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Programme description. This programme offers students an introduction to the study of the ways in which writing in English has shaped or mediated political identities in England, Scotland and Ireland. Read more

Programme description

This programme offers students an introduction to the study of the ways in which writing in English has shaped or mediated political identities in England, Scotland and Ireland.

This programme introduces you to the relationship between literary writing and political and social discourse in Britain and Ireland between the ‘Glorious Revolution’ of 1688 and the end of the 19th century. This is the period of the creation of the Britain in which we live today, and also the time in which ancient British, Scottish and Irish national cultures were conceptualised as a response to radical literary, social and political innovations.

In examining the role of literary writing in this period, you will evaluate the ways in which it changed in response to social and political developments. You will also explore how Romantic conceptions of history, society and the aesthetic are developed and questioned during the course of the 19th century.

Programme structure

The programme will be taught through a combination of seminars and tutorials over two semesters, after which you will complete an independently researched dissertation. You will complete two compulsory and two option courses, along with courses in research methods.

Compulsory courses:

  • Enlightenment and Romanticism 1688–1815
  • Romanticism and Victorian Society 1815–1900
  • Research Skills and Methods

Option courses may include:

  • Poet-Critics: the Style of Modern Poetry
  • Fairy Tales
  • Digital Humanities for Literary Studies
  • Green Thoughts: Landscape, Environment and Literature
  • The Long Summer: Edwardian Texts and Contexts 1900–1910
  • Shakespeare Adapted
  • Fairy Tales

Learning outcomes

Students who successfully follow this programme will gain:

  • knowledge and understanding of the role of literary writing in the formation of British, Scottish, Irish and English national identities in the 18th and 19th centuries
  • practical knowledge of the range of theoretical and philosophical ideas informing contemporary literary criticism
  • a grounding in the research methods of literary studies

Career opportunities

This programme will help you to identify possible topics for advanced research in English literature, potentially leading to an academic career. The transferable skills you gain, such as communication, project management and analysis, will give you an edge in a competitive employment market.



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Eighteenth Century Studies is taught with the British Museum and by teachers from eight departments in the School of Arts & Humanities. Read more
Eighteenth Century Studies is taught with the British Museum and by teachers from eight departments in the School of Arts & Humanities. Explore constructions of the Enlightenment through race, gender, class, intellectual networks and material culture. Analyse ideas, objects, texts and arts. Access to unique, diverse and rich collections. Ideal foundation for PhD study.

[[Key benefits]

- Joint degree with the British Museum

- Unrivalled access to British Museum expertise

- Unrivalled location for access to London's cultural collections

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/eighteenth-century-studies-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The MA in Eighteenth Century Studies is offered under the joint auspices of King’s and the British Museum. Drawing on the expertise of scholars from eight Departments in the School of Humanities at King’s, and senior staff at the British Museum, the MA offers exciting opportunities to explore 18th century textual, material and visual cultures.

The core module is taught in part by experts from the British Museum, with special reference to the Enlightenment Gallery and its history. Students will also be able to engage with the unique, diverse and rich collections of cultural institutions in central London, all close to King’s, including the National Portrait Gallery, the Royal Society, the Foundling Museum, and Sir John Soane’s Museum.

The core module explores constructions of Enlightenment, then and now, through frameworks such as race, gender, class, the body and intellectual networks; it invites students to analyse ideas, objects, texts and arts of the 18th century. A focus on ideas of the Enlightenment and about the Enlightenment is combined with the freedom to research a wealth of 18th century materials under the guidance of world-leading curators and experts.

- Course purpose -

Provides teaching and research training in a wide variety of disciplines relating to the study of the 18th century. As the programme will be offered jointly with the British Museum special emphasis will be placed on relevant collections held by that institution. Includes opportunities for training in any of the basic technical skills necessary for those who wish to go on to study for a PhD in 18th century subjects.

- Course format and assessment -

Seminars; study sessions in museums and galleries; research skill workshops and visits to cultural institutions. Core and optional modules assessed by coursework, plus a dissertation.

Career Prospecrs:

It is expected that some students will go on to research, while other possible roles might be in arts administration.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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This intercollegiate programme draws on the expertise of academic staff in the fields of the history of political thought and intellectual history from across the Colleges and Institutes of the University of London. Read more
This intercollegiate programme draws on the expertise of academic staff in the fields of the history of political thought and intellectual history from across the Colleges and Institutes of the University of London. The programme is administered from Queen Mary, so you register as a Queen Mary student � once you complete the programme, your degree will be a joint University of London-UCL MA. The MA Programme as a whole offers advanced training in intellectual history, the history of political thought and the history of philosophy, spanning the period from the ancient world to the Twenty-First Century. You will also be provided with an essential grounding in the various methods and approaches associated with the study of the history of thought developed over the past quarter-century in Europe and the United States.

Programme outline
The MA consists of the core module: Method and Practice in the History of Political Thought and Intellectual History, a selection of modules chosen from the list below, and an individually supervised dissertation. Below is a typical sample of module options that may be offered in a given year:

Democracy: Ancient and Modern Richard Bourke (Queen Mary)
Propaganda and Ideology in Rome Valentina Arena (UCL) [please note: not running 2011-12]
Languages of politics: Italy 1250-1500 Serena Ferente (KCL)
Political Thought in Renaissance Europe Iain McDaniel (UCL)
Early-modern theories of the state Quentin Skinner (Queen Mary)
The Public Sphere in Britain, 1476 - 1800 Jason Peacey (UCL)
Signs, Mind, and Society: Early Modern Theories of Language Avi Lifschitz (UCL)
Enlightenment and Revolution: Political Ideas in the British Isles 1688-1800 Ian McBride (KCL)
Selfhood, Sensibility and the Politics of Difference in the European Enlightenment Adam Sutcliffe (KCL) [please note: not running 2011-12]
From Hume to Darwin God, Man and Nature in European Thought Niall O'Flaherty (KCL)
Visions of Capitalism Jeremy Jennings (Queen Mary) [please note: not running 2011-12]
In the Shadow of the French Revolution: Political Thought 1790-1890 Gareth Stedman Jones (Queen Mary)
Theories of Empire: from Enlightenment to Liberalism Maurizio Isabella (Queen Mary)
Crisis and Future in Nineteenth-Century European Thought Axel K�rner (UCL)
Nationalism, Patriotism and Cosmopolitanism in Political Thought, 19th�20th Centuries Georgios Varouxakis (Queen Mary)

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This MA offers an intellectually dynamic introduction to one of the most exciting eras in literary history. Read more
This MA offers an intellectually dynamic introduction to one of the most exciting eras in literary history.

Grounded in and administered from the Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century, this is an interdisciplinary MA programme that builds upon the expertise and common research interests of 18th-century researchers and teachers across the Faculty of Humanities. The Centre provides an excellent research context for the MA programme and any further postgraduate work that will arise from it.

This programme allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent academic and recreational facilities, before relocating to our Paris centre for the spring term.

During your studies in Paris, you are based at Columbia Global Center (known as Reid Hall) in a historic corner of Montparnasse. You participate in the Paris-focused modules, taught in English. In the final term, you complete your MA by writing a 12-15,000-word dissertation on a research topic defined in collaboration with your academic supervisors.

You take two modules in each of the first two terms (three of these four modules are core) and a dissertation in the third.

Modules

In 2015 the following three core specialist modules were available: EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eighteenth Century, CP812 - Enlightenment and Counter-Enlightenment in the Long Eighteenth Century and FR803 – Paris and the European Enlightenment. These should be considered indicative of the types of modules available, which may vary from year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

Teaching and Assessment

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12,000 word dissertation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only or full-time at Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/index.html?tab=taught-masters

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This MA enables students to undertake close study of the history of Britain, Europe and the wider world between c.1500-1800, highlighting themes of political, cultural, religious and social history. Read more
This MA enables students to undertake close study of the history of Britain, Europe and the wider world between c.1500-1800, highlighting themes of political, cultural, religious and social history. Students choose from a wide range of modules and take two compulsory core courses on practical skills and methodological approaches. Leads to further research or careers in museums, journalism, finance and the cultural sector.

Key benefits

- One of the best history departments in the world, ranked 5th in the UK for Research Quality (REF 2014) and in the Top 10 departments of History in Europe (QS World University Rankings 2015).

- King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Kings is ranked in the top 6 in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016).

- A wide set of optional modules all taught by established experts in the field

- A rigorous core course that trains students in historical research in archives, manuscripts, print and objects

- Central London location and staff expertise offers students unrivalled access to world-class museums, collections, archives and libraries as well as easy access to resources in Europe.

- Vibrant research culture of seminars, workshops and conferences in the department and at the Institute of Historical Research, in which students are encouraged to participate.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/early-modern-history-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The early modern team at King's includes experts in the histories of the Reformation and the Enlightenment; gender; the material world of the Renaissance; race and racism, and on Britain, Ireland, France, the Netherlands, Portugal and the Iberian world. Our research connects the political and the social, the cultural and the religious dimensions of the early modern world, and our programme encourages interdisciplinary perspectives on early modern history.

The MA programme bridges the conventional division between British and European history, focusing on ways in which cultural, political and social themes stretch across the period c.1500-1800. The course ends with a tightly focused dissertation, but it begins by encouraging students to test concepts (identity, mentality, religion); to challenge models of change (modernization, state-building, the civilising process, reformation, enlightenment and revolution); and to try out methodologies (cultural history, gender, thinking with material objects, global history, using digital data).

- Course purpose -

The MA Early Modern History programme offers a rigorous introduction to the advanced study of early modern history, providing training in the historiographical and technical skills necessary for doctoral study, but is also designed for those who want to deepen their knowledge of the period.

- Course format and assessment -

Full-time study: 6-9 hours of taught classes per week plus dissertation tutorials.

Part-time study: 2-6 hours of taught classes per week plus dissertation tutorials.

The MA in Early Modern History modules are assessed by written coursework (and for one required module, a take-home exam). The 15,000 word dissertation enables students to research a topic of their choice, working one-to-one with an academic supervisor.

Career prospects:

Leads to further research or careers in museums, education, journalism, finance, politics and the cultural sector.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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This Masters is especially designed for students who don't already have a Philosophy degree. It will provide you with an in-depth knowledge of analytic philosophy, for instance, moral and political philosophy, the history of philosophy, philosophy of the mind and philosophy of mathematics and language. Read more
This Masters is especially designed for students who don't already have a Philosophy degree. It will provide you with an in-depth knowledge of analytic philosophy, for instance, moral and political philosophy, the history of philosophy, philosophy of the mind and philosophy of mathematics and language. The MLitt is also exceptional in providing a fast-track route into a PhD in Philosophy.

Why this programme

◾If you have a degree (or equivalent) in any other field, whether science, social science, arts or humanities, but an interest in philosophy, then the Philosophy MLitt will allow you to develop your philosophical interests in a variety of different courses as well as undertake a dissertation on a topic of your choice.
◾If you want to do a PhD in Philosophy but don't already have a Philosophy degree, then the MLitt will allow you to apply straightaway for the PhD.
◾We offer courses to bring you up to speed in a wide variety of philosophical topics, including ethics and politics, the history of philosophy including Russell, Wittgenstein and the Scottish Enlightenment, philosophy of mind - including consciousness, perception, the emotions, pain and pleasure - philosophy of language, and philosophy of mathematics.
◾You will work closely with an expert member of staff on a master’s dissertation on a topic of your choice.
◾MLitt students are encouraged to attend and participate in research seminars, workshops, conferences and reading groups hosted by the Centre for the Study of Perceptual Experience, the Forum for Philosophy and Religion, and the Forum for Quine and the History of Analytic Philosophy. Students will also present their work at the weekly postgraduate seminar where they will receive feedback from postgraduate students and staff. We also host an annual reading party in the Highlands at which students present papers and are coached on their writing and presentation skills.
◾Philosophy at Glasgow University has an illustrious history of original thinkers going against the grain of orthodoxy. Its past professors include such giants of empiricism as Adam Smith and Thomas Reid.

Programme structure

The Philosophy MLitt has three components:

1. Introduction to Analytic Philosophy (40 credits)

2. A choice of four of the following courses (20 credits each):
◾Aesthetics: philosophical questions about art and beauty
◾Origins of analytic philosophy including Russell and Wittgenstein
◾Philosophy of the Scottish Enlightenment including Hume and Reid
◾Philosophy of mind: consciousness, emotions, pain and pleasure
◾Moral philosophy: philosophical questions about value and well being
◾Political philosophy: philosophical questions about justice and the state
◾Metaphysics including existence, natural laws and the nature of time
◾Philosophy of language including meaning, translation and truth
◾Philosophy of mathematics: the nature and existence of numbers and sets

3. A dissertation on a topic of your choice guided by individual support from an expert supervisor (60 credits).

Career prospects

Philosophy students at Glasgow receive rigorous and personalised training in problem solving skills, writing skills, presentation and research skills.

All these skills are widely applicable and recognised to be exceptionally valuable in a wide range of careers, including journalism, teaching, the Civil Service, local government, business, publishing, law, and the arts.

You will also be well equipped to carry onto a further degree in philosophy such as the PhD.

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You will take two core courses and 6 option courses.You will be assessed through coursework and a 15,000-word dissertation. The compulsory courses are. Read more

You will take two core courses and 6 option courses.You will be assessed through coursework and a 15,000-word dissertation.

The compulsory courses are:

  • Historical Methodology;
  • Historical Research: Skills and Sources

Option courses previously available include:

  • Epicurus and Epicureanism
  • Myth and the History of Scholarship in Early Modern Europe
  • Theories of Empire in the Early Modern Period
  • Intellectual History of the American Revolution
  • Religion and the Enlightenment: the Birth of the Modern
  • Athens of the North: the Origins and Ideas of the Scottish Enlightenment;
  • Mind and Body in Early Modern Philosophy;
  • Seeking Japan in a Westernising World, 1868–1945;
  • Thinking the Twentieth Century;
  • Citizens and Subjects: Concepts of Citizenship in Modern African Intellectual History.

Learning outcomes

Students are expected to achieve several aims, which will be assessed primarily by essays and a dissertation, such as:

  • knowledge of the chief methods of practising intellectual history
  • a detailed understanding of certain major episodes in intellectual history
  • an appreciation of the interdependence of text and context, and of the importance of ideas in past and present

A wide variety of intellectual skills are promoted through seminars, discussions and advanced study, encouraging the development of the:

  • ability to develop tight and coherent arguments both orally and on the page
  • capacity to read texts critically and sensitively, evaluating their arguments as well as situating them in their practical and intellectual contexts
  • appreciation of a variety of approaches to intellectual history
  • ability to cross-disciplinary boundaries, for example, between philosophy, science and history

Career opportunities

Our students view the programme and a graduate degree from Edinburgh as an advanced qualification valued and respected by many employers. Those students interested in long-term academic careers consider the programme as preparation for a PhD.

The combination of specialised skills training courses and seminars, and the opportunity for independent research provides you with transferable skills that will be beneficial whatever path you choose. Graduates pursue work in related areas such as museums, policy think-tanks, national and international civil services, non-governmental organisations, galleries, libraries and historic trusts whilst others build on the transferable skills gained and enter areas as diverse as business, media, public administration and marketing.



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Our MA in French and Comparative Literature involves the postgraduate study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders with a particular focus on French culture. Read more
Our MA in French and Comparative Literature involves the postgraduate study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders with a particular focus on French culture.

Comparative Literature at Kent involves the study of literature from two or more European cultures, to gain an intercultural and transnational understanding of cultural practice. The MA in French and Comparative Literature introduces you to a wide range of theoretical perspectives, enriching your appreciation of the cultures, texts and critical practices examined in the programme’s various modules. You benefit from expert teaching from members of the Department of Modern Languages (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/modern-languages/index.html) and the Department of Comparative Literature (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/complit/index.html) and thus participate in an interdisciplinary dialogue.

Kent provides an ideal location in which to study French culture; our Canterbury campus is close to mainland Europe, with Paris only a couple of hours away by Eurostar.

In the Autumn and Spring terms, you take a choice of four modules, before undertaking a 12,000 word dissertation over the summer with supervision from an expert within the department. There is also a version of this programme which allows you to spend the spring term in Paris.

This programme is ideal for modern languages graduates who wish to consolidate their knowledge in a wider context; English graduates wishing to diversify their interests; and graduates in other humanities subjects (history, philosophy, theology) who would like to apply their knowledge to literary and visual material.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/modern-languages/postgraduate/taught-french-and-comparative-literature.html

Assessment

Assessment is by one 5,000-word essay for each module and the dissertation.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- provide the opportunity for you to obtain a postgraduate qualification (MA) in one year, and to allow, if required, a smooth transition to doctoral studies

- allow you to study modules in both modern French studies and comparative literature

- develop your knowledge and understanding of relevant aspects of contemporary Paris and the cultural history of the city as reflected in modern French, European, English and American literatures and other artistic media

- enhance your comprehension and communication skills in both French and English

- develop your awareness of various critical and research methodologies and of the interplay between literature, art and cultural context

- provide teaching which is informed by current research and scholarship and which requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- provide a deepening of intercultural awareness and understanding

- provide opportunities for the further development of personal, communication and research skills and other key skills appropriate for graduate employment both in industry and in the public sector

- provide further development of critical, analytical, problem-solving and other transferable skills.

Research areas

Staff interests broadly fit within the parameters of French literature and thought from the 18th century to the present, with research clusters organised around the following areas: the European Enlightenment and Counter-Enlightenment; Ekphrasis; Franco-Sino relations; Life Writing; Medical Humanities; Philosophy and Critical Theory; French Surrealism; Cubism; the Avant-Garde; the interface between visual arts and text.

Recent publications have focused on authors, artists and thinkers including the following: Apollinaire; Artaud; Badiou; Barthes; Blanchot; Cocteau; Crébillon fils; Deleuze; Diderot; Djebar; Flaubert; Foucault; Houellebecq; Lacan; Maupassant; Mérimée; Nimier; Proust; Sade; Yourcenar; Zola.

Centre for Language and Linguistic Studies (CLLS)
Founded in 2007, the Centre for Language and Linguistic Studies (CLLS) promotes interdisciplinary collaboration in linguistic research and teaching. Membership embraces not just the members of English Language and Linguistics but also other SECL members with an interest in the study of language, as well as researchers in philosophy, computing, psychology and anthropology, reflecting the many and varied routes by which individuals come to a love of language and an interest in the various disciplines and subdisciplines of linguistics.

Centre for Modern European Literature
Many of the most significant European writers and literary movements of the modern period have traversed national, linguistic, and disciplinary borders. Co-directed by members of Comparative Literature, French, and German, the Centre for Modern European Literature aims to promote collaborative interdisciplinary research that can do justice to these kinds of border crossing.

Ranging across English, French, German, Italian and Spanish literature, the Centre focuses in particular on the European avant-garde, European modernism and postmodernism, literary theory, the international reception of European writers, and the relations between modern European literature and the other arts, including painting, photography, film, music and architecture. The Centre’s activities include a lecture and seminar series and the regular organisation of conferences. It also works with the editors of the postgraduate journal Skepsi, and runs the MA in Modern European Literature.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in French studies is an extremely versatile qualification that can open the door to exciting career opportunities in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work in the IT industry, academic administration, cultural management and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at UK and overseas universities.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This programme will allow you to take a broad approach to African, Indian, American, British and European history from the early modern period to the 21st century. Read more

Overview

This programme will allow you to take a broad approach to African, Indian, American, British and European history from the early modern period to the 21st century.

A core module will allow you to sharpen your research skills, and you’ll choose from a wide range of optional modules spanning nations, continents, periods and themes to explore topics that interest you. You could study black internationalism alongside early modern Europe, the Spanish state, Stalinism, political violence in India or apartheid.

You’ll be taught by leading researchers as part of a large and diverse School of History and Leeds Humanities Research Institute, supported by active research groups and extensive library resources. Our research interests range from social history and identity to political history, nationalism and internationalism, meaning this flexible programme offers plenty of opportunities to gain important skills while focusing on issues that suit your interests.
The degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months. The part-time MA may be of special interest to those who are working in related fields as part of their career development.

Facilities and Resources

You’ll study in a supportive environment with a wide range of resources. The world-class Brotherton Library has one of the best history collections in the UK, ranging from monographs and journals to conference papers, theses and over 100 digital databases of primary sources and other materials for fundamental research. The Brotherton also has its own special collections including the Leeds Russian Archive and the Feminist Archive North.

The Alf Mattinson Collection is full of printed works and papers related to the history of the Labour Party, and the Romany collection and Liddle Collection offer insights into Romany culture and the First World War respectively.

Course Content

You’ll study one core module in your first semester, introducing you to different research methodologies in history and allowing you to develop your skills. You’ll also select from a wide range of optional modules throughout the year, allowing you to pursue topics that interest you such as the history of Yorkshire, the European Enlightenment or issues surrounding global security.

You’ll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the ‘Making History: Archive Collaborations’ module.

This programme will equip you with in-depth subject knowledge, as well as high-level skills in research, interpretation and analysis. You’ll be able to demonstrate these when you complete your dissertation on a modern history topic of your choice, which you’ll submit by the end of the programme.

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There are many reasons why you might choose our English Literary Studies MA. If you are thinking about taking your study of English to the next level in preparation for a PhD then our Department has the knowledge to give you the high level training you need to set you on that path. Read more
There are many reasons why you might choose our English Literary Studies MA. If you are thinking about taking your study of English to the next level in preparation for a PhD then our Department has the knowledge to give you the high level training you need to set you on that path. If you are a recent graduate looking to stand out in the job market, already working but want to develop further, or simply looking to take your passion for English to the next level then we have the strength and depth of specialisms to fit your interests.

We are one of the strongest English departments in the UK with an excellent reputation for high quality research. Our Postgraduate students are an important part of our research community, and if you choose to join us at Exeter then you will be too.

Our Library and Special Collections offer modern study facilities and a vast amount of original source material, and if you’re interested in film or visual culture then the on-site Bill Douglas Cinema Museum is an invaluable resource.

You can choose to study one of the specialist pathways we have chosen to match the Department’s strengths or you can take an open pathway and tailor your own programme from our wide range of modules.

Programme Structure

Students may opt to follow one of our seven named pathways, each of which has its own pathway leader and associated modules. American and Atlantic Studies, Criticism and Theory, Enlightenment to Romanticism, Film Studies, Renaissance Studies, Modern and Contemporary, Victorian Studies, or opt for the ‘open’ English Literary Studies pathway.

Modules

Each Pathway has compulsory and optional modules some of these are listed here;
The Cultures of American Modernism; Beyond the Border: The Politics of Place in Contemporary North American Literature and Culture; Criticism and Theory: Critical and Literary Theory in a Global Context; Revival and Return: Using the Past from Pope to Keats; Body and Identity; Sense, Sensation, and Cinema; Hearing Film: Film Sound and Music; Country City and Court Renaissance Literature 1558-1618; Bodies Politic: Cultural and Sexual Politics in England, 1603-85; From Orientalism to Globalization: Debates in Postcolonial Studies; Beyond the Border: The Politics of Place in Contemporary North American Literature and Culture; Making Progress? Literature in a Changing Environment 1830-1870 and Empire, Decadence and Modernity: Literature 1870-1910.

Constituent modules and pathways may be updated, deleted or replaced in future years as a consequence of programme development. Details at any time may be obtained from the Department website at http://humanities.exeter.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/ .

Careers

In recent years the positions some of our graduates have gone on to include: Copywriter; Marketing Assistant; Assistant Editor; Publishing Assistant; Editorial Assistant; Freelance Journalist and Writer

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This is a one-year programme in which you choose your own research topic, conduct independent research, and submit a 40,000-word thesis. Read more
This is a one-year programme in which you choose your own research topic, conduct independent research, and submit a 40,000-word thesis. You will be supported throughout the project through regular tutorial meetings with your supervisor and research training from specialist staff including the German subject librarian. The programme is tailored to your own needs and interests, ideal if you have a strong research interest in a particular topic you wish to pursue for one year only, or which lays the groundwork for a larger project to pursue at PhD level.

Research interests

Specialist areas of our staff range across the whole of the Modern period, from the 18th-century Enlightenment to the present day, with notable areas of expertise in:
-German Classicism and Romanticism
-Orientalism in German Culture from 1800 to the Present
-German Diasporic Cultures and Literatures
-Nationalism and Anti-Semitism
-Weimar Cultures
-Contemporary German History
-GDR History; Gender, Terrorism and Prison Writing
-Post-War German Literature and Culture
-German Memory Cultures
-Temporality and Deceleration in Contemporary German Culture
-Critical Theory

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Our flagship Philosophy programme offers excellent opportunities to enhance your learning among a large, vibrant and supportive postgraduate and research community at a university that has long been associated with some of the field’s most important thinkers, such as David Hume. Read more

Programme description

Our flagship Philosophy programme offers excellent opportunities to enhance your learning among a large, vibrant and supportive postgraduate and research community at a university that has long been associated with some of the field’s most important thinkers, such as David Hume.

This programme provides an intensive grounding in philosophy, its methodology and techniques of research. It is the ideal programme to lead on to further research and study in philosophy as part of a PhD programme. We will provide a broad advanced education in philosophy or a chance to specialise in any of our key areas:

ancient philosophy
early modern philosophy
epistemology
ethics
mind and cognition

Programme structure

This programme comprises two semesters of taught courses (six in total) followed by a dissertation, which you will write at the end of the second semester and over the summer.

Most courses in the philosophy department are taught in small seminar groups that meet weekly. Assessment is by essays and a dissertation of between 8,000 and 10,000 words.

At the dissertation stage, you will be assigned a supervisor with whom you meet to plan your reading and discuss your work.

Compulsory courses:

Introduction to Philosophical Method (for students without a strong philosophy background)
Advanced Philosophical Method

If you choose to follow a specialisation, the courses you choose will relate to that route. Options may include:

Advanced Topics in Mind, Language and Embodied Cognition
Ancient Theories of Existence
Bounded Rationality
British Enlightenment Philosophy
Epistemology 1
Free Will and Moral Responsibility
Introduction to Philosophical Method
Introduction to Mind, Language and Embodied Cognition
Meta-Ethics
Philosophy and the Environment

Career opportunities

This is the ideal programme for deepening your involvement in philosophy, giving you a grounding in postgraduate work or developing an academic career in philosophy.

The study of philosophy helps develop general intellectual abilities and enhance analytical, critical, interpretive and problem-solving abilities.

This programme brings you into a postgraduate community with a very high academic job-placement record.

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Explore the relationship between literature and film in an exceptionally broad array of contemporary and historical contexts, and from a variety of different perspectives. Read more
Explore the relationship between literature and film in an exceptionally broad array of contemporary and historical contexts, and from a variety of different perspectives. You discover cutting-edge approaches to cinematic and literary aesthetics, adaptation, and relationships between different media, reception contexts, ethics, and interfaces between theory and practice.

On our course you gain a deep understanding of the theoretical and practical interactions between literature and film, choosing specific areas of literary and cinema studies to complement your preparation for a creative practice or theoretical dissertation project of your choice. You will forge and develop connections between audio-visual and textual media. Focusing a variety of cultural productions and diverse forms of enlightenment, and entertainment, you will encounter parallel and sometimes more densely intertwined media histories, discovering the complex ways in which media anticipate, interfere with, and draw on one other.

Through weekly seminars, screenings and discussions of key cinematic and literary texts, you consider different ways that texts create their meanings. You study topics including:
-Areas such as modernism, poetic practice, American prose, Caribbean literature, and African American literature
-Documentary and fiction film production including screenwriting, pre-production, camera, lighting, sound, storyboarding and editing
-Landmark directors and movements such as Expressionism and the avant-garde
-Film theory including feminism, psychoanalysis, queer theory, haptic cinema
-Adaptation and comparative media

You also benefit from a series of masterclasses conducted by invited industry professionals which focus on the craft of filmmaking: developing your technical understanding of cinematography, directing and editing/postproduction.

These also introduce you to potential employment routes and industry career pathways, from setting up your own production company, to identifying and tapping into distribution networks and preparing and marketing your completed films.

We are ranked Top 20 in the UK (Times Good University Guide 2015), and three-quarters of our research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014).

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

Our intensive modules are taught in small groups by expert academic film specialists and professional filmmakers .

The Centre for Film and Screen Media at Essex is part of a vital departmental unit that offers talented students the support and confidence to respond both critically and artistically to the study of film. This distinctive environment is possible because we are a community of award-winning film-makers, scholars, and media specialists; our staff over the years have included Oscar winners and BAFTA winners.

Our academic staff specialise in a wide range of production and critical areas including producing, screenwriting, documentary, , film theory, Soviet cinema, US cinema, films of Asia and Pacific regions, modernism and the avant-garde, adaptation, and silent cinema.

Our Department has a distinguished history of combining critical and creative work, and we have long been home to poets, novelists, translators, dramatists and actors, alongside literary critics, drama scholars, filmmakers and film theorists.

Specialist facilities

For your film production modules, you have priority use of industry-standard editing facilities, two state-of-the-art studios, and a range of cameras and other filmmaking equipment. You also gain experience using professional film production software including Avid and Final Cut; everything you will need to produce films to an expert standard.

You also have access to our other departmental facilities:
-Show off your work on our Vimeo channel
-View classic films at weekly film screenings in our dedicated 120-seat film theatre, equipped with digital HD projection facilities and surround sound
-Borrow DVDs from our substantial departmental collection
-Join student film societies and the Centre for Film and Screen Media film series, which screen and discuss both recent blockbusters and less mainstream arthouse films
-Hear writers talk about their craft and learn from leading specialists at weekly research seminars
-Our on-campus Lakeside Theatre has been established as a major venue for good drama, staging both productions by professional touring companies and a wealth of new work written, produced and directed by our own staff and students
-Improve your playwriting skills at our Lakeside Theatre Writers workshops
-Our Research Laboratory allows you to collaborate with professionals, improvising and experimenting with new work which is being tried and tested
-Write for our student magazine Albert or host a Red Radio show

Your future

We actively encourage and assist you to find appropriate internship and work placement opportunities during your studies, allowing you to practice and develop your skills and experience as well as enhancing your graduate employment prospects.

A number of our Department of Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies graduates have gone on to undertake successful careers as scholars, university lecturers, teachers, publishers, journalists, arts administrators, theatre artistic directors, drama advisers, filmmakers, film editors, and translators.

We also offer supervision for PhD, MPhil and MA by Dissertation in different literatures and various approaches to literature, covering most aspects of early modern and modern writing in English, plus a number of other languages.

Our University is one of only 11 AHRC-accredited Doctoral Training Centres in the UK. This means that we offer funded PhD studentships which also provide a range of research and training opportunities.

We work with our Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

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Our MA in English Studies invites you to choose from a number of distinctive pathways through the programme. Our Eighteenth-Century Literature and Romanticism pathway takes a truly interdisciplinary approach, and explores the history of genres, philosophy, politics, history, and visual culture, amongst other topics. Read more
Our MA in English Studies invites you to choose from a number of distinctive pathways through the programme.

Our Eighteenth-Century Literature and Romanticism pathway takes a truly interdisciplinary approach, and explores the history of genres, philosophy, politics, history, and visual culture, amongst other topics.

In your first semester you might explore the popular culture of coffee house and tavern, the political world on the street and in parliament, the vocations of women poets and polemicists, polite society and its interest in the management of emotions and arts, and the metropolitan life of London.

In the second semester, you can examine Romantic poetics and manifestos, the theoretical and political growth of philosophical and cultural enlightenment, Orientalism, travel, and the French Revolution and its aftershocks.

This pathway aims to prepare students to formulate a research topic, identify research materials, and present an argument in written and oral form that is formed by alternative interpretations. Students who complete the pathway will be aware of the interdisciplinary debates concerning the literature and history of this period, and will have engaged with a variety of materials: theoretical, visual, historical, and literary. You will also be able to deploy a range of appropriate skills in research, bibliography, and IT.

You will be taught in small seminar groups, and will be introduced to a number of key research resources in London through a module in research skills.

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This flexible programme looks at the Christian past from a variety of perspectives – theological, philosophical and historical – and provides options for special study of themes from the early church to modern times. Read more

This flexible programme looks at the Christian past from a variety of perspectives – theological, philosophical and historical – and provides options for special study of themes from the early church to modern times.

The programme will enable you to understand and reflect critically upon the historical contexts in which Christian thought has developed.

Our approach is interdisciplinary: instructors include historians, philosophers of religion and systematic theologians. Your work will be enriched by the School’s guest lectures and regular research seminars in theology and ethics, and the history of Christianity.

This programme can be taken either as a Master of Theology (MTh) or as a Master of Science (MSc); the difference is only in the name.

Programme structure

This programme is run full-time over one year (or part-time over two years). You will be taught mainly in small classroom/seminar groups. You will be given training in research methods which offers a practical approach to postgraduate level skills of critical investigation and writing, and receive individual supervision for your 15,000 word dissertation.

Compulsory courses

Creeds, Councils and Controversies I: Patristic and Medieval; Creeds, Councils and Controversies II: Reformation and Modern; and two courses in research methods.

Option courses

You will choose three options. At least one must be a theology in history course, such as:

  • Byzantine Theology
  • Calvinist Theology and Piety
  • Church, State and Civil Society
  • From Diatribe to Dialogue in Muslim-Christian Relations
  • History of Christianity in Africa
  • Reformation in Sixteenth Century Britain and Ireland
  • Religion and the Enlightenment: the Birth of the Modern

The options on offer change from year to year, so please consult the Programme Director for advice on what will be available. With the agreement of your Programme Director, you may also choose options from other taught masters programmes, language courses, and advanced undergraduate courses.

Career opportunities

This programme is designed to provide a strong foundation for postgraduate research in the field or for employment in a range of areas requiring critical analysis and empathetic understanding.



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