-wide and several other major communications companies.

Technical characteristics of the pathway

This programme in satellite communications engineering. provides detailed in-depth knowledge of theory and techniques applicable to radio frequency (RF) and microwave engineering.

The programme includes core modules in both RF and microwave covering all ranges of wireless frequencies and a number of application devices including radio frequency identification (RFID), broadcasting, satellite links, microwave ovens, printed and integrated microwave circuits.

Additional optional modules enable the student to apply the use of RF and microwave in subsystem design for either mobile communications, satellite communications, nanotechnology or for integration with optical communications.

The teaching material and projects are closely related to the research being carried out in the Department’s Advanced Technology Institute and the Institute for Communication Systems.

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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Taught jointly by UCL’s Space & Climate Physics and UCL’s Electronic & Electrical Engineering Departments by expert researchers and engineers in… Read more

Taught jointly by UCL’s Space & Climate Physics and UCL’s Electronic & Electrical Engineering Departments by expert researchers and engineers in the field, this MSc programme aims to provide a broad understanding of the basic principles of space technology and satellite communications together with specialised training in research methods and transferable skills, directly applicable to a career in the public and private space sectors.

About this degree

The Space Technology pathway is focussed on the application of space technology in industrial settings, and therefore has as its main objective to provide a sound knowledge of the underlying principles which form a thorough basis for careers in space technology, satellite communications and related fields. Students develop a thorough understanding of the fundamentals of:

  • spacecraft, satellite communications, the space environment, space operations and space project management
  • the electromagnetics of optical and microwave transmission, and of communication systems modelling
  • a range of subjects relating to spacecraft technology and satellite communications.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), a Group Project (15 credits) and an Individual research Project (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Space Science, Environment and Satellite Missions
  • Space Systems Engineering
  • Communications Systems Modelling Type
  • Group Project

Optional modules

  • At least one module from the following:
  • Spacecraft Design – Electronic Sub-systems
  • Mechanical Design of Spacecraft
  • Antennas and Propagation
  • Radar Systems
  • Space-based Communication Systems

  • At least one module from:
  • Space Instrumentation and Applications
  • Space Plasma and Magnetospheric Physics
  • Principles and Practice of Remote Sensing
  • Global Monitoring and Security
  • Space Data Systems and Processing

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an Individual research Project, which normally involves attachment to a research group, and culminates in a report of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, coursework problem tasks, team-based coursework exercises, presentations and tutorials. Student performance is assessed through unseen written examinations, coursework, and the individual and group projects.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Space Science and Engineering: Space Technology MSc

Funding

STFC and NERC studentships may be available.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

The programme aims to prepare students for careers in space research or the space industry, or further research degrees.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Pushtribe
  • Signal Processing Engineer, Thales UK
  • Junior Consultant, BearingPoint
  • Satellite Communication Engineer, National Space Agency of Kazakhstan

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Space & Climate Physics, located at the Mullard Space Science Laboratory, is a world-leading research organisation and is the largest university space science group in the UK.

It offers a unique environment at the forefront of space science research, where scientists and research students work alongside top engineers building and testing instruments for space as well as studying the data from these and other spaceborne and ground-based instruments.

The close contact that the laboratory enjoys with space agencies such as ESA and NASA and with industrial research teams encourages the development of transferable skills which enhance job prospects in industrial and research centres in the public and private space sectors.



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This MSc effectively transfers to students the knowledge and expertise gained by UCL space scientists over more than four decades and is taught by world-recognised researchers in the field. Read more

This MSc effectively transfers to students the knowledge and expertise gained by UCL space scientists over more than four decades and is taught by world-recognised researchers in the field. The programme aims to provide a broad understanding of all aspects of space science together with specialised training in research methods, directly applicable to a career in academia, the public and private sectors.

About this degree

The Space Science pathway is focussed on scientific research applications of space technology; it aims to equip participants with a sound knowledge of the physical principles essential to sustain careers in space research and related fields. Students develop a thorough understanding of the fundamentals of:

  • a range of space science fields
  • spacecraft, space science instrumentation, the space environment, space operations and space project management

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), a group project (15 credits), and a research project (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Space Data Systems and Processing
  • Space Instrumentation and Applications
  • Space Science, Environment and Satellite Missions
  • Space Systems Engineering
  • Group Project

Optional modules

  • Planetary Atmospheres
  • Solar Physics
  • High Energy Astrophysics
  • Space Plasma and Magnetospheric Physics
  • Principles and Practice of Remote Sensing
  • Global Monitoring and Security

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project, which normally involves attachment to a research group, and culminates in a report of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, tutorials, team-based coursework exercises, presentations and tutorials. Student performance is assessed through unseen written examination, coursework, and the individual and group projects.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Space Science and Engineering: Space Science MSc

Funding

STFC and NERC studentships may be available.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

The programme aims to prepare students for further research degrees and/or careers in space research or the space industry.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL’s Space & Climate Physics Department, located at the Mullard Space Science Laboratory, is a world-leading research organisation and is the largest university space science group in the UK.

It offers a unique environment at the forefront of space science research, where scientists and research students work alongside top engineers building and testing instruments for space, as well as studying the data from these and other spaceborne and ground-based instruments.

The close contact that the laboratory enjoys with space agencies such as ESA and NASA and with industrial research teams encourages the development of transferable skills which enhance job prospects in academic circles and beyond.



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The Masters in Astrophysics gives you an understanding of the principles and methods of modern astrophysics at a level appropriate for a professional physicist. Read more

The Masters in Astrophysics gives you an understanding of the principles and methods of modern astrophysics at a level appropriate for a professional physicist.

Why this programme

  • The School has a major role in the award winning NASA RHESSI X-ray mission studying solar flares and in several other forthcoming international space missions such as ESA’s Solar Orbiter.
  • The School plays a world-leading role in the design and operation of the worldwide network of laser interferometers leading the search for gravitational waves.
  • Physics and Astronomy at the University of Glasgow is ranked 3rd in Scotland (Complete University Guide 2017).
  • You will gain the theoretical, observational and computational skills necessary to analyse and solve advanced astrophysics problems, providing you with an excellent foundation for a career of scientific leadership in academia or industry.
  • You will develop transferable skills that will improve your career prospects, such as project management, team-working, advanced data analysis, problem-solving, critical evaluation of scientific literature, advanced laboratory and computing skills, and how to effectively communicate with different audiences.
  • You will benefit from direct contact with our group of international experts who will teach you cutting-edge physics and supervise your projects.
  • With a 93% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2016, Physics and Astronomy at Glasgow continues to meet student expectations combining both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.

Programme Structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Astrophysics include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

The programme draws upon a wide range of advanced Masters-level courses. You will have the flexibility to tailor your choice of optional courses and project work to a variety of specific research topics and their applications in the area of astrophysics.

Core courses include

  • Advanced data analysis
  • General relativity and gravitation (alternate years, starting 2018–19)
  • Gravitational wave detection
  • Plasma theory and diagnostics (alternate years, starting 2017–18)
  • Pulsars and supernovae (alternate years, starting 2018–19)
  • Research skills
  • Statistical astronomy (alternate years, starting 2017–18)
  • The Sun's Atmosphere
  • Extended project

Optional courses include

  • Advanced electromagnetic theory
  • Applied optics
  • Circumstellar matter (alternate years, starting 2017-18)
  • Cosmology (alternate years, starting 2018–19)
  • Dynamics, electrodynamics and relativity
  • Exploring planetary systems (alternate years, starting 2018-19)
  • Galaxies (alternate years, starting 2017-18)
  • Instruments for optical and radio astronomy (alternate years, starting 2018-19)
  • Statistical mechanics
  • Stellar astrophysics (alternate years, starting 2017–18)

Career prospects

Career opportunities include academic research, based in universities, research institutes, observatories and laboratory facilities; industrial research in a wide range of fields including energy and the environmental sector, IT and semiconductors, optics and lasers, materials science, telecommunications, engineering; banking and commerce; higher education.



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Taught in both English and French over two years, this course develops in-depth knowledge of European local and regional food production, its economic and environmental impact and how these foods can be marketed to a global consumer. Read more
Taught in both English and French over two years, this course develops in-depth knowledge of European local and regional food production, its economic and environmental impact and how these foods can be marketed to a global consumer. Students learn how to develop and market food products whose typical features are the result of various factors such as geographical origin, history and the culture of a country or region. Students will acquire scientific and technical knowledge to develop these food products as well as skills to promote and market them.

The course

Harper Adams has been involved in the education and training of food industry undergraduates and graduates for many years. Selected by a European consortium of universities to be their UK partner institution Harper Adams offers a PgC in Agricultural Management for the Food Supply Industries to students enrolled on the European Masters in regional Food Production and Global Marketing and spending a proportion of their studies at Harper Adams. This PgC award forms part of the European MSc programme which is awarded and managed by ESA University in Angers, France. Harper Adams is very proud to be part of the European Masters in Regional Food Production Global Marketing course to its portfolio. Based on extensive food industry experience across Europe and current industry contact, this course addresses many of the contemporary issues facing the European food industry. It is designed to meet the requirements of those wishing to join the food industry at management level with accelerated career progression.

Taught in both English and French over two years, this course develops in-depth knowledge of European local and regional food production, its economic and environmental impact and how these foods can be marketed to a global consumer. Students learn how to develop and market food products whose typical features are the result of various factors such as geographical origin, history and the culture of a country or region. Students will acquire scientific and technical knowledge to develop these food products as well as skills to promote and market them. The learning method builds upon close links between the teaching staff of partner universities and the food industry to design a course addressing the challenges of marketing local and regional products on a global scale.

How will it benefit me?

The course aims to develop student knowledge of food production through sustainable agriculture, sourcing, manufacturing and marketing across many different food product categories in relation to country specific considerations and the global market. In so doing it produces students with specialist knowledge who learn to apply this through industry case studies and a professional project. Students are placed in production companies, trading companies, consultancy firms, technical or research institutions, laboratories or certification bodies in the final semester. The combination of in-depth knowledge and practical application makes for highly employable individuals.

To find out more visit http://www.masterfoodidentity.com

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Research degrees may be undertaken in the three main areas of research interest in the Laboratory. The growing number of academic staff are supported in their research by the technical staff and post-doctoral research fellows. Read more
Research degrees may be undertaken in the three main areas of research interest in the Laboratory. The growing number of academic staff are supported in their research by the technical staff and post-doctoral research fellows.

We make every attempt to allocate you to a supervisor directly in your field of interest, consistent with available funding and staff loading. When you apply, please give specific indications of your research interest – including, where appropriate, the member(s) of staff you wish to work with – and whether you are applying for a studentship or propose to be self-funded.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/212/physics

About The School of Physical Sciences

The School offers postgraduate students the opportunity to participate in groundbreaking science in the realms of physics, chemistry, forensics and astronomy. With strong international reputations, our staff provide plausible ideas, well-designed projects, research training and enthusiasm within a stimulating environment. Recent investment in modern laboratory equipment and computational facilities accelerates the research.

The School maintains a focus on progress to ensure each student is able to compete with their peers in their chosen field. We carefully nurture the skills, abilities and motivation of our students which are vital elements in our research activity. We offer higher degree programmes in chemistry and physics (including specialisations in forensics, astronomy and space science) by research. We also offer taught programmes in Forensic Science, studied over one year full-time, and a two-year European-style Master’s in Physics.

Our principal research covers a wide variety of topics within physics, astronomy and chemistry, ranging from specifically theoretical work on surfaces and interfaces, through mainstream experimental condensed matter physics, astrobiology, space science and astrophysics, to applied areas such as biomedical imaging, forensic imaging and space vehicle protection. We scored highly in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise, with 25% of our research ranked as “world-leading” and our Functional Materials Research Group ranked 2nd nationally in the Metallurgy and Materials discipline.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

The University has good facilities for modern research in physical sciences. Among the major instrumentation and techniques available on the campus are NMR spectrometers (including solutions at 600 MHz), several infrared and uvvisible spectrometers, a Raman spectrometer, two powder X-ray diffractometers, X-ray fluorescence, atomic absorption in flame and graphite furnace mode, gel-permeation chromatography, gaschromatography, analytical and preparative highperformance liquid chromatography (including GC-MS and HPLC-MS), mass spectrometry (electrospray and MALDI), scanning electron microscopy and EDX, various microscopes (including hot-stage), differential scanning calorimetry and thermal gravimetric analysis, dionex analysis of anions and automated CHN analysis. For planetary science impact studies, there is a two-stage light gas gun.

- Interdisciplinary approach

Much of the School’s work is interdisciplinary and we have successful collaborative projects with members of the Schools of Biosciences, Computing and Engineering and Digital Arts at Kent, as well as an extensive network of international collaborations.

- National and international links

The School is a leading partner in the South East Physics Network (SEPnet), a consortium of seven universities in the south-east, acting together to promote physics in the region through national and international channels. The School benefits through the £12.5 million of funding from the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE), creating new facilities and resources to enable us to expand our research portfolio.

The School’s research is well supported by contracts and grants and we have numerous collaborations with groups in universities around the world. We have particularly strong links with universities in Germany, France, Italy and the USA. UK links include King’s College, London and St Bartholomew’s Hospital, London. Our industrial partners include British Aerospace, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, and Ophthalmic Technology Inc, Canada. The universe is explored through collaborations with NASA, ESO and ESA scientists.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Nature; Science; Astrophysical Journal; Journal of Polymer Science; Journal of Materials Chemistry; and Applied Optics.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Careers

All programmes in the School of Physical Sciences equip you with the tools you need to conduct research, solve problems, communicate effectively and transfer skills to the workplace, which means our graduates are always in high demand. Our links with industry not only provide you with the opportunity to gain work experience during your degree, but also equip you with the general and specialist skills and knowledge needed to succeed in the workplace.

Typical employment destinations for graduates from the physics programmes include power companies, aerospace, defence, optoelectronics and medical industries. Typical employment destinations for graduates from our forensic science and chemistry programmes include government agencies, consultancies, emergency services, laboratories, research or academia.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Our MSc in Communications, Networks and Software covers the key aspects of the changing Internet environment, in particular the convergence of computing and communications underpinned by software-based solutions. Read more

Our MSc in Communications, Networks and Software covers the key aspects of the changing Internet environment, in particular the convergence of computing and communications underpinned by software-based solutions.

Some of our students undertaking their project are able to work on one of our wide range of testbeds, such as internet technologies, wireless networking, network management and control, and internet-of-things (IoT) applications.

We also have specialist software tools for assignments and project work, including OPNET, NS2/3, and various system simulators.

Read about the experience of a previous student on this course, Efthymios Bliatis.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over 12 months or part-time from 24 to 60 months. It consists of eight taught modules and a project.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme 

The taught postgraduate degree programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant).

To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:

  • Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing and Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
  • Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
  • Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
  • Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
  • Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
  • Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

A graduate from this MSc Programme should:

  • Know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin communications, networks and software
  • Be able to analyse problems within the field of communications, networks and software and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
  • Be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
  • Know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within communications, networks and software
  • Be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
  • Be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
  • Be able to carry out research-and-development investigations
  • Be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

Facilities, equipment and support

We have a full range of software support for assignments and project work, including:

  • Matlab/Simulink, C, C++ and up-to-date toolboxes, systemsview, OPNET and NS2/3 (you will be able to access system simulators already built in-house, including 3GPP, BGAN, DVB-S2-RCS, GSM, UMTS, DVB-SH, WCDMA, GPRS, WiMAX, LTE, HSPA and HSDPA)
  • Our Rohde and Schwartz Satellite Networking Laboratory includes DVBS2-RCS generation and measurement equipment and roof-mounted antennas to pick up satellites (a security test-bed also exists for satellite security evaluation)
  • A fully equipped RF lab with network analyser, signal and satellite link simulations
  • A small anechoic chamber for antenna measurements (a wideband MIMO channel sounder is available for propagation measurements)
  • SatNEX is a European Network of Excellence in satellite communications, and a satellite platform exists to link the 22 partners around Europe (this is used for virtual meetings and to participate in lectures and seminars delivered by our partners)
  • A fully equipped UHF/VHF satellite ground-station facility is located on campus, which is being expanded to S-band and is supported by the ESA GENSO project (at present, the station tracks amateur satellites and CubeSats)
  • Our wide coverage experimental wireless network test-bed is based on IPv4, and IPv6 for testing new networking protocols for mobility, handover, security, cognitive radio and networking can be carried out (most networking protocol projects use this test-bed, with the help of PhD students and staff)
  • We are the only university in the UK that has an IP-Multimedia Subsystem (IMS) test-bed for developing and experimenting with advanced mobile/wireless services/applications – you can use this to carry out your services and application-based projects for mobile multimedia, such as multi-mode user interface, service mobility, service discovery and social networking services
  • Our wireless sensor test-bed is unique; advanced routing protocols, middleware architectures, air interface and networking protocols for wireless sensor networks can be developed and tested

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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Master's specialisation in Particle and Astrophysics. A physics programme that covers the inner workings of the universe from the smallest to the largest scale. Read more

Master's specialisation in Particle and Astrophysics

A physics programme that covers the inner workings of the universe from the smallest to the largest scale

Although Particle Physics and Astrophysics act on a completely different scale, they both use the laws of physics to study the universe. In this Master’s specialisation you’ll dive into these extreme worlds and unravel questions like: What did our universe look like in the earliest stages of its existence? What are the most elementary particles that the universe consists of? And how will it evolve?

If you are fascinated by the extreme densities, gravities, and magnetic fields that can be found only in space, or by the formation, evolution, and composition of astrophysical objects, you can focus on the Astrophysics branch within this specialisation. Would you rather study particle interactions and take part in the search for new particles – for example during an internship at CERN - then you can choose a programme full of High Energy Physics. And for students with a major interest in the theories and predictions underlying all experimental work, we offer an extensive programme in mathematical or theoretical physics.

Whatever direction you choose, you’ll learn to solve complex problems and think in an abstract way. This means that you’ll be highly appealing to employers in academia and business. Previous students have, for example, found jobs at Shell, ASML, Philips and space research institute SRON.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy/particle

Why study Particle and Astrophysics at Radboud University?

- This Master’s specialisation provides you with a thorough background in High Energy Physics, Astrophysics, and Mathematical Physics and the interface between them.

- Apart from the mandatory programme, there’s plenty of room to adapt the programme to your specific interests.

- The programme offers the opportunity to perform theoretical or experimental research.

- During this specialisation it is possible to participate in large-scale research projects, like the Large Hadron Collider at CERN or the LOFAR telescope.

Career prospects

This Master’s specialisation is an excellent preparation for a career in research, either at a university, at an institute (think of ESA and CERN) or at a company. However, many of our students end up in other business or government positions as well. Whatever job you aspire, you can certainly make use of the fact that you have learned:

- Thinking in an abstract way

- Solving complex problems

- Using statistics

- Computer programming

- Giving presentations

Some of our alumni now work as:

- National project manager at EU Universe Awareness

- Actuarial trainee at Talent & Pro

- Associate Private Equity at HAL Investments

- Consultant at Accenture

- ECO Operations Manager at Ofgem

- Scientist at SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research

- Technology strategy Manager at Accenture

Working at a company

Other previous students have found jobs at for example:

- Shell

- KNMI

- Liander

- NXP

- ASML

- Philips

- McKinsey

- DSM

- Solvay

- Unilever

- AkzoNobel

Researchers in the field of Particle and Astrophysics develop advanced detector techniques that are often also useful for other applications. This resulted in numerous spin-off companies in for example medical equipment and detectors for industrial processes:

- Medipix

- Amsterdam Scientific Instruments

- Omics2Image

- InnoSeis

PhD positions

At Radboud University, there are typically a few PhD positions per year available in the field of Particle and Astrophysics. Many of our students attained a PhD position, not just at Radboud University, but at universities all over the world.

Our approach to this field

In the Particle and Astrophysics specialisation, you’ll discover both the largest and the smallest scales in the universe. Apart from Astrophysics and High Energy Physics, this specialisation is also aimed at the interface between them: experiments and theory related to the Big Bang, general relativity, dark matter, etc. As all relevant research departments are present at Radboud University – and closely work together – you’re free to choose any focus within this specialisation. For example:

- High energy physics

You’ll dive into particle physics and answer questions about the most fundamental building blocks of matter: leptons and quarks. The goal is to understand particle interactions and look for signs of physics beyond the standard model by confronting theoretical predictions with experimental observations.

- Astrophysics

The Astrophysics department concentrates on the physics of compact objects, such as neutron stars and black holes, and the environments in which they occur. This includes understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies. While galaxies may contain of up to a hundred billion stars, most of their mass actually appears to be in the form of unseen ‘dark matter’, whose nature remains one of the greatest mysteries of modern physics.

- Mathematical physics

Research often starts with predictions, based on mathematical models. That’s why we’ll provide you with a theoretical background, including topics such as the properties of our space-time, quantum gravity and noncommutative geometry.

- Observations and theory

The Universe is an excellent laboratory: it tells us how the physical laws work under conditions of ultra-high temperature, pressure, magnetic fields, and gravity. In this specialisation you’ll learn how to decode that information, making use of advanced telescopes and observatories. Moreover, we’ll provide you with a thorough theoretical background in particle and astrophysics. After you’ve got acquainted with both methods, you can choose to focus more on theoretical physics or experimental physics.

- Personal approach

If you’re not yet sure what focus within this specialisation would best fit your interests, you can always ask one of the teachers to help you during your Master’s. Based on the courses that you like and your research ambitions, they can provide you with advice about electives and the internship(s).

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy/particle

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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Under the patronage of SIT – the. Italian Society of Telemedicine. Read more

Under the patronage of SIT – the Italian Society of Telemedicine - the Rome Business School’s Master’s Degree Course in e-Health Management has been designed to supply training on organizational processes and technologies aimed at the proper introduction and management of ICT solutions and Telemedicine in Health Systems.

E-Health is the combined use of information technology and electronic communication, especially the internet, in the health sector, for clinical, educational and administrative purposes; both on-site and at distance (in which case it is called Telemedicine). E-Health is not only a technical development, but also represents a way of thinking, a commitment, an organizational approach to improve health care locally or regionally by using the new opportunities presented by Information and Communication Technology.

By means of e-Health and Telemedicine, a Healthcare Institution or Ministry can achieve:

• More efficiency in health care: reducing costs by networking data and knowledge, avoiding duplication in diagnostic or therapeutic interventions, treating patients directly at home.

• A higher quality of care: by networking the Health professionals’ knowledge, enabling comparisons, and involving the patients and care givers.

• The empowerment of patients.

• The education of both physicians and patients about the management of pathologies

• More equity, for example by networking smaller hospitals with larger institutions and making virtual visits to remote areas.

In this scenario, it is crucial for a Manager to understand the potentiality, seize the opportunities, push and, above all, lead the e-Health and Telemedicine revolution in health care.

The Rome Business School’s Master’s Degree Course in e-Health Management has been designed to supply training on organizational processes and technologies aimed at the proper introduction and management of ICT solutions and Telemedicine in Health Systems.

TARGET RECIPIENTS

The Master’s Degree Course is designed for

• Directors and Managers of Healthcare Institutions,

• Directors and Managers of Social and Healthcare Ministries,

• Healthcare Decision-Makers,

• Clinicians,

• Clinical Engineers.

TRAINING OBJECTIVES

On completion of the training course, attendees will:

• Understand e-Health and Telemedicine terminologies and their areas of application.

• Be aware of the most widespread and innovative technology platforms and solutions available.

• Possess the skills to evaluate and choose the best e-Health projects and solutions.

• Be able to manage the organizational aspects stemming from the introduction of e-Health in an Institution, a Region, or a Country.

• Be able to apply the knowledge of the best-in-class European e-Health projects to the domestic contexts.

• Be e-Health evangelists.

PROFESSIONAL OUTLETS

On completion of this Master’s Degree Course, attendees will be able to work or improve their careers as:

• E-Health Managers

• Chief Information Officers for healthcare institutions

• E-Health executive consultants

• Managers of ICT Departments of Health Ministries

• E-Health and Telemedicine evangelists

Course Contents

• Introduction, Terms and General Concepts

• Health Technology Assessment

• Electronic Medical Records

• National Electronic Health Records

• Chronic Disease Management

• EMR for Primary Care

• Clinical Decision Support Systems

• UK WSD “The Largest Randomised Control Trial of Telehealth and Telecare in the World”

• Better Health Through IT

• Standards and Interoperability

• Telemedicine: areas of use and technologies

• Introducing e-Health in Hospital environments

• Economics of e-Health

• Healthcare reform: changing the healthcare models in Europe

• ESA activities in Telemedicine: space technology for downstream eHealth applications

• E-Health experiences in the Italian regions

• E-Health in Hospitals

• Telemedicine for local organizations

• Telemedicine for developing Countries

• Public-Private Partnerships

• Designing of e-health projects

• European Structural Funding for e-Health management

STRUCTURE

The course is structured in:

• 20 two hour seminars (6 months) +

• A final project work (6 months).



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