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Masters Degrees (Environmental Informatics)

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The MSc in Environmental Informatics aims to provide students with a multi-disciplinary education and training in geographical information systems in the context of environmental science, enabling them to gain employment in public/private agencies/ businesses that deal with the sustainable management of natural resources(including conservation, planning, and environmental management). Read more
The MSc in Environmental Informatics aims to provide students with a multi-disciplinary education and training in geographical information systems in the context of environmental science, enabling them to gain employment in public/private agencies/ businesses that deal with the sustainable management of natural resources(including conservation, planning, and environmental management).

Core Modules:
Introduction to GIS
Research Design and Methods in Geography
Geographic Visualisation
Theories, Concepts and Applications of Sustainable Development
Dissertation

Optional Modules:
Programming for Spatial Scientists
Spatial Information Science
Earth Observation and Remote Sensing
Environment, Space and Society
Global Climate and Environmental Change
Biodiversity Conservation and Global Change: Tropical East Africa (Kenya field trip)
Environmental Economics
Sustainable Management of Biological Resources

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Our Climate Change. Environment, Science & Policy MSc course is an opportunity for graduates of geography, physical sciences, engineering and computer sciences to explore specific issues relating to climate and environmental change at an advanced level. Read more

Our Climate Change: Environment, Science & Policy MSc course is an opportunity for graduates of geography, physical sciences, engineering and computer sciences to explore specific issues relating to climate and environmental change at an advanced level. You will explore a wide range of critical topics focusing on human-originated influences on the terrestrial, hydrological and atmospheric environments, and their biological, physical and societal consequences.

Key benefits

  • Gain an up-to-date understanding of the nature and processes of environmental changes occurring in Earth’s terrestrial, hydrological and atmospheric environments.
  • Study the methods used to examine the potential future consequences of environmental changes.
  • Learn to evaluate and analyse environmental change research critically and reflect on the strengths and weaknesses and potential societal implications of the science.
  • Develop an understanding of the scientific evidence needed for policymakers and society to respond to the problems associated with global and regional environmental changes impacting the Earth.

Description

The Climate Change: Environment, Science & Policy MSc is a flexible course allowing you to study either a Policy or a Science pathway. Our course will provide you with an in-depth understanding of the processes and the nature of environmental changes occurring in the Earth’s terrestrial, hydrological and atmospheric environments. You will also develop essential research, analysis and critical-thinking skills that will help you to understand and interpret scientific evidence and also respond to the problems associated with global and regional environmental changes in the Earth’s system.

The study course is made up of optional and required modules and you must take the minimum of 180 credits for the course. If you are studying full-time, you will complete the course in one year, from September to September. If you are studying part-time, your course will take two years to complete. You will take the required combination of required and optional modules over this period of time, with the dissertation in your second year.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We will teach you through a combination of lectures and seminars, and you will typically have 20 hours of this per module. We also expect you to undertake 180 hours of independent study for each module. For your 12,000 word dissertation, we will provide four workshops and five hours of one-to-one supervision to complement your 587 hours of independent study.

As part of a two-year schedule, part-time students typically take the required 40-credit taught module and 40 credits of optional module in year 1. They will then take a 60 credit dissertation module and 40 credit optional modules in year 2. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

Performance on taught modules in the Geography Department is normally assessed through essays and other written assignments, oral presentations, lab work and occasionally by examination, depending on the modules selected. All students also undertake a research-based dissertation of 12,000 words.

Career prospects

Our MSc is designed to prepare you for a career in environmental change research, consultancy and/or policy development. It provides interdisciplinary research training for those going onto a PhD in environmental and/or Earth system science within King's or elsewhere, and students entering the job market immediately after graduation are expected to be highly marketable in three main areas: local and national governmental and non-governmental agencies (eg Environment Agency, County Councils, Nature Conservancies); environmental consultancies and businesses (eg environmental informatics providers; environmental businesses - including carbon trading; insurance; waste management and energy industries), and policy development organisations (eg such government departments as Defra). The Seminars in Environmental Research, Management and Policy module offers you the chance to hear and meet practitioners in many of these key areas.

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The need for sustainable development is a global concern. This flexible Masters degree prepares you to address the challenges faced in safeguarding natural resources, livelihoods and the alleviation of development problems. Read more

The need for sustainable development is a global concern. This flexible Masters degree prepares you to address the challenges faced in safeguarding natural resources, livelihoods and the alleviation of development problems. The focus is on societies undergoing change or faced with resource pressures, in developing and developed countries.

This programme is ideal if you want a career in international development or in an environmental field, in the private, public, or not-for-profit sectors. It can be taken as an MA or MSc depending on your dissertation topic.

You will be based within one of the largest groups of geographers, resource management specialists and environmental scientists in the UK and modules will be taught by world-leading researchers. Their expertise includes mining and extractive industries; livelihoods and moral economies; the politics of land, water, and ‘green’ grabbing; environmental justice and the relationship between climate change and existing social inequalities; migration; food security and agri-food systems including fishing and marine ecosystems; forest policy; sustainable transport; poverty and service delivery; the political economy of global environmental change; the workings of international development; trade (legal and illegal), and biodiversity conservation.

You will complete six taught modules and a dissertation research project, with individual supervision from a research-active expert. There are two or three core modules which give you a solid foundation in the key theoretical issues around the environment and development and you will develop the social science research skills needed to explore them.

We offer great flexibility with over 30 modules to choose from, spanning the social and natural sciences. This enables you to construct a degree that fits your interests and career ambitions and to put your learning in a wider cultural context.

You can gain key practical skills that are valued by employers, such as environmental analysis of development projects, data analysis and programming, geo-informatics and auditing. There are opportunities to gain work experience through one of our many government, civil society and private sector partners – including those in Asia, Africa, Oceania and South America.

Your dissertation project forms a substantial part of your Masters degree. It will enhance your practical and analytical skills and give you the opportunity to apply your learning to a real-world challenge. Dissertation topics are available in both environmental and development themes: our research projects and partners across the globe provide exciting possibilities and fieldwork opportunities when you are choosing your dissertation topic. Most dissertations are anchored in the social sciences but this is not a requirement.

Examples of previous dissertation topics are:

  • The IPCC and the Production of Environmental Knowledge
  • The Spirituality of Climate Change
  • Responsible Mining: Oxymoron or Development Opportunity
  • Soil Quality and Soil Management in China
  • An international comparison of food sovereignty
  • Informal Settlements in Dar Es Salaam: Using PGIS to Map Out Community Voices
  • Ecosystems in Venezuela
  • The intersection of aesthetics and design in urban agriculture
  • Towards a cultural political ecology of ecotourism in Madagascar

Course Structure

You will study a range of modules as part of your course, some examples of which are listed below.

Core

Optional

Information contained on the website with respect to modules is correct at the time of publication, but changes may be necessary, for example as a result of student feedback, Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies' (PSRB) requirements, staff changes, and new research.

Assessment

Coursework, presentations, examinations and dissertation



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Goal of the pro­gramme. Life Sciences.  is one of the strategic research fields at the University of Helsinki. The multidisciplinary Master’s Programme in Life Science Informatics (LSI) integrates research excellence and research infrastructures in the Helsinki Institute of Life Sciences (. Read more

Goal of the pro­gramme

Life Sciences is one of the strategic research fields at the University of Helsinki. The multidisciplinary Master’s Programme in Life Science Informatics (LSI) integrates research excellence and research infrastructures in the Helsinki Institute of Life Sciences (HiLIFE).

The Master's Programme is offered by the Faculty of Science. Teaching is offered in co-operation with the Faculty of Medicine and the Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences. As a student, you will gain access to active research communities on three campuses: Kumpula, Viikki, and Meilahti. The unique combination of study opportunities tailored from the offering of the three campuses provides an attractive educational profile. The LSI programme is designed for students with a background in mathematics, computer science and statistics, as well as for students with these disciplines as a minor in their bachelor’s degree, with their major being, for example, ecology, evolutionary biology or genetics. As a graduate of the LSI programme you will:

  • Have first class knowledge and capabilities for a career in life science research and in expert duties in the public and private sectors
  • Competence to work as a member of a group of experts
  • Have understanding of the regulatory and ethical aspects of scientific research
  • Have excellent communication and interpersonal skills for employment in an international and interdisciplinary professional setting
  • Understand the general principles of mathematical modelling, computational, probabilistic and statistical analysis of biological data, and be an expert in one specific specialisation area of the LSI programme
  • Understand the logical reasoning behind experimental sciences and be able to critically assess research-based information
  • Have mastered scientific research, making systematic use of investigation or experimentation to discover new knowledge
  • Have the ability to report results in a clear and understandable manner for different target groups
  • Have good opportunities to continue your studies for a doctoral degree

Further information about the studies on the Master's programme website.

Pro­gramme con­tents

The Life Science Informatics Master’s Programme has six specialisation areas, each anchored in its own research group or groups.

Algorithmic bioinformatics with the Genome-scale algorithmicsCombinatorial Pattern Matching, and Practical Algorithms and Data Structures on Strings research groups. This specialisation area educates you to be an algorithm expert who can turn biological questions into appropriate challenges for computational data analysis. In addition to the tailored algorithm studies for analysing molecular biology measurement data, the curriculum includes general algorithm and machine learning studies offered by the Master's Programmes in Computer Science and Data Science.

Applied bioinformaticsjointly with The Institute of Biotechnology and genetics.Bioinformatics has become an integral part of biological research, where innovative computational approaches are often required to achieve high-impact findings in an increasingly data-dense environment. Studies in applied bioinformatics prepare you for a post as a bioinformatics expert in a genomics research lab, working with processing, analysing and interpreting Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) data, and working with integrated analysis of genomic and other biological data, and population genetics.

Biomathematics with the Biomathematics research group, focusing on mathematical modelling and analysis of biological phenomena and processes. The research covers a wide spectrum of topics ranging from problems at the molecular level to the structure of populations. To tackle these problems, the research group uses a variety of modelling approaches, most importantly ordinary and partial differential equations, integral equations and stochastic processes. A successful analysis of the models requires the study of pure research in, for instance, the theory of infinite dimensional dynamical systems; such research is also carried out by the group. 

Biostatistics and bioinformatics is offered jointly by the statistics curriculum, the Master´s Programme in Mathematics and Statistics and the research groups Statistical and Translational GeneticsComputational Genomics and Computational Systems Medicine in FIMM. Topics and themes include statistical, especially Bayesian methodologies for the life sciences, with research focusing on modelling and analysis of biological phenomena and processes. The research covers a wide spectrum of collaborative topics in various biomedical disciplines. In particular, research and teaching address questions of population genetics, phylogenetic inference, genome-wide association studies and epidemiology of complex diseases.  

Eco-evolutionary Informatics with ecology and evolutionary biology, in which several researchers and teachers have a background in mathematics, statistics and computer science. Ecology studies the distribution and abundance of species, and their interactions with other species and the environment. Evolutionary biology studies processes supporting biodiversity on different levels from genes to populations and ecosystems. These sciences have a key role in responding to global environmental challenges. Mathematical and statistical modelling, computer science and bioinformatics have an important role in research and teaching.

Systems biology and medicine with the Genome-scale Biology Research Program in BiomedicumThe focus is to understand and find effective means to overcome drug resistance in cancers. The approach is to use systems biology, i.e., integration of large and complex molecular and clinical data (big data) from cancer patients with computational methods and wet lab experiments, to identify efficient patient-specific therapeutic targets. Particular interest is focused on developing and applying machine learning based methods that enable integration of various types of molecular data (DNA, RNA, proteomics, etc.) to clinical information.



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About the course. This course brings together geography, environmental and development studies expertise to engage with the challenges of environmental change in the Global South. Read more

About the course

This course brings together geography, environmental and development studies expertise to engage with the challenges of environmental change in the Global South. You’ll explore contemporary theory, policy and practice.

There are three elements to your study: training in development research methods and professional skills, training in specialised subject areas, and a placement-based research dissertation.

The course includes a 10-day field class currently in Galapagos, Nepal and Tanzania, which provides hands-on experience of research.

How we teach

Our staff are active researchers at the cutting-edge of their fields. That research informs our masters courses. As well as the usual lectures and seminars, there are practicals, lab classes, field trips and research projects.

Facilities and equipment

A new £1m Sediment-Solute Systems lab enables geochemical analysis of aqueous and solid phases, especially in the context of biogeochemistry. We have equipment for chromatography, UV spectrometry and flow injection/auto analysis.

Our sample preparation facilities enable digestion, pre-concentration by evaporation under vacuum, and tangential flow filtration. There are alpha and gamma counters, a laser particle sizer and a luminescence dating lab. Field equipment includes automatic water samplers, weather stations, data loggers and environmental process characterisation sensors.

We have high-quality petrological microscopes for examining geological samples. We have labs for spectrometry and for palaeontological preparation, and you’ll also have access to specialist facilities in other departments at the University.

Laptops, camcorders, tape recorders and transcribers are available for your fieldwork. Our postgraduate computer labs have networked workstations for GIS research and climate modelling, ARC/INFO, ERDAS software and specialist software for remote sensing. GIS facilities are also provided by the £5m Informatics Collaboratory for the Social Sciences.

Our new postgraduate media GIS suite has facilities for Skype, video conferencing, web design, video editing and creative media.

Fieldwork

Most of our courses involve fieldwork. The MPH, MSc and MA International Development take students on a 10-day field trip where they put their research skills into practice. Recent classes visited the West Pokot region of Kenya, urban and rural areas of Nepal, the suburbs of Cairo and India.

Core modules

  • Ideas and Practice in International Development
  • Research Design and Methods in International Development
  • Understanding Environmental Change
  • Key Issues in Environment and Development
  • Professional Skills for Development
  • Dissertation with Placement
  • International Development field class

Examples of optional modules

  • Living with Climate Change in the Global South
  • Using Policy to Strengthen Health Systems
  • Cities of Diversity
  • Cities of ‘the South’: planning for informality

Teaching and assessment

There are seminars, lectures, workshops and reading groups. You’ll be assessed on your coursework assignments and a dissertation.



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The Master of Research (MRes) programme in Ecology and Environmental Biology provides research training for students wishing to enter a PhD programme or seeking a career in ecological science. Read more

The Master of Research (MRes) programme in Ecology and Environmental Biology provides research training for students wishing to enter a PhD programme or seeking a career in ecological science.

Why this programme

This programme consists of a taught component, and a laboratory or field based research project. The taught component consists of core research skills and specialist options in analytical and sampling techniques. The main part of the degree is devoted to experience of research techniques. You will carry out an extended research project chosen to reflect your interests and the skills you wish to acquire. 

A total of 180 credits are required, with 30 flexible credits in the first term. See the accompanying detailed course descriptions found in the IBAHCM Masters Programme Overview. When selecting options, please email the relevant course coordinator as well as registering using MyCampus.

Term 1: Core courses (assessment in %)                             

Key Research Skills (scientific writing, introduction to R, introduction to linear models; advanced linear models, experimental design). Coursework – 60%; scientific report – 40%

 Term 1: Optional courses                        

  • Spatial Ecology and Biodiversity**. Coursework – 60%; assignment – 40%
  • Programming in R (*prerequisite B grade in KRS R component). Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Biodiversity Informatics. Coursework – 25%; assignment – 75%
  • GIS for Ecologists. Set exercise – 60%; critical review – 40%
  • Infectious Disease Ecology & the Dynamics of Emerging Disease*. Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Introduction to Bayesian Statistics*. Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Invertebrate Identification. Coursework – 20%; class test – 40%; assignment – 40%
  • Molecular Analyses for Biodiversity and Conservation. Coursework – 40%; assignment – 60%
  • Molecular Epidemiology & Phylodynamics. Coursework – 40%; assignment – 60%
  • Multi-species Models**. Coursework – 50%; Assignment – 50%
  • Single-species Population Models. Coursework – 30%; assignment – 70%
  • Vertebrate Identification. Coursework – 20%; class test – 40%; assignment – 40%
  • Human Dimensions of Conservation**. Press statement – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Principles of Conservation Ecology**. Coursework – 30%; set exercise – 15%; poster – 55%
  • Protected Area Management**. Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%

Projects:                       

  • MRes Ecology and Environmental Biology Project 1 (terms 1 + 2). Oral presentation – 20%; project report– 80%
  • MRes Ecology and Environmental Biology Project 2 (Summer). Poster – 15%; supervisor’s assessment – 15%; project report– 70%

Career prospects

The programme will provide an excellent training for those who wish to apply for a PhD programme or enter ecological consultancy or conservation sectors. It also serves as an excellent introduction to research in the UK for overseas students.



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MSc Geo-Information Science. Do you want to contribute to solving multidisciplinary and complex issues using Geo- information science, geo-informatics and remote sensing? Then the master's Geo- Information Science is a perfect match for you!. Read more

MSc Geo-Information Science

Do you want to contribute to solving multidisciplinary and complex issues using Geo- information science, geo-informatics and remote sensing? Then the master's Geo- Information Science is a perfect match for you!

The increasing complexity of our society demands for specialists who can collect, manage, analyse and present spatial data using state-of-the-art methods and tools. At Wageningen University & Research we offer a unique, top-quality programme that blends geo-information science methods, technologies and applications within environmental and life sciences for a changing world. Our Geo-information Science graduates usually have a job waiting for them on graduation. Read more about the background of the programme

Specialisations

There are no formal specialisations in the Geo-Information Science programme. You can specialise by taking advanced courses in GIS and/or Remote Sensing, and by selecting courses in a range of application fields or geo-information technology. Furthermore, you develop your Geo-information Science profile by completing a major research thesis in one of the following research fields:

Your choice of internship location is another factor in developing your profile and specialisation.

Your future career

The increasing demand for digital geographical information has resulted in a phenomenal growth in the discipline of Geo-Information Science. The demand for geo-information is the result of an increase in environmental problems and the need to manage the natural and the social environment.The increasing demand for digital geographical information has resulted in a phenomenal growth in the discipline of Geo-Information Science.

The overview below provides more detailed information about the fields and positions taken by our alumni on graduation:

In Research

  • PhD
  • Researcher
  • Research Assistant

In Consultancy

  • Remote Sensing Specialist
  • Consultant
  • GIS adviser
  • Geo-information Manager
  • Geo-information Analist

In Education

  • Lecturer

Read more about career perspectives and opportunities after finishing the programme.

Related programmes:

MSc Geographical Information Management and Applications

MSc Forest and Nature Conservation 

MSc Landscape Architecture and Planning

MSc Environmental Sciences 

MSc Biosystems Engineering



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The current environmental changes affect both natural ecosystems and civil societies. Global change refers to planetary-scale changes occurring in complex socio-ecological systems, which are affected by climatic and non-climatic drivers (e.g., changes in human society). Read more
The current environmental changes affect both natural ecosystems and civil societies. Global change refers to planetary-scale changes occurring in complex socio-ecological systems, which are affected by climatic and non-climatic drivers (e.g., changes in human society). Understanding the intricate, medium- to long-term changes in our land, air and water requires advanced scientific knowledge in measurement, modelling and prediction.

This joint international MSc course between the UCD School of Biology and Environmental Science and Justus-Liebig University (JLU) Giessen, Germany is the response to these global change challenges and will suit skilled motivated science graduates wishing to develop a scientific career in ecosystem research as well as those aiming to contribute to evidence-based environmental policy.

You will be involved in active research groups in both countries, contributing to their ongoing ecosystem studies in order to experience the process of creating scientific knowledge in ecosystem science. In addition to acquiring skills in measuring, analysing and understanding what is behind scientific data you will have the opportunity to develop your analytical, presentation and communication skills to enable you to participate in the policy making process.

Key Fact

Graduates will receive a joint international degree from two well-established universities combining their complementary and multidisciplinary research profiles and cutting-edge expertise. Through the 6-8 weeks work placement in in a company or institution of your choice, you will acquire transferable skills which will make you a sought after and effective employee.

Course Content and Structure

This is a 120 CP programme comprising 70 CP of taught modules, 20CP of work placement and 20 CP of independent research project. The first semester is based at UCD, Dublin, followed by a 6-8 week work placement in a company or institution of your choice. We have established links with organisations such as FAO, UNFCCC, ISEO, EFI, ICLEI and NOAA as well as European and national EPA agencies and many research institutes.
The second taught semester is based in JLU, Giessen between March and August and the third semester (Sept-Dec) is devoted entirely to the individual research project, which can be undertaken in either UCD, JLU or another approved research institute.
Samples of topics include:

• Global change (soil, air, water): modelling and advanced techniques
• Science and policy
• Research in ecology
• Environmental law and policy
• Man in past climates
• Policy consultancy
• Plant-soil-atmosphere interactions
• Biodiversity informatics
• Data analysis and interpretation
• Economics and environmental management
• Environmental impact assessment


For more information on module description and available scholarships, visit http://globalchange.ucd.ie/

Career Opportunities

Graduates may pursue roles as policy advisers, scientific analysts or researchers in government, international organisations, NGOs, research institutes or consulting companies. There are also many opportunities for further studies. The skills you acquire, particularly through the completion of the minor thesis within a 4 month period, provide a strong foundation for PhD research.

Prospective employers include the national Environmental Protection Agency, governmental departments, European Commission as well as policy consultancy firms such as European Environment Agency and also international organisations (e.g. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; United Nations Environment Programme; Food and Agriculture Organisation; International Union for the Conservation of Nature).

Facilities and Resources

• A climate change station at JLU hosts one of the world longest-running Free Air Carbon dioxide (FACE) experiments.
• The Program for Experimental Atmospheres and Climate (PEAC) at UCD is a state-of-the art plant growth room facility to investigate past and future climatic scenarios.
• The UCD Earth Institute is a centre for resource and environment research aimed at leading Ireland’s response to climate change and the global energy crisis.

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Improving air quality through the control of pollutant emissions is a high priority and global challenge. To control, monitor and model atmospheric emissions requires in-depth understanding of the sources of emission, atmospheric chemistry, dispersion modelling and emissions technology. Read more

Improving air quality through the control of pollutant emissions is a high priority and global challenge. To control, monitor and model atmospheric emissions requires in-depth understanding of the sources of emission, atmospheric chemistry, dispersion modelling and emissions technology.

Who is it for?

The MSc in Atmospheric Emission Technology course is designed to provide up-to-date knowledge focusing on international and industrial emission monitoring and control technologies. The latest atmospheric and air quality policy and modelling developments will be introduced to prepare you for a career as air quality monitoring and emissions technology experts within industry, environmental consultancies or regulators.

Why this course?

Currently there is a scarcity of higher education courses in topics that are relevant to air quality management. This course will provide a future generation of professionals in the air quality and air pollution control sectors, with comprehensive understanding of sources and dispersion of atmospheric pollutants linked with key industrial processes and vehicle/aircraft emission.

Informed by Industry

The course offers unique practical experience in the NERC/Met Office Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) base in the Centre for Atmospheric Informatics and Emissions Technology at Cranfield.

Many academics in the teaching team have significantly experience working in close collaboration with environmental consultancies, the emission monitoring and control industry, and regulators.

Course details

The course comprises eight assessed modules, a group project and an individual research project.

Group project

The group projects are founded on group-based research programmes typically undertaken between February and April. The projects are designed to integrate knowledge, understanding and skills from the taught modules in a real-life situation.

Individual project

The thesis project, typically delivered between May and September, further develops research and project management skills that provide the ability to think and work in an original way; contribute to knowledge; overcome genuine problems; and communicate through a thesis and oral exam. Each student is allocated a supervisor who will guide and assess the student's work.

Assessment

Taught modules: 40%, Group projects: 20%, Individual project: 40%

Your career

We aim to develop this course as a recognised and sought-after qualification within the professional environmental field in the UK and abroad. Successful students will develop diverse and rewarding careers in environmental regulation, public sector organisations (e.g. Defra and Environmental Agency), environmental and business consultancies and process industries in private sectors.

We have been providing Masters level training for over 20 years. Our strong reputation and links with potential employers provide you with outstanding opportunities to secure interesting jobs and develop successful careers. 

Our applied approach and close links with industry mean 93% of our graduates find jobs relevant to their degree or go on to further study within six months of graduation. Our careers team support you while you are studying and following graduation with workshops, careers fairs, vacancy information and one-to-one support.



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Promoting and developing best practice in the field of infection prevention and control is a pressing issue for professionals and the community as a whole. Read more
Promoting and developing best practice in the field of infection prevention and control is a pressing issue for professionals and the community as a whole. The issues facing hospital and community staff one day may well be the same as those confronting environmental health officers the next.

This innovative postgraduate course in Infection Prevention and Control has been designed to help you deal safely and effectively with infection risks. You will develop your confidence and expertise in the management and implementation of infection control change.

If you have to deal with infection as part of your job, or if you’d like to widen your knowledge and be in a position to apply for more senior posts in infection control, the MSc Infection Prevention and Control can help you achieve these goals.

Special Features

• Loans for tuition fees are available from the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) for eligible Scotland domiciled and EU students, and loans for living costs for eligible Scottish students.
• The course is delivered online through the university’s virtual learning environment (VLE), enabling you to fit your study around your personal and professional commitments, wherever you are in the world
• You can choose to study individual modules for continuing professional development (CPD), or work towards the PgCert, PgDip, or full Masters degree
• Specialist modules at PgDip and MSc level allow you to specialise in areas of particular relevance to your career
• The course content contributes to the development of the core dimensions in the NHS Knowledge and Skills Framework (KSF): communication; personal and people development; health, safety and security; quality; and equality and diversity
• Students undertaking module Informatics in Health and Social Care can continue their studies in health informatics by completing the Embedding Clinincal Informatics in Education (eICE) programme free which is accredited by the UK Council for Health Informatics Professions (UKCHIP)
• Students can complete the university’s Skills and Employability Award where by you gain recognition (not academic credit) for a range of activities you takee part in addition to your studies to help you stand out from the crowd and demonstrate the skills you have, prepare for a real interview and impress prospective employers

Modules

PgCert

Core modules are: Micro-organisms and Disease; Decontamination; Epidemiology and Surveillance of Healthcare Associated Infections

PgDip

Core module: Host Defence and Protection

Option modules, from which you choose two, may include:
 Advanced Infection Prevention and Control
 Healthcare Outbreak Management
 Informatics in Health and Social Care
 Qualitative inquiry*
 Research Methods and Techniques*
 Introduction to Patient Safety in Integrated Health and Social Care Environment
*You must choose one of these modules if you wish to continue to MSc

Msc

To achieve the award of MSc Infection Control you must complete a research dissertation related to your professional field

Locations

This course is available Online with support from Inverness College UHI, 1 Inverness Campus, Inverness, IV2 5NA

Funding

From 2017, eligible Scotland domiciled students studying full time can access loans up to 10,000 from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS).This comprises a tuition fee loan up to £5,500 and a non-income assessed living cost loan of £4,500. EU students studying full time can apply for a tuition fee loan up to £5500.

Part-time students undertaking any taught postgraduate course over two years up to Masters level who meet the residency eligibility can apply for a for a tuition fee loan up to £2,750 per year.

See Scholarships tab below for full details

Top reasons to study at UHI

Do something different: our reputation is built on our innovative approach to learning and our distinctive research and curriculum which often reflects the unique environment and culture of our region and closely links to vocational skills required by a range of sectors.
Choice of campuses – we have campuses across the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Each campus is different from rich cultural life of the islands; the spectacular coasts and mountains; to the bright lights of our city locations.
Small class sizes mean that you have a more personal experience of university and receive all the support you need from our expert staff
The affordable option - if you already live in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland you don't have to leave home and incur huge debts to go to university; we're right here on your doorstep

How to apply

If you want to apply for this postgraduate programme click on the ‘visit website’ button below which will take you to the relevant course page on our website, from there select the Apply tab to complete our online application.
If you still have any questions please get in touch with our information line by email using the links beow or call on 0845 272 3600.

International Students

If you would like to study in a country of outstanding natural beauty, friendly communities, and cities buzzing with social life and activities, the Highlands and Islands of Scotland should be your first choice. We have campuses across the region each one with its own special characteristics from the rich cultural life of the islands to the bright city lights of Perth and Inverness. Some courses are available in one location only, for others you will have a choice; we also have courses that can be studied online from your own home country. .http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international

English Language Requirements

Our programmes are taught and examined in English. To make the most of your studies, you must be able to communicate fluently and accurately in spoken and written English and provide certified proof of your competence before starting your course. Please note that English language tests need to have been taken no more than two years prior to the start date of the course. The standard English Language criteria to study at the University of the Highlands and Islands are detailed on our English language requirements page http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international/how-to-apply-to-uhi/english-language-requirements

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Today more than ever, quantitative skills form an essential basis for successful careers in ecology, conservation, and animal and human health. Read more

Today more than ever, quantitative skills form an essential basis for successful careers in ecology, conservation, and animal and human health. This Masters programme provides specific training in data collection, modelling and statistical analyses as well as generic research skills. It is offered by the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine (IBAHCM), a grouping of top researchers who focus on combining field data with computational and genetic approaches to solve applied problems in epidemiology and conservation.

Why this programme

  • This programme encompasses key skills in monitoring and assessing biodiversity critical for understanding the impacts of environmental change.
  • It covers quantitative analyses of ecological and epidemiological data critical for animal health and conservation.
  • You will have the opportunity to base your independent research projects at the university field station on Loch Lomond (for freshwater or terrestrial-based projects); Millport field station on the Isle of Cumbrae (for marine projects); or Cochno Farm and Research Centre in Glasgow (for research based on farm animals). We will also assist you to gain research project placements in zoos or environmental consulting firms whenever possible.
  • The uniqueness of the programme is the opportunity to gain core skills and knowledge across a wide range of subjects, which will enhance future career opportunities, including entrance into competitive PhD programmes. For example, there are identification based programmes offered elsewhere, but most others do not combine practical field skills with molecular techniques, advanced informatics for assessing biodiversity based on molecular markers, as well as advanced statistics and modelling. Other courses in epidemiology are rarely ecologically focused; the specialty in IBAHCM is understanding disease ecology, in the context of both animal conservation and implications for human public health.
  • You will be taught by research-active staff using the latest approaches in quantitative methods, sequence analysis, and practical approaches to assessing biodiversity, and you will have opportunities to actively participate in internationally recognised research. Some examples of recent publications lead by students in the programme:
  • Blackburn, S., Hopcraft, J. G. C., Ogutu, J. O., Matthiopoulos, J. and Frank, L. (2016), Human-wildlife conflict, benefit sharing and the survival of lions in pastoralist community-based conservancies. J Appl Ecol. doi:10.1111/1365-2664.12632. 
  • Rysava, K., McGill, R. A. R., Matthiopoulos, J., and Hopcraft, J. G. C. (2016) Re-constructing nutritional history of Serengeti wildebeest from stable isotopes in tail hair: seasonal starvation patterns in an obligate grazer. Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom., 30:1461-1468. doi: 10.1002/rcm.7572.
  • Ferguson, E.A., Hampson, K., Cleaveland, S., Consunji, R., Deray, R., Friar, J., Haydon, D. T., Jimenez, J., Pancipane, M. and Townsend, S.E., 2015. Heterogeneity in the spread and control of infectious disease; consequences for the elimination of canine rabies. Scientific Reports, 5, p. 18232. doi: 10.1038/srep18232.
  • A unique strength of the University of Glasgow for many years has been the strong ties between veterinarians and ecologists, which has now been formalised in the formation of the IBAHCM. This direct linking is rare but offers unique opportunities to provide training that spans both fundamental and applied research.

Programme structure

The programme provides a strong grounding in scientific writing and communication, statistical analysis, and experimental design. It is designed for flexibility, to enable you to customise a portfolio of courses suited to your particular interests.

You can choose from a range of specialised options that encompass key skills in

  • monitoring and assessing biodiversity – critical for understanding the impacts of environmental change
  • quantitative analyses of ecological and epidemiological data – critical for animal health and conservation
  • ethics and legislative policy – critical for promoting humane treatment of both captive and wild animals.

A total of 180 credits are required, with 50 flexible credits in the second term. See the accompanying detailed course descriptions found in the IBAHCM Masters Programme Overview. When selecting options, please email the relevant course coordinator as well as registering using MyCampus.

Term 1: Core courses (assessment in %)

  • Key research skills (scientific writing, introduction to R, introduction to linear models; advanced linear models, experimental design). Coursework – 60%; scientific report – 40%
  • Spatial Ecology and Biodiversity. Coursework – 60%; assignment – 40%

Term 2: Core courses

  • Programming in R. Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%

Term 2: Optional courses

  • Biodiversity Informatics. Coursework – 25%; assignment – 75%
  • GIS for Ecologists. Set exercise – 60%; critical review – 40%
  • Infectious Disease Ecology & the Dynamics of Emerging Disease. Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Introduction to Bayesian Statistics. Coursework – 50% assignment – 50%
  • Invertebrate Identification. Coursework – 20%; class test – 40%; assignment – 40%
  • Molecular Analyses for Biodiversity and Conservation. Coursework – 40%; assignment – 60%
  • Molecular Epidemiology & Phylodynamics. Coursework – 40%; assignment – 60%
  • Multi-species Models. Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Single-species Population Models. Coursework – 30%; assignment – 70%
  • Vertebrate Identification. Coursework – 20%; class test – 40%; assignment – 40%
  • Human Dimensions of Conservation*. Press statement – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Principles of Conservation Ecology*. Coursework – 30%; set exercise – 15%; poster – 55%
  • Protected Area Management*. Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Animal Ethics. Oral presentation – 50%; reflective essay – 50%
  • Biology of Suffering. Essay – 100%
  • Care of Captive Animals. Report – 100%
  • Enrichment of Animals in Captive Environments. Essay – 100%
  • Legislation & Societal Issues. Position paper – 50%; press release – 50%
  • Welfare Assessment. Critical essay – 100%

Term 3: Core MSc Component

  • Research project. Research proposal – 25%; project report – 60%; supervisor’s assessment –15%

Career prospects

You will gain core skills and knowledge across a wide range of subjects that will enhance your selection chances for competitive PhD programmes. In addition to academic options, career opportunities include roles in zoos, environmental consultancies, government agencies, ecotourism and conservation biology, and veterinary or public health epidemiology.



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The MA Health and Wellbeing is designed to meet the career development needs of health and social care professionals in the UK. Read more
The MA Health and Wellbeing is designed to meet the career development needs of health and social care professionals in the UK.

The course will increase your awareness of the social, technological, economic, political and environmental changes taking place within health and social care, whether in the public, private or voluntary sectors, enabling you to take your career to the next stage.

You will study core modules in the development of national and international health and social care policy, the influence of sociology, psychology and ethics on our understanding of health and wellbeing, the issues of health and social care provision in remote and rural areas as well as gaining skills in research methods.

Special Features

Loans for tuition fees are available from the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) for eligible Scotland domiciled and EU students, and loans for living costs for eligible Scottish students.

The course is part time delivered online which means you can fit your studies around your work and personal committments wherever you are in the world

The course content contributes to the development of the core dimensions in the NHS Knowledge and Skills Framework (KSF): communication; personal and people development; health, safety and security; service improvement; quality; and equality and diversity

You will also have the opportunity to study modules in more specialised areas, such as child and adolescent mental health, diabetes, infomatics in health and social care, and patient safety in health and social care environments.

Lews Castle College UHI are registering with Embedding Clinincal Informatics in Education (eICE) to deliver CPD Informatics training for staff working in a Clinical setting or students who aim to be working in a Clinical setting within Primary, Secondary or Health and Social care agencies.

Successful candidates will be entitled to affiliate registration with UK Council for Health Informatics Professions (UKCHIP)

Students are encouraged to undertake research in relation to their specific interest or in relation to their employment for the dissertation module.

Students can complete the university’s Skills and Employability Award where by you gain recognition (not academic credit) for a range of activities you take part in addition to your studies to help you stand out from the crowd and demonstrate the skills you have, prepare for a real interview and impress prospective employers.

Modules

PgCert

Core modules are: Policy into practice; Individual and social influences on health; You will also choose from an option module from the list below in the PgDip option modules

PgDip

If you wish to progress to the MA, the core modules are: Challenges and Practice Solutions in Remote and Rural Areas; Qualitative Inquiry; You will also choose one option from the list below.

Alternatively, if you do not wish to continue to Masters level you can study the first core module and two options from the list below.
Option modules include: Advanced Diabetes; Child and Adolescent Mental Health; Developing Communities; Disability and Society; Enabling Self-Management: Developing Practice; Enabling Self-Management: Leading Change; Ethics in Health and Wellbeing; Informatics in Health and Social Care; Introduction to Patient Safety in Integrated Health and Social Care Environment

MA

To achieve the award of MA Health and Wellbeing you must complete a research dissertation

Locations

This course is available Online supported by Lews Castle College UHI, Stornoway, Isle of Lewis, HS2 0XR

Funding

From 2017, eligible Scotland domiciled students studying full time can access loans up to 10,000 from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS).This comprises a tuition fee loan up to £5,500 and a non-income assessed living cost loan of £4,500. EU students studying full time can apply for a tuition fee loan up to £5500.

Part-time students undertaking any taught postgraduate course over two years up to Masters level who meet the residency eligibility can apply for a for a tuition fee loan up to £2,750 per year.

See Scholarships tab below for full details

How to apply

If you want to apply for this postgraduate programme click on the ‘visit website’ button below which will take you to the relevant course page on our website, from there select the Apply tab to complete our online application.
If you still have any questions please get in touch with our information line by email using the links beow or call on 0845 272 3600.

International Students

If you would like to study in a country of outstanding natural beauty, friendly communities, and cities buzzing with social life and activities, the Highlands and Islands of Scotland should be your first choice. We have campuses across the region each one with its own special characteristics from the rich cultural life of the islands to the bright city lights of Perth and Inverness. Some courses are available in one location only, for others you will have a choice; we also have courses that can be studied online from your own home country. .http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international

English Language Requirements

Our programmes are taught and examined in English. To make the most of your studies, you must be able to communicate fluently and accurately in spoken and written English and provide certified proof of your competence before starting your course. Please note that English language tests need to have been taken no more than two years prior to the start date of the course. The standard English Language criteria to study at the University of the Highlands and Islands are detailed on our English language requirements page http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international/how-to-apply-to-uhi/english-language-requirements

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Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives. Read more
Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives.

All of our Anthropology Master’s programmes are recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as having research training status, so successful completion of these courses is sufficient preparation for research in the various fields of social anthropology. Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

We welcome students with the appropriate background for research. If you wish to study for a single year, you can do the MA or MSc by research, a 12-month independent research project.

If you are interested in registering for a research degree, you should contact the member of staff whose research is the most relevant to your interests. You should include a curriculum vitae, a short (1,000-word) research proposal, and a list of potential funding sources.

About the School of Anthropology and Conservation

Kent has pioneered the social anthropological study of Europe, Latin America, Melanesia, and Central and Southeast Asia, the use of computers in anthropological research, and environmental anthropology in its widest sense (including ethnobiology and ethnobotany).

Our regional expertise covers Europe, the Middle East, Central, Southeast and Southern Asia, Central and South America, Amazonia, Papua New Guinea, East Timor and Polynesia. Specialisation in biological anthropology includes forensics and paleopathology, osteology, evolutionary psychology and the evolutionary ecology and behaviour of great apes.

Course structure

The first year may include coursework, especially methods modules for students who need this additional training. You will work closely with one supervisor throughout your research, although you have a committee of three (including your primary supervisor) overseeing your progress. If you want to research in the area of applied computing in social anthropology, you would also have a supervisor based in the School of Computing.

Research areas

- Social Anthropology

The related themes of ethnicity, nationalism, identity, conflict, and the economics crisis form a major focus of our current work in the Middle East, the Balkans, South Asia, Amazonia and Central America, Europe (including the United Kingdom), Oceania and South-East Asia.

Our research extends to inter-communal violence, mental health, diasporas, pilgrimage, intercommunal trade, urban ethnogenesis, indigenous representation and the study of contemporary religions and their global connections.

We research issues in fieldwork and methodology more generally, with a strong and expanding interest in the field of visual anthropology. Our work on identity and locality links with growing strengths in customary law, kinship and parenthood. This is complemented by work on the language of relatedness, child health and on the cognitive bases of kinship terminologies.

A final strand of our research focuses on policy and advocacy issues and examines the connections between morality and law, legitimacy and corruption, public health policy and local healing strategies, legal pluralism and property rights, and the regulation of marine resources.

- Environmental Anthropology and Ethnobiology

Work in these areas is focused on the Centre for Biocultural Diversity. We conduct research on ethnobiological knowledge systems and other systems of environmental knowledge as well as local responses to deforestation, climate change, natural resource management, medical ethnobotany, the impacts of mobility and displacement and the interface between conservation and development. Current projects include trade in materia medica in Ladakh and Bolivia, food systems, ethno-ornithology, the development of buffer zones for protected areas and phytopharmacy among migrant diasporas.

- Digital Anthropology: Cultural Informatics, Social Invention and Computational Methods

Since 1985, we have been exploring and applying new approaches to research problems in anthropology – often, as in the case of hypermedia, electronic and internet publishing, digital media, expert systems and large-scale textual and historical databases, up to a decade before other anthropologists. Today, we are exploring cloud media, semantic networks, multi-agent modelling, dual/blended realities, data mining, smart environments and how these are mediated by people into new possibilities and capabilities.

Our major developments have included advances in kinship theory and analysis supported by new computational methods within field-based studies and as applied to detailed historical records; qualitative analysis of textual and ethnographic materials; and computer-assisted approaches to visual ethnography. We are extending our range to quantitative approaches for assessing qualitative materials, analysing social and cultural invention, the active representation of meaning, and the applications and implications of mobile computing, sensing and communications platforms and the transformation of virtual into concrete objects, institutions and structures.

- Biological Anthropology

Biological Anthropology is the newest of the University of Kent Anthropology research disciplines. We are interested in a diverse range of research topics within biological and evolutionary anthropology. These include bioarchaeology, human reproductive strategies, hominin evolution, primate behaviour and ecology, modern human variation, cultural evolution and Palaeolithic archaeology. This work takes us to many different regions of the world (Asia, Africa, Europe, the United States), and involves collaboration with international colleagues from a number of organisations. We have a dedicated research laboratory and up-to-date computing facilities to allow research in many areas of biological anthropology.

Currently, work is being undertaken in a number of these areas, and research links have been forged with colleagues at Kent in archaeology and biosciences, as well as with those at the Powell- Cotton Museum, the Budongo Forest Project (Uganda) and University College London.

Kent Osteological Research and Analysis (KORA) offers a variety of osteological services for human remains from archaeological contexts.

Careers

Higher degrees in anthropology create opportunities in many employment sectors including academia, the civil service and non-governmental organisations through work in areas such as human rights, journalism, documentary film making, environmental conservation and international finance. An anthropology degree also develops interpersonal and intercultural skills, which make our graduates highly desirable in any profession that involves working with people from diverse backgrounds and cultures.

Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

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The MSc in Sustainable Chemical Engineering is designed for ambitious graduates who aspire to play leading roles in managing, innovating and delivering resource efficient products, processes and systems in a sustainable way. Read more
The MSc in Sustainable Chemical Engineering is designed for ambitious graduates who aspire to play leading roles in managing, innovating and delivering resource efficient products, processes and systems in a sustainable way. The process industry has a high dependence on material and energy resources. Because of this, there is a strong interest in improving resource efficiency to increase competitiveness and decrease environmental impact.

Resource efficiency is about 'doing more and/or better with less' and delivering this sustainably presents a major opportunity and challenge for engineers and scientists. Industry needs skilled graduates with the expertise to take up this challenge now.

This course benefits from the support of our multidisciplinary EPSRC Centres for Doctoral Training:

- Sustainable Chemical Technologies (University of Bath)
- Water Informatics: Science and Engineering (Universities of Bath, Exeter, Bristol, Cardiff)
- Catalysis (Universities of Bath, Cardiff, Bristol).

The three Centres for Doctoral Training offer excellent opportunities for cross-disciplinary projects in engineering and science as well as access to a lively programme of talks and other events throughout the year. At the start of the MSc programme you will be assigned a doctoral student who will act as your mentor in addition to an academic tutor and supervisor.

Make an Impact: Sustainability for Professionals

If you are interested in sustainability, you can sign up for our free MOOC (massive open online course) Make an Impact: Sustainability for Professionals (https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/sustainability-for-professionals). The course starts in April.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/engineering/graduate-school/taught-programmes/sustainable-chemical-engineering/index.html

Learning Outcomes

This course teaches and builds on advanced concepts and technologies core to sustainable chemical engineering. It will train you how to integrate systems thinking and economic, environmental and social objectives in problem solving and decision making. You will graduate with the practical and interpersonal skills required by professionals to work in the emerging and expanding employment market in the green sector.

You will:

- gain a holistic understanding of the environmental, social, ethical, regulatory and economic dimensions of sustainable chemical engineering and how they interact

- apply methodologies and tools to design and evaluate alternative products, processes and systems based on sustainability criteria

- apply your knowledge of resource conservation to deal with complex scenarios, real-life problems and decision making in the face of incomplete or uncertain information

- develop 'big picture' thinking to evaluate alternative products, processes and systems using whole systems approaches, which consider the multiple criteria and stakeholders along the process industry value chain

- develop the skills to formulate and implement research and design projects independently and in professional multidisciplinary teams.

Structure

The programme creates many opportunities for interdisciplinary and active learning through authentic, industrially relevant case studies, games and project work. There are guest speakers from industry and other organisations, as well as opportunities for industrial visits. Transferable skills development, such as problem solving, teamwork, effective communication, networking and time and resource management, is embedded throughout the programme.

- Semester 1 (September to January):
The first semester consists of five taught compulsory units that provide you with a foundation in sustainability and systems analysis to apply throughout the programme.

The units advance your understanding of the concepts, technologies and issues in resource recovery, including the valorisation and the re-use of waste streams (waste2resource). You will examine in detail how resources can be conserved by transforming wastes and other feedstocks into high value products in the bioeconomy.

Each unit consists of lectures, tutorials and case studies, and is supplemented by private study and preparation for in-class activities.

Assessment is by a combination of coursework and examination.

- Semester 2 (February to May):
In the second semester you will take two further technical specialist units on resource conservation. These cover a range of advanced technologies and concepts, including process intensification and waste, water and energy integration.

You will also develop your understanding of Sustainable Chemical Engineering in a design, research and management context through three project-based units, focused on resource efficiency and conservation.

In the group activity, you will apply engineering and project management techniques to solve a design problem, just as an industry-based design team would.

Project unit 1 introduces you to research methods and project planning. You will then apply this to detailed background research in your discipline area to prepare for your individual summer dissertation project in Project unit 2.

Assessment is by a combination of coursework and examination.

- Semester 3 (June to September):
The final semester consists of an individual project leading to an MSc dissertation. Depending on your chosen area of interest, the project may involve theoretical, computational and/or experimental activities. You will conduct your individual project at Bath under the supervision of a member of academic staff, with opportunities for industrial co-supervision. You will have access to the state-of the-art facilities in the Department of Chemical Engineering.

Assessment is through a written dissertation and an oral presentation.


Facilities and equipment
The Department has a full range of research facilities with pilot plants for all major areas of research. Our analytical facilities include gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), UV-VIS, FTIR and Raman, photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), microcalorimetry, adsorption measurement systems, surface and pore structure analysis systems and particle sizing equipment. Within the University, there is access to atomic force, scanning and transmission electron microscopes.

Research Excellence Framework 2014
We are proud of our research record: 89% of our research was graded as either world-leading or internationally excellent in the Research Excellence Framework 2014, placing us 10th in the UK for our submission to the Aeronautical, Mechanical, Chemical and Manufacturing Engineering.

Careers information
We are committed to ensuring that postgraduate students acquire a range of subject-specific and generic skills during their research training including personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and career management. Most of our graduates take up research, consultancy or process and product development and managerial appointments in the commercial sector, or in universities or research institutes.

Find out how to apply here - https://secure.bath.ac.uk/prospectus/cgi-bin/applications.pl?department=chem-eng

We have Elite MSc Scholarships for £2,000 towards your tuition fees available for this course - http://www.bath.ac.uk/engineering/graduate-school/taught-programmes/funding/

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About the course. Read more

About the course

This new and exciting programme is aimed at training graduates from a range of scientific disciplines who wish to pursue a research career in cold-regions science, notably within the disciplines of glaciology, glacial geomorphology, polar climatology/ oceanography, environmental science, polar biogeochemical processes, or their intersections.

The programme’s underlying theme is contemporary, as its key interest is to explore the expressions, mechanisms and impacts of rapid ongoing changes in our planet’s cold regions.

Your career

You’ll develop the skills to work in private or public sector research, or join the civil service. Recent graduates have started careers in consulting or with organisations like CAFOD, the Environment Agency and the British Library. Many of our graduates stay on to do research. We have a high success rate in securing funding for those who wish to study for a PhD with us after finishing a masters.

Study with the best

This is a vibrant postgraduate community, with strong international links. Our research partners are global, from UK universities to institutions in southern Africa, Denmark, Iceland, Australia and the USA. Our teaching is invigorated by work from several interdisciplinary research groups, like the Sheffield Centre for International Drylands Research, the Urban and Regional Policy Research Institute and the Sheffield Institute for International Development.

How we teach

Our staff are active researchers at the cutting-edge of their fields. That research informs our masters courses. As well as the usual lectures and seminars, there are practicals, lab classes, field trips and research projects.

Facilities and equipment

A new £1m Sediment-Solute Systems lab enables geochemical analysis of aqueous and solid phases, especially in the context of biogeochemistry. We have equipment for chromatography, UV spectrometry and flow injection/auto analysis.

Our sample preparation facilities enable digestion, pre-concentration by evaporation under vacuum, and tangential flow filtration. There are alpha and gamma counters, a laser particle sizer and a luminescence dating lab. Field equipment includes automatic water samplers, weather stations, data loggers and environmental process characterisation sensors.

We have high-quality petrological microscopes for examining geological samples. We have labs for spectrometry and for palaeontological preparation, and you’ll also have access to specialist facilities in other departments at the University.

Laptops, camcorders, tape recorders and transcribers are available for your fieldwork. Our postgraduate computer labs have networked workstations for GIS research and climate modelling, ARC/INFO, ERDAS software and specialist software for remote sensing. GIS facilities are also provided by the £5m Informatics Collaboratory for the Social Sciences.

Our new postgraduate media GIS suite has facilities for Skype, video conferencing, web design, video editing and creative media.

Fieldwork

Most of our courses involve fieldwork. The MPH, MSc and MA International Development take students on a 10-day field trip where they put their research skills into practice. Recent classes visited the West Pokot region of Kenya, urban and rural areas of Nepal, the suburbs of Cairo and India.

Core modules

  • Research Design in Analysis of Environmental Systems
  • Current Issues in Polar and Alpine Science
  • Arctic/Alpine Field Course
  • Polar and Alpine Change Research Project

Teaching and assessment

Modules are delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars, workshops and independent study.

The Research Project is assessed by oral presentation of mid-project findings, submission of a project report in the summer and by a poster presentation of project findings.



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