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Masters Degrees (Environmental Ethics)

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The MSc in Environmental Management draws on expertise in the School of Geographical & Earth Sciences and the School of Interdisciplinary Studies at the University of Glasgow. Read more
The MSc in Environmental Management draws on expertise in the School of Geographical & Earth Sciences and the School of Interdisciplinary Studies at the University of Glasgow. Together they represent a leading centre of expertise in environmental teaching and research. They work on issues dealing with the natural and urban environment including policies and practices for environmental management.

Programme structure

The MSc in Environmental Management aims to produce graduates who
◾have a strong understanding of the environment and how it changes
◾have an awareness of economic and policy issues affecting the environment
◾are able to apply practical and technical solutions to assist in the management of the environment, environmental risk and environmental change.

You will develop a firm understanding of the environment – and how human and physical processes affect it.

You will be introduced to policies and practices for environmental management, as they are applied in a range of environments and at different scales. You will develop skills in processing and presenting environmental information to inform and enhance environmental management.

You will gain an enhanced appreciation of the importance of research and reflection as a route to successful environmental management.

Graduate attributes

This degree programme equips you for a wide range of opportunities by providing the knowledge and understanding to:
◾Critically assess the influence of physical processes and the impact of human decision making on the environment
◾Evaluate theories of environmental management
◾Discuss theories of climate change, how this will affect different environments
◾Compare and contrast environmental management policies in different regions and at different scales
◾Develop strategies for behavioural change to improve management of the environment
◾Explain the need to develop policies to manage the environment at different scales
◾Create plans to react to and manage environmental change
◾Explain how GIS and Remote Sensing contribute to the management of environmental data and can contribute to environmental management.

Courses

The programme is taken over 2 years of full-time study and is divided into 4 main components:

Part 1: Compulsory courses taught by University of Glasgow (Total 80 credits)
◾Principles of Geographic Information Systems for Environmental Management (20 credits)
◾Environmental Remote Sensing (20 credits)
◾Understanding Changing Environments (20 credits)
◾Environmental Ethics and Behaviour Change (20 credits)

Part 2: Compulsory courses taught by Nankai University (Total 50 credits)
◾Applied Mathematics (20 credits)
◾Environmental Economics (15 credits)
◾Environmental Management

Part 3: Optional courses taught by Nankai University (Total 30 credits)

At least 2 from:
◾Environmental Planning and Strategic Environmental Assessment (15 credits)
◾Cleaner Production (15 credits)
◾Municipal Ecology (15 credits)
◾Environmental Risk Assessment (15 credits)
◾Advancement in Environmental Impact Assessment Techniques (15 credits)

Part 4: Compulsory Research Experience and Skills
◾Social Science Research Methods (20 credits – taught by UofG)
◾Dissertation or Major Project on an approved topic in Environmental Management (60 credits – jointly supervised. 20 Glasgow / 40 Nankai)

Career prospects

Career opportunities include positions in international organisations, government ministries, academia and research institutions, non-governmental organisations; and further study at PhD level.

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Environmental problems are indisputably a part of the contemporary political landscape. Societies across the globe increasingly confront innumerable and often inter-related environmental challenges ranging from climate change and loss of biodiversity to local conflicts about land-use. Read more

Overview

Environmental problems are indisputably a part of the contemporary political landscape. Societies across the globe increasingly confront innumerable and often inter-related environmental challenges ranging from climate change and loss of biodiversity to local conflicts about land-use. Each of these challenges has political, economic, cultural and ethical dimensions; each provides an opportunity to rethink longstanding debates and opens up new fields of political enquiry.

SPIRE’s Masters in Environmental Politics has run since 1996 and is taught by some of the most prominent figures in the field. The course is designed for people who wish to understand and analyse the wide range of political and policy questions thrown up by increasingly complicated environmental problems. It has attracted students from all over the UK, the EU and the world. The international mix of students and staff adds greatly to the nature of discussion and learning.

Keele University has an unrivalled reputation for its work in Environmental Politics, with internationally recognised experts in various fields of social science environmental research particularly in the fields of sociology, political theory, economics, international relations, environmental ethics and public policy. Our interdisciplinary approach, together with a large and active research community on environmental issues within Keele, contributes to a thriving intellectual culture of which you can expect to be a part as an Environmental Politics student.

The course is taught over a 12 month period (September-September; January-January). It is available as a full-time and/or part-time mode of study. Students completing the course have gone on to a variety of careers in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/environmentalpolitics/

Course Aims

The aim of the MA/MRes in Environmental Politics is to provide you with an intensive period of study in which to learn about environmental politics and policy in a systematic and critical manner. It aims to provide you with a foundation in the theoretical and practical dimensions of this challenging, interdisciplinary field. In addition to your core modules for the MA/MRes, we recommend that you take our Dimensions of Environmental Politics module, which introduces five key fields of political inquiry in relation to the environment. It looks at: green political theory; the political sociology of the environment; the environment and public policy; environment and political economy; and international environmental politics. Your other chosen elective modules and your dissertation project give a broad scope in which to pursue specific environmental topics of your own choosing.

Course Content

Taught masters programmes require satisfactory completion of at least 180 credits, made up of 6 taught module (120 credits) plus a 15,000 word dissertation (60 credits). The MA and MRes programmes differ in that the MA programme contains more subject-specific modules and less research training, while the MRes programme contains more research training, in preparation for a research career or for undertaking a research degree such as a PhD.

MA
• Power, Knowledge and the World (30 credits)
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Research in Action (15 credits)
• Three (15 credits) optional modules chosen from the list below
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Public Policy (60 credits)

MRes
• Research Design and Process (20 credits)
• Two 15 credits optional modules chosen from the list below
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Quantitative Data Analysis I (20 credits)
• Qualitative Data Analysis (20 credits)
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Public Policy (60 credits)

Options
Optional modules can be drawn from modules such as those listed below, although the precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.

• Approaches to European Integration: History and Practice
• Comparative Public Management reform (recommended)
• Comparative European Politics
• Diplomatic Law
• Diplomatic Practice
• Dimensions of Environmental Politics (recommended)
• Environmental Diplomacy (recommended)
• Environmental Movements: North and South
• Environmental Politics and Policy in India and China (recommended)
• Parties and Democracy
• Right-Wing Radical Parties
• The Changing International Agenda
• The Politics of Global Security
• The Theory of Global Security
• US Environmental Politics and Policy
• US Foreign Policy (recommended)

Teaching & Assessment

Postgraduate teaching and learning generally takes place in a combination of large seminars and smaller discussion groups. Our academics typically lead the sessions, encouraging discussion between all students. Sometimes students will give presentations, either individually or in groups.

There is a strong emphasis on independent learning and students are expected to work on their own to produce their essays and dissertation. Most modules are assessed by a diverse range of coursework (e.g., essays, critiques, reports, presentations), though some modules may also be assessed by seminar contributions and/or written exams. Students take three modules in each semester. The taught modules are completed by May, leaving the summer months for students to write their dissertation.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Sweden, Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Influence cities of tomorrow. Now more than ever, more emphasis has been placed on the environmental management and planning of our cities. Read more

Influence cities of tomorrow

Now more than ever, more emphasis has been placed on the environmental management and planning of our cities. Graduates must acquire knowledge to solve problems and reshape the quality and performance of cities around the world.

Gain access to a wide range of career pathways in the natural and built environments with a Master of Sustainable Environments and Planning at Bond. Graduates will receive theoretical and practical skills to undertake environmental management, and urban and regional developments.

Intensive mode delivery

The Master of Sustainable Environments and Planning is delivered in intensive mode. Intensive mode delivery is a compact and time efficient way to complete a postgraduate qualification with minimal impact on professional and personal lifestyles. Each subject is delivered over two weekends during the semester. There are two sets of three-day sessions per subject, generally scheduled Thursday to Saturday (approximately six to eight contact hours per day) with a break of four or five weeks between session one and session two of each subject.

Participants will receive 40 hours of combined lectures, discussion groups, case studies and workshops during contact hours. International students are required to be on campus every week.

The program is also professionally recognised by some of Australia’s leading professional bodies. This allows graduates to differentiate themselves within the industry.

About the program

The Master of Sustainable Environments and Planning program focuses on Environmental Management as well as Urban Design & Planning. The Environmental Management component provides an in-depth examination of environmental management, including field work. The content is globally focused, providing qualifications that are in demand worldwide. Students may apply for a postgraduate industry internship in the final semester of the program. This includes the option of being involved in a client based environmental management capstone project or research dissertation. The Urban Design and Planning curriculum equips graduates with the theoretical and practical skills required to undertake the design, appraisal and management of urban and regional developments. With this qualification, professionals from a built environment background will be able to undertake urban planning and development at a professional level. 

Structure and subjects

View the Master of Sustainable Environments and Planning - Program Structure and Sequencing

The structure of the Master of Sustainable Environments and Planning comprises both theoretical and practical subjects. This program is designed in close consultation with prominent industry professional boards to ensure the integrity and contemporary relevance of the degree.

This program enables you to exit after four (4) subjects with a graduate certificate, after eight (8) subjects with a graduate diploma or complete 12 subjects for a master’s degree.

Graduate Certificate in Sustainable Environments and Planning (4)

You must complete four (4) of the following subjects:

Graduate Diploma in Sustainable Environments and Planning (8)

If you have obtained a cognate undergraduate degree and seek accreditation by the Planning Institute of Australia (PIA) you must complete the following eight (8) subjects:

If you are not seeking accreditation from PIA you may complete eight (8) subjects from the following:

Master of Sustainable Environments and Planning (12)

To complete a Master of Sustainable Environments and Planning, you must complete all of the following subjects:

Electives (2)

Students choose any two electives from the FSD list of postgraduate subjects.



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This online degree will allow you to develop the knowledge and skills to handle ethical issues as they arise in the workplace. It’s specially designed to help people in business, the public sector, the professions, the third sector and walks of life to explore different approaches to ethical problems. Read more

This online degree will allow you to develop the knowledge and skills to handle ethical issues as they arise in the workplace.

It’s specially designed to help people in business, the public sector, the professions, the third sector and walks of life to explore different approaches to ethical problems. You’ll look at the work of philosophers in applied ethics, but you’ll also look at real-life case studies to gain a real understanding of the role of ethics in the professional world. You’ll think about environmental issues, equality and diversity, privacy, consent and professional responsibility, guided by expert tutors at our Interdisciplinary Ethics Applied Centre.

If you want to study without putting your career on hold, this online degree will allow you to study in your own time, wherever you are in the world. You’ll be able to discuss issues with professionals from a variety of backgrounds to gain a real insight into the ethical dimensions of workplace situations.

Students come from a wide range of professional backgrounds, and you’ll discuss ideas and share expertise with people from around the world. Current and recent students have studied while working in demanding roles for organisations such as UN agencies, the UK Police Force and the Commonwealth Secretariat, or in law, actuarial professions, development, engineering, management, dentistry and more.

This programme is also available to study full-time, and you could also study for a PGDip qualification where you take fewer modules overall. If you don’t have a degree, we usually ask you to register for the PGDip programme – you can upgrade to the MA if you progress successfully.

If you’re still not sure about applying to study for the MA, you could consider studying a single Applied and Professional Ethics Module as a stand-alone short course.

Course content

In your first year you’ll be introduced to principles and approaches in the study of ethics, and look at key workplace issues such as professional responsibility. You’ll then build on your knowledge as you go through the rest of the core modules – you’ll look at issues such as confidentiality, consent, contracts and diversity. You’ll be able to swap one module for an independent project, usually related to your line of work.

Throughout the degree you’ll be deepening your knowledge, improving your skills and gaining a new perspective on ethical issues. You’ll showcase all of this in your dissertation, where you’ll independently research a topic of your choice. You’ll submit this before the end of the programme in September of your final year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Introduction to Ethics: Reasons, Motivation, Obligations and Happiness 15 credits
  • Professional Issues 1 15 credits
  • Agents and Professional Responsibility 15 credits
  • Dissertation (MA students) 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Professional Issues 2: Privacy and Confidentiality 15 credits
  • Professional Issues 3: Consent and Contracts 15 credits
  • Justice: Fairness, Equality and Diversity 15 credits
  • Global Environmental Ethics 15 credits
  • Business Ethics 15 credits
  • Professional Ethics Project

For more information on typical modules, read Applied and Professional Ethics MA in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

This degree is taught entirely online, so there are no lectures or seminars. You won’t even have to attend Leeds at any point during the course, although if you can travel there may be chances to meet other students. Instead, you’ll used specially designed interactive teaching materials and participate in structured collaborative activities. You’ll contribute to discussion groups in our Virtual Learning Environment, so you can share experiences and perspectives with students from different backgrounds worldwide.

Read more about Online Distance Learning

Assessment

Because you study online, you won’t have to take any exams during this programme. Instead, most of the time you will be assessed using essays and coursework assignments. You’ll receive support from our tutors and be able to discuss your work with them before you submit it. Group projects, presentations and regular contributions to discussion forums may also be used to assess your progress in some modules.

Career opportunities

Studying applied ethics will allow you to develop transferable skills in research, critical thinking and communication. It will also give you more confidence to handle situations with ethical implications in the workplace.

All of this is good preparation for a range of careers, while it could also benefit you in your current role. In particular, the programme gives you scope to develop your career in growing areas such as compliance and corporate social responsibility.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.




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This programme examines the social, political and cultural implications of environmental science and technology. You will learn to assess scientific and technological innovations as potential solutions to environmental issues. Read more
This programme examines the social, political and cultural implications of environmental science and technology. You will learn to assess scientific and technological innovations as potential solutions to environmental issues. It trains professionals, decision-makers and students in the social implications of environmental issues, particularly in relation to technologies as potential solutions. It focuses on responsible innovation.

Why this programme

-This programme addresses the wider social and political dimensions behind our scientific and technological choices concerning the environment, using a global approach.
-We provide interdisciplinary teaching, combining solutions from science and engineering with the sensitivities of sociology, history, ethics and politics.
-Our programme has an applied focus, and features a programme of guest speakers from relevant fields.
-The School of Interdisciplinary Studies is one of the UK’s foremost centres of expertise in interdisciplinary environmental teaching and research.
-Teaching is closely linked with the Solway Centre for Environment & Culture, a research centre providing opportunity for further research and collaboration.
-Dumfries & Galloway, in south west Scotland, is an excellent location for environmental study and research. The modern campus is ideally situated in proximity to a natural living laboratory, relevant non-governmental organisations, renewable energy companies and a range of partnership organisations.

Programme structure

You will take four core and two optional courses, and complete a dissertation. Teaching is through a combination of methods including lectures, seminars, case studies and a programme of guest speakers.

Core courses
-Environment, technology and society
-Environmental communication
-Environmental ethics and behavioural change
-Environmental politics and society

Optional courses
-Climate change: impacts on ecology
-Reading the environment: modern and contemporary nature writing
-Tourism, sustainability and climate change
-Writing the environment: old and new world romanticisms

Career prospects

As a graduate you will be able to pursue careers in technology assessment, environmental management and policy making and analysis with government agencies, environmental consultancies, and private companies. The degree also aims to empower active citizens by providing the skills and understandings to underpin successful environmental campaigns. The degree is also an excellent first step toward a PhD in topics related to the wider implications of our environmental and societal choices.

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This programme highlights the social, political and cultural implications of environmental science and technology. You will learn to assess scientific and technological innovations as potential solutions to environmental issues. Read more

This programme highlights the social, political and cultural implications of environmental science and technology. You will learn to assess scientific and technological innovations as potential solutions to environmental issues. It trains professionals, decision-makers and students in the social implications of environmental issues, particularly in relation to technologies as potential solutions. It focuses on responsible innovation.

Why this programme

  • This programme addresses the wider social and political dimensions behind our scientific and technological choices concerning the environment, using a global approach.
  • We provide interdisciplinary teaching, combining solutions from science and engineering with the sensitivities of sociology, history, ethics and politics.
  • This is the first UK degree addressing the wider social and political dimensions behind our scientific and technological choices for the environment. The School of Interdisciplinary Studies is one of the UK’s foremost centres of expertise in interdisciplinary environmental teaching and research.
  • The programme provides you with the tools to understand how the environment is appreciated by humanity. You will analyse how our technological choices can positively influence approaches to the problem of climate change. 
  • Our programme has an applied focus, and features a series of guest speakers from relevant fields.

Programme structure

You will take four core and two optional courses, and complete a dissertation. Teaching is through a combination of methods including lectures, seminars, case studies and a programme of guest speakers.

Core courses

  • Environment, technology and society
  • Environmental communication
  • Environmental ethics and behavioural change
  • Environmental politics and society.

Optional courses may include

  • Advanced research methods
  • Climate change: impacts on ecology
  • Critical perspectives on knowledge and power
  • Critical thinking and communication
  • Reading the environment: modern and contemporary nature writing
  • Tourism, sustainability and climate change
  • Writing the environment: old and new world romanticisms.

Career prospects

As a graduate you will be able to pursue careers in technology assessment, environmental management and policy making and analysis with government agencies, environmental consultancies, and private companies. The degree also aims to empower active citizens by providing the skills and understanding to underpin successful environmental campaigns. It is also an excellent first step toward a PhD in topics related to the wider implications of our environmental and societal choices.



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This programme gives you a solid grounding in issues key to the sustainable development debate. The views of stakeholders such as business groups, environmentalists, government agencies and development institutions will be considered. Read more

This programme gives you a solid grounding in issues key to the sustainable development debate. The views of stakeholders such as business groups, environmentalists, government agencies and development institutions will be considered.

You will acquire the necessary skills to evaluate existing frameworks, inquire into environmental issues in organisations and industries, and develop sensitive business practices.

The programme provides excellent preparation for any corporate-focused environmental career. It provides a route to graduate membership of the Institute of Environmental Management & Assessment. We encourage you to read about the past and present student experiences of our environment and sustainability programmes.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over 12 months and part-time for up to 60 months. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

  • Provide participants with a solid grounding in the sustainable development debate from the wide-range of perspectives, i.e. business groups, environmentalists, government agencies, development institutions, etc.
  • Equip participants to evaluate existing political, socio-economic, ethical, cultural and regulatory frameworks to inform decisions regarding environmental practice
  • Equip participants to develop a sensitive business practice towards environmental and social issues
  • To equip students with the necessary skills for critical inquiry related to environmental issues in organisations and industries

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • Intra and inter-organisational contexts in which corporate environmental strategies are developed
  • Concepts of sustainable development and their usefulness to business ethics
  • Evolving regulatory and policy framework as part of engendering an anticipatory view of environmental management
  • Knowledge of a range of corporate environmental management strategies and control mechanisms
  • Accessing and using environmental data

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Absorb complex environmental information and communicate them effectively through logically constructed argumentsCreatively formulate new ideas (MSc, PGDip and PGCert)
  • Learn the value of teamwork to solve problems that require multi-disciplinary engagement
  • Independent learning and study through self-directed assignments and dissertation
  • Critical reading and analysis of environmental policy and regulation
  • Inductive reasoning: using specific examples/observations and forming a more general principal
  • Deductive reasoning: use stated general premise to reason about specific examples

Professional practical skills

  • Comprehend how corporations build, implement and maintain an Environmental Management System (EMS)
  • To perform an EMS Audit according to the ISO standards
  • Give coherent presentations
  • Lead discussions on complex subject areas
  • See the other side of the argument given that there are varying and often conflicting perspectives in the environment field
  • Competently handle environment information
  • Self-motivation, self-regulation and self-assurance

Key / transferable skills

  • Acquire knowledge and skills to prepare and deliver a structured and successful presentation
  • Write effectively as a means of communicating important ideas
  • Communication of findings and presentation of research to a non-specialist audience
  • Lead discussion of small/large groups
  • Organise and manage a research project
  • Basic to advanced IT skills, depending on type of electives and dissertation topic
  • Willingness to learn

Academics

Several high-profile guest lecturers have assisted with the delivery of some of the modules. CES modules make maximum use of guest lecturers, drawing on the practical skills and experience of key experts from government and industry to complement the theoretical components of the modules offered.

For example, Jonathon Porritt, former chairman of the Sustainable Development Commission, gives a guest lecture on the Sustainable Development Applications module, analysing the standing of sustainable development in business and policy making.

The extensive expertise of CES academics and researchers is also drawn upon in modules. Professor Tim Jackson, advisor to the government and international bodies and author of the seminal book, Prosperity without Growth – economics for a finite planet–also lectures on some CES modules.

Industrial placement

Full-time students are able to undertake an industrial placement module which enables them to spend six to twelve weeks working for a company or NGO, doing the type of work they will aim to find on graduation.

Examples of organisations at which recent industrial placements have taken place include:

  • Minimise Solutions
  • Portsmouth City Council
  • GAP
  • Diocese of London
  • The Radisson
  • LC Energy
  • AECOM
  • Solar Aid
  • NUS

Careers

Graduates go on to a diverse range of careers implementing sustainable development and dealing with the real environmental challenges facing humanity.

Recent examples include working as an energy efficiency officer for a local government, an environmental officer in multi-national chemical company, a sustainability advisor for a national television / radio station, an environmental consultant for an engineering consultancy, and a programme officer with a sustainability charity.

Other graduates use the research skills they developed to go on and do PhDs.

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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This course addresses fundamental questions in philosophy of religion and ethics and will be taught entirely online. Drawing on the School’s outstanding research in philosophy of religion and ethics (PRE), you’ll use a variety of online learning resources to explore key issues in the field of PRE. Read more

This course addresses fundamental questions in philosophy of religion and ethics and will be taught entirely online.

Drawing on the School’s outstanding research in philosophy of religion and ethics (PRE), you’ll use a variety of online learning resources to explore key issues in the field of PRE. You’ll have the opportunity to consider themes such as: concepts of God; the nature of justice; religious experience; ethics of the environment; the religious and spiritual significance of the arts and our relationship to the natural world.

This programme is designed to be accessible to students from a variety of backgrounds. It will be of interest to students with a personal interest in philosophical and religious questions, and also to teachers who wish to deepen their knowledge of philosophy and religious studies for professional development purposes.

You can also study this programme for a PGDip or PGCert qualification. You’ll study the same content as the MA programme, but take fewer modules overall.

Course content

There are two modules in the philosophy of religion strand of the course: a module examining concepts of God, and a module examining religious and spiritual practice, and its significance for our understanding of the nature of a good human life. You choose one of these modules if studying the PGCert, and can take both modules if studying the Diploma or MA.

You also take a core module in ethical theory, and choose from optional modules on a range of ethical themes, such as life and death, the environment, and the nature of justice.

The dissertation enables you to investigate a topic of your choice at length with the support of a supervisor, and to apply the knowledge and skills in independent research that you have developed in the course. As an MA student, you have the option of taking fewer optional modules and writing an extended dissertation instead.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

For the MA, PGDip and PGCert, you take Introduction to Ethics and at least one philosophy of religion module, plus at least one optional module. MA students take a standard or an extended dissertation. PGDip students have the option of taking a standard dissertation.

  • Introduction to Ethics: Reasons, Motivation, Obligations and Happiness 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Philosophy and Spiritual Practice 30 credits
  • Concepts of God 30 credits
  • Justice: Fairness, Equality and Diversity 15 credits
  • Global Environmental Ethics 15 credits
  • Business Ethics 15 credits
  • Current Developments in Health Care Ethics 30 credits
  • Ethical Issues at the Beginning of Life 15 credits
  • Ethical Issues at the End of Life 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Philosophy of Religion and Ethics MA in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

This course is taught entirely online, so you can fit your studies around your social and professional life. You’ll be able to access a wide range of teaching and learning resources through our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) and use the University Library’s online resources for your own independent research. You’ll also be able to discuss issues arising from your studies with other students through our forums.

Assessment

For most modules, you keep a weekly log, in which you reflect on the study exercises for the week. In addition, you make regular contributions to discussion forums, and write one or more essays. The discussion forum contributions and essays determine the final module mark.

Career opportunities

The MA Philosophy of Religion and Ethics will be of interest to teachers of Philosophy and Religious Studies for professional development purposes. The course can also provide a route into a research degree in the fields of philosophy of religion and ethics. Equally, the important skills of argumentation and clear expression that are developed in the programme will be valuable in a wide range of work settings.



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This programme is perfect training for those concerned with the management of natural resources or the implementation of environmental policy at local and international level, in communities, or in corporate and government organisations. Read more
This programme is perfect training for those concerned with the management of natural resources or the implementation of environmental policy at local and international level, in communities, or in corporate and government organisations. You will gain an understanding of the principal environmental policy issues confronting managers in diverse geographical and culture situations, and an awareness of the ethical and moral issues involved the use of natural resources. You will also benefit from both an academic award and professional recognition from partaking in one study programme.

This course takes a multidisciplinary approach to current issues of global environmental concern. It is relevant to those who are concerned with the management of resources and the making and implementation of policies that have an environmental impact at local, national and international levels.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/programmes/environmental/msc/

Structure

For the MSc in Environmental Management students will take:

- 4 core modules
- 3 elective modules*
- 2 research modules

* including one free choice from across all programmes (subject to approval on the Programme Convenor)

Core Modules:

- Introduction to Environmental Economics & Policy
- Environmental Science & Management
- Environmental Assessment
- Environmental Auditing and Environmental Management Systems

Elective Modules:

- Energy and Development
- Environmental Valuation: Theory, Techniques and Application
- Climate Change and Development
- Water Resources Management
- NGO Management
- Sustainable Land Management
- International Environmental Law
- Ethics for Environment and Development
- One module selected from another programme, with the approval of the Programme Convenor

Research Modules:

- Research Methods
- Dissertation

Teaching & Learning

1. Academic level

All CeDEP programmes are taught to Master’s (Second Cycle) level, which involves building upon existing knowledge and understanding typically associated with the Bachelor’s (First Cycle) level or its equivalent. Study at Master’s level requires:

- originality in developing and/or applying ideas, and extending or enhancing previous learning

- application of knowledge and understanding, including problem solving in new or unfamiliar environments within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts

- integration of knowledge and handling of complexity

- formulating judgements with incomplete or limited information, including reflection on social and ethical responsibilities

- clear and unambiguous communication of conclusions, and the knowledge and rationale underpinning these, to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- learning skills to study in a manner that may be largely self-directed or autonomous

Prospective students should note that distance education of this kind demands a high degree of commitment, determination and self-discipline. Whilst CeDEP provides significant support through the tutorial system and by other means, students taking on programmes of this nature should possess a strong measure of self-reliance.

2. Study Expectations

- How long will it take?
For students in full time employment, the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma, usually take three or four years to complete and the Certificate 2 years.

- When can I study?
You can begin your studies in either February or June. The examinations for all students are in October. The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June.

- How many hours a week?
For the 30 week study period starting in February, you will need to allocate 5–6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15 week session, 10–12 hours per module, per week is recommended.

- How many modules can I take per study year?
We strongly recommend that students should take only one or two modules in their first year, so that they can adjust to studying at a distance, whilst combining this with work and family life.

Students wishing to complete an MSc in two years they will need to enrol/pay for four core modules and both Research Methods and the Dissertation in the first year although the Dissertation is written and submitted in the second year. Please contact your programme convenor by email.

3. Assessment

- How you will be assessed
For each module you will sit a two-hour unseen examination held on a specific date in October, worth 80% of your total module mark. There is also an Examined Assignment (worth 20% of the total module mark) which is submitted during the study year and marked by your tutor.

- Examination arrangements
Examinations are held in students’ countries of residence, using the University of London’s network of approved Overseas Examination Authorities. Fees for taking examinations at all examination centres other than London are the responsibility of the student.
Assignments are submitted to CeDEP electronically via the online learning environment.

- Assessment of the Research Component
The Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541) are not assessed through final written examinations. These two modules constitute the Research Component of an MSc and are assessed entirely by submitted coursework.

4. Research Component

In order to qualify for an MSc, it is mandatory for CeDEP students to pass the Research Component.

The Research Component comprises two of the nine modules necessary for completion of an MSc. These are a Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541). The modules are assessed as follows:

- P506 through two examined assignments submitted during the study year
- P541 through a 10,000 word dissertation

The Research Component is studied over two consecutive years. The Research Methods module (P506) must be studied and successfully passed before the Dissertation module (P541). This is because it provides skills and techniques which will assist with the subsequent development and conduct of your research and preparation of your dissertation. Students are required to enrol and pay for P506 and P541 at the same time.

The dissertation is usually carried out during the final year of registration with CeDEP. Students conduct desk- or field-based research in a relevant topic of their choice. All research topics are subject to approval and each student is assigned a personal supervisor. Background reading and preparation of the proposal take place between the October exams and commencement of the final study year in February.

Career prospects for graduates

Graduates of this programme typically apply skills in natural resource management, environmental appraisal, environmental auditing and analysis and policy design to the work of:

- government ministries and related agencies, performing environmental planning and/or policy analysis work

- private companies and consultancies preparing environmental assessments, evaluations and policy advice

- corporations implementing programmes to meet goals of social and environmental responsibility

- research and educational institutions involved in environmental management and sustainable development

- international and non-governmental organisations concerned with economic development and environmental change

- charitable trusts and organisations carrying out conservation and educational field work

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/applying/

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The only programme of its kind in the world, GCU's MSc Climate Justice explores one of the most pressing issues of our times. climate justice, where climate change, human rights and policy development intersect. Read more

The only programme of its kind in the world, GCU's MSc Climate Justice explores one of the most pressing issues of our times: climate justice, where climate change, human rights and policy development intersect.

Each year, the effects of climate change become more pronounced. People all over the world are already being displaced due to rising sea levels, crop-destroying droughts and disasters like floods and forest fires. Over the next decade, these climate consequences will only intensify. How we chose to move forward may be one of the most important ethical questions of the 21st century.

Your MSc Climate Justice programme will prepare you to think strategically and contribute to the growing field of climate justice. You might help craft public policy at a local or global level, work with a non-profit or intergovernmental agency, assist a developmental organisation or pursue academic research in the field.

Taking a practical, multi-disciplinary approach, the curriculum offers a solid foundation in the complex issues of climate justice.

  • Explore topics in resources and sustainability
  • Learn about carbon management and renewable energy technologies
  • Study how water access affects public health
  • Investigate gender issues and their implications for human rights
  • Master the basics of project management and environmental management

GCU's Centre for Climate Justice is taking the lead, collaborating to drive research and policy in the field. At GCU, the University for the Common Good, you'll join a community dedicated to achieving meaningful social change. You'll find friends, classmates, colleagues and professors who share your values in the fight for human rights.

As we come to this crossroads, we believe in working together to transform our society and strengthen our communities - for the common good.

What you will study

The MSc Climate Justice explores the principles that underpin climate justice; human rights, development and climate change. The programme is tailored to provide a practical angle to climate justice to allow students to graduate with a Masters which provides them with skills, approaches and methodologies for addressing climate justice in their future work plans. It can be studied full-time for one year or part-time over two years.

Resources and Sustainability

This module provides an overview of our resources (water, air, forests, soil, raw materials, energy, etc) and how to critically analyse how and why these resources are exploited on a global scale. This module will focus on both the natural and social and economic sciences to provide a holistic understanding of sustainable resource use and management.

Climate Change and Carbon Management

Develops a student's understanding and knowledge of global climate change issues and the role of built environment in it, and an ability to conduct practical investigation of carbon management in the context of the built environment.

Climate Justice

Provides an overview of key issues that underpin climate justice (injustice) and the history of the climate justice movement and critique thereof Climate injustice and human rights to life are explored via addressing equity and equality including the implications, complexities and trade-offs between climate change and poverty. Controversial issues are examined by exploring challenging current economic models and theories and analysing failures(Kyoto, CDM and MDGs).

Human Rights, Gender and Development

This module critically examines the variety of ways in which a rights based approach seeks to engage with the impact of climate change. It does so by considering climate change within broader debates surrounding human rights and the structured nature of vulnerability in relation to gender and development.

Environmental Ethics and Climate Change

Critically examines the ethics of climate change. Rather than taking the concept of climate justice as its starting point, however, the focus is on locating the phenomena of climate change within the wider debates and schools of thought that are prevalent in the field of environmental ethics.

Climate Change, Adaptation and Mitigation

Develops a student's understanding and knowledge of global climate change issues and the ways that differing political cultures can impact adaptation and mitigation measures. In addition, sectoral responses to climate change will be explored and country/regional mitigation strategies will be considered, using climate modelling to investigate how decisions regarding adaptation and mitigation emerge.

Water, Justice and Public Health

Develops a student's understanding and knowledge of the important links between water and public health and explores the water/food/energy nexus that prevents developing world countries from making the most of economic development opportunities. It discusses whether developed world solutions are appropriate or even desirable for implementation in the developing world.

Renewable Energy Technologies

The module concentrates on therenewable energy technologies most likely to succeed in the UK and other temperate countries, i.e. solar energy, energy from waste, wind, hydro and biomass. Renewable energy is regarded as an integral part of a sustainable development strategy and is intimately linked to safe water access and agriculture based economic development.

Master's Dissertation/Project

Provides the student with the opportunity to conduct an individual in-depth piece of research, into a topic of their own choosing. This includes elements of time management, achieving deadlines and outputs and different ways of presenting work.

Assessment methods

Students will be assessed via a combination of coursework, oral presentations, on-line discussions, computer based exercises, case study analysis, reports and a final dissertation.

Graduate prospects

Graduates of the MSc Climate Justice will find rewarding careers with development organisations, the UN and related organisations, government agencies and non-profit organisations - as well as within academic and research institutions.



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Environmental issues at local, national and global levels are among the foremost challenges facing society today, and the result of complex interactions of natural processes with economic forces and policies. Read more
Environmental issues at local, national and global levels are among the foremost challenges facing society today, and the result of complex interactions of natural processes with economic forces and policies. It is widely recognised that most environmental problems, whether small-scale or global, are the result of a complex interaction of natural processes with economic forces and decisions. This programme provides graduates with a sound theoretical base and practical appreciation of the concepts and methods of environmental and natural resource economics relevant to policy decisions and research. It is designed to suit students with a primary interest in issues and policies concerning the rural environment.

Visit the website https://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/programmes/appenveco/msc/

Structure

For the MSc in Environmental Economics students will take:

- 4 core modules
- 3 elective modules*
- 2 research modules

* including one free choice from across all programmes (subject to approval on the Programme Convenor)

Core Modules:

- Economic Principles [this module must be taken in the first year]
- Economics of Environmental Policy
- Environmental Valuation: Theory, Techniques and Application
- Natural Resource Economics

Elective Modules:

- Applied Econometrics
- Climate Change and Development
- Project Planning and Management
- Environmental Science and Management
- Environmental Assessment
- Environmental Auditing and Environmental Management Systems
- International Environmental Law
- Ethics for Environment and Development
- either Water Resources Management or Sustainable Land Management or Biodiversity, Conservation and Development or Energy and Development
- One module selected from another programme, with the approval of the Programme Convenor

Research Modules:

- Research Methods
- Dissertation

Strengthening quantitative skills:
Some modules in this programme make use of applied mathematics, including use of calculus. If your basic quantitative analysis skills are weak, it is recommended that you should also study the non-examined module: Quantitative Methods (CF04), at or near the start of your studies. Study materials for this module are available to registered students only, and are obtainable through the online learning environment, Moodle, in the Study Skills section.

Teaching & Learning

1. Academic level

All CeDEP programmes are taught to Master’s (Second Cycle) level, which involves building upon existing knowledge and understanding typically associated with the Bachelor’s (First Cycle) level or its equivalent. Study at Master’s level requires:

- originality in developing and/or applying ideas, and extending or enhancing previous learning

- application of knowledge and understanding, including problem solving in new or unfamiliar environments within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts

- integration of knowledge and handling of complexity

- formulating judgements with incomplete or limited information, including reflection on social and ethical responsibilities

- clear and unambiguous communication of conclusions, and the knowledge and rationale underpinning these, to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- learning skills to study in a manner that may be largely self-directed or autonomous

Prospective students should note that distance education of this kind demands a high degree of commitment, determination and self-discipline. Whilst CeDEP provides significant support through the tutorial system and by other means, students taking on programmes of this nature should possess a strong measure of self-reliance.

2. Study Expectations

- How long will it take?
For students in full time employment, the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma, usually take three or four years to complete and the Certificate 2 years.

- When can I study?
You can begin your studies in either February or June. The examinations for all students are in October. The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June.

- How many hours a week?
For the 30 week study period starting in February, you will need to allocate 5–6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15 week session, 10–12 hours per module, per week is recommended.

- How many modules can I take per study year?
We strongly recommend that students should take only one or two modules in their first year, so that they can adjust to studying at a distance, whilst combining this with work and family life.

Students wishing to complete an MSc in two years they will need to enrol/pay for four core modules and both Research Methods and the Dissertation in the first year although the Dissertation is written and submitted in the second year. Please contact your programme convenor by email.

3. Assessment

- How you will be assessed
For each module you will sit a two-hour unseen examination held on a specific date in October, worth 80% of your total module mark. There is also an Examined Assignment (worth 20% of the total module mark) which is submitted during the study year and marked by your tutor.

- Examination arrangements
Examinations are held in students’ countries of residence, using the University of London’s network of approved Overseas Examination Authorities. Fees for taking examinations at all examination centres other than London are the responsibility of the student.

Assignments are submitted to CeDEP electronically via the online learning environment.

- Assessment of the Research Component
The Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541) are not assessed through final written examinations. These two modules constitute the Research Component of an MSc and are assessed entirely by submitted coursework.

4. Research Component

In order to qualify for an MSc, it is mandatory for CeDEP students to pass the Research Component.

The Research Component comprises two of the nine modules necessary for completion of an MSc. These are a Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541). The modules are assessed as follows:

- P506 through two examined assignments submitted during the study year
- P541 through a 10,000 word dissertation

The Research Component is studied over two consecutive years. The Research Methods module (P506) must be studied and successfully passed before the Dissertation module (P541). This is because it provides skills and techniques which will assist with the subsequent development and conduct of your research and preparation of your dissertation. Students are required to enrol and pay for P506 and P541 at the same time.

The dissertation is usually carried out during the final year of registration with CeDEP. Students conduct desk- or field-based research in a relevant topic of their choice. All research topics are subject to approval and each student is assigned a personal supervisor. Background reading and preparation of the proposal take place between the October exams and commencement of the final study year in February.

Scholarships

For further details and information on external scholarships visit the Scholarships section (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/)

Career prospects for graduates

Graduates of this programme will typically find work as environmental economists and advisers in the following fields:

- government ministries undertaking environmental planning and policy analysis work

- public and private sector companies conducting analyses of the environmental effects of economic activity

- international and non-governmental organisations concerned with the environmental implications of economic change and the economic implications of global environmental change

- consultancy work within the broad arena of environmental economics and policy

- applied research and teaching in institutions of research and higher education

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/applying/

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This programme explores the relationships we hold with our ‘wild’ environments, and how these evolved. You will develop a knowledge of environmental debates from both cultural and scientific perspectives, and learn to communicate environmental issues using a variety of tools and strategies. Read more
This programme explores the relationships we hold with our ‘wild’ environments, and how these evolved. You will develop a knowledge of environmental debates from both cultural and scientific perspectives, and learn to communicate environmental issues using a variety of tools and strategies. It is suitable for students with or without a specialism in literary or environmental studies.

Why this programme

◾This programme focuses on the emerging subject area related to ecocriticism and green studies in order to better understand environmental issues from multiple perspectives.
◾Teaching is closely linked with the Solway Centre for Environment & Culture, a research centre providing opportunity for further research and collaboration.
◾The School of Interdisciplinary Studies is one of the UK’s foremost pockets of expertise in interdisciplinary environmental teaching and research.
◾The programme connects its activities to the wider environment in applied ways through fieldtrips, including the Galloway and Southern Ayrshire Biosphere Reserve, the Galloway Forest Dark Sky Park, the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park, and the Lake District National Park. Dumfries & Galloway is also home to the world-class Crawick Multiverse, designed by the internationally renowned land artist Charles Jencks.
◾Dumfries & Galloway, in south west Scotland, is an ideal location for environmental study and research. The unspoilt beaches, hills and forests provide a stunning and diverse outdoor classroom, while the region’s thriving artistic community, which specialises in environmental art, is a great source of inspiration.
◾The degree features a programme of guest speakers from relevant fields and publications.

Programme structure

You will take three core and three optional courses. There is a choice of project work: you can choose to engage with a particular contemporary environmental issue or case study, or to undertake a personal interaction with the features of a particular location, examining notions of place creatively. You will also undertake a dissertation, through which you can develop and demonstrate independent research skills or a work placement where you will undertake research in a relevant organisation or company.

Core courses
◾Environmental communication*
◾Environmental politics and society*
◾Reading the environment: old and new world romanticisms
◾Writing the environment: modern and contemporary nature writing.

*You must take at least one of these courses.

Optional courses
◾Climate change: impacts on ecology
◾Environment, technology and society
◾Environmental ethics and behavioural change
◾Tourism, sustainability and climate change.

Career prospects

Graduates are prepared to enter fields from environmental journalism and education, to public relations, advertising and consultancy roles. The interdisciplinary nature of the programme means your skills are also tailored towards emerging fields such as negotiating between scientific fact and cultural understanding of climate change, and the ‘anticipatory history’ that must inform landscape management in the future. Graduates have gone on to work for environmental NGOs, ecological arts organisations, and undertaken further study at PhD level.

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Deepen your understanding of the environmental issues facing New Zealand and the world. Examine subjects like climate change, the sustainability of our cities, loss of biodiversity, water quality and consumerism. Read more

Deepen your understanding of the environmental issues facing New Zealand and the world. Examine subjects like climate change, the sustainability of our cities, loss of biodiversity, water quality and consumerism.

Learn how environmental problems can be addressed through better policy, planning, design and communication. Discover how human behaviour can be influenced by these things and the role that politics plays in environmental concerns. You'll graduate with a good understanding of how you can create change.

Study alongside students from around the world and find out how environmental issues are tackled in different countries and the different problems they face.

Learn from the experts

Learn from highly regarded academics who are experts in their fields. You'll also hear from guest lecturers who are experienced professionals in environmental planning, economics, policy, law, politics, ethics and indigenous development.

Across disciplines

Environmental Studies connects with Geography and Development Studies as well as Public Policy, Law and Management. You can study the subject at postgraduate level from a science, commerce or arts background. Because you'll study with students from a variety of disciplines and professions, you'll broaden your own understanding through their different viewpoints and experiences.

The right connections

Make connections with the organisations that make the policy, do the research and create the spaces we live in. In the capital city you can take advantage of Victoria's relationships with the central government policy world and major research institutes like the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research and the New Zealand Climate Change Research Institute.

Flexible study

You can choose to complete a one-year Postgraduate Diploma or a two-year Master's that will include a thesis. Both programmes offer you the flexibility to choose the courses that best suit your interests and career goals.

If you are interested in creating a better environment and have a Bachelor's degree with a B+ average in a relevant subject (or B for the PGDip), then postgraduate Environmental Studies is ideal for you. If you don't have a degree but have significant relevant experience, you may also be able to enrol in one of the programmes.

Available qualifications

  • Master of Environmental Studies
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Environmental Studies

Choose the qualification that suits your career goals, time constraints and financial situation. If you begin by enrolling in the Diploma programme you may be able to continue on to complete your Master's. Or if you enrol in the Master's but only complete the first year (Part 1), for whatever reason, you can be awarded the Diploma.

What you'll study

The PGDip is the same as the first year, or Part 1, of the Master's.

Core courses

Both qualifications include the 15-point core courses Environmental Management, and Research Methods. You'll get an overview of the current issues decision-makers face in managing the environment and look at case studies ranging from water management to urban design.

Research Methods will prepare you for thesis research and you'll study research design, data collection and analysis and how to communicate research findings.

Elective courses

You'll select the remaining 90 points from a wide range of approved 400- and 500-level courses from several different disciplines. You'll complete around seven of these and can tailor your choices to match your areas of interest and career direction.

You might focus on environmental law or economics, Māori resource management, climate change, political ecology or the psychology of behaviour change.

Master's thesis and practicum

If you are doing the Master's, you'll go on to a second year (Part 2) and complete a research thesis. You can choose to do the 35,000-word option, or complete a 25,000-word thesis and do a 30-point practicum. The practicum is a supervised work placement at an organisation that specialises in environmental or resource management.

You'll need an average grade of B+ across your courses in Part 1, for entry into Part 2 of the Master's programme.

Research topics

The Environment Studies programme encourages an active culture of research. Find out what potential projects you might work on.

Workload and duration

If you are studying full time you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

The Postgraduate Diploma (PGDipEnvStud) can be completed in one year full time or usually two years part time. The Master’s (MEnvStud) will take you up to two and half years of full-time study or can be completed over up to five years if you are part time.

Careers

You'll graduate able to contribute to environmental practice in New Zealand or anywhere in the world. The skills you'll develop are relevant to many careers, including environmental policy, planning and management.

Many students have gone on to work in places like the Ministry for the Environment, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade and regional or city councils. You might join a non-governmental organisation (NGO), a corporation, an iwi organisation or become an environmental business consultant or social entrepreneur.



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Research profile. Read more

Research profile

The research interests of academic staff and graduate students in Ethics and Practical Theology encompass a range of theoretical and practical approaches to ethics, religion and theology, including environmental ethics, peace-building and reconciliation, ethical theory, and pastoral and practical theology.

You can find out more and identify a potential supervisor by looking at the School of Divinity’s * Staff Profiles, which give details of research interests and publications, and email addresses.

You are encouraged to contact a potential supervisor to discuss your research project before making a formal application. In the Ethics and Practical Theology research area, projects are often interdisciplinary. If this is the case, you may be jointly supervised with a subject specialist from another School in the University.

At the School of Divinity you will join a community of around 150 research students, drawn from around the world, and from a variety of religious and non-religious backgrounds.

You will study in a stimulating environment. The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranked the School’s research environment at 100% world-leading / internationally excellent, second in the UK on this front in theology and religion. This outstanding result reflects the vibrancy of the School’s research culture.

Training and support

The ethos of the Graduate School is to promote excellence in postgraduate study, within a stimulating and supportive environment. We value equality and diversity in the School community, and an academic culture that is both critical and constructive.

  • At the start of the academic year, you will be invited to Welcome Week, an intensive introduction to study and life in Edinburgh. Some events are especially for international students new to Scotland and the UK, but everything is open to all.
  • In the first weeks, the School provides a general orientation to research skills and to wider opportunities for training and support.
  • From your first days as a PhD or MPhil student, you will work 1:1 with your primary research supervisor.
  • Your progress will be tracked, through regular supervisions and milestone reviews, to ensure that you get the support you need to bring your project to fruition.
  • You will be part of the research seminar in Theology and Ethics, to which visiting speakers are invited and to which postgraduates present work-in-progress.
  • You can also engage with the work of the * Centre for Theology and Public Issues.
  • You will be able to follow taught courses that contribute to your interests and research needs, and can also take advantage of opportunities to learn ancient and modern languages.
  • If you are a PhD student, after successful completion of your first year, you will be eligible to apply for tutoring opportunities, to gain teaching experience.

A University review (2015) commended the Graduate School for providing excellent support: responsive to student feedback; proactive in helping new postgraduates to adjust to their studies and to life in Scotland; enthusiastic and practical in promoting career development. The postgraduate student committee works closely with the School to make the research student experience the best it can be.

Facilities

The School of Divinity, one of the largest centres for the study of religion in the United Kingdom, is located in the historic setting of New College, close to Edinburgh Castle and overlooking Princes Street.

Resources for research are excellent. You can draw on the outstanding holdings of New College Library, the University of Edinburgh’s main library, and the nearby National Library of Scotland. New College Library has one of the largest theology collections in the UK, with more than a quarter of a million items and a large and rich manuscript collection. The University library exceeds 2.25 million volumes. The National Library of Scotland – a ‘legal deposit’ library like the British Library in London and the university libraries of Oxford and Cambridge – is just around the corner.

The School provides an extensive programme of weekly research seminars and special guest lectures. In addition, three research centres provide a special focus for activity: the Centre for the Study of Christian Origins; the Centre for Theology and Public Issues; the Centre for the Study ofWorld Christianity.

You will have access to excellent study facilities, dedicated to postgraduates. PhD and MPhil students have access 24/7, and can request an allocated desk. Masters by Research students have shared study space. All areas have printing/scanning and computer facilities. The main postgraduate study wing has a kitchen. New College has an on-site cafe that is open during term time.

Research opportunities

If you have academic training in theology or religious studies (or another relevant subject), and would like to develop your interest with a focus on a particular area, the Masters by Research may interest you. This programme can be taken either as a ‘Master of Theology by Research’ or as a ‘Master of Science by Research’ – the difference is only in the name. You can study full-time (one year) or part-time (two years). Your pattern of study can either be three supervised research essays followed by a 15,000 word dissertation, or a 30,000 word dissertation. Most students take the ‘research essays + shorter dissertation’ path. All students receive research training.



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The role of the corporate environmental manager is becoming increasingly complex and strategic. Corporate social and environmental responsibility is becoming prominent in consumer demand and a pre-requisite for tender eligibility. Read more
The role of the corporate environmental manager is becoming increasingly complex and strategic. Corporate social and environmental responsibility is becoming prominent in consumer demand and a pre-requisite for tender eligibility. This necessitates a more sophisticated environmental manager who can interpret legislative and audit requirements and deliver them in a manner conducive to continued economic development, whilst recognising the market trends. The aim of this programme is to develop skills in the delivery of economic activities related to environment, green technology and sustainability. The programme includes highly topical case studies from across these sectors reflecting changing strategies and alternative approaches. The course is suitable for graduates in a wide range of disciplines, including Environment, Engineering, Finance, Social Sciences and other subjects.
Testimonials

Compulsory Modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts. Specific topics include:

The nature of organisations
Organisation structures: strategy, design and function, job design
Organisation cultures: values, ethics, norms of behaviour
Theories and models of management: classical and contemporary
Individual differences: perception, learning, motivation, equality and diversity
Groups and teams in the organisation
Managing relationships: power, conflict, communication, engagement
Managers as leaders, people developers, coaches
Managing job satisfaction and performance

International Strategic Management: This module analyses strategic decision-making within business. You will develop a critical understanding of the strategic processes of business management, the interconnections with the functional domains of marketing, human resource management and corporate finance, and the management of knowledge systems. Specific topics include:

Concepts of strategic management applicable to business
Prescriptive and emergent strategies
Strategy implementation through capacity building and resource allocation
Managing, monitoring and reviewing strategic change
Organisational designs for strategic advantage
Human resources strategy, marketing and corporate financial strategy
Organisational learning and knowledge management

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments. Specific topics include:

Research methodologies and philosophy: positivism and interpretivism
Qualitative research methods and the search for meaning
Selecting a research strategy and design
Data gathering, documentary records, triangulation and mixed methods
Content analysis, conversation analysis, discourse analysis, grounded theory
Quantitative research design and methodologies
Univariate and multivariate analysis, factor, cluster and discriminant analysis

Business Planning for the Green Economy: This module explores the process of establishing a venture from idea generation to the completion of a business plan which incorporates environmental planning and management. It takes the student through the actual process of developing a business plan and its different components, the market and sustainability. Specific topics include:

Entrepreneurship
The entrepreneurial role in relation to the initiation and development of a sustainable business
Key environmental factors of business development
The differences between the entrepreneur and the environmental manager, and the problems faced by small growth firms in sustainable growth.
The importance and complexity of entrepreneurship and environmentalism within a large firm environment

Finance for Managers: This module is designed for those who aim to achieve a basic understanding of financial management and control, and who require an understanding of finance in order to manage an organisation effectively. Financial planning and control are central themes, as well as the appraisal techniques of investment projects. Specific topics include:

Principles underlying the preparation of accounting information
Recording business transactions
Preparation and analysis of financial statements
Preparation of budgets, financial planning and control
Costing methods, uses and interpretation of cost data
Investment appraisal techniques

Strategic Environmental Management: This module is designed to provide a an understanding of the principles of sustainable development, environmental legislation, environmental auditing and assesment, and green technological development. Specific topics include:

Sustainable development
Environmental legislation
Environmental auditing
Environmental assessment
Corporate social responsibility and socially responsible investment
Life cycle analysis

Green Technology: This module reviews the environmental consequences of economic activities, including energy generation, waste management, food and water supply, consumer goods. It then goes on to consider recent policy initiatives and drivers and examines key green technologies. Specific topics include:

Development and deployment of green technologies
Environment impacts of energy generation
Green technology policies and initiatives
Green technologies - commerce, ideas and concepts
Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for green technologies

Part 2:

For MBA Environmental Management, you must complete Part 2 by undertaking a relevant dissertation.

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