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Masters Degrees (Epigraphy)

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This stimulating course offers opportunities for you to both experience the great range of ancient historical studies and to specialise in key areas. Read more
This stimulating course offers opportunities for you to both experience the great range of ancient historical studies and to specialise in key areas. We offer units on periods from Near Eastern History to the Byzantine Empire and a vast range of methodologies are deployed and sources considered.

As this is an intercollegiate MA, jointly run with King’s College London and University College London, you will benefit from the choice of a wide range of fascinating subjects. You will study from an exciting menu of units which covers not only Greek and Latin literature, the major periods of ancient history, ancient philosophy and the Greek and Latin languages, but also key technical skills such as papyrology, epigraphy, and palaeography.

This course is ideal if you are considering progressing to advanced research or wish to add an additional year of high level study to your undergraduate qualification.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/classics/coursefinder/maancienthistory.aspx

Why choose this course?

- We are an international centre of excellence in research and teaching, promoting understanding and knowledge of the ancient world and its culture.

- You will have the opportunity to take part in our departmental research seminars.

- As we are a College of the University of London, you will have the opporunity to choose intercollegiate course units at King’s College London and UCL.

- We offer units which cover not only Greek and Latin literature, the major periods of ancient history, ancient philosophy and the Greek and Latin languages, but also key technical skills such as papyrology, epigraphy, and palaeography.

- We have an excellent track record of publications that advance the understanding of antiquity.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Classics & Philosophy Department at Royal Holloway is a thriving and internationally recognised research centre.

- The Department is home to two College Research Centres: the Centre for the Reception of Greece and Rome and the new Centre for Oratory and Rhetoric.

- Research in the Department covers the whole range of Classical Studies, from Homeric Greece to the very end of the Roman Empire

- In Ancient History, we are particularly well equipped to supervise dissertations on: the history of Greek law, Athenian political and social history, the Roman army, ancient shipping and shipsheds, and ancient urbanism, and both Greek and Latin epigraphy.

Course content and structure

Students study one core unit and two elective course units, and prepare a dissertation. At least one of the elective units should be in Ancient History, as should the dissertation. Courses available cover a range of subjects from ancient Greece and Rome to Egypt, as well as offering skills in language acquisition and epigraphy. For more information about the course units please see the Department of Classics' website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/classics/informationforcurrentstudents/home.aspx .

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a detailed knowledge and understanding of the methodologies of ancient history

-an understanding of critical methodologies and their limitations

- an understanding of advanced, current research issues relevant to the discipline

a critical awareness of the multiplicity of material available and the strengths and weaknesses of the various forms of historical information.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and in recent years have entered many classics/ancient history related areas including academic positions at Oxford, Bristol, and Roehampton Universities, as well as teaching careers in the UK and overseas, archaeological and museum work, and a wide range of other roles.

This taught Master’s course will also provide you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This MA offers students the opportunity to specialise in an exciting and multi-faceted field of study that covers the history and culture of the Mediterranean world during the long millennium from the foundation of Constantinople (modern Istanbul) in 324 to the fall of the Byzantine empire in 1453. Read more
This MA offers students the opportunity to specialise in an exciting and multi-faceted field of study that covers the history and culture of the Mediterranean world during the long millennium from the foundation of Constantinople (modern Istanbul) in 324 to the fall of the Byzantine empire in 1453.

[Degree information]]
Students gain a thorough grounding in key aspects of and approaches to late antique and Byzantine studies. They acquire necessary research skills (ancient languages, palaeography, epigraphy, papyrology) and develop their critical and conceptual understanding of the field through a variety of disciplines (history, literature, material culture, philosophy).

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core language or research skills module (40 credits), optional modules (80 credits), and a research disssertation (60 credits).

Core modules
Either one language acquisition module, or a research skills module (40 credits). These include:
-Beginners Ancient Greek for Research
-Intermediate Ancient Greek for Research
-Beginners Latin for Research
-Intermediate Latin
-Sources and Methods in Ancient History
-Greek Epigraphy
-Greek Papyrology
-Latin Epigraphy
-Medieval Latin Literature

Optional modules - options may include the following:
-Byzantium and the First Crusade
-Byzantium and the Fourth Crusade
-Byzantium & the West, A. D. 800-1000
-Cities of God: making the Late Antique City
-Codes and Practice: The World of Roman Law
-Cyprus from Late Antiquity to the Renaissance
-The Empire of Constantinople
-Homer's Legacy
-Identity and Power in Medieval Europe, AD 500-1300
-The Late Roman and Early Byzantine City
-Living in Byzantium: Material Culture and Built Environment
-The Making of the Christian Empire, AD 284-425
-Medieval Papacy
-Philosophy under the Roman Empire
-The Reign of Constantine I

Dissertation/report
All students attend the Introduction to Byzantium seminar, leading to an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of up to 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, workshops and library visits. Assessment is through unseen examinations, coursework essays and the dissertation.

Careers

Graduates of the programme are equipped with the skills necessary for further doctoral study in this field. The programme also leads to careers in research or teaching, cultural management, general management, civil service and banking. Debates, small group seminars and tutorials help students to acquire strong presentation and negotiation skills for their future career. Likewise the analytical and research skills gained by students on this programme are highly valued by employers from a range of industries. There are many additional activities available, both within the department and the wider UCL community, to help students focus on employability skills whilst they are here, for example, departmental careers talks and networking opportunities with history alumni.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL History enjoys an outstanding international reputation for its research and teaching.

This intercollegiate programme is taught jointly with King's College London and Royal Holloway, University of London, and students benefit from the international expertise and wealth of resources that the three colleges have to offer.

Located in Bloomsbury, UCL History is just a few minutes' walk to the British Library, the British Museum and the research institutes of the University of London, including the Warburg Institute and the Institute of Historical Research. UCL is ideally located at the heart of various historical societies and academic communities.

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The Ancient History MA is an intercollegiate degree programme of the University of London. It offers students the opportunity to focus on a specific period or topic, explore adjacent disciplines, and acquire technical skills in such areas as archaeology, epigraphy, numismatics, papyrology, and textual criticism. Read more
The Ancient History MA is an intercollegiate degree programme of the University of London. It offers students the opportunity to focus on a specific period or topic, explore adjacent disciplines, and acquire technical skills in such areas as archaeology, epigraphy, numismatics, papyrology, and textual criticism.

Degree information

Students gain a thorough grounding in the key aspects of and approaches to ancient history. They develop the ability to assess historical evidence critically and synthesise historical data from printed, manuscript, archaeological, numismatic, epigraphic, and papyrological sources, and are equipped with the tools necessary for further research in this field.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (40 credits), two to four optional modules (80 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules:
-Sources and Methods in Ancient History

Optional modules - options include the following (for a list of what is available in any given year please see our departmental website page):
-Ancient Rome on Film
-Change and Continuity in the Ancient Near East
-The City of Rome (BA/MA), (Royal Holloway)
-Economic and Social History of Archaic and Classical Greece
-Economic and Social History of Rome (Royal Holloway)
-Greek and Latin language at various levels
-Greek Epigraphy
-Greek Historiography
-Greek Law and Lawcourts (Royal Holloway)
-Greek Papyrology
-Latin Epigraphy
-Lived Religion in Ancient Greece
-The Making of the Christian Empire AD 284-425
-Persepolis (King's College London)
-Propaganda and Ideology in Rome
-Roman Britain (King's College London)
-Roman Egypt

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project in the field of Ancient History, which culminates in a dissertation of up to 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures and museum visits. Most teaching is available inside UCL, but some is held in other London colleges. Assessment is through unseen examinations, coursework essays, and the dissertation.

Careers

This degree provides an outstanding foundation for those wishing to undertake PhD research and pursue an academic career. It is also popular with students wishing to go into journalism, the civil service, business, museums and heritage and the education sector.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Head of Admissions, Unspecified International School in London
-Consulting Intern, Oracle Corporation
-Editorial Assistant, Bloomsbury Publishing
-Senior Intelligence Analyst, British Transport Police
-Senior Executive Officer, Department of Energy & Climate Change (DECC)

Employability
Students develop an enviable range of skills by taking this degree. Debates, small-group seminars and tutorials help students to acquire strong presentation and negotiation skills for their future career. The analytical and research skills gained are also highly valued by employers from a range of industries. There are many additional activities available, both within the department and the wider UCL community, to help students focus on employability skills whilst they are here, for example, departmental careers talks and networking opportunities with UCL History alumni.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL History enjoys an outstanding international reputation for its research and teaching.

This intercollegiate programme is taught jointly with King's College London and Royal Holloway, University of London, and students benefit from the international expertise and wealth of resources that the three colleges have to offer.

Located in Bloomsbury, UCL History is just a few minutes' walk away from the exceptional resources of the British Library, the British Museum and the research institutes of the University of London, including the Institute of Classical Studies, the Warburg Institute and the Institute of Historical Research.

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Advanced study of the history and culture of the Eastern Mediterranean world, from the foundation of Constantinople in 330 to the fall of the Byzantine empire in 1453. Read more
Advanced study of the history and culture of the Eastern Mediterranean world, from the foundation of Constantinople in 330 to the fall of the Byzantine empire in 1453. Wide range of modules in research skills (languages, palaeography, epigraphy, papyrology) and history, literature, culture, philosophy and theology. Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

- One of the world's largest and most distinguished departments of Classics.

- Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.

- Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.

- King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)


Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/late-antique-and-byzantine-studies-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The MA in Late Antique and Byzantine Studies offers the opportunity to specialize in an exciting and multi-faceted field of study that covers the history and culture of the Eastern Mediterranean world during the long millennium from the foundation of Constantinople (modern Istanbul) in 330 to the fall of the Byzantine empire in 1453. The degree allows students, through the numerous modules on offer, to acquire expertise in the necessary research skills (ancient languages, palaeography, epigraphy, papyrology) and in a variety of disciplines (history, literature, material culture, philosophy, theology).

- Course purpose -

For students whose previous training has been in a related subject in the humanities. To give a grounding in the subject, normally with a language-training element in medieval Greek or Latin.

- Course format and assessment -

Full-time study: 6-8 hours of taught classes per week. Part-time study: 2-6 hours of taught classes per week. Modules are assessed by coursework and/or examinations. The 12,000 word dissertation enables students to research a topic of their choice, working one-to-one with an academic supervisor.

Career Prospects:

Research in our department and elsewhere in the UK, EU and US; teaching, cultural management, general management, civil service, banking.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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This fascinating course is designed to provide you with advanced training in the techniques of art history and archaeology. It offers opportunities for you to study an exciting range of topics, taught by leading experts in the field. Read more
This fascinating course is designed to provide you with advanced training in the techniques of art history and archaeology. It offers opportunities for you to study an exciting range of topics, taught by leading experts in the field.

As this is an intercollegiate MA, jointly run with King’s College London and University College London, you will benefit from the choice of a wide range of stimulating units on Greek and Roman art and archaeology from all parts of the Mediterranean world. You may also take elective units covering Greek and Latin language and literature, ancient history, and technical skills such as papyrology, epigraphy and palaeography.

This course is ideal if you are considering progressing to advanced research or wish to add an additional year of high level study to your undergraduate qualification.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/classics/coursefinder/maclassicalartandarchaeology.aspx

Why choose this course?

- We are an international centre of excellence in research and teaching, promoting understanding and knowledge of the ancient world and its culture.

- You will have the opportunity to take part in our departmental research seminars.

- As we are a College of the University of London, you will have the opporunity to choose intercollegiate course units at King’s College London and UCL.

- We offer units which cover not only Greek and Latin literature, the major periods of ancient history, ancient philosophy and the Greek and Latin languages, but also key technical skills such as papyrology, epigraphy, and palaeography.

- We have an excellent track record of publications that advance the understanding of antiquity.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Department is home to two College Research Centres: the Centre for the Reception of Greece and Rome and the new Centre for Oratory and Rhetoric.

- Major archaeological research projects in the Department include the.Laurentine Shore Project and the Kalaureia Research Program.

- In Classical Art and Archaeology we are particularly well equipped to supervise dissertations on: Greek architecture, quantitative methods in archaeology, Roman sculpture, the city of Rome, the archaeology of the Roman empire, and ancient shipping and shipsheds.

Course content and structure

You will study three elective course units and prepare a dissertation. At least two of the elective units should be on a classical archaeological or art-historical subject as should the dissertation. For more information about the course, please see the Department of Classics' website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/classics/informationforcurrentstudents/home.aspx .

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a detailed knowledge and understanding of the methodologies of classical art and archaeology
- an understanding of critical methodologies and their limitations
- an understanding of advanced, current research issues relevant to the discipline
- a critical awareness of the multiplicity of material available and the strengths and weaknesses of the various forms or archaeological information.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and in recent years have entered many classics/archaeology related areas including academic positions at Oxford, Bristol, and Roehampton Universities, as well as teaching careers in the UK and overseas, archaeological and museum work, and a wide range of other roles.

This taught Master’s course will also provide you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This stimulating course offers opportunities for you to study the full range of classical literature and history, as well as improving your languages and learning new technical skills. Read more
This stimulating course offers opportunities for you to study the full range of classical literature and history, as well as improving your languages and learning new technical skills.

As this is an intercollegiate MA, jointly run with King’s College London and University College London, you will benefit from the choice of a wide range of fascinating subjects. These include the Greek and Latin literatures from Homer to Late Antiquity, classical reception, ancient history, ancient philosophy and the Greek and Latin languages, as well as key technical skills such as papyrology, epigraphy, and palaeography.

This course is ideal if you are considering progressing to advanced research or wish to add an additional year of high level study to your undergraduate qualification.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/classics/coursefinder/maclassics.aspx

Why choose this course?

- We are an international centre of excellence in research and teaching, promoting understanding and knowledge of the ancient world and its culture.

- You will have the opportunity to take part in our departmental research seminars.

- As we are a College of the University of London, you will have the opporunity to choose intercollegiate course units at King’s College London and UCL.

- We offer units which cover not only Greek and Latin literature, the major periods of ancient history, ancient philosophy and the Greek and Latin languages, but also key technical skills such as papyrology, epigraphy, and palaeography.

- We have an excellent track record of publications that advance the understanding of antiquity.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Department is home to two College Research Centres: the Centre for the Reception of Greece and Rome and the new Centre for Oratory and Rhetoric.

- Research in the Department covers the whole range of Classical Studies, from Homeric Greece to the very end of the Roman Empire.

- In classical language, literature and thought we are particularly well equipped to supervise dissertations on: Homer, epic tradition, Greek drama, the ancient novel, Greek literature under the Roman Empire, ancient rhetoric and oratory, Latin epic and elegy, ancient myth, ancient philosophy (especially Neoplatonism) and classical reception.

Course content and structure

You will study three elective course units and prepare a dissertation. The elective units must include either at least one taught course which tests knowledge of Greek or Latin in the original or one language acquisition course. The dissertation should normally be in the field of classical language, literature or thought, or the classical tradition. For more information about the course units, please see the Department of Classics' website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/classics/informationforcurrentstudents/home.aspx .

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a detailed knowledge and understanding of the methodologies of classics
- an understanding of critical methodologies and their limitations
- an understanding of advanced, current research issues relevant to the discipline
- a critical awareness of the main forms of material available to you when studying classical antiquity.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and in recent years have entered many classics related areas including academic positions at Oxford, Bristol, and Roehampton Universities, as well as teaching careers in the UK and overseas, archaeological and museum work, and a wide range of other roles.

This taught Master’s course will also provide you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This course enables you to apply the study of ancient material and visual culture to a particular historical and geographical context. Read more
This course enables you to apply the study of ancient material and visual culture to a particular historical and geographical context. You’ll undertake specialist research training in art, numismatics and epigraphy that will equip you for further PhD study in these fields, or for a career in museum work or education.

The course includes a core module in Approaching Ancient Visual and Material Culture, plus a core language module, as well as the Core module in Greece. You will also select one optional module at Warwick.

The MA in the Visual and Material Culture of Ancient Greece is the first in the UK to give you access to the postgraduate training courses of the British School at Athens, an institute for advanced research based in Greece. You will have the opportunity to spend two to three weeks in Athens or Knossos, following a full programme of site visits and seminars from visiting scholars.

Admission to the course is subject to the discretion of the BSA/BSR and cannot be guaranteed. Students are responsible for funding their travel to Greece.

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We offer a unique opportunity to explore the civilizations of the ancient Mediterranean and the Near East. Read more

General Information

We offer a unique opportunity to explore the civilizations of the ancient Mediterranean and the Near East. Our remarkably diverse faculty includes world experts who both teach, and conduct path-breaking research on, the archaeology, history, languages, literatures, and religions of ancient Egypt, the Near East, Greece and Rome, including Judaism, Christianity, and early Islam. Our programs, which can be individually tailored to fit specific interests, foster interdisciplinary study, at the same time developing the relevant skill sets to prepare our students for future study and employment.

What makes the program unique?

Every program is unique and students have the option to design a perfect curriculum for them. Our strengths include rigorous training in the primary languages, Ancient Greek, Latin, Hebrew, Middle Egyptian, and Classical Arabic; broad coverage of the mythic systems of ancient civilizations; in-depth study of the dramatic, historical, legal, literary and religious texts produced by those civilizations; advanced training in practical methods of archaeology and epigraphy; and exploration of the traditions and receptions of antiquity by later eras.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts
- Specialization: Ancient Culture, Religion and Ethnicity
- Subject: Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Major Project/Essay required
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts

Ancient Language Requirement

Candidates will be required to demonstrate reasonable competence in one of the classical languages. The minimum standard required is a grade of B-/68% in 6 credits of one of the following: GREK 301/302 (Greek Literature of the Classical Period) or LATN 301 (Latin Literature of the Classical Period) or HEBR 479 (Readings in Biblical Hebrew) or ARBC 420 (supervised study in Classical Arabic) or their equivalents. These 6 credits may form part of the course requirements for the M.A. program.

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On this course, you will gain substantial research experience, working alongside our leading subject specialists. You will engage with a broad range of research methods, including some of the most influential theoretical positions and methodologies in classical scholarship and academic enquiry. Read more

Summary

On this course, you will gain substantial research experience, working alongside our leading subject specialists. You will engage with a broad range of research methods, including some of the most influential theoretical positions and methodologies in classical scholarship and academic enquiry. You will also improve your knowledge of ancient languages.

This research-focused programme is designed to enhance the abilities of classics and ancient history students to conduct research at a high intellectual, methodological and theoretical level. You will receive training and guidance on conducting a piece of original research and its written presentation from a specialist in your area of interest on the programme team. The course will offer focused preparation for doctoral research. It will also present specific preparation for a range of professional careers that require highly-developed research and writing skills. You will also gain experience in how to present and discuss papers and posters at conferences.

As part of the intensive research training on offer, you will engage critically and creatively with classical texts, objects and images, and with their reception in later periods of history. The knowledge and experience of working with a variety of media will underlie your own original and innovative studies of the classical past. Additionally, you will have the opportunity to receive focused instruction in relevant subject areas for example epigraphy, numismatics and material culture. To further bolster your classical research skills, we offer tuition in both Latin and Ancient Greek, knowledge of which underpins a successful career in classical academia. As well as developing your practical research skills, the course will provide a deep understanding of the theoretical concepts that inform academic enquiry in classics and ancient history. Using your improved knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of the research methods, you will be in a position to contribute to the national and international research profile of classical studies at Roehampton and to take advantage of opportunities for co-operation and collaboration in the UK and beyond.

Content

You will be introduced to some of the most important theoretical positions and methodologies in classical scholarship. Whilst some of the theories have arisen from the work of classicists and ancient historians themselves, others have been imported from other disciplines. All of them seek to address the agenda of classical scholars not merely to describe the ancient world, but to explain it. Relevant scholarly texts and sources related to this interdisciplinary and multi-disciplinary nature will be studied, introducing you to the specialised skills you will need as a researcher.

With your grounding in the theoretical premises of classical research, you will begin your dissertation research project. This represents substantial independent research into a topic in classical studies or ancient history, and can be undertaken in a broad range of areas. The research project provides an opportunity for you to explore and train your research skills, pursuing a specific problem or topic in considerable depth. This project is a great opportunity to prepare for a three- to four-year PhD programme before committing to it.

A third important aspect of the course is the delivery of language and commentary skills in Latin and Ancient Greek. Students can take modules in one or both of the ancient languages which are prerequisites for successful study of original ancient documents. The languages are offered from beginner level to the study of an ancient author in depth.

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This postgraduate egree offers an intensive and challenging approach to the study of the Classical Mediterranean worlds across the Greek and Roman periods. Read more
This postgraduate egree offers an intensive and challenging approach to the study of the Classical Mediterranean worlds across the Greek and Roman periods. The course questions the traditional ways in which we reconstruct the classical past, and interrogates current understandings and perceptions of Greek and Roman societies across the Mediterranean.

Course Outline

A key part of the course is our interdisciplinary approach, drawing from both history and archaeology. We will equip you to work with different classical sources in combination, including literary texts, epigraphy, material culture, landscape studies, architecture, and visual art.

The course will enable you to reflect critically on the economic, social, political, cultural, artistic and religious developments and interactions between the various regions and powers of the Classical Mediterranean. You will develop a high level of competence in the cultures of the Greek, Hellenistic and Roman Mediterranean.

The School has a high concentration of relevant staff expertise and specialisms which is exceptional in Britain. Our expertise ranges across the classical world, including Italy, North Africa, the Aegean, Anatolia and Syria, offering you a coherent perspective of the whole Mediterranean.

This course will equip you with the skills needed to go on to conduct doctoral research or enhance your career prospects, whether in archaeology, related or other professions.

Course Structure

Core Modules:
Text and Material Culture
Dissertation (15,000 words)

Plus 3 option modules from a choice approximately 22.

(Please note: due to regular enhancement of the University’s courses, please refer to Leicester’s own website (http://www.le.ac.uk) or/and Terms and Conditions (http://www2.le.ac.uk/legal) for the most accurate and up-to-date course information. We recommend that you familiarise yourself with this information prior to submitting an application.)

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This MA is unique in combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art. Offered by The Robert H. Read more
This MA is unique in combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art. Offered by The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Art and Conservation at The Courtauld, the MA was established as a one-year degree in 2013. In order to build on and expand the strengths of the programme, the MA is changing in 2017 to a two-year degree taught in collaboration with SOAS.

The MA now brings together world-famous institutions: The Courtauld for the study of art history and conservation, and SOAS for the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Drawing on the unique strengths of the two institutions and their exceptional faculties, the new curriculum of the MA provides detailed and systematic teaching over two years. Each discipline is introduced, expanded and integrated to allow students to obtain the best possible learning experiences and skills acquisition. Designed to provide increased specialisation over the two years, the course culminates in research and a substantial dissertation in the final months.

Offered once every two years, applications are now invited for the programme beginning autumn 2017. Taught by a wide range of specialists from both The Courtauld and SOAS, the MA also benefits from teaching by visiting experts. The course includes study trips to museums in the UK and Europe, and a longer study trip to India to develop an appreciation of Buddhist art in its original contexts. Students also benefit from conferences and public events regularly held by the Ho Centre at The Courtauld.

Drawing also on the research and conservation work undertaken by The Courtauld’s Conservation of Wall Painting Department in Bhutan, China and India, this MA is specifically designed to equip students with knowledge of:

‌•the central concepts of Buddhism, and their historical diffusion;
‌•the history of Buddhist art in its various religious, social and cultural contexts;
‌•the materials and techniques involved in the making of various types of Buddhist art;
‌•approaches to the conservation of Buddhist art, including understanding of the ethical, technical and administrative issues involved.

This MA provides a comprehensive grounding in the history of Buddhism, Buddhist art and its conservation for those intending to pursue further specialist conservation education, and for those who wish to proceed into related fields such as art-historical research, curating, and site-management.

About eight students are accepted on the MA. Applicants from different academic and geographical backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Previous experience in any of the fields covered by the MA is not required.

Please Note: Plans are being made for the redevelopment of The Courtauld’s home at Somerset House. The project, called Courtauld Connects, will include the development of state-of-the-art teaching and research facilities. During the redevelopment the location of some teaching will move. Further information on Courtauld Connects will be published on The Courtauld’s website over the coming months.

Programme Structure

This two-year MA combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art, is structured to provide increased specialisation during the course, with a substantial dissertation at the end. The programme consists of interwoven strands. Led by Professor David Park and Dr Giovanni Verri at The Courtauld, and by Dr Christian Luczanits and Dr Vincent Tournier at SOAS, it includes teaching by a wide range of specialists from both institutions and from elsewhere. Some strands will be taught at The Courtauld or on-site, while for others students will join classes at SOAS.

Year 1
The objectives of this year are to provide a grounding in the concepts of Buddhism and their historical diffusion; an appreciation of the chronological development, regional variations and major themes of Buddhist art; an understanding of the making of different types of Buddhist art, and of the ethical, legal and other issues underlying the conservation and display of Buddhist art; and an interdisciplinary exposure to the imagining and presentation of Buddhas and their achievements in South Asia, juxtaposing the textual perspective with what is communicated through imagery. The formal teaching is reinforced through a study trip in the second term to museums in Paris or elsewhere in Europe, and in the third term by a longer study trip to India.

‌•Strand 1: Critical Concepts in Buddhist Studies Convenor: Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course is designed to provide a broad understanding of the major processes and dynamics at work in the growth and development of Buddhism as a pan-Asian religion, and with the key methodological tools required to approach this major cultural force in its fascinating diversity.

•Strand 2: History of Buddhist Art Convenors: David Park (The Courtauld) & Christian Luczanits (SOAS) This course provides an overview of Buddhist art with regard to its chronological development, regional variations, major themes, and the multiplicity of different media. Buddhist art in collections will also be studied, examining aspects of collecting and display.

•Strand 3: The Making of Buddhist Art, and Conservation Principles Convenor: Giovanni Verri (The Courtauld) This course provides an introduction to the making of Buddhist art from its origins. Primary sources and technical studies are used to understand the different types of materials employed. It will also provide an introduction to the principles, ethics and other issues underlying the conservation and display of Buddhist art.

•Strand 4: Imag(in)ing Buddahood in South Asia Convenors: Christian Luczanits & Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course engages in an interdisciplinary manner with the central idea of Buddhism, as it developed within and beyond its South Asian cradle. Bringing together the expertise of an art historian and a historian of Buddhist thought, it will provide exposure to a diversity of approaches to textual, iconographic, and archaeological sources, to understand how Buddhas and their achievements were imagined, presented and encountered by Buddhist practitioners.

‌•Strand 5: Study trip to museums in Europe To examine Buddhist art in major museums in Paris or elsewhere, considering art-historical, technical and conservation aspects, as well as display and management issues.

•Strand 6: Fragile Inheritance: the Conservation of Buddhist Art Convenor: David Park (The Courtauld) To examine the measures directly involved in the preservation of Buddhist art in museums and in situ; and to examine particular major case studies in detail with regard to the legal, ethical, management, practical and other issues involved.

Year 2
Strand 6 continues in Year 2. More specialised teaching is introduced in a variety of areas: texts, and their relationship to Buddhist objects; the scientific examination and imaging of Buddhist art; and a choice of specialised courses in Buddhist studies and Buddhist art, allowing students to pursue particular interests and to assist in the choice of dissertation topic. The dissertation, undertaken over a period of fourteen weeks, should consider an aspect of the original techniques, conservation, management, curating, history or use of Buddhist art.

‌•Strand 6: Fragile Inheritance: the Conservation of Buddhist Art Continued from Year 1

•Strand 7: Texts on and around Buddhist objects Convenors: David Park (The Courtauld) & Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course will

‌-explore the many ways by which texts inform, respond to, and accompany Buddhist objects across Asian societies. It will, in particular, -explore the Text-Image relationship, examining how textual and visual narratives respond to each other. It will introduce students to the methods of epigraphy and codicology, including the increasing use of imaging technologies.

‌•Strand 8: Analysis and Imaging of Buddhist Art Convenor: Giovanni Verri (The Courtauld) This course provides an introduction to methods of examination and analysis through the use of visual observations and scientific instruments, and an introduction to and basic instruction in the technical imaging of Buddhist art including multispectral imaging.

•Strand 9: Choice of one of the following specialised courses in Buddhist Studies and one in Buddhist Art at SOAS Students will select these courses in consultation with their tutors, on the basis of their previous background and career objectives; options will also depend on availability at SOAS. This further specialism will aid students in their choice of dissertation topic. Presentations and discussions at The
Courtauld will enable students to harmonise their experience.

Specialised Course in Buddhist Studies

-Buddhism in Tibet (Ulrich Pagel)
-Chinese Buddhism in the Pre-modern Period (Antonello Palumbo)
-East Asian Buddhist Thought (Lucia Dolce)
-The Buddhist Conquest of Central Asia (Ulrich Pagel)
-Specialised Course in Buddhist Art

-Buddhist and Hindu Art of the Maritime Silk Route (Peter Sharrock)
-Collecting and Curating Buddhist Art in the Museum (Louise Tythacott)
-Illustrated Manuscript Cultures of Southeast Asia (Anna Contadini & Farouk Yahya)
-Sacred Art and Architecture of Ancient Korea (Charlotte Horlyck)
-The Figure of the Buddha: Theory, Practice and the Making of Buddhist Art History (Ashley Thompson)
-Tibetan Buddhist Monuments in Context (Christian Luczanits)

‌•Strand 10: Dissertation: A major component of the MA is a 12,000-word dissertation, undertaken in the second and third terms of Year 2. The dissertation topic should focus on the original techniques, conservation, management, curating, history, or use of Buddhist art. Students are encouraged to design their research to reflect the interdisciplinary nature of the MA. Selection of the topic will be undertaken in the first term of Year 2 in consultation with course tutors, and will include assessment of the state of research, and production of an illustrated outline proposal with references.Topics have been varied; those of the previous one-year MA have included:

-19th– and early 20th-century copies and photographs of the Ajanta murals;
-narrative and biography in early Tibetan teacher portraits;
-tree and forest imagery in Buddhist Yamato-e handscroll paintings;
-technical study and investigation of Nagthangs;
-materials and techniques of red dyed gold from Southeast Asia;
-the influence of Tibetan Buddhism on Ming Imperial porcelains;
-examination and assessment of the environmental conditions of the Textile Museum of Bhutan.This range demonstrates the scope for students to research avenues that significantly develop their individual interests and skills, while also providing a contribution to the field.

Teaching Methods

Teaching methods and work required of the students are related to each strand and include:

‌•lectures: to impart factual information;
‌•seminars: to provide a forum for open discussion, and to allow assessment of the development of the individual student’s critical abilities;
‌•student seminars: to develop skills in gathering, organising and presenting a body of information, including visual material;
‌•essays: to develop skills in written communication and research methodology;
‌•reports: on the study trips;
‌•tutoring: to provide individual guidance, and to allow monitoring of the student’s progress.

How to Apply

Before starting your application, please ensure that you read and refer to the following three sets of information. Then access our Online Application System by selecting the relevant "Apply Now” link from the table of courses, below.

Follow this link for the information: http://courtauld.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-how-to-apply

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Advanced study of Greek and Roman art and archaeology, with unique opportunity to acquire technical skills provided by optional modules in papyrology, epigraphy and palaeography. Read more

Course Description

Advanced study of Greek and Roman art and archaeology, with unique opportunity to acquire technical skills provided by optional modules in papyrology, epigraphy and palaeography. Intercollegiate programme with options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies. Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

- One of the world's largest and most distinguished Departments of Classics.

- Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.

- Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.

- King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. King's is ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2016)

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/classical-art-and-archaeology-ma.aspx

Course detail

Archaeology is the study of human activities as preserved in the material record, such as domestic and public buildings, rituals, mortuary practices, and the use of symbols. History of art explores painting, pottery, sculpture and mosaics, and the craftsmanship that produced these works. Traditionally, classical archaeology focused on the art history of Classical Greece and Italy, but has more recently branched out geographically and chronologically. Archaeology has also become more theoretical in recent decades, exploring the relationship between humans and their material environment. Furthermore, engagement in field projects is essential for the continuing health of the discipline. All trends are well represented here at King's.

The MA programme in Classical Art & Archaeology is organised on an intercollegiate basis, so that the programme offerings combine the expertise of staff in all three of the participating colleges - King's, UCL and Royal Holloway. It centres on the University's Institute of Classical Studies, which not only contains a world-class research library, but also hosts the richest programme of seminars, conferences, and occasional lectures for this subject area in the UK.

- Course purpose -

This programme offers advanced study of Greek and Roman archaeology and art; it is intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research.

- Course format and assessment -

Full-time study: 6-8 hours of taught classes per week. Part-time study: 2-6 hours of taught classes per week. Modules are assessed by coursework and/or examinations. The 12,000 word dissertation enables students to research a topic of their choice, working one-to-one with an academic supervisor.

Career prospects

Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/mlc

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-Study at one of the largest and liveliest classical world education centres in the UK. -Work with a strong research community, supported by excellent resources. Read more
-Study at one of the largest and liveliest classical world education centres in the UK
-Work with a strong research community, supported by excellent resources
-Opportunities to begin or continue your study of Ancient Greek or Latin

The MA in Classics and Ancient History is extremely flexible and wide-ranging. In this it reflects the broad, multidisciplinary nature of the subject, which includes Latin and Greek language, the history of Greek and Roman antiquity from archaic times to the beginning of the Middle Ages, and Greek and Roman literature, philosophy, and culture. The MA is designed to introduce students to advanced study in their chosen field and to equip them with the skills required for doctoral research. The programme and most modules within it allow students to tailor their advanced study and research-preparation to their interests, needs and existing knowledge. Apart from the thesis, the only compulsory unit is that devoted to research training. We also expect all students to study Latin and/or Greek as part of their MA. (No existing knowledge of Latin or Greek is required, and we are very well-equipped to support students beginning their study of either language; it is also possible to study one or both languages at more Advanced levels). Apart from these requirements, students are able to choose freely in constructing an MA course which best suits their interests and skills.

In addition, we offer one specialist route through the MA programme: namely the 'City of Rome' route. This route involves taking a course unit at the British School at Rome, for which students prepare by studying a course on Roman social and urban history.

Aims

On successful completion of the MA in Classics and Ancient History, students will:

i. Demonstrate the enhancement of previously acquired skills at a more critical, reflective, and sophisticated level, especially skills involving synthesising information from a variety of sources, historical and/or literary interpretation, exercising independent and critical judgement.
ii. Understand and respect the `otherness' of the past by developing specialist knowledge about one or more aspect of Graeco-Roman civilisation.
iii. Be able to describe, analyse, and assess ancient sources, including (as appropriate) literary, non-literary, visual, and material evidence.
iv. Be able to design and complete a substantial piece of independent research.
v. Work effectively as autonomous scholars.
vi. Be able to understand complex problems and communicate them clearly in oral and written form, with the help, where appropriate, of visual or graphic aids.

Coursework and assessment

The MA in Classics & Ancient History is made up of a taught element (120 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). Taught units are usually assessed by extended essay, but assessment might also include oral presentations, conference posters, commentary exercises and (particularly for language units) formal examinations.

In more detail, the structure of the course is as follows:

Research training . Our core course, 'Studying the Ancient World: Techniques and Approaches', introduces you to the key research questions and methods involved in advanced study of the discipline and, in the second semester, gives you experience in developing and presenting your own research project.

Language units. If you are a beginner, you will take one of our specially-designed `intensive' courses in Latin or Greek, which will put you in a position to start reading ancient texts in the original language before the end of your MA. If you have already studied Greek or Latin, you will continue your study of one or both languages at an appropriate level. If you are already at a very advanced stage in both languages you will take a specially-designed course unit which allows you further to develop your language skills in an area related to your research interests (for example: palaeography; papyrology; textual criticism; epigraphy).

Taught course-units . The remainder of your taught credits are selected from a range of taught units, chosen from a menu covering a range of topics in Greek and Roman history, literature, and culture. Most taught units are worth 15 credits, and usually involve 11 `classroom' hours, consisting of both student-led and tutor-led discussion, supported by additional guidance and planning sessions.

It is possible for one of these units to be an approved unit from another subject area (for example, History or Archaeology), or a Directed Reading course, in which you are free to pursue whatever avenue is of interest to you, by negotiation with a tutor and with the Postgraduate Programme Director. The usual pattern for a Directed Reading course is 6 to 8 hours of contact time, which may be individual or in a small group, or a mixture of the two.

A dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words: 60 credits.

Career opportunities

This non-vocational Masters degree teaches and develops a wealth of transferable skills, and thus enables students to keep open a very wide range of career options. Recent graduates have gone on to vocational MAs (e.g. in Gallery & Museum Studies), to PhDs in Classics or Ancient History, to teaching, to contract researching, or to work in local or central government, commerce or industry.

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Are you interested in exploring classical material and visual culture, and its impact upon subsequent historical conceptions of antiquity? If so, this course is the ideal foundation for a career in museum work or education. Read more
Are you interested in exploring classical material and visual culture, and its impact upon subsequent historical conceptions of antiquity? If so, this course is the ideal foundation for a career in museum work or education. It also equips you for further PhD study in related fields.

You will undertake specialist research training in art, numismatics and epigraphy, with museum visits forming an important part of the programme. Teaching comprises two core modules — one language module and the other focusing on issues of reception, historiography and museum display — plus your choice of optional modules.

Options can be taken from within the Classics Department or you may decide to study a module from a related department, such as History of Art. Over the summer, you will complete a supervised dissertation, enabling you to research independently an area of personal academic interest in more depth.

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The MA is designed to develop historical skills and provide deeper knowledge of themes in ancient history. Core courses explore research skills and methodologies such as epigraphy, historiography and numismatics; option courses focus on aspects of ancient Greek and Roman history. Read more
The MA is designed to develop historical skills and provide deeper knowledge of themes in ancient history. Core courses explore research skills and methodologies such as epigraphy, historiography and numismatics; option courses focus on aspects of ancient Greek and Roman history. For more details visit: http://www.qub.ac.uk/history

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