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Masters Degrees (Environmentalism)

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The Environment and Development MA/MSc course is designed to provide you with an advanced theoretical understanding of the relationship between development problems and environmental issues, grounded in differing regional contexts across the global South. Read more

The Environment and Development MA/MSc course is designed to provide you with an advanced theoretical understanding of the relationship between development problems and environmental issues, grounded in differing regional contexts across the global South.

The course provides a framework for appraising the understanding of environmental issues and development problems in Asia, Africa and Latin America and encourages you to look beyond conventional North-originated perspectives and assumptions through regional case studies.

Key benefits

  • Academic staff have first-hand experience of environmental and developmental issues in the world’s underdeveloped countries.
  • Opportunities to carry out original fieldwork either in the UK or overseas for your dissertation.
  • Excellent tutorial support, extensive course specific interactive teaching and regular classroom discussions.

Description

The Environment & Development MA, MSc course offers a demanding and stimulating programme of study, with an emphasis on developing your analytical and research skills and on breaking free of conventional ‘North-originated’ paradigms on development. You will study modules covering Livelihoods and Development and Environmentalism in the ‘South’, as well as choosing from a wide range of optional modules. If you choose to follow the MSc research pathway, you will also study Advanced Quantitative & Spatial Methods in Human Geography.

The course is made up of optional and required modules. You must take the minimum of 180 credits to complete the course, 60 of which will come from a dissertation of around 12,000 words. If you are studying full-time, you will complete the course in one year, from September to September. If you are studying part-time, your course will take two years to complete. You will take the combination of required and optional modules over this period of time, with the dissertation in your second year.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We use lectures, seminars and group tutorials to deliver most of the modules on the course. You will also be expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Per 20-credit taught module you can typically expect 20 hours worth of lectures, seminars and feedback. You can also expect 180 hours worth of self study (some modules in the Geography Department may involve lab work or e-learning which would require less self-guided learning).

For the Dissertation module you can typically expect four dissertation workshops/ tutorials and five contact hours of one-to-one or group consultation with supervisors. In addition to this you will have 587 hours worth of self-study and project work.

Assessment

Performance on taught modules in the Geography Department is normally assessed through essays and other written assignments, oral presentations, lab work and occasionally by examination, depending on the modules selected. All students also undertake a research-based dissertation of 12,000 words.

Career prospects

Many of our graduates have gone on to undertake further graduate study and work as research assistants for international development agencies. There are also good career opportunities with government agencies, international and national non-governmental organisations and academic research institutes.



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MSc Environmental Governance critically analyses some of the key environmental challenges of our time, exploring the connections between environmental governance and policies and the production, distribution and consumption of resources. Read more

MSc Environmental Governance critically analyses some of the key environmental challenges of our time, exploring the connections between environmental governance and policies and the production, distribution and consumption of resources.

The course will develop your ability to apply sophisticated, critical and interdisciplinary sustainability and environmental theories at multiple scales and in different geographical contexts.

As part of the course, you'll have the unique opportunity to collaborate and engage with cutting-edge researchers and world-leading experts on environmental governance, political ecology, Marxist political economy and urban sustainability. You will learn from real-world practitioners, and liaise with external organisations on live policy problems.

This makes MSc Environmental Governance an ideal choice for:

  • future leaders interested in pursuing a career in environmental policy regulation and urban sustainable management
  • those wishing to develop further their academic career by pursuing a PhD
  • environmental professionals wishing to deepen their knowledge.

Aims

  • Interdisciplinary and sophisticated academic rigour: The course is highly interdisciplinary, exposing you to ideas and practices developed in a range of subject areas such as geography, environmental studies, politics, economics and development studies, rather than one alone. Our curriculum covers theories and interdisciplinary practices of environmental governance and offers you a comprehensive introduction to how human-use of the non-human world is organised at multiple scale and what the effects of this are.
  • Inclusive and collaborative research environment : The degree offers collaboration with the internationally renowned Society-Environment Research Group (SERG) . This group involves more than ten researchers from the School of Environment, Education and Development , with distinguished records of theoretical, empirical and applied research in a range of geographical and environmental settings. This includes work on water and energy governance in Europe, Africa and South-East Asia; social, environmental and climate justice and equity in Central and Eastern Europe, smart cities and urban sustainability in the UK - to name but a few.
  • Knowledge transfer and employability : We combine training in theory and critical thinking with more practical and applied elements. Our range of `real world' practitioners gives you the opportunity to liaise with external organisations on live policy problems and enhance your employability.

Teaching and learning

Part-time Study

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director first and also seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

Eight taught units comprise two-thirds of the programme. The remainder of the programme consists of a 12,000 word dissertation on an approved topic. Typical course units comprise two hours a week of seminar or small-group work. Together these units involve a range of formative and summative assessments, including individual and group work, oral presentations and long essays, project work and reports. Coursework is designed to allow you to pursue your particular areas of interest. 

In the summer semester, you work independently to undertake dissertation work based on primary and/or secondary data, or else a more philosophical/theoretical dissertation. We encourage you develop research in collaboration with members of the Society and Environment Research Group and external organisations.

Course unit details

Core course units

  • Key Debates in Environmental Governance - Introduces the main (and often competing) approaches to environmental governance in play today, ranging from `free market environmentalism', environmental modernisation and ecological economics, to the `risk society' perspective and green governmentality.
  • Issues in Environmental Policy - Links theory and practice by focusing on different types of environmental policy measures (their logic, operation and outcomes), and is taught by way of real world case studies drawn from the research literature and the work of policy practitioners locally, nationally and globally.
  • Doing Environmental Research - Provides advanced research skills and encourages you to plan and design your dissertation/research review projects. The course introduces you to a range of both research and career options appropriate to the skills acquired on the course, including planning research projects and preparing and writing a detailed proposal for dissertation/research review.

Past dissertation projects

Every year we have a range of different dissertation topics that reflect students' research interests. For illustration, this list presents some past dissertation topics:

  • The Nature of Industrial Preservation: Mapping Gentrification in New Islington, Manchester
  • Exploring the (post)political nature of urban climate change governance: a study of Manchester: A Certain Future
  • Multi-actor Partnership for Environmental Governance: An Investigation from the Perspective of Bangladesh
  • Transition Impossible? A Post-Political Analysis of the Transition Movement
  • Representation of Nature in Environmental Campaigns: The Visual Case of Greenpeace's #SavetheArctic Polar Bear
  • From government to governance in an age of austerity: an evaluation of new land management partnerships to fit a new economic era for the Peak District National Park
  • The urban commons and the scalar politics of climate activism
  • Manchester Certain Future Forum: Success of network partnerships in promoting sustainability behaviour change.

What our students say

"From the very start, I found all the staff extremely friendly and helpful. There was always someone to speak to, no matter what the problem - as someone who came into studying this subject from a very different undergraduate degree, this made my transition much easier. It also helped that the teaching staff have a real passion for the subject, which I found infectious and inspiring."

Oliver Gibbons, MSc Environmental Governance

Facilities

The Arthur Lewis Building provides excellent resources including analytical laboratories, studio facilities, workshops, seminar rooms, an on-site cafe and dedicated computer clusters including GIS facilities.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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Do you enjoy writing about people, places and wildlife? Are you interested in environmental issues in Britain and around the world? Would you like to be published, and make a living as a travel or nature writer? Then this course is for you. Read more
Do you enjoy writing about people, places and wildlife? Are you interested in environmental issues in Britain and around the world? Would you like to be published, and make a living as a travel or nature writer? Then this course is for you.

The MA in Travel and Nature Writing focuses on learning to write from your own experience in the field. You’ll develop your writing skills and techniques, learn from established writers, and examine the history, context and genres of travel and nature writing.

By meeting practitioners – writers, editors, agents and publishers – you’ll gain a unique insight into the professional skills you require to get your writing published.

This low-residency course allows you to be based wherever you wish, so you can pursue your academic work while maintaining your current lifestyle. It can be taken full-time over one year, or part-time over two.

COURSE STRUCTURE

We aim to give you an understanding of issues and approaches to the representations of peoples, other species, habitats, places, cultures and environments in various kinds of writing. You’ll graduate with the ability to apply what you’ve learnt to your own professional practice.

You’ll study:

• A mix of thematic topics represented by a variety of writers.
• A balance between historical and contemporary writing.
• Issues raised by eco-tourism, conservation and environmentalism.
• Issues related to the experience and representation of people, wildlife and places in specific locations in the UK and elsewhere.
• The genres, and context of contemporary and historical travel and nature writing, and the history of our connections with the environment and the natural world.

MODULES

Writing in the Field is a broad introduction to the skills and techniques required to write from personal experience.whether about people, landscapes, the natural world, or a combination of all three. By using fieldcraft techniques, based on looking, listening, feeling and thinking, we explore ways of writing about the world around us.

Context, History and Genres in Travel and Nature Writing gives an overview, both broad and focused, on the key developments in the travel writing and nature writing genres over time; including analysis of historical trends, specific authors and works, the history and development of both ‘travel’ and ‘nature’ as social pastimes, and the contemporary scene.

In Advanced Travel and Nature Writing, you'll develop new ways of writing about the world: pushing the boundaries of your writing style and content in order to learn what works best for you as a writer.

Professional Skills in Travel and Nature Writing is a practical guide to getting your work published across a range of different media and outlets, including newspapers, magazines, websites, blogs, books and on TV and radio. Featuring advice from senior practitioners, editors and publishers. You’ll also learn to plan a trip requiring commissions, and do a pitch and interview of an idea for publication.

In A Portfolio of Travel and Nature Writing, you'll develop a 20,000 words portfolio of your best work, together with a reflective diary of your progress throughout the year.

For more information on modules please view our Course Handbook via our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-travel-and-nature-writing/

TEACHING METHODS

A large part of the course is taught on three residential courses. You’ll undergo an intensive few days of creative writing, discussion, meetings with practitioners and commissioners and firsthand experience in the field. Please note that you’ll have to pay for travel, food and accommodation on the residential courses.

You’ll also learn online. You’ll have internet-based seminars and group discussions on Google Hangouts. You’ll also post your work on our Virtual Learning Environment, where your peers and tutors can critique it in detail.

For more information about teaching methods and how the course will be structured please go to our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-travel-and-nature-writing/

ASSESSMENT

You’ll be assessed through a combination of formative and summative assessments. This will include creative writing pieces, critical and analytical essays, presentations and a broad portfolio of your writing.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

The course is designed to introduce students to the workings of various travel and nature writing publishing opportunities and prepare them for the submission of their own work. It will also equip them with the practical and business skills to operate as freelance writers.

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The role of the corporate environmental manager is becoming increasingly complex and strategic. Corporate social and environmental responsibility is becoming prominent in consumer demand and a pre-requisite for tender eligibility. Read more
The role of the corporate environmental manager is becoming increasingly complex and strategic. Corporate social and environmental responsibility is becoming prominent in consumer demand and a pre-requisite for tender eligibility. This necessitates a more sophisticated environmental manager who can interpret legislative and audit requirements and deliver them in a manner conducive to continued economic development, whilst recognising the market trends. The aim of this programme is to develop skills in the delivery of economic activities related to environment, green technology and sustainability. The programme includes highly topical case studies from across these sectors reflecting changing strategies and alternative approaches. The course is suitable for graduates in a wide range of disciplines, including Environment, Engineering, Finance, Social Sciences and other subjects.
Testimonials

Compulsory Modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts. Specific topics include:

The nature of organisations
Organisation structures: strategy, design and function, job design
Organisation cultures: values, ethics, norms of behaviour
Theories and models of management: classical and contemporary
Individual differences: perception, learning, motivation, equality and diversity
Groups and teams in the organisation
Managing relationships: power, conflict, communication, engagement
Managers as leaders, people developers, coaches
Managing job satisfaction and performance

International Strategic Management: This module analyses strategic decision-making within business. You will develop a critical understanding of the strategic processes of business management, the interconnections with the functional domains of marketing, human resource management and corporate finance, and the management of knowledge systems. Specific topics include:

Concepts of strategic management applicable to business
Prescriptive and emergent strategies
Strategy implementation through capacity building and resource allocation
Managing, monitoring and reviewing strategic change
Organisational designs for strategic advantage
Human resources strategy, marketing and corporate financial strategy
Organisational learning and knowledge management

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments. Specific topics include:

Research methodologies and philosophy: positivism and interpretivism
Qualitative research methods and the search for meaning
Selecting a research strategy and design
Data gathering, documentary records, triangulation and mixed methods
Content analysis, conversation analysis, discourse analysis, grounded theory
Quantitative research design and methodologies
Univariate and multivariate analysis, factor, cluster and discriminant analysis

Business Planning for the Green Economy: This module explores the process of establishing a venture from idea generation to the completion of a business plan which incorporates environmental planning and management. It takes the student through the actual process of developing a business plan and its different components, the market and sustainability. Specific topics include:

Entrepreneurship
The entrepreneurial role in relation to the initiation and development of a sustainable business
Key environmental factors of business development
The differences between the entrepreneur and the environmental manager, and the problems faced by small growth firms in sustainable growth.
The importance and complexity of entrepreneurship and environmentalism within a large firm environment

Finance for Managers: This module is designed for those who aim to achieve a basic understanding of financial management and control, and who require an understanding of finance in order to manage an organisation effectively. Financial planning and control are central themes, as well as the appraisal techniques of investment projects. Specific topics include:

Principles underlying the preparation of accounting information
Recording business transactions
Preparation and analysis of financial statements
Preparation of budgets, financial planning and control
Costing methods, uses and interpretation of cost data
Investment appraisal techniques

Strategic Environmental Management: This module is designed to provide a an understanding of the principles of sustainable development, environmental legislation, environmental auditing and assesment, and green technological development. Specific topics include:

Sustainable development
Environmental legislation
Environmental auditing
Environmental assessment
Corporate social responsibility and socially responsible investment
Life cycle analysis

Green Technology: This module reviews the environmental consequences of economic activities, including energy generation, waste management, food and water supply, consumer goods. It then goes on to consider recent policy initiatives and drivers and examines key green technologies. Specific topics include:

Development and deployment of green technologies
Environment impacts of energy generation
Green technology policies and initiatives
Green technologies - commerce, ideas and concepts
Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for green technologies

Part 2:

For MBA Environmental Management, you must complete Part 2 by undertaking a relevant dissertation.

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Liverpool Hope University’s MA International Relations encompasses a number of the most important issues in the modern world including global politics and policy, globalisation, trade, social and economic development, integration, interdependence, war and peace, conflict resolution and peace-keeping, international justice and human rights, gender issues, environmentalism and climate change. Read more
Liverpool Hope University’s MA International Relations encompasses a number of the most important issues in the modern world including global politics and policy, globalisation, trade, social and economic development, integration, interdependence, war and peace, conflict resolution and peace-keeping, international justice and human rights, gender issues, environmentalism and climate change.

The MA International Relations is built around a strong core of international politics, but also draws on other disciplines such as history, economics, sociology, development and cultural studies. The objective is to encourage you to engage critically with both the theoretical and practical dimensions of contemporary global politics. You will develop your ability to understand and interpret the modern world through a combination of theoretical insights with detailed practical analyses.
The MA International Relations is suitable to both recent graduates and those wishing to return to study, who have an interest in global politics and the nature of international and transnational relations. The programme attracts students from across the world and from many different backgrounds.

Programme Overview

The MA International Relations combines academic and practical modules, consisting two compulsory courses, up to five elective courses, and a dissertation (final research project) totaling 180 credits. Assessment methods may include coursework, in-class tests, examinations, presentations, a research proposal and research dissertation.

Research Environment

The Department of Politics, History, Media and Communication at Liverpool Hope has a strong teaching and research reputation. All faculty members are actively engaged in research, publishing and contributing to the development of their discipline. Faculty in the department work collaboratively with colleagues in other departments and are actively involved in a number of the University’s research centres and groups.

The department has particular research interests in international relations; UN peacekeeping; European integration; American government; British and Irish politics and history; maritime and colonial history; and twentieth century European ideologies, cultures and identities.

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The field of Social Policy examines the definition, pattern and range of social problems in contemporary society and the various policy responses to them. Read more

The field of Social Policy examines the definition, pattern and range of social problems in contemporary society and the various policy responses to them. It explores the role of the state in relation to the welfare and management of its citizens and the role of state intervention in determining the conditions under which people live. This programme is designed to provide you with a grounding in social research as applied in social policy investigations.

Course Structure

You will take a range of taught modules primarily in the first two terms of the academic year. Starting in the first term, you will undertake a module on research design which will enables you to develop a research proposal for your dissertation.

Core Modules

In previous years, typical modules offered were:

Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)

  • Introduction to social scientific research
  • Establishing cause and interpreting meaning in social sciences
  • Essentials of quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences.

Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits)

  • Spreadsheets and data analysis
  • Populations, sample data and sampling distributions
  • Point estimates and confidence intervals
  • Significance tests, cress-tabulations, and Chi-Square tests
  • Correlation and linear regression.

Research Design and Process (15 credits)

  • Formulating research questions
  • Evaluating and developing a research proposal
  • Reviewing relevant literature
  • Experimental vs. observational studies
  • Sampling and selecting respondents
  • Measurement.

Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

  • Introduction to theory and research practice in qualitative methods
  • Ethnography and grounded theory
  • Group discussions
  • Data analysis and management processes.

Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

  • Sampling and sample design, questionnaire design
  • Numerical taxonomy and cluster analysis in practice
  • Methods for representing complex systems.

Social Policy and Society (30 credits)

  • Spanning two terms, this module covers theory and concepts in the first term, and applications of concepts in the second term
  • Critical perspectives in Marxism, feminism, anti-racism, and environmentalism
  • Social control, regulations and resistance
  • Citizenship and community
  • Applications in healthcare, education, social security, housing, crime, justice and punishment.

Policy Related and Evaluation Research (15 credits)

  • Relationship between theory and empirical research in evaluation
  • Defining and measuring outcomes
  • Case study analysis
  • Poster presentation and participatory evaluation.

Dissertation (60 credits)

  • 15,000 word dissertation based on a supervised research project.

Academic learning is assessed through a range of summative essays, statistical/computer-based projects, research proposals, and a dissertation.

Course Learning and Teaching

These MA Research Methods programmes are full-time, starting in early October and continuing over 12 months following university terms. 

The main teaching methods include lectures, seminars, and computer practical sessions. Lectures introduce the key concepts, theories, current debates and other issues critical for understanding the topics. Seminars are opportunities for you to discuss any questions arising from the readings, to share experience of conducting research, to present your own work for comments. Modules that teach the use of computer software packages have practical sessions in computer rooms so that you can carry out hands-on exercises under supervision and further assistance. 

Modules are usually assessed through essays. Statistics modules may require you to complete specific analyses with more structured instructions. Some module conveners may allow you to submit formative assignments in order for you to obtain a sense of how well you understand the subject. Some modules’ assessment may contain a proportion of presentations and group projects. 

Further academic support is available. You will have the opportunity to learn from your dissertation supervisors at individual tutoring meetings, dissertation workshops, and forums. Every member of teaching staff has two hours of office hours each week where you can access additional support for your modules, assignments and so forth. In addition, both the University and the School host seminars for external speakers that are open to all students.

You will have access to a variety of learning resources, including learning spaces in libraries and teaching rooms, readings and textbooks, computers, databases, etc. 



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