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Masters Degrees (Environmental Crime)

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The focus of this programme is on contemporary substantive issues in criminology and criminal justice and on criminological research methods. Read more
The focus of this programme is on contemporary substantive issues in criminology and criminal justice and on criminological research methods. It is particularly appropriate for those engaged in criminal justice policy analysis and development or similar work in allied fields.

The programme develops a theoretical, policy and technical understanding of key issues within criminology, criminal justice and research methods. More specifically, it aims to develop an advanced understanding of the complex nature of crime, harm and victimisation together with an appreciation of the role of the state/criminal justice system in the regulation of human behaviour, deviance and crime. The programme will equip you to design and implement social scientific research using a broad range of methodologies, consider research ethics, analyse and present the material such research generates.

Through combining criminology and research methods, the programme enables you to think logically and in an informed manner about criminological issues. The programme fosters a critical awareness of the relationship between theory, policy and practice and enables you to utilize your research knowledge of research skills and translate these into research practice in the field of criminology and broader social science research professions.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/criminology-social-research-methods-msc

Modules

You'll undertake modules from a broad base of subject areas including:

- Criminological theory
This module charts the development of criminological thinking from the onset of modernity through to the present day. It will place discrete theories in their proper sociological, historical, political and cultural contexts. It will seek to establish the implications and relationships of various theories to criminal justice policy. A number of contemporary issues (terrorism, urban disturbances, and gang culture) will be explored with a view to critically evaluating the value of competing theoretical frameworks.

- Crime, harm and victimisation
The module aims to deconstruct the fundamental elements of criminology: the crime, the criminal and the victim. It begins by examining historical and contemporary patterns of crime and criminality, as officially measured, within the UK and beyond. It then engages with more critical academic debates about defining and measuring crime, considering definitions of crime as: a breach of criminal law; a violation of collective conscience; a product of conduct norms; a social construct; ideological censure; a gendered reality; a violation of human rights, and; social or environmental harm. The module engages with critical deconstructions of the 'offender' and the 'victim', considering how these are socially constructed and how our understanding of these, like of 'crime', has changed and continues to change in late-/post-modern society.

- Responding to crime: justice, social control and punishment
This module explores some of the key issues and controversies in the delivery of justice, social control and punishment. It begins with a critical consideration of the concept of justice and emphasises the significance of this in relation to how the state responds to various forms of crime. It encourages you to think critically about the role of the state in the regulation of behaviour and provides an overview of key changes that have occurred in the field of crime control and criminal justice. One of the key features of contemporary crime control discourse is the rise of risk management and the pursuit of security. This module outlines the ways in which such a discourse has transformed criminal justice thinking and practices of both policing and penal policy, and also of crime (and harm) prevention.

- Criminological research in practice
This module uses examples from recent and current research conducted by members of the Crime and Justice Research Group at LSBU and external guest speakers to develop both the research training and subject understanding elements of the MSc, demonstrating how research becomes knowledge – generating theoretical advances, policy initiatives, new research questions and university curricula. Lectures/seminars will take the form of a research commentary, talking you through a research project from idea inception through research design, fieldwork, analysis and dissemination and, where appropriate, on to the influences research has had (or could have) on subsequent academic works and policy developments. Particular emphasis will be placed on challenges peculiar to criminological research.

- Methods for social research and evaluation: philosophy, design and data collection
This module introduces you to core concepts in social research and shows how they can be used to address social scientific questions and practical issues in policy evaluation. You'll be introduced to central topics in the philosophy of social sciences and the effect they have on research choices. You are then introduced to different ways research can be designed and the ways design affects permissible inferences. You are then introduced to the theory of measurement and sampling. The final third of the module focuses on acquiring data ranging from survey methods through qualitative data collection methods to secondary data.

- Data analytic techniques for social scientists
You are introduced to a range of analytic techniques commonly used by social scientists. It begins by introducing you to statistical analysis, it then moves to techniques used to analyse qualitative data. It concludes by looking at relational methods and data reduction techniques. You'll also be introduced to computer software (SPSS, NVivo and Ucinet) that implements the techniques. Students will gain both a conceptual understanding of the techniques and the means to apply them to their own research projects. An emphasis will be placed on how these techniques can be used in social evaluation.

- Dissertation
The dissertation is a major part of your work on the MSc, reflected in its value of 60 credits. The aim of the dissertation is to enable students to expand and deepen their knowledge of a substantive area in criminology, whilst simultaneously developing their methodological skills. You'll choose an area of investigation and apply the research skills of design and process, modes of data generation and data analysis techniques to undertake a 15,000 word dissertation. You'll be allocated a dissertation supervisor from the departmental team and will meet regularly for personal supervision meetings.

Employability

This MSc will enable you to pursue a range of professional careers in criminal justice related work in statutory, commercial or community voluntary sectors and operating at central, regional and local government levels, for example, the Home Office; police forces; local government; crime and disorder reduction partnerships and their equivalencies throughout the world.

The acquisition of specific criminological and research methods knowledge will also enhance the career opportunities if you are currently working in the field. The specialist focus on research methods also offers an excellent foundation for those interested in undertaking subsequent doctoral research in the field.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

The Crime and Criminal Justice Research Group, (CCJRG), at LSBU has developed a strong national and international reputation for delivering high quality and real life impact research. It has worked closely with a range of government agencies, including the Office for Criminal Justice Reform (Ministry of Justice); Government Office for London; the Scottish Executive, Northern Ireland Office and the Equalities and Human Rights Commission. It has also undertaken extensive research in collaboration with various London local authorities together with a range of voluntary and charity-based agencies.

Placements

Our criminology programme also has a strong voluntary work scheme.You're encouraged to undertake voluntary work in a variety of criminal justice related agencies. Recent positions have been within the police service, the prison service, legal advice, victim support, domestic violence and child abuse agencies and youth offending and youth mentoring schemes.

Teaching and learning

Study hours:
Year 1 class contact time is typically 6 hours per week part time and 12 hours per week full time plus individual tutorial and independent study.

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This course is a flexible, rigorous, integrated and practical course covering national and international environmental law regimes alongside associated regimes, such as energy law. Read more
This course is a flexible, rigorous, integrated and practical course covering national and international environmental law regimes alongside associated regimes, such as energy law. It incorporates up-to-date research and contemporary developments within the field.

-Study other aspects of sustainability with different faculties, broadening your knowledge.
-Undertake an internship and gain first-hand experience of these issues in practice.
-Students come from all over the world to study on Kingston's law courses, so you will finish the course with an international network of contacts.
-Tailor your studies to your interests with a wide choice of modules and a research project covering an issue that interests you.
-Kingston Law School's expert academic team includes National Teaching Award winners and fellows from the Higher Education Academy, as well as lecturing staff who combine teaching with legal practice, research and scholarship.
-Kingston upon Thames has been rated London's happiest borough and has the lowest crime rate in London, as well as fast transport links to the city centre.

"A specialised Kingston LLM helps students acquire the necessary experience and gives them a named masters course title to demonstrate that they are specialists in their field." – Siri Harris, senior lecturer in law

Assessment

Written coursework, examinations and dissertation.

About Kingston University's LLM courses

Kingston University's LLM courses allow you to specialise and tailor your degree to a topic of your choice, while also giving you the flexibility to take modules on other subjects, making it flexible and easy to adapt to your interests and career goals.

You will complete work worth 180 credits by studying four 30-credit modules and one 60-credit dissertation module.

In addition to the Law School's team of highly skilled academics, courses are taught by experienced practitioners, and many of our lecturing staff combine teaching with legal practice. This helps to ensure that the courses are constantly refreshed with the latest industry thinking and practice, and provides you with the opportunity to mix with people who can provide hands-on experience and insight into their area of legal work.

Kingston Law School has strong links with The Law Society, the professional body that represents practising solicitors in England and Wales.

Course structure

You take four modules (at least two of which must be selected from the core modules list) and take the Legal Research and Dissertation module on any topic of your choice related to environmental law and sustainability.

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules (choose at least two, plus the Legal Research and Dissertation module)
-Environmental Law and Regulation
-International Environmental Law and Sustainability
-Energy and Climate Change Law
-Legal Research and Dissertation

Option modules (choose two, which can also be selected from the core module list)
-Advocacy
-Alternative Dispute Resolution
-Arbitration
-Civil Procedure
-Company Law
-EU Competition Law
-Evidence and Arbitral Awards
-Family Mediation
-Immigration and Refugee Law
-Individual Employment Law
-Insolvency Law
-Intellectual Property Law
-International Economic Law
-International Environmental Law and Sustainability
-International Sale of Goods and E-Commerce
-International Trade Contracts
-Labour Law in the Global Economy
-Law of International Trade
-Legal Aspects of Business Finance
-Termination of Employment

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This course is particularly suitable for people who work for regulatory bodies, whether in legal departments or as field or enforcement officers, environmental consultants, planners, solicitors, barristers, those who work in regulated industries, such as waste or water, and academics. Read more

About the course

This course is particularly suitable for people who work for regulatory bodies, whether in legal departments or as field or enforcement officers, environmental consultants, planners, solicitors, barristers, those who work in regulated industries, such as waste or water, and academics.
•Informa
This course is delivered in partnership with Informa Professional Academy, an organisation dedicated to working with leading academic bodies to provide high-calibre and well respected distance learning postgraduate courses
•Develop your own personal pathway
This course combines one core module with a diverse range of optional modules
•Study at your own pace
Enjoy flexible distance learning, with the option to exit at one of several points with a postgraduate award
•Differentiate yourself in the job market
Gain a competitive edge by increasing your knowledge of Environmental law
•Boost your employability
Improve your career and employability options in a globalised job market

Course modules

The Environment and Legal Control – in this module you will look at the historical development of the legal regulation of the environment. You will further examine the UK and EU legal systems in which environmental law is framed and gain an understanding of use of civil penalties in an environmental law context.

You will also select elective modules which might include:
•Atmospheric Pollution Law
•Biodiversity Impact and Nature Conservation Law
•Environmental Assessment
•Environmental Permitting & Climate Change
•International Environmental Law
•Law of Environmental Crime
•Law of Health and Safety
•Light Pollution Law
•Negotiated Study
•Noise Pollution Law
•Planning Law
•Waste Management and Contaminated Land
•Water Pollution Law
•Nuclear Law

Dissertation
You must also undertake a dissertation, providing an invaluable opportunity to work in depth on a particular aspect of the law. You will need to apply and enhance your technical knowledge and critical awareness in a subject of your choice. In order to obtain the LLM in Environmental Law and Practice it is necessary to write a dissertation with an environmental law theme.

Teaching and assessment

The LLM is studied by distance learning and is fully assessed by coursework and a dissertation. The distance learning mode involves optional attendance at Leicester De Montfort Law School, for a maximum of ten Saturday study days during the period of study. The course is structured in a way that allows you to exit at one of several points, if desired, each with a postgraduate award.

Graduate careers

This career development course equips you to enter legal and other work relating to the operation and regulation of businesses, both in the UK and overseas.

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How do we understand crime? How can it be prevented? Why should crime be punished, and how should we go about it? Criminologists engage with some of the most pressing issues, decisions and dilemmas facing societies today. Read more
How do we understand crime? How can it be prevented? Why should crime be punished, and how should we go about it? Criminologists engage with some of the most pressing issues, decisions and dilemmas facing societies today. On our course you explore the nature of crime, criminal justice and punishment within wider social contexts.

Criminology at Essex builds on strong sociological foundations and reflects the diversity of staff interests, including leading contributors to studies of women, young people and criminal justice, prostitution, homicide, victimisation, visual criminology and media, organised crime and law enforcement, terrorism and surveillance, environmental crime and more. Our courses provide critical, conceptual and theoretical analyses of crimes and harms, from the local to the global.

The course provides you with a strong grounding in the key theories, understandings and issues covered by cutting-edge criminology. You explore a wide range of topics, including:
-The analysis, politics and prevention of crime
-Globalisation and various forms of crime
-Security and the state
-New criminological theory
-Terrorism, counter-terrorism, surveillance and human rights

You also develop the skills needed to make your own contribution to the field, gaining a critical and coherent perspective on empirical research and examining the key assumptions and ideological underpinnings of qualitative and quantitative research.

Our Department of Sociology was rated top 10 in the UK for research quality (REF 2014), and we consistently receive strong student satisfaction scores, including 96% overall student satisfaction in 2015.

Our expert staff

You are taught by a team of award-winning internationally renowned scholars widely regarded as leading experts in their fields.

Criminology at Essex is led by Professor Eamonn Carrabine, Professor Pamela Cox, Dr Isabel Crowhurst, Professor Pete Fussey, Dr Anna Sergi, Professor Nigel South, Dr Darren Thiel and Dr Jackie Turton.

All staff are actively engaged in research at the cutting edge of their respective fields of interest and specialism and bring the very latest developments and findings into the classroom. All are prominent writers and the criminology team collectively author the best-selling criminology textbook, Criminology: A Sociological Introduction (now in its 3rd edition), used on undergraduate courses across the country.

Our staff have worked at local, national and international level with bodies from local councils and the Home Office, to Amnesty International and the United Nations.

Specialist facilities

-Our Centre for Criminology hosts expert speakers and practitioners
-Dedicated postgraduate support facilities through a unique Student Resource Centre where you can get help with your studies, access examples of previous students’ work, and attend workshops on research skills
-Our renowned off-campus Graduate Conference takes place every February
-The Sociology common room is open all day Monday-Friday, is stocked with daily newspapers, magazines and journals
-Links with the Institute of Social and Economic Research, which conducts large-scale survey projects and has its own library, and the -UK Data Archive, which stores national research data like the British Crime Survey
-Our students’ Sociology Society is a forum for the exchange of ideas, arranging talks by visiting speakers, introducing you to various career pathways, and organising debates

Your future

This course provides excellent preparation for further academic study, and many of our postgraduates go on to successful academic careers, both in the UK and overseas.

Others have established careers in non-governmental organisations, local authorities, specialist think tanks, government departments, charities, media production, and research organisations.

We work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Formative Debates in Criminology
-Current Controversies in Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy
-Sociological Research Design
-Dissertation
-Interviewing and Qualitative Data Analysis (optional)
-Organised Crime: Global and Local (optional)
-Critical Perspectives on Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism (optional)

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This course is particularly suitable for people who work for regulatory bodies, whether in legal departments or as field or enforcement officers, environmental consultants, planners, solicitors, barristers, those who work in regulated industries, such as waste or water, and academics. Read more

About the course

This course is particularly suitable for people who work for regulatory bodies, whether in legal departments or as field or enforcement officers, environmental consultants, planners, solicitors, barristers, those who work in regulated industries, such as waste or water, and academics.
•Informa
This course is delivered in partnership with Informa Professional Academy, an organisation dedicated to working with leading academic bodies to provide high-calibre and well respected distance learning postgraduate courses
•Develop your own personal pathway
This course combines one core module with a diverse range of optional modules
•Study at your own pace
Enjoy flexible distance learning, with the option to exit at one of several points with a postgraduate award
•Differentiate yourself in the job market
Gain a competitive edge by increasing your knowledge of Environmental law
•Boost your employability
Improve your career and employability options in a globalised job market

Environmental Law modules:

The Environment and Legal Control – in this module you will look at the historical development of the legal regulation of the environment. You will further examine the UK and EU legal systems in which environmental law is framed and gain an understanding of use of civil penalties in an environmental law context.

You will also select elective modules which might include:
•Atmospheric Pollution Law
•Biodiversity Impact and Nature Conservation Law
•Environmental Assessment
•Environmental Permitting & Climate Change
•International Environmental Law
•Law of Environmental Crime
•Law of Health and Safety
•Light Pollution Law
•Negotiated Study
•Noise Pollution Law
•Planning Law
•Waste Management and Contaminated Land
•Water Pollution Law
•Nuclear Law

Dissertation
You must also undertake a dissertation, providing an invaluable opportunity to work in depth on a particular aspect of the law. You will need to apply and enhance your technical knowledge and critical awareness in a subject of your choice. In order to obtain the LLM in Environmental Law and Practice it is necessary to write a dissertation with an environmental law theme.

Note: All modules are subject to change in order to keep content current.

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This programme considers pressing contemporary global issues from a criminological perspective, including organised crime, trafficking, terrorism and environmental crime. Read more
This programme considers pressing contemporary global issues from a criminological perspective, including organised crime, trafficking, terrorism and environmental crime.

Why this programme

-You will gain access to a wide range of potential careers and further academic pathways related to understanding international crime and developing strategies and policy for its prevention.
-You will benefit from the combined strengths of staff from the University's Scottish Centre for Crime & Justice Research. The breadth and diversity of expertise represented within the teaching team is a key strength of the programme.
-There will be a number of guest lectures, presentations and seminars throughout, with high-calibre speakers from the UK and abroad.
-You will have the opportunity to link up with a criminal justice organisation for your dissertation work.

Programme structure

Through a combination of lectures, seminars and project work you will:
-Enhance your understanding of relevant theoretical approaches, concepts, debates and techniques of criminological enquiry as they relate to the study of transnational crime and security in a globalised context.
-Develop your appreciation of the routines and structures of the global criminal economy, including contemporary developments in transnational organised crime and the illicit global economic activities of states, corporations and white-collar criminals.
-Apply criminological knowledge to critically analyse contemporary social, legal, political and policy issues in transnational crime and security.
-Develop the analytical skills to contribute to public debate on crime and security issues.
-Gain an advanced understanding of criminological perspectives on transnational crime and justice, relevant to your further careers or academic studies.

Core courses
-Understanding and explaining crime and social harm
-Criminological perspectives on security and globalisation
-Research and enquiry in criminology and criminal justice
-The global criminal economy: white-collar crime and organised crime

Optional courses
-Crime, media and popular culture
-Criminal justice: global challenges
-Crime and community safety
-Rehabilitation and desistance from crime
-Punishment and penalty

Career prospects

You will be well equipped for careers in public, private and third sector agencies concerned with crime prevention policy and strategy, especially with international and cross-border agencies.

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Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation. Read more
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation.

The Applied Geographical Information Systems (Applied GIS) pathway aims to develop students in-depth knowledge of GIS-based methods for monitoring the social/human and natural environments. It will also help develop the student's understanding of the spatial interaction of social/human and environmental factors. Importantly, it seeks to increase the student's capability to extract social/human and/or environmental information from a variety of sources, such as remotely sensed data, and to undertake analysis and assessment using appropriate methods within a GIS framework.

The first year of study (equivalent to PgC in GIS) involves three core units:

Foundations of GIS -
This unit provides an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) from conceptual, theoretical, and practical perspectives. Students will learn about the different methods used in geographic encoding and spatial data modelling before employing such datasets in a software environment. The unit concludes with a review of contemporary issues in GIS. Key elements of the curriculum include: Origins of GIS; Representation, Modelling and Geovisualisation; Software Skills; GIS: Today and Tomorrow.

Spatial Data Infrastructures -
Spatial data is key to any GIS project. This unit investigates how spatial data is sourced and also aims to provide students with the requisite knowledge and practical skills to identify and evaluate, against recognised national and international quality standards, spatial data for use in GI-based projects. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Data; Data Standards and Infrastructures; Sourcing Spatial Data; Data Quality; Evaluating Fitness for Purpose.

Databases -
GIS are fundamentally information systems which provide specialist facilities for the creation, storage and manipulation of spatial and attribute data. Much of the functionality offered by GIS software is shared with conventional database software. Indeed, most GIS - at their core - have a conventional database management system (DBMS) around which spatial functionality has been wrapped. It is essential that GIS specialists have a thorough understanding of database theory, design and implementation. Key elements of the curriculum include: Why Databases?; Relational Databases; Critiquing Relational Databases; Implementation and Interrogation.

The second year of study (equivalent to the PgD in GIS) involves one core and two elective units:

Methods in GIS (core) -
The concepts, theories and methods behind the application of GIS are examined in detail. The unit explores research design, data analysis and interpretation and presentation. Special focus is given to methods of spatial analysis and their implementation using GIS software. Key elements of the curriculum include: Research Design; Qualitative and Quantitative Techniques; Fundamentals of Spatial Analysis; Recent Advances in Spatial Analysis.

Two elective units are chosen from:

Environmental Applications of GIS -
GIS and related technologies such as remote sensing have been widely employed in environmental applications for almost forty years. The advent of satellite remote sensing allowed reliable synoptic data to be available to scientists who have developed numerous models. This together with the decision-making tools and spatially-referenced framework of GIS offers significant support to researchers investigating different environmental phenomena. Data from remote sensing, GPS and other sources provide a valuable input into GIS models for environmental monitoring, modelling and prediction. This unit introduces case study examples of how GIS and related technologies can be used in environmental applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Applicability and benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving and Evaluation using techniques such as Terrain Analysis, Multicriteria Evaluation, Landscape Metrics etc.

Remote Sensing for GIS Applications -
This unit provides students with an introduction to the principles of remote sensing and explores its role in data gathering/information extraction for GIS applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: Principles of Remote Sensing; Satellite Systems; Quantitative Data; GIS Integration.

Social Applications of GIS -
Where an investigation into social, economic, political, and cultural characteristics and phenomena is required, GIS provides a powerful tool. For social applications such as crime mapping and healthcare resource management, GIS can be used effectively to help model, monitor and enable (spatial) decision making based on existing criteria. Social systems are often highly organised and complex - GIS allows this complexity to be effectively distilled into an abstraction representing the most causally related behaviour. This unit introduces case tudy examples of how GIS can be used in social applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Exemplars of GIS use in Social Applications, e.g. health, crime and urban transportation; Evaluation of the Benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving techniques.

The final year of study (the MSc stage) requires the student to design and undertake a substantial and unique independent research project, to be presented as an academic dissertation (max. of 15,000 words).

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Everything we do is aimed at helping you to appreciate the approaches and methods used by historians, and developing your knowledge of historical trends, processes and events over the past 300 years. Read more
Everything we do is aimed at helping you to appreciate the approaches and methods used by historians, and developing your knowledge of historical trends, processes and events over the past 300 years.

You will have the opportunity to explore a range of social and cultural developments in the history of Britain, Europe and the wider world. Throughout your study, you will work in small groups or individually, guided by your expert teaching team. Their historical research in areas such as urban history, the history of crime, environmental history, imperialism, sexuality and gender, migration, popular culture and social movement, is of an international standing and will feed into your learning.

Our teaching will give you the platform to reflect on historical interpretations of the past and conduct your own independent historical research.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: 38% of our research was judged to be world leading or internationally excellent in the Communication, Culture and Media Studies, Library and Information Management unit.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/socialhistory_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

You will develop a range of transferable skills valued by employers in areas such as teaching, local government, administration, management, the civil service, marketing, public relations and the non-profit sector. Your course will also provide you with an excellent grounding should you want to pursue further postgraduate study.

- Teacher
- Historical Researcher
- Lecturer
- Journalist

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will work in small groups or individually with research-active historians throughout your period of study. Our history team has strengths in many areas and you will benefit from their expertise in urban history, the history of crime, environmental history, imperialism, sexuality and gender, migration, popular culture and social movement history.

Core Modules

Researching Cultures
This is an introduction to research skills and methods, exploring libraries, sources, archives and treatments of history through the theme of war. You will analyse the relationships between literary texts, historical documents, and films, as well as scrutinising how World War Two has been recorded, historicised, fictionalised and dramatised.

Underworlds: Representations of Crime, Police & the Criminal c.1700 to c.1945
You will study the representation of crime, criminals and police during a period which witnessed key changes in the criminal justice system, the rise of a policed society, and the emergence of print culture.

Sexuality, Gender & Popular Culture in Britain 1918-1970
According to some theorists, a preoccupation with sexuality is one of the defining features of Western modernity. You will explore current debates, relevant theoretical approaches and will be introduced to a range of source material including newspaper reports, film and popular literature.

Organised Crime in the Modern World: Global Criminal Cultures
Throughout history, as societies have become more organised, so too have their criminals. You will study a range of criminal organisations, exploring the role organised crime has played in both shaping and reacting to the ebb and flow of power and socio-economic development in the modern world.

European Cities: Making Urban Landscapes & Cultures since c.1945
You will examine urbanisation and metropolitan cultures of the cities within Europe during the second-half of the 20th century. We will ask you to consider the relationship between cities and the social, economic, political and cultural policies of local, national and supranational governments and other governing bodies.

Journeys & Discoveries: Travel, Tourism & Exploration, 1768-1996
This is an opportunity to consider the journeys, voyages and discoveries recounted in travel journals, guidebooks, colonial texts, memoirs and ethnographic studies. You will learn how travel, tourism and exploration has evolved - influenced by innovations in transport, health and media, public tastes, colonial policies and racial attitudes.

A Cultural Revolution? The Sixties in Comparative Perspective
Focusing on cultural, social and political elements of the 'long 1960s' (1958-1975), you will study a wide variety of political movements, social changes and cultural forms - such as music, film, TV, theatre and literature - looking at the United States, Britain and Western Europe, and the wider world.

Dissertation
You will undertake a sustained piece of research in social history on a topic selected by yourself and involving the use of both primary and secondary sources.You will design, plan, manage and complete a sustained research project, presenting your findings both orally and in writing.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation. Read more
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation.

The Geographical Information Systems (GIS) pathway aims to provide students with a broadly based postgraduate qualification in the field of GIS. Importantly, it offers students choice in the selection of their application area (with a range of units available). The pathway helps students to develop an in-depth knowledge of the issues involved in applying GIS to solving spatial problems with an understanding of the constraints imposed by the application area(s) and the interactions between data, methods, people, and technology.

The first year of study (equivalent to PgC in GIS) involves three core units:

Foundations of GIS -
This unit provides an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) from conceptual, theoretical, and practical perspectives. Students will learn about the different methods used in geographic encoding and spatial data modelling before employing such datasets in a software environment. The unit concludes with a review of contemporary issues in GIS. Key elements of the curriculum include: Origins of GIS; Representation, Modelling and Geovisualisation; Software Skills; GIS: Today and Tomorrow.

Spatial Data Infrastructures -
Spatial data is key to any GIS project. This unit investigates how spatial data is sourced and also aims to provide students with the requisite knowledge and practical skills to identify and evaluate, against recognised national and international quality standards, spatial data for use in GI-based projects. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Data; Data Standards and Infrastructures; Sourcing Spatial Data; Data Quality; Evaluating Fitness for Purpose.

Databases -
GIS are fundamentally information systems which provide specialist facilities for the creation, storage and manipulation of spatial and attribute data. Much of the functionality offered by GIS software is shared with conventional database software. Indeed, most GIS - at their core - have a conventional database management system (DBMS) around which spatial functionality has been wrapped. It is essential that GIS specialists have a thorough understanding of database theory, design and implementation. Key elements of the curriculum include: Why Databases?; Relational Databases; Critiquing Relational Databases; Implementation and Interrogation.

The second year of study (equivalent to the PgD in GIS) involves one core and two elective units:

Methods in GIS (core) -
The concepts, theories and methods behind the application of GIS are examined in detail. The unit explores research design, data analysis and interpretation and presentation. Special focus is given to methods of spatial analysis and their implementation using GIS software. Key elements of the curriculum include: Research Design; Qualitative and Quantitative Techniques; Fundamentals of Spatial Analysis; Recent Advances in Spatial Analysis.

Two elective units are chosen from:

Distributed GIS -
This unit discusses the most vibrant and rapidly developing area of geospatial technology. Desktop GIS packages are increasingly looking like the specialist packages for serious users that, in truth, they always were. Now, for the very large majority of people who really only want to look at the location of things, we can offer WebGIS systems that deliver what they need directly into their web-browsers. This unit explains the concepts and methods of Internet GIS, development and its applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: From Desktop to Distributed GI Services; Technologies in Distributed GIS; Building the GeoWeb; Tutorials.

Environmental Applications of GIS -
GIS and related technologies such as remote sensing have been widely employed in environmental applications for almost forty years. The advent of satellite remote sensing allowed reliable synoptic data to be available to scientists who have developed numerous models. This together with the decision-making tools and spatially-referenced framework of GIS offers significant support to researchers investigating different environmental phenomena. Data from remote sensing, GPS and other sources provide a valuable input into GIS models for environmental monitoring, modelling and prediction. This unit introduces case study examples of how GIS and related technologies can be used in environmental applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Applicability and benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving and Evaluation using techniques such as Terrain Analysis, Multicriteria Evaluation, Landscape Metrics etc.

Remote Sensing for GIS Applications -
This unit provides students with an introduction to the principles of remote sensing and explores its role in data gathering/information extraction for GIS applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: Principles of Remote Sensing; Satellite Systems; Quantitative Data; GIS Integration.

Social Applications of GIS -
Where an investigation into social, economic, political, and cultural characteristics and phenomena is required, GIS provides a powerful tool. For social applications such as crime mapping and healthcare resource management, GIS can be used effectively to help model, monitor and enable (spatial) decision making based on existing criteria. Social systems are often highly organised and complex - GIS allows this complexity to be effectively distilled into an abstraction representing the most causally related behaviour. This unit introduces case tudy examples of how GIS can be used in social applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Exemplars of GIS use in Social Applications, e.g. health, crime and urban transportation; Evaluation of the Benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving techniques.

Spatial Databases and Programming -
The importance of programming and GIS as part of a larger system, which involves spatial databases, software development and programme coding, has been increasingly realised in GIS practice. This unit aims to develop your geospatial skills in building enterprise oriented databases (e.g. geo-database and server) and creating application-oriented GIS models through programming. This unit also helps you to critically evaluate the issues and trends in enterprise GIS and GIS application development from the perspective of software engineering and geospatial technology. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Databases; Design and Quality; Programming; Tutorials.

The final year of study (the MSc stage) requires the student to design and undertake a substantial and unique independent research project, to be presented as an academic dissertation (max. of 15,000 words).

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Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation. Read more
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation.

The Geographical Information Systems (GIS) pathway aims to provide students with a broadly based postgraduate qualification in the field of GIS. Importantly, it offers students choice in the selection of their application area (with a range of units available). The pathway helps students to develop an in-depth knowledge of the issues involved in applying GIS to solving spatial problems with an understanding of the constraints imposed by the application area(s) and the interactions between data, methods, people, and technology.

The first year of study (equivalent to PgC in GIS) involves three core units:

Foundations of GIS -
This unit provides an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) from conceptual, theoretical, and practical perspectives. Students will learn about the different methods used in geographic encoding and spatial data modelling before employing such datasets in a software environment. The unit concludes with a review of contemporary issues in GIS. Key elements of the curriculum include: Origins of GIS; Representation, Modelling and Geovisualisation; Software Skills; GIS: Today and Tomorrow.

Spatial Data Infrastructures -
Spatial data is key to any GIS project. This unit investigates how spatial data is sourced and also aims to provide students with the requisite knowledge and practical skills to identify and evaluate, against recognised national and international quality standards, spatial data for use in GI-based projects. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Data; Data Standards and Infrastructures; Sourcing Spatial Data; Data Quality; Evaluating Fitness for Purpose.

Databases -
GIS are fundamentally information systems which provide specialist facilities for the creation, storage and manipulation of spatial and attribute data. Much of the functionality offered by GIS software is shared with conventional database software. Indeed, most GIS - at their core - have a conventional database management system (DBMS) around which spatial functionality has been wrapped. It is essential that GIS specialists have a thorough understanding of database theory, design and implementation. Key elements of the curriculum include: Why Databases?; Relational Databases; Critiquing Relational Databases; Implementation and Interrogation.

The second year of study (equivalent to the PgD in GIS) involves one core and two elective units:

Methods in GIS (core) -
The concepts, theories and methods behind the application of GIS are examined in detail. The unit explores research design, data analysis and interpretation and presentation. Special focus is given to methods of spatial analysis and their implementation using GIS software. Key elements of the curriculum include: Research Design; Qualitative and Quantitative Techniques; Fundamentals of Spatial Analysis; Recent Advances in Spatial Analysis.

Two elective units are chosen from:

Distributed GIS -
This unit discusses the most vibrant and rapidly developing area of geospatial technology. Desktop GIS packages are increasingly looking like the specialist packages for serious users that, in truth, they always were. Now, for the very large majority of people who really only want to look at the location of things, we can offer WebGIS systems that deliver what they need directly into their web-browsers. This unit explains the concepts and methods of Internet GIS, development and its applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: From Desktop to Distributed GI Services; Technologies in Distributed GIS; Building the GeoWeb; Tutorials.

Environmental Applications of GIS -
GIS and related technologies such as remote sensing have been widely employed in environmental applications for almost forty years. The advent of satellite remote sensing allowed reliable synoptic data to be available to scientists who have developed numerous models. This together with the decision-making tools and spatially-referenced framework of GIS offers significant support to researchers investigating different environmental phenomena. Data from remote sensing, GPS and other sources provide a valuable input into GIS models for environmental monitoring, modelling and prediction. This unit introduces case study examples of how GIS and related technologies can be used in environmental applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Applicability and benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving and Evaluation using techniques such as Terrain Analysis, Multicriteria Evaluation, Landscape Metrics etc.

Remote Sensing for GIS Applications -
This unit provides students with an introduction to the principles of remote sensing and explores its role in data gathering/information extraction for GIS applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: Principles of Remote Sensing; Satellite Systems; Quantitative Data; GIS Integration.

Social Applications of GIS -
Where an investigation into social, economic, political, and cultural characteristics and phenomena is required, GIS provides a powerful tool. For social applications such as crime mapping and healthcare resource management, GIS can be used effectively to help model, monitor and enable (spatial) decision making based on existing criteria. Social systems are often highly organised and complex - GIS allows this complexity to be effectively distilled into an abstraction representing the most causally related behaviour. This unit introduces case tudy examples of how GIS can be used in social applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Exemplars of GIS use in Social Applications, e.g. health, crime and urban transportation; Evaluation of the Benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving techniques.

Spatial Databases and Programming -
The importance of programming and GIS as part of a larger system, which involves spatial databases, software development and programme coding, has been increasingly realised in GIS practice. This unit aims to develop your geospatial skills in building enterprise oriented databases (e.g. geo-database and server) and creating application-oriented GIS models through programming. This unit also helps you to critically evaluate the issues and trends in enterprise GIS and GIS application development from the perspective of software engineering and geospatial technology. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Databases; Design and Quality; Programming; Tutorials.

The final year of study (the MSc stage) requires the student to design and undertake a substantial and unique independent research project, to be presented as an academic dissertation (max. of 15,000 words).

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International law regulates almost every aspect of state law and practice, whether in business, human rights or the environment, and also regulates the relationship between different states and governments. Read more
International law regulates almost every aspect of state law and practice, whether in business, human rights or the environment, and also regulates the relationship between different states and governments.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

The LLM International Law programme offers a varied and stimulating range of mandatory and optional modules, enabling students to shape their course to their best advantage, with the option to include Public International Law, Human Rights, International Environmental Law and International Business Law. International Law continues to be of global relevance and importance to business practices, state agencies and to legal advisers. This course offers you the opportunity to help enhance your future career prospects and professional development by providing specialist knowledge of this important, ever expanding, area of legal knowledge.

If you choose this course you could benefit from:
-An in-depth understanding and analysis of international law through the study of a range of contemporary modules in areas such as public international law, corporate governance, environmental law and international human rights law
-Extensive guidance on research, study and writing skills together with research design and methods, in preparation for writing assessments and researching and submitting your dissertation
-The study of a range of contemporary international law modules to allow specialism in international diplomatic relations, human rights law, corporate governance and environmental law
-The study of legal subjects and research and academic skills alongside home and EU students and a wide range of international students, thus gaining a rewarding and varied academic and personal experience

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

Courses are regularly reviewed and updated to reflect new developments and the requirements of the profession, together with the needs of industry and new legislative and other changes. The mandatory modules on the programme provide basic research skills and methodology and tuition in the core substantive legal areas:
-Research Skills
-Research Design
-Dissertation
-International Human Rights
-International Law in the Contemporary World Arena
-International Corporate Governance

The dissertation will be studied in semester 3 and most mandatory modules are completed in semester 1, although it is possible to study some in semester 2.

The optional modules, from which you choose two, supplement the mandatory subject areas and allow further specialism:
-International Environmental Law
-International Corporate Crime
-International Criminal Law
-Gender and International Human Rights
-Law of Diplomatic Relations

Optional modules are generally studied in semester 2, although it is possible to study some in semester 1.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

LLM International Law can provide successful graduates with career opportunities in various companies, government and state agencies and non-governmental organisations, either as a legal adviser or in a non-legal capacity.

Some students may specialise in Diplomatic Relations or Human Rights Law as lawyers both at home and abroad, dealing with legal issues affecting the contemporary international community, for example, global security, international human rights and state responsibility and matters relating to international environmental law and responsibility. Others have gone on to work for international organisations in a non-legal capacity in areas such as international human rights and the environment, and for local and national government agencies. This course can also be an excellent preparation for further degrees and research and academic careers in universities and other academic and research institutions.

GLOBAL LEADERS PROGRAMME

To prepare students for the challenges of the global employment market and to strengthen and develop their broader personal and professional skills Coventry University has developed a unique Global Leaders Programme.

The objectives of the programme, in which postgraduate and eligible undergraduate students can participate, is to provide practical career workshops and enable participants to experience different business cultures.

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The MSc Forensic Psychology is the only BPS accredited programme in Wales, offering a unique opportunity for students to study Forensic Psychology in Wales. Read more

Course Overview

The MSc Forensic Psychology is the only BPS accredited programme in Wales, offering a unique opportunity for students to study Forensic Psychology in Wales. Working collaboratively with NOMS Cymru (National Offender Management Services, Wales), helps keep the programme up to date with strategy development and policy decisions. Regular contributions from practitioners within the Principality enable students to understand more about services within Wales and their impact on our society locally. We also have many national contributors who share their extensive knowledge and experience.​

Due to the popularity of this programme you should submit your application at the earliest opportunity, and at the very latest by 29th July. ​

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/health/courses/Pages/Forensic-Psychology---MSc-.aspx

​Course Content​​

Forensic Psychology is the practice and application of psychological research relevant to crime, policing, the courts, the criminal and civil justice system, offenders, prison, secure settings, offender management, health and academic settings as well as private practice.

It looks at the role of environmental, psychosocial, and socio-cultural factors that may contribute to crime or its prevention. The primary aim of Forensic Psychology as an academic discipline is to develop understanding of the processes underlying criminal behaviour and for this improved understanding to impact on the effective management and rehabilitation of different groups of offenders in all settings within the criminal justice system.

The first aim of the programme is to provide students with a thorough and critical academic grounding in the evidence relating to environmental, cultural, cognitive and biological factors that may contribute to a wide variety of forms of offending. The programme will encourage students to consider the role and limitations of causal explanations for offending in the development of offender treatments, services and policy.

The second aim of the programme is to introduce students to the basic professional competencies for working in the many settings where forensic psychology is practiced, including skills related to inter-disciplinary working, risk assessment, ethics, continuing professional development, report writing and differences in practice when working with offenders, victims, the courts and the police.

The programme aims to produce Masters degree graduates with the ability to understand the limitations of the conceptual underpinnings of interventions and assessments used in forensic psychology and who are able therefore to engage in critical evaluation of the evidence base upon which their own practice will eventually be based. The programme will specifically avoid providing any formal supervised practice. Its aim is to produce reflective scientist-practitioners who will be ready to engage with the next stage of training (i.e. BPS Stage 2 or HCPC route) towards registration as a Forensic Psychologist with the Health and Care Professions Council.

Students will complete the following taught modules and will also be required to conduct a novel, supervised research dissertation with participants preferably drawn from a forensic setting:

Research Methods and Design (30 credits)
The aim of this module is to extend students knowledge and experience of quantitative and qualitative research methods. Topics covered include: randomised control trials, ANOVA, ANCOVA, MANOVA, Power analysis, Regression, Non parametric methods, interviews, discourse analysis, grounded theory, reflective analysis and psychometric evaluation.

Forensic Mental Health (20 credits)
This module aims to provide students with a critical examination of the relationship between mental illness, personality disorder, learning disability and criminal behaviour. The module will encourage students to view the mental health needs of offenders in the broadest possible context and to appreciate the inter-disciplinary nature of services available to mentally disordered offenders, difficulties in accessing those services and problems for custodial adjustment presented by specific psychiatric diagnoses

Professional Practice and Offender Management (20 credits)
The focus of this module is the professional practice of forensic psychology. The module builds on the groundwork laid by earlier modules and covers professional skills and the types of interventions that a practicing forensic psychologist may engage in. The topics covered by this module include ethics, report writing, working with other agencies, and working with offenders and victims.

Psychological Assessments and Interventions (20 credits)
This module covers psychology as it may be applied to the reduction of re-offending by convicted criminals. The central focus of the module is the 'what works' literature. A range of topics will be covered demonstrating the broad application of psychology to offender rehabilitation in the Criminal Justice System, and within Wales particularly. These topics include: (1) Offender assessment: risk, need and protective factors (2) factors affecting response to treatment; (3) ethical issues of compulsory treatment; and (4) interventions for a range of offending behaviours.

Theories of Criminal Behaviour (10 credits)
The module aims to examine the contribution made by biological, psychodynamic, evolutionary, cognitive and socio-cultural perspectives to our understanding of the aetiology of criminal behaviour. It will explore psychological theories of a variety of offending behaviours such as: violence, aggression, domestic abuse, sex offending, vehicle crime, fire setting as well as gangs and gangs membership.

Legal Psychology (10 credits)
This module covers psychology as it may be applied to the law, and the central focus of the module is evidence. A range of topics will be covered, demonstrating the broad application of psychology within the legal system. These topics include the interviewing of suspects and witnesses, vulnerable victims, offender profiling and the detection of deception.

Addiction and Psychological Vulnerabilities (10 credits)
This module informs students about different factors that may contribute to psychological vulnerability in offenders and victims. A variety of topics will be covered, including issues around the concept of addictive behaviours, vulnerability and the protection of vulnerable adults, including factors which may increase vulnerability to offending and victimisation.

Learning & Teaching​

​Teaching on the MSc Forensic Psychology Programme is predominantly conducted in small groups and adopts an interactive approach. The Research Methods and Design module and the Dissertation workshops are the only part of the programme which is taught in a larger group of around 40 to 50 students as opposed to between 10 and 20 students on the core modules. As a result teaching involves a range of discussions, activities, evaluations of papers, case studies and role play exercises. The focus within the programme is on both content and key skills to develop specialists in the field of forensic psychology with flexible generic skills. These experiences also help to foster student development and confidence as independent life-long learners.

Student learning is promoted through a variety of learning and teaching methods. These include: lectures, workshops, online learning through the virtual learning environment, Moodle, as well as self directed learning. Each student will have an allocated personal tutor to support them through their period of study.

As this programme is accredited by the BPS, there is a requirement for students to attend at least 80% of the taught sessions for the programme.

Assessment

The MSc is assessed by a range of different coursework assignments – e.g. presentations, reports, essays, reflective reports, academic posters, research proposal. There are no examinations.

Employability & Careers​

An MSc in Forensic Psychology is the first step (stage one) in gaining Chartered Psychologist status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and Registered Practitioner status with the Health and Care Professionals Council (HCPC). The MSc in Forensic Psychology will provide the knowledge base and applied research skills that will provide the foundation for stage two of the chartered process that requires a minimum of two years of full-time supervised practice with an appropriate client group.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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Expand your knowledge in all areas of forensic science, from gathering evidence at the crime scene itself, right through to the courtroom. Read more
Expand your knowledge in all areas of forensic science, from gathering evidence at the crime scene itself, right through to the courtroom. Develop your skills and knowledge on our accredited course, as you collect and analyse evidence, equipping you to become a confident and effective practitioner.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/forensic-science

In-keeping with its industry-focus our Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences accredited course is taught by experienced forensics practitioners. We’ll immerse you in a practical environment that closely emulates a real forensics laboratory. The analytical skills and expertise you gain apply equally well in the broader scientific and technological fields as they do in forensics.

Our course combines practical skills with high-level theoretical knowledge of the wide range of forensic techniques you need to apply at all stages of an investigation. Going further still, you’ll be trained to design and execute your own research project in a relevant area, which particularly interests you. This will include guidance on research methods, good practice, presentation and the application of your research.

Full-time - January start, 15 months. September start, 12 months.
Part-time - January start, 33 months. September start, 28 months.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/forensic-science

This course will provide you with:
• the opportunity to acquire Masters level capabilities, knowledge and skills in diverse areas of forensic science from the crime scene to the court
• training in the design and execution of science based research in an appropriate area of forensic science
• the opportunity to undertake a formal research programme in an appropriate area of forensic science

The intention is to immerse you in an environment that is as realistically close to that of a practising forensic science laboratory as is possible in an academic institution. The experience and background of Anglia Ruskin's staff, their intimate knowledge and working relationships with the industry and the availability or new or relatively new purpose-built laboratory facilities places this course in a strong position to deliver such an experience.

This course is suitable for candidates who wish to specialise in Forensic Science as a progression from their first degree in forensic science and for candidates coming into Forensic Science with a strong background in traditional analytical science. This course is accredited by The Forensic Science Society

On successful completion of this course you will be able to:
• demonstrate deep and systematic knowledge of several major areas of forensic science, including either chemical or biological criminalistics.
• apply theoretical and experimentally based empirical knowledge to the solution of problems in forensic science
demonstrate that you are cognisant with the best ethical practices, validation and accreditation procedures relevant to forensic science.
• demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the theory and practice of advanced analytical techniques, as used and applied in forensic science.
• devise, design, implement and, if necessary, modify a programme of basic research directly related to the solution of practical problems in the broad field of forensic science.
• assimilate the known knowledge and information concerning a particular problem/issue and erect testable and viable alternative hypotheses, from theoretical and empirical/experimental view points.
• demonstrate a level of conceptual understanding that will enable information from a wide range of sources and methodologies to be comprehensively and critically appraised.
• operate competently, safely and legally in a variety of complex, possibly unpredictable contexts and be able to apply appropriate standards of established good practice in such circumstances.
• demonstrate that you are able to exercise initiative in your work tasks, but yet be able to exercise your responsibility so as not to move beyond the scope of your expertise.
• search for and obtain information from a wide range of traditional, non-traditional and digital/electronic sources and be able to synthesis it into a coherent argument.
• present the results of your work in a number of forms (reports, papers, posters and all forms of oral presentation) at a level intelligible to the target audience (highly trained/specialised professional to informed lay-person).
• organise your own time and patterns of work to maximum effect and be able to work competently either autonomously or as part of groups and teams as required.

Careers

Our course is enhanced by our excellent working relationships with most of the major employers in the forensic science industry, including the police and fire services.

This focus on theory and good laboratory practice, analytical measurement and research and management skills, together with our industry contacts will make you an attractive candidate for employment. It’ll open up career opportunities in specialist forensic science laboratories in the chemical, biological, environmental, pharmaceutical and law enforcement industries.

You’re also in the perfect position to continue your academic career and move up to our Forensic Science PhD.

Core modules

Evidence Collection and Management
Mastering Forensic Evidence
Mastering Forensic Analysis
Specialist Topics
Research Methods
Research Project

Assessment

Your progress will be assessed using a variety of methods including laboratory reports, court reports (including witness statements), presentations, exams, essays and reports.

Facilities

Wide range of advanced microscopy instruments. SEM with EDS. Full range of organic analysis (GC, GC-MS, HPLC and ion chromatography). FT-IR and Raman spectrometers. Gene sequencing and other DNA analytical equipment. Comprehensive collection of specialist forensic equipment including GRIM, VSC and MSP. Dedicated crime scene facility with video equipment.

Your faculty

The Faculty of Science & Technology is one of the largest of five faculties at Anglia Ruskin University. Whether you choose to study with us full- or part-time, on campus or at a distance, there’s an option whatever your level – from a foundation degree, to a BSc, MSc, PhD or professional doctorate.

Whichever course you pick, you’ll gain the theory and practical skills needed to progress with confidence. Join us and you could find yourself learning in the very latest laboratories or on field trips or work placements with well-known and respected companies. You may even have the opportunity to study abroad.

Everything we do in the faculty has a singular purpose: to provide a world-class environment to create, share and advance knowledge in science and technology fields. This is key to all of our futures.

Specialist facilities

Our facilities include a wide range of advanced microscopy instruments – SEM with EDS, a full range of organic analysis (GC, HPLC and ion chromatography). FT-IR and Raman Spectrometers, gene sequencing and other DNA analytical equipment. A comprehensive collection of specialist forensic equipment includes GRIM, VSC and MSP and we also have a dedicated crime scene facility with video equipment.

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Crime, justice, policy, surveillance and law and order are key issues in the 21st Century. The Masters degree in Criminology is designed specifically to let you explore these and related topics in depth. Read more
Crime, justice, policy, surveillance and law and order are key issues in the 21st Century. The Masters degree in Criminology is designed specifically to let you explore these and related topics in depth. You will be encouraged to challenge established wisdom while studying the intellectual canon of the discipline.

At Liverpool Hope we are driven by a desire to not just be passive observers of criminological, social and criminal justice issues but to be active participants in it. This means that we pay special attention to the interests and goals of our postgraduate students who wish to pursue their studies here.

Drawing on our vibrant and developing research culture we offer an inter-disciplinary, contemporary and relevant degree programme, drawing expertise from our interest in current criminological trends in Britain, Europe and globally. Studying for a Masters in Criminology is guaranteed to be an intellectually interesting experience, challenging assumptions on contemporary questions around globalisation, environmental and green crime, state crime and the policing of protest to a critical analysis of the impact of gender, race and ethnicity, poverty and social exclusion on crime and criminal justice matters.

The Masters is a way of becoming a participant in criminological debate and analysis, whilst being supported in gaining an in-depth and critical understanding of the traditions and latest developments of the discipline.

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Develop your understanding of policy formulation, implementation and evaluation with the Master of Politics and Public Policy. This masters degree will give you a comprehensive understanding of current debates in public policy, including. Read more

Overview

Develop your understanding of policy formulation, implementation and evaluation with the Master of Politics and Public Policy.

This masters degree will give you a comprehensive understanding of current debates in public policy, including:
- evidence-based policy
- accountability
- federal-state relations
- globalisation
- policy transfer
- political parties
- citizen engagement

See the website http://courses.mq.edu.au/international/postgraduate/master/master-of-politics-and-public-policy

Key benefits

- Looks at issues from an Australian perspective and within the context of political science
- Emphasises the politics surrounding public policy, the changing landscape of policy making and Australian public policy
- Current students and graduates include members of parliament, ministerial policy advisers and media advisers

Suitable for

Whether you’re in the private sector but work with government departments, or want to develop a career in public, voluntary or political work – the Master of Politics and Public Policy will further your career.

Our students come from a wide range of countries and professional backgrounds, from public health, Indigenous affairs, education, immigration and taxation to crime control, environmental protection, resource management, community services and human rights.

Recognition of prior learning

Course Duration
- 1.5 year program
Bachelor degree in a relevant field;
Over 3 years relevant work experience.

- 1 year program
Bachelor degree in a relevant field and
over 5 years relevant full time work experience;
Honours, PG diploma, or Masters in a relevant discipline and over 3 years relevant work experience.

- Relevant disciplines
Political Science and Policy Studies; Philosophy and Religious Studies; Studies in Human Society; Social Work; Welfare Studies; Behavioural Science; Law; Linguistics; Literature; Language and Literature; Philosophy and Religious Studies; Economics; Criminology; Society and Culture; Communication and Media Studies; International Business

- Relevant areas
In policy-related employment or volunteer work including advisory, advocacy, consultancy, representation, analysis, research, management in public service, community, government relations, political and social, international or professional bodies, organisations, institutes or associations.

English language requirements

IELTS of 6.5 overall with minimum 6.0 in each band, or equivalent

All applicants for undergraduate or postgraduate coursework studies at Macquarie University are required to provide evidence of proficiency in English.
For more information see English Language Requirements. http://mq.edu.au/study/international/how_to_apply/english_language_requirements/

You may satisfy the English language requirements if you have completed:
- senior secondary studies equivalent to the NSW HSC
- one year of Australian or comparable tertiary study in a country of qualification

Careers

- Career Opportunities
Current students and graduates include members of parliament, ministerial policy advisers, media advisers, public servants, consultants, parliamentary and electorate office staff, lobbyists, journalists, researchers, lawyers and community organisation workers.

- Employers
Graduates have been successful finding employment within the Commonwealth, State and Local governments in areas such as:
- public health
- Indigenous affairs
- education
- immigration
- taxation
- crime control
- environmental protection
- resource management
- community services
- human rights.

In the private sector, our graduates have found success in:
- finance
- health
- publishing
- insurance
- media
- public relations
- law

See the website http://courses.mq.edu.au/international/postgraduate/master/master-of-politics-and-public-policy

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