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Masters Degrees (Environmental Forensics)

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The Master of Chemistry in Environmental Forensics programme is an exciting opportunity, using active learning and providing practical experience in close cooperation with industry and environmental researchers. Read more

The Master of Chemistry in Environmental Forensics programme is an exciting opportunity, using active learning and providing practical experience in close cooperation with industry and environmental researchers.

Environmental forensics is the systematic and scientific evaluation using various disciplines for the purpose of developing defensible scientific and legal conclusions regarding the source, age and history of chemical pollutants released into the environment. You, together with industry and leading researchers, have the opportunity to develop the knowledge needed for you to contribute to a future resilient society.

The programme offers insight into several disciplines including analytical and environmental analysis, in order to characterise the source and amount of chemical pollutants in the environment as well as describe their history. In order to facilitate a broad understanding of the specialities involved in environmental forensics, the curriculum will include a wide-range of multidisciplinary expertise within natural sciences such as environmental science, isotope chemistry, environmental sampling, human health, advanced statistics, and transportation modelling. To ensure that students gain practical field experience, real-life cases are provided in collaboration with industry. The programme uses problem-based learning (PBL) to encourage active learning and to develop problem solving abilities. These skills will be used to identify sources and history of environmental pollution.

It is a two-year programme, but can be finished after one year resulting in a 60-credit Master of Science in Chemistry. Year one deals with distribution of environmental pollutions, environmental toxicology, human exposure, sustainability and environmental regulations, and forensic analytical methods. Year two includes advanced statistical methods, research methodology and project management. Both alternatives conclude with project work in a research group and/or with industry.



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On this part-time, distance learning course you will learn how to evaluate and interpret different forms of forensic evidence and how to consider its relevance to police investigations. Read more

Course Description

On this part-time, distance learning course you will learn how to evaluate and interpret different forms of forensic evidence and how to consider its relevance to police investigations. You will study the scientific principles and practical application of the many and varied techniques used to forensically examine different evidence types.

You will learn how to select the most appropriate techniques for different evidence types, how to interpret the results and how to apply critical analysis to determine what that means in terms of evidential value.

The skills and knowledge you will gain on this course will enable you to confidently argue the reasoning behind the interpretation and evaluation of forensic evidence and to demonstrate in a court of law that you are credible as an expert witness.

This course is offered in association with the University of Florida and the University of Canberra.

If you have any questions about this course, join us for a live online chat with academic tutors and admissions staff.

Course Structure

If you complete all of the modules and a dissertation you will be awarded an MSc. However it is also possible to compete only the modules, without a dissertation, and receive a Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip), or to complete just the first year modules and receive a Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) These are 'exit awards' which means that you cannot apply for them directly; you must apply for the MSc.

Core Modules:

Crime Scene Examination
Trace Evidence Analysis
Evidential Value and Interpretation
Research Methods

Option Modules (choose 4-6):

Physical Evidence modules

Fingerprint corrosion of metal
Arson investigation
Forensic engineering
Toxicology of chemical weapons (F)
Blood distribution and spatter (F)
Environmental forensics (C)

Biological Evidence modules

Biological evidence and serology (F)
Forensic toxicology (F)
Biological evidence and serology (F)

Human Remains modules

Introduction to forensic archaeology
Introduction to forensic anthropology
Forensic entomology (F)
Forensic genetics (F)

Management modules

Crime scene management
Intelligence gathering and data mining

*Modules marked F or C are taught by the University of Florida or the University of Canberra.

After completing your modules, you will complete a dissertation of approximately 15,000-20,000 words, which may be related to work-based issues you are facing.

(Please note: due to regular enhancement of the University’s courses, please refer to Leicester’s own website (http://www.le.ac.uk) or/and Terms and Conditions (http://www2.le.ac.uk/legal) for the most accurate and up-to-date course information. We recommend that you familiarise yourself with this information prior to submitting an application.)

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This programme aims to introduce students to the concepts of soil for the 21st century and is suitable for students wishing to pursue a career in land-based management or environmental protection. Read more

This programme aims to introduce students to the concepts of soil for the 21st century and is suitable for students wishing to pursue a career in land-based management or environmental protection.

Soils underpin the sustainability of terrestrial ecosystems and are key to food production. Soils form the basis of all agricultural production, but they also store water, mediate the impact of pollutants, provide biological habitats, have an impact on the accumulation of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere, are involved in dealing with society’s waste, are a source of extractable minerals and provide the foundations for the housing and roads on which society depends.

You will learn about soil function and management, and soil classification, assessment and analysis, with a strong emphasis on practical skills. You will gain expertise in the relationship between soil and sustainable approaches to land resource use.

This programme is run in collaboration with Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC).

Programme structure

This programme involves two semesters of compulsory and option taught courses followed by a period of individual dissertation project work.

Compulsory courses typically will be:

  • Soil Protection and Management
  • Soils Science Concepts and Application
  • Professional Research Skills in Practice
  • Dissertation

Option courses:

In consultation with the Programme Director, you will choose from a range of optional courses^. We particularly recommend:

  • Analysing the Environment
  • Analysing the Environment Study Tour
  • Culture, Ethics & Environment
  • Ecosystem Dynamics and Functions
  • Human Dimensions of Environmental Change and Sustainability
  • International Development in a Changing World
  • Principles of Environmental Sustainability
  • Principles of GIS
  • Project Appraisal
  • Atmospheric Quality and Global Change
  • Frameworks to Assess Food Security
  • Integrated Resource Management
  • Spatial Modelling
  • Ecosystem Values and Management
  • Environmental Impact Assessment
  • Land Use/Environmental Interactions
  • Participation in Policy and Planning
  • Sustainability of Food Production
  • Interrelationships in Food Systems

Courses are subject to timetabling and availability and are subject to change.

Field trip

An integral, week-long study tour lets you refresh skills learned on the programme and develop new tools and techniques, useful during the dissertation process. The tour has historically been held in Mende, France. In addition to the formal taught component, students had the opportunity to go rafting and visit the Aven Armand caves.

There may also be a short tour during induction week, to give students a chance to get to know each other.

Learning outcomes

Students will:

  • gain a knowledge and understanding of the relationship between soils and sustainable land management
  • gain an understanding of soil sampling and analysis, interpretation and reporting
  • be able to assess soil management issues and develop improved management plans
  • understand the function of soils in relation to sustainable land use and societal needs

Career opportunities

A recent report by the British Society of Soil Science (BSSS) identified soil science as an area in which there are critical skills shortages, meaning graduates will be in high demand.

Soil scientists are employed in a broad range of vocations including environmental consultancy, research, overseas development, environmental impact assessment and analysis, site reclamation and remediation, and conservation as well as advising on government policy, archaeological excavations and laboratory analyses, forensics, and landscape design.

Student experience

Would you like to know what it’s really like to study at the School of GeoSciences?

Visit our student experience blog where you can find articles, advice, videos and ask current students your questions.



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Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives. Read more
Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives.

All of our Anthropology Master’s programmes are recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as having research training status, so successful completion of these courses is sufficient preparation for research in the various fields of social anthropology. Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

We welcome students with the appropriate background for research. If you wish to study for a single year, you can do the MA or MSc by research, a 12-month independent research project.

If you are interested in registering for a research degree, you should contact the member of staff whose research is the most relevant to your interests. You should include a curriculum vitae, a short (1,000-word) research proposal, and a list of potential funding sources.

About the School of Anthropology and Conservation

Kent has pioneered the social anthropological study of Europe, Latin America, Melanesia, and Central and Southeast Asia, the use of computers in anthropological research, and environmental anthropology in its widest sense (including ethnobiology and ethnobotany).

Our regional expertise covers Europe, the Middle East, Central, Southeast and Southern Asia, Central and South America, Amazonia, Papua New Guinea, East Timor and Polynesia. Specialisation in biological anthropology includes forensics and paleopathology, osteology, evolutionary psychology and the evolutionary ecology and behaviour of great apes.

Course structure

The first year may include coursework, especially methods modules for students who need this additional training. You will work closely with one supervisor throughout your research, although you have a committee of three (including your primary supervisor) overseeing your progress. If you want to research in the area of applied computing in social anthropology, you would also have a supervisor based in the School of Computing.

Research areas

- Social Anthropology

The related themes of ethnicity, nationalism, identity, conflict, and the economics crisis form a major focus of our current work in the Middle East, the Balkans, South Asia, Amazonia and Central America, Europe (including the United Kingdom), Oceania and South-East Asia.

Our research extends to inter-communal violence, mental health, diasporas, pilgrimage, intercommunal trade, urban ethnogenesis, indigenous representation and the study of contemporary religions and their global connections.

We research issues in fieldwork and methodology more generally, with a strong and expanding interest in the field of visual anthropology. Our work on identity and locality links with growing strengths in customary law, kinship and parenthood. This is complemented by work on the language of relatedness, child health and on the cognitive bases of kinship terminologies.

A final strand of our research focuses on policy and advocacy issues and examines the connections between morality and law, legitimacy and corruption, public health policy and local healing strategies, legal pluralism and property rights, and the regulation of marine resources.

- Environmental Anthropology and Ethnobiology

Work in these areas is focused on the Centre for Biocultural Diversity. We conduct research on ethnobiological knowledge systems and other systems of environmental knowledge as well as local responses to deforestation, climate change, natural resource management, medical ethnobotany, the impacts of mobility and displacement and the interface between conservation and development. Current projects include trade in materia medica in Ladakh and Bolivia, food systems, ethno-ornithology, the development of buffer zones for protected areas and phytopharmacy among migrant diasporas.

- Digital Anthropology: Cultural Informatics, Social Invention and Computational Methods

Since 1985, we have been exploring and applying new approaches to research problems in anthropology – often, as in the case of hypermedia, electronic and internet publishing, digital media, expert systems and large-scale textual and historical databases, up to a decade before other anthropologists. Today, we are exploring cloud media, semantic networks, multi-agent modelling, dual/blended realities, data mining, smart environments and how these are mediated by people into new possibilities and capabilities.

Our major developments have included advances in kinship theory and analysis supported by new computational methods within field-based studies and as applied to detailed historical records; qualitative analysis of textual and ethnographic materials; and computer-assisted approaches to visual ethnography. We are extending our range to quantitative approaches for assessing qualitative materials, analysing social and cultural invention, the active representation of meaning, and the applications and implications of mobile computing, sensing and communications platforms and the transformation of virtual into concrete objects, institutions and structures.

- Biological Anthropology

Biological Anthropology is the newest of the University of Kent Anthropology research disciplines. We are interested in a diverse range of research topics within biological and evolutionary anthropology. These include bioarchaeology, human reproductive strategies, hominin evolution, primate behaviour and ecology, modern human variation, cultural evolution and Palaeolithic archaeology. This work takes us to many different regions of the world (Asia, Africa, Europe, the United States), and involves collaboration with international colleagues from a number of organisations. We have a dedicated research laboratory and up-to-date computing facilities to allow research in many areas of biological anthropology.

Currently, work is being undertaken in a number of these areas, and research links have been forged with colleagues at Kent in archaeology and biosciences, as well as with those at the Powell- Cotton Museum, the Budongo Forest Project (Uganda) and University College London.

Kent Osteological Research and Analysis (KORA) offers a variety of osteological services for human remains from archaeological contexts.

Careers

Higher degrees in anthropology create opportunities in many employment sectors including academia, the civil service and non-governmental organisations through work in areas such as human rights, journalism, documentary film making, environmental conservation and international finance. An anthropology degree also develops interpersonal and intercultural skills, which make our graduates highly desirable in any profession that involves working with people from diverse backgrounds and cultures.

Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

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To gain this qualification, you need 180 credits as follows. Stage 1. 60 credits from List A. List A. optional modules. Advanced routing - CCNP 1 (T824). Read more

Modules

To gain this qualification, you need 180 credits as follows:

Stage 1

60 credits from List A:

List A: optional modules

• Advanced routing - CCNP 1 (T824)
• Capacities for managing development (T878)
• Conflict and development (T879)
• Development: context and practice (T877)
• Environmental monitoring and protection (T868)
• Finite element analysis: basic principles and applications (T804)
• Institutional development (TU872)
• Making environmental decisions (T891)
• Managing for sustainability (T867)
• Managing systemic change: inquiry, action and interaction (TU812)
• Managing technological innovation (T848)
• Manufacture materials design (T805)
• Multilayer switching - CCNP 3 (T826)
• Network security (T828)
• Optimising networks - CCNP 4 (T827)
• Problem solving and improvement: quality and other approaches (T889)
• Strategic capabilities for technological innovation (T849)
• Thinking strategically: systems tools for managing change (TU811)

Plus 30 credits from List B:

List B: optional modules

• Advanced mathematical methods (M833)
• Advanced routing - CCNP 1 (T824)
• Analytic number theory I (M823)
• Analytic number theory II (M829)
• Applied complex variables (M828)
• Approximation theory (M832)
• Calculus of variations and advanced calculus (M820)
• Capacities for managing development (T878)
• Coding theory (M836)
• Conflict and development (T879)
• Data management (M816)
• Developing research skills in science (S825)
• Development: context and practice (T877)
• Digital forensics (M812)
• Environmental monitoring and protection (T868)
• Finite element analysis: basic principles and applications (T804)
• Fractal geometry (M835)
• Information security (M811)
• Institutional development (TU872)
• Making environmental decisions (T891)
• Managing for sustainability (T867)
• Managing systemic change: inquiry, action and interaction (TU812)
• Managing technological innovation (T848)
• Manufacture materials design (T805)
• Multilayer switching - CCNP 3 (T826)
• Network security (T828)
• Nonlinear ordinary differential equations (M821)
• Optimising networks - CCNP 4 (T827)
• Problem solving and improvement: quality and other approaches (T889)
• Project management (M815)
• Researching mathematics learning (ME825)*
• Software development (M813)
• Software engineering (M814)
• Space science (S818) NEW1
• Strategic capabilities for technological innovation (T849)
• Thinking strategically: systems tools for managing change (TU811)

* 60-credit module of which only 30 credits count towards this qualification

Plus 30 credits from:

Compulsory module

Team engineering (T885)

Stage 2

60 credits from:

Compulsory module

Research project (T802)

The modules quoted in this description are currently available for study. However, as we review the curriculum on a regular basis, the exact selection may change over time.

Credit transfer

Credit transfer is not permitted for the MSc except for any awarded as part of the Postgraduate Diploma in Engineering.
For further advice and guidance, please email us.

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Expand your knowledge in all areas of forensic science, from gathering evidence at the crime scene itself, right through to the courtroom. Read more
Expand your knowledge in all areas of forensic science, from gathering evidence at the crime scene itself, right through to the courtroom. Develop your skills and knowledge on our accredited course, as you collect and analyse evidence, equipping you to become a confident and effective practitioner.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/forensic-science

In-keeping with its industry-focus our Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences accredited course is taught by experienced forensics practitioners. We’ll immerse you in a practical environment that closely emulates a real forensics laboratory. The analytical skills and expertise you gain apply equally well in the broader scientific and technological fields as they do in forensics.

Our course combines practical skills with high-level theoretical knowledge of the wide range of forensic techniques you need to apply at all stages of an investigation. Going further still, you’ll be trained to design and execute your own research project in a relevant area, which particularly interests you. This will include guidance on research methods, good practice, presentation and the application of your research.

Full-time - January start, 15 months. September start, 12 months.
Part-time - January start, 33 months. September start, 28 months.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/forensic-science

This course will provide you with:
• the opportunity to acquire Masters level capabilities, knowledge and skills in diverse areas of forensic science from the crime scene to the court
• training in the design and execution of science based research in an appropriate area of forensic science
• the opportunity to undertake a formal research programme in an appropriate area of forensic science

The intention is to immerse you in an environment that is as realistically close to that of a practising forensic science laboratory as is possible in an academic institution. The experience and background of Anglia Ruskin's staff, their intimate knowledge and working relationships with the industry and the availability or new or relatively new purpose-built laboratory facilities places this course in a strong position to deliver such an experience.

This course is suitable for candidates who wish to specialise in Forensic Science as a progression from their first degree in forensic science and for candidates coming into Forensic Science with a strong background in traditional analytical science. This course is accredited by The Forensic Science Society

On successful completion of this course you will be able to:
• demonstrate deep and systematic knowledge of several major areas of forensic science, including either chemical or biological criminalistics.
• apply theoretical and experimentally based empirical knowledge to the solution of problems in forensic science
demonstrate that you are cognisant with the best ethical practices, validation and accreditation procedures relevant to forensic science.
• demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the theory and practice of advanced analytical techniques, as used and applied in forensic science.
• devise, design, implement and, if necessary, modify a programme of basic research directly related to the solution of practical problems in the broad field of forensic science.
• assimilate the known knowledge and information concerning a particular problem/issue and erect testable and viable alternative hypotheses, from theoretical and empirical/experimental view points.
• demonstrate a level of conceptual understanding that will enable information from a wide range of sources and methodologies to be comprehensively and critically appraised.
• operate competently, safely and legally in a variety of complex, possibly unpredictable contexts and be able to apply appropriate standards of established good practice in such circumstances.
• demonstrate that you are able to exercise initiative in your work tasks, but yet be able to exercise your responsibility so as not to move beyond the scope of your expertise.
• search for and obtain information from a wide range of traditional, non-traditional and digital/electronic sources and be able to synthesis it into a coherent argument.
• present the results of your work in a number of forms (reports, papers, posters and all forms of oral presentation) at a level intelligible to the target audience (highly trained/specialised professional to informed lay-person).
• organise your own time and patterns of work to maximum effect and be able to work competently either autonomously or as part of groups and teams as required.

Careers

Our course is enhanced by our excellent working relationships with most of the major employers in the forensic science industry, including the police and fire services.

This focus on theory and good laboratory practice, analytical measurement and research and management skills, together with our industry contacts will make you an attractive candidate for employment. It’ll open up career opportunities in specialist forensic science laboratories in the chemical, biological, environmental, pharmaceutical and law enforcement industries.

You’re also in the perfect position to continue your academic career and move up to our Forensic Science PhD.

Core modules

Evidence Collection and Management
Mastering Forensic Evidence
Mastering Forensic Analysis
Specialist Topics
Research Methods
Research Project

Assessment

Your progress will be assessed using a variety of methods including laboratory reports, court reports (including witness statements), presentations, exams, essays and reports.

Facilities

Wide range of advanced microscopy instruments. SEM with EDS. Full range of organic analysis (GC, GC-MS, HPLC and ion chromatography). FT-IR and Raman spectrometers. Gene sequencing and other DNA analytical equipment. Comprehensive collection of specialist forensic equipment including GRIM, VSC and MSP. Dedicated crime scene facility with video equipment.

Your faculty

The Faculty of Science & Technology is one of the largest of five faculties at Anglia Ruskin University. Whether you choose to study with us full- or part-time, on campus or at a distance, there’s an option whatever your level – from a foundation degree, to a BSc, MSc, PhD or professional doctorate.

Whichever course you pick, you’ll gain the theory and practical skills needed to progress with confidence. Join us and you could find yourself learning in the very latest laboratories or on field trips or work placements with well-known and respected companies. You may even have the opportunity to study abroad.

Everything we do in the faculty has a singular purpose: to provide a world-class environment to create, share and advance knowledge in science and technology fields. This is key to all of our futures.

Specialist facilities

Our facilities include a wide range of advanced microscopy instruments – SEM with EDS, a full range of organic analysis (GC, HPLC and ion chromatography). FT-IR and Raman Spectrometers, gene sequencing and other DNA analytical equipment. A comprehensive collection of specialist forensic equipment includes GRIM, VSC and MSP and we also have a dedicated crime scene facility with video equipment.

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Why this course?. The MSc in Forensic Science is the UK’s longest established forensic science degree course, celebrating its . Read more

Why this course?

The MSc in Forensic Science is the UK’s longest established forensic science degree course, celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2016/2017.

You’ll join a global network of Strathclyde forensic science graduates in highly respected positions all over the world.

In addition to preparing you for life as a forensic scientist, you’ll also graduate with a wide range of practical skills, problem solving and investigative thinking relevant to a wide range of careers.

You'll study

  • crime scene investigation
  • legal procedures and the law
  • evidence interpretation and statistical evaluation
  • analysis of range of evidence types including footwear marks, trace evidence, and questioned documents

Following a general introduction to forensic science in semester 1, you can choose to specialise in either forensic biology or forensic chemistry. As a forensic biologist you’ll study a range of topics including:

  • body fluid analysis
  • blood pattern interpretation
  • DNA profiling
  • investigation of assaults and sexual offences

If you choose to specialise in forensic chemistry, you’ll develop expertise in:

  • analysis of fires and explosives
  • drugs of abuse
  • alcohol and toxicology

The focal point of the course is our major crime scene exercise, in which you are expected to investigate your own mock outdoor crime scene, collect and analyse the evidence, and present this in Glasgow Sheriff Court in conjunction with students training in Strathclyde Law School.

Project

In semester 3, MSc students undertake a three-month project, culminating in the production of a dissertation.

Students may be given the opportunity to complete their project in an operational forensic science provider either in the UK or overseas (subject to visa requirements). Alternatively, students may complete their project within the Centre for Forensic Science itself, under the supervision of our team of academics.

Examples of institutions that previous Strathclyde students have been placed in to undertake their project include: 

  • Scottish Police Authority, Forensic Services
  • Centre for Applied Science and Technology (CAST)
  • Forensic Explosives Laboratory, Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL)
  • LGC Forensics
  • Cellmark Forensic Services
  • Institute of Environmental Science and Research, Auckland, New Zealand
  • Institute of Forensic Research, Krakow, Poland
  • Centre of Forensic Sciences, Toronto, Canada

The MSc in Forensic Science runs for 12 months, commencing in September. 

Facilities

Teaching takes place in the Centre for Forensic Science. It’s a modern purpose-built laboratory for practical forensic training, equipped with state-of-the-art instrumentation for analysis of a wide range of evidence types. This includes a microscopy suite, DNA profiling laboratory, analytical chemistry laboratory, blood pattern analysis room, and a suite for setting up mock crime scenes.

Accreditation

The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences is a professional body with members in over 60 countries and is one of the oldest and largest forensic science associations in the world.

Our MSc in Forensic Science is accredited by the Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences, demonstrating our commitment to meeting their high educational standards for forensic science tuition.

Assessment

Assessment consists of written coursework, practical work assessments, oral presentations and formal written examinations. Practical work is continually assessed and counts towards the award of the degree. The project is assessed through the completion of a dissertation.

The award of MSc is based upon 180 credits.

Careers

Most forensic scientists in Scotland are employed by the Scottish Police Authority.

In the rest of the UK, forensic scientists are employed by individual police forces, private forensic science providers such as LGC Forensics and Cellmark Forensic Services, or government bodies such as the Centre for Applied Science and Technology (CAST) and the Defence Science Technology Laboratory (DSTL).

Outside of the UK, forensic scientists may be employed by police forces, government bodies or private companies.

Forensic scientists can specialise in specific areas such as crime scene examination, DNA analysis, drug analysis, and fire investigation.

Most of the work is laboratory-based but experienced forensic scientists may have to attend crime scenes and give evidence in court.

Where are they now?

Many of our graduates are in work or further study.**

Job titles include:

  • Analytical Chemist
  • Biology Casework Examiner
  • Deputy Laboratory Director
  • DNA Analyst
  • Forensic Case Worker Examiner
  • Forensic DNA Analyst
  • Forensic Scientist
  • Laboratory Analyst
  • Medical Laboratory Assistant Histopathology
  • Research & Development Chemist

Employers include:

  • Gen-Probe Life Sciences
  • HKSTC
  • Key Forensic Services Ltd
  • Lancaster Labs
  • LGC Forensics
  • Life Technologies
  • National Institute Of Criminalistics And Criminology
  • NHS
  • Seychelles Forensic Science Lab
  • University of Strathclyde

*information is intended only as a guide.

**Based on the results of the National Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey (2010/11 and 2011/12).



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Molecular Biology with Biotechnology (MSc). This taught MSc course in the School of Biological Sciences provides intensive training in this important area of Biology and is designed both for fresh graduates and for those wishing to develop and extend their expertise in this area. Read more
Molecular Biology with Biotechnology (MSc)

This taught MSc course in the School of Biological Sciences provides intensive training in this important area of Biology and is designed both for fresh graduates and for those wishing to develop and extend their expertise in this area. The course has a strong practical emphasis and will provide the advanced theoretical and practical background necessary for employment in the Biotechnology industry, as well as equipping students with the knowledge required to pursue advanced studies in this area.
Course structure

The course consists of a taught component and a Research project. During the taught phase of the degree, you will take modules in Marine Biotechnology, Molecular and Medical Laboratory Techniques, Techniques of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology; Systems Biology; Plant Biotechnology, Environmental Biotechnology and Medical Biotechnology.

Topics covered in these modules will include Agrobacterium Ti plasmid based plant transformation vectors and the development of transgenic crops; the use and interpretation of microarrays and proteome systems; the development of transgenic fish and the diagnosis of fish diseases using molecular markers; bioremediation, biomining and the use of bacteria to degrade novel organic pollutants; stem cell technologies and the diagnosis of genetic disease using single nucleotide polymorphisms. image of students in the labDuring this part of the course, you will also take part in intensive laboratory exercises designed to introduce you to essential techniques in molecular biology and biotechnology including nucleic acid and protein extraction, PCR and QTL analysis, northern, southern and western blotting etc. In addition, most of the taught theory modules will have an associated practical component. The Research project will take place during the summer and will be conducted under the direct supervision of one of the staff involved in teaching the course. Students will be able to choose their Research project from a wide range of topics which will be related to the taught material.

Career options

The 21st century post genomics era offers a wide range of job opportunities in the agricultural, medical, pharmaceutical, aquaculture, forensics and environmental science areas. The rapidly developing economies of China and India in particular have recognised the enormous opportunities offered by Biotechnology. Job openings in sales and marketing with companies who have a science base are also common. Some graduates will also choose to extend their knowledge base by undertaking PhD programmes in relevant areas.

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The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Read more
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Its more than 2,500 students are engaged in a wide variety of challenging courses and hands-on learning experiences that extend across all areas of the humanities and sciences – from the great philosophers and classic literature to the world economy and environmental sustainability.

At the core of each department are faculty members who have garnered national acclaim for their best-selling books, ground-breaking research and creative endeavors. Together, students and their professors explore globally significant subjects and work towards the goal of improving every aspect of the way in which human beings live. To learn more about a specific area of study, click on the left-hand navigation bar for a full listing of academic departments.

The department

In the Department of Criminal Justice, undergraduate and graduate programs are designed to meet the constant demand for law enforcement and criminal justice professionals. Our programs also provide an excellent pathway toward the study of law.

Our core curriculum thoroughly explores the theory and practice of the criminal justice system. But you will customize your study through elective courses that focus on a particular area of interest. Our full-time faculty is an internationally renowned group of academic professionals, and our adjunct professors are working criminal justice professionals, including attorneys, judges and law enforcement officials.

The LIU Post Department of Criminal Justice was one of the first on the East Coast to establish an internship program. All criminal justice majors intern in the field, and have access to an extraordinary network of criminal justice professionals, making it possible to be offered positions upon graduation.

Criminal Justice students may have the opportunity to spend a semester in Washington, D.C., participating in the Justice Semester at American University, or studying Forensic Psychology at George Washington University.

M.S. in Criminal Justice

The 36-credit Master of Science in Criminal Justice offers an in-depth, 21st century curriculum geared toward forensics, law and society, criminal behavior, cyber crime, terrorism and criminological theory. In addition to our core curriculum, electives are available but not limited to areas such as terrorism, law, high technology, forensics, security, and fraud. The program prepares students for modern-day careers in criminal justice, including cyberspace crime detection, law enforcement management systems and homeland security.

Courses are taught by a distinguished faculty that includes published authors, researchers and widely-consulted authorities on the American and world criminal justice systems. Adjunct faculty members are working professionals in the field and include attorneys, judges and law enforcements officials. Our professors will engage and inspire you to exceed your expectations.

Alumni of our program are employed in a wide variety of professional positions: law enforcement officers, federal agents, security officers, prosecutors, corrections counselors, judges, attorneys, private security professionals, homeland security agents, forensic technologists, crime lab technicians, emergency managers, FBI agents and social service representatives.

Forensic Psychology Semester: George Washington University, Washington, D.C.

The Department of Criminal Justice is proud to announce an articulation agreement with George Washington University concerning Forensic Psychology. Eligible criminal justice graduate students may take forensic psychology courses in Washington, D.C. for a semester. Completed credits will be applied towards the student’s plan of study. To find out more about the George Washington University Program contact the Department of Criminal Justice.

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About the course. Study the dynamic field of efficient information transfer around the globe. We teach this course jointly with the Department of Computer Science so you get up-to-date knowledge and understanding. Read more

About the course

Study the dynamic field of efficient information transfer around the globe. We teach this course jointly with the Department of Computer Science so you get up-to-date knowledge and understanding.

Our graduates are in demand

Many go to work in industry as engineers for large national and international companies, including ARUP, Ericsson Communications, HSBC, Rolls-Royce, Jaguar Land Rover and Intel Asia Pacific.

Real-world applications

This is a research environment. What we teach is based on the latest ideas. The work you do on your course is directly connected to real-world applications.

We work with government research laboratories, industrial companies and other prestigious universities. Significant funding from UK research councils, the European Union and industry means you have access to the best facilities.

How we teach

You’ll be taught by academics who are leaders in their field. The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) puts us among the UK top five for this subject. Our courses are centred around finding solutions to problems, in lectures, seminars, exercises and through project work.

First-class facilities

Semiconductor Materials and Devices

LED, laser photodetectors and transistor design, a high-tech field-emission gun transmission electron microscope (FEGTEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) milling facility, and electron beam lithographic equipment.

Our state-of-the-art semiconductor growth and processing equipment is housed in an extensive clean room complex as part of the EPSRC’s National Centre for III-V Technologies.

Our investment in semiconductor research equipment in the last 12 months totals £6million.

Electrical Machines and Drives

Specialist facilities for the design and manufacture of electromagnetic machines, dynamometer test cells, a high-speed motor test pit, environmental test chambers, electronic packaging and EMC testing facilities, Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre for Advanced Electrical Machines and Drives.

Communications

Advanced anechoic chambers for antenna design and materials characterisation, a lab for calibrated RF dosimetry of tissue to assess pathogenic effects of electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones, extensive CAD electromagnetic analysis tools.

Core modules

  • Network and Inter-Network Architectures
  • Network Performance Analysis
  • Data Coding Techniques for Communications and Storage
  • Advanced Communication Principles
  • Mobile Networks and Physical Layer Protocols
  • (either) Foundations of Object-Orientated Programming (or) Object-Orientated Programming and Software Design
  • Major Research Project

Examples of optional modules

  • Computer Security and Forensics
  • 3D Computer Graphics
  • Software Development for Mobile Devices
  • Cloud Computing
  • Advanced Signal Processing
  • Antennas, Propagation and Satellite Systems
  • Optical Communication Devices and Systems
  • Computer Vision
  • Broadband Wireless Techniques; Wireless Packet Data Networks and Protocols
  • System Design

Teaching and assessment

We deliver research-led teaching from our department and Computer Science with individual support for your research project and dissertation. Assessment is by examinations, coursework and a project dissertation with poster presentation.



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This MSc course explores the way we think about and approach tasks or situations. Everyone brings with them their own perspective, which means that we all see things in different ways. Read more
This MSc course explores the way we think about and approach tasks or situations. Everyone brings with them their own perspective, which means that we all see things in different ways. The discipline of systems thinking in practice will provide you with the tools to challenge your approach to complex situations, consider the roles other people play, and assess how different components within those situations are related. You will also develop the skills needed to think more holistically and work more collaboratively to avoid systemic failures.

Key features of the course

•Offers you the choice of a research route or a professional route
•Both routes develop essential skills for addressing systems thinking issues systematically in your own context, and extend your knowledge of recent research and research methods
•Concludes with either a substantial piece of independent study on a topic of professional interest to you, or a more academic in-depth research project.

This qualification is eligible for a Postgraduate Loan available from Student Finance England. For more information, see our fees and funding web page.

You can take a number of different routes towards your qualification. Please visit our website to see some suggested routes.

Modules

To gain this qualification, you need 180 credits as follows:

Stage 1

60 credits of compulsory modules:

Compulsory modules

• Thinking strategically: systems tools for managing change (TU811)
• Managing systemic change: inquiry, action and interaction (TU812)

Plus

60 credits from List A:

Please see the module descriptions for any specific entry requirements before making your choice.

List A – optional modules

• Advanced routing - CCNP 1 (T824)
• Capacities for managing development (T878)
• Conflict and development (T879)
• Continuing professional development in practice (U810)
• Data management (M816)
• Development: context and practice (T877)
• Digital forensics (M812)
• Earth science: a systems approach (S808)
• Entrepreneurship: experience and perspective (BB846)
• Information security (M811)
• Institutional development: conflicts, values and meanings (TU872)
• Leadership and management in intercultural contexts (BB848)
• Leading healthcare improvements (K827)
• MBA stage 1: management: perspectives and practice (B716)
• MBA stage 1: management: perspectives and practice (fast-track)* (BXFT716)
• Making environmental decisions (T891)
• Management beyond the mainstream (BB847)
• Managing for sustainability (T867)
• Managing technological innovation (T848)
• Manufacture materials design (T805)
• Marketing in the 21st century (BB844)
• Multi-layer switching - CCNP 3 (T826)
• Network security (T828)
• Optimising networks - CCNP 4 (T827)
• Problem solving and improvement: quality and other approaches (T889)
• Project management (M815)
• Software development (M813)
• Software engineering (M814)
• Strategic capabilities for technological innovation (T849)
• Strategic human resource management (BB845)
• Sustainable creative management (BB842)

* This version is for accelerated study and requires you to devote 20-25 hours a week to your studies.

Completion of Stage 1 will entitle you to claim the Postgraduate Diploma in Systems Thinking in Practice (E28).

Plus

Stage 2

This MSc offers a choice of routes after you have completed Stage 1; a research route or a more business-oriented professional route.

60 credits from either the Research route or the Professional route:

Research route

Compulsory module

• Research project (T802)

Professional route

Compulsory module

• The MSc professional project (T847)

Plus an additional 30 credits from List A in Stage 1 above

The modules quoted in this description are currently available for study. However, as we review the curriculum on a regular basis, the exact selection may change over time.

Credit transfer

If you have already completed some successful study at postgraduate level at another institution you may be able to transfer credit for this study and count it towards this Open University qualification. If you wish to apply to transfer credit you must do so as soon as possible as it may affect your choice of OU modules. If you are awarded credit for study completed elsewhere, you may find that you need to study fewer OU modules to complete your qualification with us. Visit our Credit Transfer site for more information on how to apply.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Applied Analytical Science (LCMS) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Applied Analytical Science (LCMS) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

World demand for mass spectrometry (MS) and chromatography has grown at an unprecedented rate, with qualified graduates in short supply and highly sought-after. Postgraduate (PG) training is essential as undergraduates are not taught to the required depth. Swansea is the only UK institution to offer a range of schemes solely dedicated to these topics, drawing upon expertise in the Institute of Mass Spectrometry (IMS), based at a long established UK centre of excellence.

Key Features

Course content designed for the needs of industry:

Essential topics such as fundamentals of mass spectrometry and separation science, professional management of laboratory practice, data analysis and method development.

Extensive training in a research-led Institute:

To improve their analytical science skills to professional levels required for the workplace.

Highly practical course and extensive in-house equipment:

MRes Applied Analytical Science (LCMS) students can experience more in-depth and ‘hands-on’ learning than most current analytical MRes programmes. Additional sessions including experiment design, health and safety, and laboratory skills are held in preparation of the research project, to ensure students are adequately equipped for project work.

Taught modules encourage problem solving skills, involving relevant simulated (pre-existing) scenarios:

To develop analytical thinking, professional and academic skills through advanced practical and theoretical studies and the submission of a scientifically defensible thesis.

Participation of expert industrial guest lecturers:

Unique opportunities to network with potential employers and enhanced employability prospects in highly skilled and relevant areas such as pharmaceuticals, agriculture, food and nutrition, homeland security, clinical diagnostics, veterinary and forensic science, environmental analysis, plus marketing and sales, to name a few.

Assessments that encourage transferrable skills essential for employment:

Including case studies, problem sheets, data processing and informatics exercises in addition to the traditional examinations and essay based assignments.

Modules

All MRes Applied Analytical Science (LCMS) students will complete the following taught modules:

Mass spectrometry – basics and fundamentals

Separation science and sample handling

Data analysis and method development

Professional management and laboratory practice

MRes students will also be expected to complete a 120 credit research thesis with a viva.

Professional Accreditation

Professional Development (PD) Portfolio

This will enable students to organise and highlight current competencies and training needs into a single document. This can be essential in documenting necessary requirements for continued professional development with a relevant professional body (i.e. Royal Society of Chemistry, RSC, CChem status).

A PD portfolio will typically contain:

- Educational training and experience

From external parties such as National Mass Spectrometry Facility (NMSF), industrial guest lecturers, and educational exercises recognised by the RSC.

- Practical/instrument training and experience

From external parties such as NMSf and instrument manufacturers.

- Research training and experience

MRes project - health and safety, project training, laboratory practice competency framework test and research

- Qualifications

Plus any affiliations and CV.

This will be an organised and detailed record of competencies for presenting to prospective employers with the potential to offer Swansea University (SU) PG students an edge in ensuring gainful relevant employment.

Accreditation.

An application to the Royal Society of Chemistry will be submitted after the first year of study.

Careers and Employability

Course content designed for the needs of industry

Fundamentals of mass spectrometry and separation science, professional management of laboratory practice, data analysis and method development.

Extensive training in a research-led Institute

Highly practical course and extensive in-house equipment

Experience more in-depth and ‘hands-on’ MRes than most Applied Analytical Science courses.

Taught modules encourage problem solving skills, involving relevant simulated (pre-existing) scenarios

Assessments that encourage transferrable skills essential for employment

Professional Development (PD) Portfolio

Participation of expert industrial guest lecturers

Unique networking opportunities with relevant potential employers for enhanced employability in areas such as:

- Pharmaceuticals

- Food and Nutrition

- Clinical diagnostics

- Forensics

- Environment

- Agriculture

- Homeland security

- Marketing and sales

- Veterinary

- Cosmology

- Geology

- Textile manufacture

- Archaeology

Facilities

Applied Analytical Science graduates will be extensively trained in a research-led institute. The highly practical nature of the course and extensive in-house equipment will enable students to experience a more in-depth and 'hands-on' MRes than most current analytical courses.

Instrumentation/techniques within IMS include:

Liquid chromatography/high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (LC/HRMS and LC/HRMSn)

Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MSn); low resolution MS.

Nano-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (nano-LC/MS)

Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS)

Liquid chromatography/ultraviolet spectrophotometry (LC/UV)

Liquid chromatography/diode array (LC/DAD)

Electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS)

Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS)

Electron ionisation-mass spectrometry (EI-MS)

Chemical ionisation-mass spectrometry (CI-MS)

Liquid secondary ion-mass spectrometry (LSI-MS i.e. ‘Fast Atom Bombardment’, FAB),

Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS)

We routinely carry out a number of sample preparation techniques including:

Solid phase extraction (SPE)

Liquid-liquid extraction (LLE)

Electrophoretic techniques

Affinity extraction

Ion-exchange

Precipitation



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At the beginning of the 21st century, novel technologies are allowing us to make exciting new discoveries and obtain detailed knowledge of how molecules, cells, tissues, and organisms operate. Read more
At the beginning of the 21st century, novel technologies are allowing us to make exciting new discoveries and obtain detailed knowledge of how molecules, cells, tissues, and organisms operate. Furthermore, these advances are changing the way in which we diagnose and treat human disease. In light of these developments, it is crucial that we educate today’s students about biology at the molecular level. Koç University’s Molecular Biology and Genetics Masters Program succeeds in providing broad and deep education in the biological sciences. The Molecular Biology and Genetics Masters Program offers advanced cell and molecular biology and genetics courses as well as electives in areas, such as cancer biology, neuroscience, and bioinformatics. Students in the Molecular Biology and Genetics program will engage in experimental research by working with faculty members in their cutting-edge research programs. The program will prepare students for careers in areas including: academia, pharmaceutical discovery and development, biotechnology, environmental sciences, food quality control, and forensics.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Bioinformatics
• Genomics
• Proteomics
• Cancer
• Mitochondrial Function and Ageing
• Neuroscience
• Cell division/Cell Cycle
• Molecular Biology of Human Diseases
• Circadian Rhythm
• Plant Biotechnology
• Stem Cell Biology

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This new MSc programme equips you with the ability to excavate and analyse human remains. Learn the practical skills needed to recover human remains in the field. Read more
This new MSc programme equips you with the ability to excavate and analyse human remains.

Learn the practical skills needed to recover human remains in the field. Gain the theoretical knowledge needed to reconstruct biological profiles from hard tissue, supported by laboratory based training.

You learn from a team of internationally respected academics with extensive professional experience. You have the opportunity to access one of the largest human skeletal collections in the UK, with extensive skeletal pathology and accompanying radiographs. The collection is curated by the Skeletal Biology Research Centre, in the School's Human Osteology Research Laboratory.

The programme is suited for students from a wide range of BA and BSc backgrounds. This MSc will provide a firm foundation for continued work, or PhD research, in anthropology, archaeology and related forensic fields.

For more information about this new MSc programme please contact the programme director Dr Chris Deter:

About the School of Anthropology and Conservation

With specialisation in forensics and paleopathology, osteology, evolutionary psychology and the evolutionary ecology and behaviour of great apes Kent is one of the largest institutions for biological anthropolgy. The School also houses the Skeletal Biology Research Centre (SBRC) which brings together innovative research, novel methodologies and international collaborations. Kent Osteological Research and Analysis (KORA) is an enterprise unit based within SBRC offers osteological analyses of human skeletal remains.

Kent has pioneered the social anthropological study of Europe, Latin America, Melanesia, and Central and Southeast Asia, the use of computers in anthropological research, and environmental anthropology in its widest sense (including ethnobiology and ethnobotany). We maintain an active research culture, with staff working in many different parts of the world.

Our regional expertise covers Europe, the Middle East, Central, Southeast and Southern Asia, Central and South America, Amazonia, Papua New Guinea, East Timor and Polynesia.

Careers

Higher degrees in forensic anthropology create opportunities in many employment sectors including academia, archaeology, police sector, the civil service and non-governmental organizations through work in areas such as human rights. A forensic anthropology degree also develops interpersonal and intercultural skills, which make our graduates highly desirable in any profession that involves working with people from diverse backgrounds and cultures.

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