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Masters Degrees (English Essay)

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This programme provides professional development for English language teachers, and focuses on the theory and practice of teaching the English language in a variety of contexts, drawing on innovative research carried out by members of the School of Humanities, which includes work on Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL), corpus linguistics, Academic English and telecollaboration. Read more
This programme provides professional development for English language teachers, and focuses on the theory and practice of teaching the English language in a variety of contexts, drawing on innovative research carried out by members of the School of Humanities, which includes work on Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL), corpus linguistics, Academic English and telecollaboration.

A distinctive feature of the programme is that you will have opportunities to observe English Language classes in higher education and undertake microteaching practice. You will also develop digital expertise with state-of-the-art e-learning tools and focus on specific English Language issues relating to your own educational contexts.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

Students on the programme state that staff provide them with excellent academic and pastoral support and that their learning experience is very positive (evidence from module and course evaluation questionnaires). The course also focuses on the future world of work and students may apply for part-time paid teaching opportunities and work placements within Coventry University, including placements overseas.

The assessment on the programme is varied and includes essays, reports, presentations, digital learning object design, microteaching and seen in-class tests. The course also offers extra-curricular activities, such as participation in lectures and workshops with renowned visiting applied linguists andeducation experts.

There also is a free field trip relevant to the curriculum. In 2014 for example we went to the British Museum in London and then designed intercultural teaching tasks based on the objects viewed at the museum (activity linked to the mandatory module on materials design).

You will moreover be offered other field trips at competitive rates as they are supported by the Faculty of Arts and Humanities and by the Centre for Global Engagement.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

You will:
-Discuss theory and practice of English language learning and teaching
-Develop skills in the evaluation and design of teaching materials for a variety of settings
-Explore the role played by new technologies for learning, teaching and communicating
-Analyse English as it is spoken and written in the UK and in the rest of the world
-Have the opportunity to practice teaching and observe experienced teachers in a variety of face-to-face and blended-learning settings

The mandatory modules are:
-Theories, Approaches and Methods of Language Learning and Teaching
-Developing Language Teaching Materials
-Analysing Written and Spoken Discourse
-Grammar and Phonology for the English Language Teacher
-Teaching English in Higher Education
-Computer Assisted Language Learning: Theory and Practice
-Dissertation in ELT/Applied Linguistics

In addition, you will choose three of the following optional modules:
-Business English;
-Sociolinguistics and English Language Teaching
-Teaching English Through Literature
-Corpus Analysis and Pedagogy
-English for Academic Purposes Course Design and Language Testing
-Understanding Academic English

HOW WILL THIS COURSE BE TAUGHT?

The full-time, face-to-face, programme runs over three semesters. There are two entry points: September and January. Students normally take four 15-credit modules in semester 1, four 15-credit modules modules in semester 2, and complete a Dissertation in semester 3.

Modules are taught face-to-face with lectures, workshops, laboratory sessions and seminars. All students are asked to submit a diagnostic task on arrival (normally a short essay). One-to-one support is available for students who need practise in academic English writing.

The delivery of all modules is supported by an online learning environment that is used, for example, to display content material, to submit assignments and provide electronic feedback, to discuss seminar topics (discussion forums), to design student-centred glossaries and to engage in online assessment and practice.

Students are also offered the opportunity to discuss English language teaching and analyse the English language with dedicated e-learning platforms for specific purposes (e.g. Corpus Linguistics tools, Computer Assisted Language Learning and Mobile Assisted Language Learning platforms).

Staff teaching on the programme also make use of the new learning spaces in the Disruptive Media Learning Laboratory in the Lanchester Library, to encourage students to practise English teaching in a variety of settings.

A part-time programme is available for UK/EU applicants, and can be tailored to the needs of each applicant.

HOW WILL I BE ASSESSED?

A variety of assessed tasks have been integrated into this programme, offering you a stimulating assessment experience and to enable you to reflect on your work, as the programme is designed to train teachers who will assess work themselves. Each module will normally have two assessment tasks and you will receive feedback on the first task before you submit the second one. The assessment tasks include seen examinations, presentations, essays and reports, corpus-based syllabus and course design, microteaching, reflective test design, e-learning object design in group and peer observation reports.

The external examiners have commented very positively on the variety, innovation and appropriateness of the assessment tasks on this programme. For example in 2013-2014 the External Examiner commented in his annual report: 'The assessment tasks are of good quality - well conceived, often imaginative, and in many cases appropriately practical, matching well with intended learning outcomes. I commend this.'

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

English looks likely to continue as the international language for the foreseeable future, and this MA programme leads to a variety of career destinations in teaching the language and/or in education management. Qualifications of this kind are often seen as important for access to senior management posts in both private and state educational institutions around the world. In addition to classroom teaching you will be well equipped to perform roles such as materials developer, resource manager and examiner.

Graduates from the MA in ELT are currently employed as professors in Jordan and China, as Pre-sessional Programme Coordinators in the UK and China and as Academic English Consultants for both the private and public sector, just to provide a few examples.

WORK PLACEMENTS

You will be provided support to find a work placement by dedicated staff in the careers office and in the Centre for Global Engagement.

OPPORTUNITIES FOR AN INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE

You will be offered the opportunity to take part in the global leaders programme (additional fees apply, see further details below) that includes international experiences. There will also be international trips organised by the School in collaboration with the Centre for Global Engagement. As English is a global language, international perspectives on learning and teaching English are fully embedded in the curriculum.

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You will combine advanced study in historical and modern aspects of English language and English linguistics. This programme provides career opportunities in research, teaching, publishing and lexicography among others. Read more
You will combine advanced study in historical and modern aspects of English language and English linguistics. This programme provides career opportunities in research, teaching, publishing and lexicography among others. It is a research training Masters in line with Arts & Humanities Research Council practice and is an accredited part of the training programme of the Economic & Social Research Council Scottish Doctoral Training Centre.

Why this programme

-You will have access to Glasgow’s Special Collections, which has a large collection of medieval and renaissance manuscripts and early printed books.
-You will also have access to professional standard equipment for the analysis of speech data in the University’s Phonetics Lab.

Programme structure

You will learn through a combination of lectures, regular supervisions, formative essay writing and attendance at supplementary classes and seminars. Assessment includes a portfolio of essays.

You will undertake a number of core courses in historical and modern English language and English linguistics, including
-Phonetics and phonology
-Sociolinguistics
-Lexicography, lexicology and semantics
-Discourse analysis and grammar
-English historical linguistics

You can also take courses on offer in some MLitt programmes in the College of Arts, for example,Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Classics.

You will take courses in research skills and methods. The second half of the programme is dedicated to your individual dissertation work, under the guidance of an assigned supervisor.

Please note that the availability of Core Courses depends on staff availability in any session; the availability of Option Courses depends on student take-up and staff availability in any session.

Core and optional courses

The components covered in Semester 1 provide a high level overview of core topics in English Language and English Linguistics. You will study current issues in these fields, which will provide the basis for independent empirical research in your chosen specified areas in Semester 2.
-Phonetics and Phonology
-Sociolinguistics
-Discourse Studies
-English Historical Linguistics
-Early English Textual Studies

Dissertation

From April to September, students work on a short dissertation (15,000 words) linking directly to work undertaken in Semester 2 with their supervisors. The Dissertation can be an end in itself, but it is envisaged that it can also act as a pilot-study for, or a component part of, a subsequent doctoral thesis.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include teaching, publishing, digital analysis, journalism and lexicography. You can take advantage of opportunities to establish or advance your career as a writer or editor, or to work in museums, schools or academia. Other graduates have used their specialist knowledge to gain positions in the media or in business.

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Develop the various intellectual and practical skills necessary for research in the field of mediaeval literature. The opportunity to extend and deepen knowledge of English and Scottish literature from the earliest Old English writings through to the close of the Middle Ages. Read more

MLitt in Mediaeval English

• Develop the various intellectual and practical skills necessary for research in the field of mediaeval literature.
• The opportunity to extend and deepen knowledge of English and Scottish literature from the earliest Old English writings through to the close of the Middle Ages.

Teaching methods: Seminar (and some didactic classes and hands-on practical sessions).
Assessment: Coursework essays, assessed exercises, Dissertation.
Contact hours: Variable from module to module: see individual module descriptions for details.

See the website http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/

Features

* The School of English currently has 32 permanent members of staff, as well as several Teaching Fellows, Honorary Lecturers/Senior Lecturers, and Honorary Professors.

* The School admits around 30 new taught postgraduate students each year.

* Research excellence in all periods of English literature from Old English to the present day.

* Members of the School include winners of the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry, Whitbread Prize, T S Eliot Prize for Poetry, the Forward Poetry Prize, the Geoffrey Faber Prize, the Somerset Maugham Award, the Canongate Prize, the Petrarca Preis, the Prix Zepter Prize and a Commonwealth Writers Prize for fiction.

* The University has one of the highest concentrations of mediaevalists in the UK, united by the St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies (SAIMS).

* The School is home to the Cambridge University Press edition of Virginia Woolf edited by Susan Sellers and Jane Goldman (University of Glasgow), making St Andrews a prestigious international centre for Woolf studies.

* Members of the School sit on the editorial board of Forum for Modern Language Studies, a humanities journal published by Oxford University Press.

Postgraduate community

The School has a vibrant postgraduate community of around 80 students (full and part time) with a dedicated administrator who manages and advises on all postgraduate matters from admissions queries to PhD vivas, ensuring continuity for both postgraduates and staff.

Postgraduates meet regularly at the School’s Postgraduate Forum and at various voluntary seminar series organised by English or other Schools within the Faculty of Arts. The crossfertilisation of ideas between traditional literary / theoretical research and creative writing provides a uniquely stimulating environment supporting the usual individual meetings between postgraduate students and their supervisors. All taught postgraduates have access to research funds to help offset the costs of attending conferences or other research libraries.

Students are part of a welcoming and lively academic community. There is an active student-run Literary Society and the Postgraduate Forum, where postgraduates meet to present and discuss their ongoing work. Each semester, the School invites distinguished visiting academics and creative writers to lead seminars, lectures and workshops as part of our regular research events.

Facilities

The teaching rooms and staff offices of the School of English are housed in two nineteenth-century stone buildings, Castle House
and Kennedy Hall, opposite St Andrews Castle and overlooking the sea. 66 North Street, the School’s dedicated Centre for research students, is only a few minutes’ walk away. It offers bench rooms with PC workstations for all postgraduates, both taught and research. This lovely nineteenth-century building also has a well-used kitchen, common room and sunny garden. The encouragement of postgraduate study is a special concern of ours, and the number of postgraduate students has grown markedly in recent years.

The University Library has outstanding resources for research in English. The Copyright Deposit Collection contains approximately 40,000 volumes, covering the whole subject area from 1709 to 1837, and approximately 5,000 volumes of periodicals which ceased publication before 1841. Some of this material is not held in the National Library of Scotland. The print collection therefore offers an impressive range of opportunities for research in eighteenth-century literature, the Scottish Enlightenment and Romanticism.

The University Library also subscribes to a wide variety of online databases, including JISC Historic Books for access to almost all printed books to 1800, and Defining Gender 1450- 1910 for material supporting the School’s work in gender and sexuality studies. Manuscript collections extend from mediaeval archives through some of the world’s most detailed records of eighteenth and nineteenth-century reading to the papers of the contemporary poet Douglas Dunn. Postgraduates have the opportunity to work with expert Library staff in areas ranging from palaeography to digital humanities.

Additional application information

All MLitt applicants should submit a sample of written work of around 2,000 words. This must be a critical academic essay (or extract) related to the proposed field of study. Applicants for the MLitt programme in Creative Writing should also include a typed portfolio of original verse, prose or play/ screenwriting (around 10 poems or 10-15 pages of prose or play/screenwriting). In addition, all applicants should submit a Supplementary Application Form in place of a personal statement. The form may be downloaded from the website at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/applying/documents/

Funding: investing in your future

The School of English normally offers a small number of its own awards for suitably qualified applicants who have been accepted for an MLitt. These are open to both home/EU and overseas students. Up-to-date information can be found at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/funding/

Recent School of English taught postgraduate students have also succeeded in obtaining funding from a variety of external sources in order to study here, including the Marshall Scholarship, the Ransome Trust and Scotland’s Saltire Scholarship fund.

Details of these and other scholarship opportunities and initiatives can be found on the University’s scholarships webpages: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/pg/fees-and-funding/scholarships/taught/

Careers

Following a taught postgraduate course in English at the University, students go on to pursue careers in a range of sectors including journalism, marketing, publishing and teaching. Others continue in academia, moving on to a PhD. The Careers Centre offers one-to-one advice to all students on a taught postgraduate course and offers a programme of events to assist students to build their employability skills.

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​MA English Literature & Creative Writing is a rewarding taught degree, combining the study of English Literature with the theoretical and practical component of fiction writing. Read more

Course Overview

​MA English Literature & Creative Writing is a rewarding taught degree, combining the study of English Literature with the theoretical and practical component of fiction writing.

The MA is taught by published writers and researchers. The course is aimed to support you while you develop and hone your critical and creative writing skills, particularly in the field of fiction. You can take our MA for professional development purposes, in order to enhance your career and to increase your likelihood of publication. The MA will also help you specialise in the areas of creative practice as well as contemporary and historical literature in relation to place and space in order to pave the way for doctoral study.

We have expertise across a number of fields and our academic community is vibrant and dynamic with strong industry links.

The English Literature part of the degree analyses historic and contemporary textual representations of place, theorising cultural practices of location and space. The Creative Writing modules are specifically designed to develop you as a writer of fiction.

One of the great strengths of the programme is its flexibility. MA English Literature and Creative Writing can be studied either full or part time. Modules can be taken individually, allowing you to control the pace and depth of your postgraduate study. Programme delivery is enhanced by the university’s commitment to e-learning​.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/education/courses/Pages/English-and-Creative-Writing---MA.aspx

Course Content​​

All of our modules are core and are delivered over one year full time or two years part time.
Term 1
- Researching Humanities
Researching Humanities will introduce you to research methods at MA level. The module provides a thorough breakdown of research methods across the fields of Creative Writing and English Literature. This module is taught across all of our MA Creative Writing and English Literature pathways and it is also a great opportunity for you to get to know your peers.

- Short Story Writing
Short Story Writing provides a thorough introduction to the short story. This is done through two distinct, but integrated, approaches: a critical analysis of the development of the short story, with particular focus on twentieth century and contemporary writing; and through the creative practice itself. Each week you'll be encouraged to explore key techniques and approaches in your own writing through writing workshops.

- Literature and Landscapes
In Literature and Landscapes, you’ll examine artistic and literary representations of landscape, and engage with the complex social, cultural and aesthetic factors that contribute to the formation of identity. The module provides a comparative foundation from which you’ll consider representations of the urban encountered in Writing the City.

Term 2
- Novel Writing
Novel Writing extends and deepens your engagement with fiction writing. The module provides you with a thorough introduction to the novel as a distinct fictional genre focussing on the contemporary. As well as examining key works, you'll also be working on your own creative practice. A key part of the module focuses on the preparation of your work for publication.

- Writing the City
In Writing the City you'll explore representations of urban space through set texts and in your own creative writing. In this module you’ll examine texts that explore the urban in literary fiction, particularly throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

- Critical Practice
Critical Practice prepares you for your dissertation through which you'll be able to submit a substantial body of creative work along with a contextualising critical commentary.

- Dissertation
The Dissertation module is your opportunity to create a portfolio of writing, such as a collection of short stories or an excerpt of a novel that you are working on. The creative work will be accompanied by a critical reflection in which you contextualise your writing within a critical framework and with reference to other texts.

Learning & Teaching​

​Most modules are taught through group workshops and seminars. Some modules will also include individual tutorials and the dissertation module is delivered entirely through one-to-one tutorials with your supervisor.

In workshops and seminars full use is made of University technology and course materials will be delivered and stored through our Virtual Learning Environment. It will be possible for you to access the Virtual Learning Environment remotely and you will be encouraged to do so.

Most modules are 20 or 30 credits although we also have a 10-credit module and the dissertation is worth 60 credits.

In a 10-credit module you will receive 11 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 89 hours of independent study. In a 20-credit module you will receive 22 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 178 hours of independent study. In a 30-credit module you will receive 33 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 267 hours of independent study. The 60-credit dissertation is mainly conducted with independent study. You will receive 6 hours of tutorial supervision (this includes supervisors looking over your work) and you will be expected to conduct 594 hours of independent study.

Each student is appointed a personal tutor who will be available for academic advice, pastoral support and personal development planning. Tutors also have weekly office hours.

A critical but supportive environment is achieved through a combination of workshops, research seminars and e-learning. You will be introduced to the practicalities of preparing and submitting your work for possible publication.

Assessment

We have a variety of approaches to assessment across the programme depending upon the module. All creative practice modules (Short Story Writing, Novel Writing, Dissertation) are assessed through portfolios of creative work and accompanying critical essays in which you are required to reflect on your creative practice and to contextualise your work with reference to other texts. These modules also include class-based formative peer-assessment in the form of writing workshops. These do not count towards your final grade but the sessions do help you grow and reflect as a critical and creative writer.

In some modules (Writing the City) you can choose your method of assessment (creative portfolio and critical essay, or essay, or reflection, for example). In other modules (Literature and Landscapes) you will be asked to produce an essay.

In the introductory Researching the Humanities module you will be ask to produce a visual representation of a chosen research method, in the form of a poster. In other modules, such as Writing the City, you will be asked to post your work to a reflective blog.

Modules also make use of Virtual Learning Environments for assessments and you may be asked to view material online and then to respond to it.

You will receive tutor support in class and through our VLE in order to prepare you for each assessment point. We also have library facilities online and at campus.​

Employability & Careers​

Many of our students use the course to generate and hone their own writing for publication. Our creative practice modules are designed with eventual publication in mind. For example, in our Novel Writing module you will be taught how to write a synopsis for submission to an agent or publisher. Several of our students have had publication success (see below).

The MA is also a great choice for those wishing to enhance their employment and professional opportunities in editorial and publishing careers. The programme is suitable for those who would like to become teachers of English literature and creative writing as well as those who are already teachers. For example, teachers of English at ‘A’ Level and GCSE often find the course suitable for professional development purposes, providing them with skills to enhance their teaching of English literature creative writing within their current curricula or skilling them up to deliver the new Creative Writing ‘A’ Level.

Our MA is appropriate for those who would like careers in community-based education and practice. The course also prepares you for further study at PhD level at Cardiff Metropolitan University and beyond.

This degree will encourage you to develop the valuable transferable skills of autonomy, effective collaboration, self-direction, organisation, initiative and adaptability that are highly regarded in the workplace.

Recent student publishing successes:
Barbara A Stensland (MA Creative Writing) writes a blog about living with MS that has recently been published as a book, Stumbling in Flats (2015). It has been shortlisted for The International Rubery Book Award 2015.

Emre Karatoprak (MA Creative Writing) had his first novel published on Amazon, Türbülans (2013).

Alex Sambrook (MA Creative Writing) had a short story shortlisted in the prestigious Bridport Short Story Competition (2012).

​Stacey Taylor, (MA English & Creative Writing), won the It Started With a Kiss competition run by Authonomy in November 2011 with a 416 word flash fiction.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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This is an innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme, combining taught modules and a dissertation, which allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris. Read more
This is an innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme, combining taught modules and a dissertation, which allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris.

The programme allows you to choose from the full range of our MA literature modules. The list of what’s on offer is regularly added to by academics keen to explore new areas of thinking with students and to draw you in to our established areas of research strength.

Following a similar path to our English and American Literature MA, the Paris option allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent academic and recreational facilities. For the spring term you relocate to our Paris centre, studying in a historic corner of Montparnasse - close to the famous Latin Quarter, the Sorbonne University and the glorious Jardin du Luxembourg.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/223/english-and-american-literature-canterbury-and-paris

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)
EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
FR866 - Literature and Theory (30 credits)
EN871 - Origins of Modern Poetry (30 credits)
FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12,000 word dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- extend and deepen through coursework and research your understanding of a body of literatures in English, with special emphasis on modern and postcolonial literatures, and on literary and critical theory

- enable you to develop an historical awareness of literary traditions

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement

- introduce you to bibliographic method and scholarship and to foster in you the research methods that facilitate advanced literary study

- provide a basis in knowledge and skills if you intend to teach English and American literature, especially in higher education

- develop your understanding and critical appreciation of the expressive resources of language

- offer opportunities for you to develop your potential for creative writing (where such a module is taken)

- offer scope for the study of literature within an interdisciplinary context, notably that provided by history

- develop your ability to argue a point of view with clarity and cogency, both orally and in written form

- develop your knowledge and understanding of relevant aspects of contemporary Paris and the cultural history of the city as reflected in modern European, English and American literatures and other artistic media.

Research areas

Research in the School of English comes roughly under the following areas. However, there is often a degree of overlap between groups, and individual staff have interests that range more widely.

Eighteenth Century
The particular interests of the Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century converge around gender, class, nation, travel and empire, and the relationship between print and material culture. Staff in the Centre pursue cutting-edge approaches to the field and share a commitment to interdisciplinary methodologies.

The Centre regularly hosts visiting speakers as part of the School of English research seminar programme, and hosts day symposia, workshops and international conferences.

Nineteenth Century
The 19th-century research group is organised around the successful MA in Dickens and Victorian Culture and the editorship of The Dickensian, the official publication outlet for new Dickens letters. Other staff research interests include literature and gender, journalism, representations of time and history, sublimity and Victorian Poetry.

American Literature
Research in north American literature is conducted partly through the Faculty-based Centre for American Studies, which also facilitates co-operation with modern US historians. Staff research interests include 20th-century American literature, especially poetry, Native American writing, modernism, and cultural history.

Creative Writing
The Centre for Creative Writing is the focus for most practice-based research in the School. Staff organise a thriving events series and run a research seminar for postgraduate students and staff to share ideas about fiction-writing. Established writers regularly come to read and discuss their work.

Medieval and Early Modern
The Faculty-based Canterbury Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies has a distinctive brand of interdisciplinarity, strong links with local archives and archaeological trusts, and provides a vibrant forum for investigating the relationships between literary and non-literary modes of writing in its weekly research seminar.

Modern Poetry
The Centre for Modern Poetry is a leading centre for research and publication in its field, and participates in both critical and creative research. Staff regularly host visiting speakers and writers, participate in national and international research networks, and organise graduate research seminars and public poetry readings.

Postcolonial
Established in 1994, the Centre for Colonial and Postcolonial Research has acquired an international reputation for excellence in research. It has an outstanding track record in publication, organises frequent international conferences, and regularly hosts leading postcolonial writers and critics. It also hosts a visiting writer from India every year in association with the Charles Wallace Trust.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The English Department offers MAs in the areas of Literature, Renaissance Studies, and Composition/Rhetoric. Department faculty mentor students at all stages of their graduate experience, from coursework to teaching to examinations and the writing of master’s theses and doctoral dissertations. Read more

Literature

The English Department offers MAs in the areas of Literature, Renaissance Studies, and Composition/Rhetoric.

Department faculty mentor students at all stages of their graduate experience, from coursework to teaching to examinations and the writing of master’s theses and doctoral dissertations.

Graduate students in our Department not only have the opportunity to learn in an engaging environment but also to teach in one as well. Beginning in their first (for PhD candidates) and second (for MA candidates) years, they gain valuable classroom experience in composition classes, literature surveys, and courses they design themselves. Our program's scholarly and pedagogical preparation, as well as our detailed attention to professional placement, has enabled students to develop careers as teachers, scholars, publishers and editors.

Hudson Strode Program in Renaissance Studies

"Bringing the Globe to Alabama"

The Strode Program is a privately endowed program to promote the study of English literature from Skelton to Milton. The endowment provides for lectures and residencies by distinguished scholars and fellowships for graduate study at the University of Alabama in the field of English Renaissance Literature.

Hudson Strode served on the University of Alabama faculty from 1916 to 1963. He was a prolific author and celebrated teacher of Shakespeare and of creative writing. The Strode program was endowed by Professor Strode and his wife, Thérèse.

Focus: The Graduate Student

The intellectual work and educational activities sponsored by the Strode Program, from fellowships to lecture series, from the Strode Seminar to summer research awards, converge upon a single focus: the graduate student. We have a lively and talented group of students specializing in English Renaissance literature in preparation for careers in colleges and universities, or for other professional or personal goals. The faculty is committed not only to teaching students but also to mentoring them, fostering a community of future scholars.

Our students have won departmental and college awards for teaching and they have won university-wide fellowships for dissertation research. A recent Ph.D. received the College of Arts and Sciences annual award for best dissertation. Topics treated in the dissertations produced by our students are diverse—from readings of Spenser which deploy the theories of Derrida and Lacan to studies of the representation of female sexuality which draw upon seventeenth-century London court records; from adaptations of Shakespeare for teen films to performance criticism of regional and university theatrical productions. Essays written by our students—on Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy, on the agency of the letter in Hamlet, on class conflict in Coriolanus, on Leo Africanus and early modern imperialism, and on queer kinship in The Merchant of Venice—have appeared in Early Modern Literary Studies, English Literary History, English Literary Renaissance, Studies in English Literature, and Shakespeare, among other journals and essay collections.

We have an excellent record of placing Ph.D.s in tenure-track professorships. In the past ten years, 100% of our Ph.D. graduates who went on the academic job market eventually landed tenure-track jobs. Recent graduates have joined the faculty at Cornell College, High Point University, Mercer University, Stephen F. Austin State University, Xavier University, and Youngstown State University. M.A. students have matriculated to Ph.D. programs at Emory, Northwestern, Rutgers, University of California, University of Georgia, University of Oxford, University of Tennessee, and University of Washington, to name a few. Other M.A. students have gone on to law school, library school, the Peace Corps, high school teaching, or other opportunities.

Composition and Rhetoric

The graduate curriculum in CRES (Composition, Rhetoric, and English Studies) provides a solid foundation in English studies with a particular focus on the teaching of writing and studies in language, literacy, and rhetoric. The doctoral program is designed for those seeking academic positions as composition specialists (researchers, teachers, or administrators) in postsecondary English departments that emphasize writing instruction. The MA program is ideal for those who wish to do community college teaching or administrative work, and for students wishing to continue on to the PhD.

The graduate curriculum provides core courses in composition-rhetoric as well as elective opportunities in literature, linguistics, communication studies, education, and interdisciplinary areas such as gender and race. CRES students have opportunities to teach first-year writing, technical writing, and sophomore literature surveys. We also offer opportunities for writing center work and writing program administration.

Our graduates have obtained tenure-track positions at community colleges and four-year institutions such as Central Piedmont Community College (Charlotte, NC), Shelton State Community College (Tuscaloosa, AL), North Carolina Wesleyan College (Rocky Mount, NC), Judson College (Marion, AL), Charlotte School of Law (NC), Stillman College (Tuscaloosa, AL), the University of Houston, Itawamba Community College (Fulton, MS), Chattanooga State Community College (TN), Hinds Community College (Jackson, Mississippi), Marion Military Institute (Marion, AL), Louisiana Tech, Murray State (KY), the University of Alabama-Birmingham, the University of Texas-El Paso, Alabama A&M, St. Louis Community College (Meramec Campus), LaGrange College (GA), East Tennessee State, the University of South Alabama, Eastern Illinois University, and the University of North Alabama.

Application to all graduate programs offered by the Department of English is made through the University of Alabama Graduate School online application, which can be accessed by following the link on the English Department's Admissions page.

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This course offers a flexible, challenging Master’s programme, delivered by a team of tutors with internationally recognised academic expertise in specialist areas. Read more
This course offers a flexible, challenging Master’s programme, delivered by a team of tutors with internationally recognised academic expertise in specialist areas.

There are three routes: you can choose a specialised pathway in Contemporary Literature, Film & Theory or The Gothic, and a general English Studies route where students can build their own bespoke programme, choosing units from either pathways to create a Master's level experience reflecting your own interests in the further study of English.

Features and benefits of the course

Taught in small groups, you will benefit from the expertise of research active staff, rapidly developing your specialist subject knowledge and acquiring professional levels of research skills and conference presentation skills.

Research in the department has been rated highly in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise with some rated as world leading.

You will benefit from regular seminars by visiting speakers as well as a thriving conference schedule.

A personal tutoring system is in place, ensuring that all students have a tutor with whom they can discuss any aspect of their academic developments.

The Manchester Centre for Gothic Studies was launched in 2013 to capitalise on the expertise of a high number of internationally renowned Gothic scholars housed in the Department of English. Founding Centre Head, Linnie Blake along with Xavier Aldana Reyes and Sorcha Ni Fhlainn form the Centre’s core members.

About the Course

There are three routes: you can choose a specialised pathway (MA English Studies: Contemporary Literature, Film and Theory or MA English Studies: The Gothic) or a general route (MA English Studies), selecting from the range of units to construct a Master's level experience reflecting your interests in the further study of English.

MA English Studies: Contemporary Literature, Film and Theory focuses on contemporary cultural practices and critical theoretical interventions. This pathway reflects research strengths in contemporary literary and film studies, critical and cultural theory, memory and trauma studies, the critical medical humanities and queer, postcolonial and cultural disability studies.

MA English Studies: The Gothic begins with the pre-history of the Gothic mode in the seventeenth century, explores its eighteenth and nineteenth-century incarnations and concludes with contemporary manifestations of the mode. Students study plays and novels, films and television, framed by socio-cultural perspectives and critical and theoretical analyses.

MA English Studies (general pathway) allows students to freely select units from the full range on offer.

Assessment details

The programme is examined mainly through written work, with an essay of around 6000 words (or equivalent) in each unit usually forming the basis of that assessment. All MA students submit a Dissertation of around 15,000 words. Each year, we run an MA Day when you will present your dissertation proposals to the teaching team and the rest of the group.

MA English Studies students submit all their written coursework online, and the Programme makes extensive use of easily accessible online provision of teaching and learning support materials.

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This intensive programme is for international students about to start full-time postgraduate study at a UK university. This programme is more than just a language course, which is why it is longer than other pre-sessional courses you might find elsewhere - http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/pre-sessional-english-language/. Read more
This intensive programme is for international students about to start full-time postgraduate study at a UK university.

This programme is more than just a language course, which is why it is longer than other pre-sessional courses you might find elsewhere - http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/pre-sessional-english-language/

It will also familiarise you with the British education system, and will develop your study skills. And it is tailored to the arts and social sciences, so it's ideal if you're planning on studying these subjects in the future.

The course covers:

-English language
-academic study skills
-cultural background studies
-critical analysis

There is continuous assessment through regular assignments, especially listening exercises, presentations and essays. At the end of the programme, you receive a profile of your performance and progress, and recommendations for your future language development. There is an opportunity to take the IELTS exam.

Social programmes

During your time in London, there will be opportunities to visit theatres and galleries. A party is organised at the end of the programme.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Centre for English Language and Academic Writing.

Modules & Structure

This programme consists of several entry points: you start the programme in either May, July or August, and finish in September.

Students who start the programme in May are provided with more general EAP (English for Academic Purposes) modules. This is especially important for students whose previous experience of English learning has focused on IELTS or general English only. However, you will receive classes in critical studies and cultural background.

Renaissance and text analysis

In May the critical studies module introduces you to the Renaissance and introduces you to text analysis: in recent years we have focused on avant-garde British director Derek Jarman’s film Caravaggio, which is thematically related to the Renaissance but also deals with key concerns of postmodern thought. This provides a good preparation for the lectures in Postmodernity in July and August.

Development of critical thinking

From May to June the module involves some reading, writing, and discussion, but the main skills focus is on oral presentations. In the cultural background module, you will learn and write about theories of how world culture began and developed. Crucially, both modules encourage the development of your critical thinking.

Learning language through content

From July the language, skills and ideas introduced earlier are extended, while the focus is very much on teaching language through content. You will have a choice of lectures in either Contemporary Art History or Film Studies and a lecture series in ‘Postmodernities’ where you will be introduced to key postmodern thinkers and their ideas through a series of lectures presented by specialists in the field. These weekly lectures give you excellent practice in the academic language skills of listening to lectures and taking notes. To support the lectures, you will receive classes in writing and presentation skills, vocabulary and grammar development, and listening and speaking skills. The lectures also provide the academic theory on which you must base an extended essay.

Department

Centre for English Language and Academic Writing:

Come and learn from a dedicated team of specialists. Some of our team have worked in this area for over 20 years.

We offer courses for:

students with English as a second language
native English speakers who are keen to develop their skills in academic writing
These courses range from standalone foundation years and pre-sessional courses right through to in-sessional courses that you complete during your degree programme.

It’s also possible to book an appointment with our resident Royal Literary Fund Fellows – professional writers who can help you improve your essay-writing skills.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This MRes prepares you for more advanced research projects at MPhil/PhD level, but is also a degree in its own right. It's ideal if you're considering a 'taster' year of research, or if you're keen to complete shorter term research at graduate level- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mres-english/. Read more
This MRes prepares you for more advanced research projects at MPhil/PhD level, but is also a degree in its own right. It's ideal if you're considering a 'taster' year of research, or if you're keen to complete shorter term research at graduate level- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mres-english/

The aim of the MRes is to expand your knowledge and understanding of your chosen topic. You'll carry out independent research under the guidance of a supervisor, and in the context of a structured programme of study.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Maria Macdonald.

Structure

You'll attend the Department's Postgraduate Research Methods series, and either a Research Skills Workshop or a Research Skills series. You'll also be encouraged to attended Methods and Resources day schools that are offered by the Institute of English Studies at Senate House.

You'll also attend, but not be assessed on, at least one appropriate Masters level module offered in the Department of English and Comparative Literature in the first term of study. Your supervisor may advise you to attend selected elements of the module only, and to focus on a particular problem within the syllabus. Attending the module will enable you to take part in discussions, and to refine and nuance your understanding of different perspectives on a topic.

The main focus of the MRes, however, will be on the development of your own research project. Throughout this process you will:

-Study in depth and reflect critically upon an aspect of research methods relevant to your dissertation topic, under the guidance of your supervisor
-Where appropriate, you can choose to write on methodological topics arising from the syllabus of one of the taught Masters level modules
-Carry out systematic research into the primary, critical and theoretical literature relevant to the dissertation topic, under the guidance of your supervisor
-Develop an independent dissertation project, under the guidance of a supervisor

Modules

You'll complete the following modules:

Research Methods:
Assessed by one 5,000-6,000-word essay (or two 2,500-3,000-word essays).

Bibliographical Exercise:
Assessed by one 5,000-word essay.

Dissertation:
Assessed by a 20,000-word dissertation.

Assessment

A thesis of approximately 20,000 words will account for 80% of your final grade. The remaining 20% of your grade will be assessed through coursework.

Department

English at Goldsmiths is ranked:
18th in the UK for the quality of our research**
In the world’s top 150 universities for English language and literature***

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings
***QS World University Rankings by subject 2015

English and Comparative Literature:
Cervantes. Bukowski. Dostoevsky. Self. From classical literature and linguistics, to creative writing and contemporary fiction, we take a critical and creative approach to the discipline.

As a department we’re interested in a field of enquiry that extends from Old English to 21st-century literatures in English, French, Spanish and Italian. So you can study texts and films across a variety of periods and genres.

We’re engaged

We have a dedicated Writers’ Centre that encourages new writing and stimulates debate about all forms of literature. And we award the annual Goldsmiths Prize (for “fiction at its most novel”), which brings critically acclaimed writers like Ali Smith and Eimear McBride to campus.

We’re nurturing

We may be one of the largest departments at Goldsmiths but that doesn’t mean you won’t get personal support. Learn from our approachable team of academic staff and become part of the student-run English Society.

We’re vibrant

As one of the first departments in the UK to offer creative writing, you’ll be part of a hub of literary excellence – our graduates have gone on to win prestigious awards from the Orange Prize for Fiction to the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year.

Skills

This programme will enable you to develop transferable skills, including:

enhanced communication and discussion skills in written and oral contexts
the ability to analyse and evaluate different textual materials
the ability to organise information
the ability to assimilate and evaluate competing arguments

Careers

Our graduates have gone on to pursue careers in publishing, journalism, public relations, teaching, advertising, the civil service, business, industry, the media.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The MA English Literature is a rewarding taught degree offering an exhilarating analysis of English Literature using texts from the 'long nineteenth century' to the present day.​. Read more

Course Overview

The MA English Literature is a rewarding taught degree offering an exhilarating analysis of English Literature using texts from the 'long nineteenth century' to the present day.​

The degree focuses on historic and contemporary textual representations of place, theorising cultural representations and practices of location, space, history and textuality, and the effect of these on constructions of identity. Where possible, the modules encourage you to explore interdisciplinary boundaries and texts.

The MA is taught by published writers and researchers. The course is aimed to support you while you develop and hone your critical writing and research skills, particularly in relation to literature that addresses history, place and space. You can take our MA for professional development purposes, in order to enhance your career and to increase your employability in the arts and heritage sectors. The MA will also help you specialise in the areas of contemporary and historical literature in relation to place and space in order to pave the way for doctoral study.

We have expertise across a number of fields and our academic community is vibrant and dynamic with strong industry links.

One of the great strengths of the programme is its flexibility. MA English Literature can be studied either full or part time. Modules can be taken individually, allowing you to control the pace and depth of your postgraduate study. Programme delivery is enhanced by the university’s commitment to e-learning​.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/education/courses/Pages/English---MA.aspx

​Course Content​​

All of our modules are core and are delivered over one year full time or two years part time.

Term 1
- Researching Humanities
Researching Humanities will introduce you to research methods at MA level. The module provides a thorough breakdown of research methods across the fields of Creative Writing and English Literature. This module is taught across all of our MA Creative Writing and English Literature pathways and it is also a great opportunity for you to get to know your peers.

- New & Experimental Writing
In New and Experimental Writing you will encounter a range of transgressive texts from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Starting with the avant-garde, the module proceeds chronologically to the contemporary. We interrogate what it means to transgress aesthetic norms at various points in time and take into consideration historical and cultural context to consider whether there might be a connection between the challenging of literary and social standards. You will be able to approach these texts via a number of methodologies, including theoretical and creative.

- Literature and Landscapes
In Literature and Landscapes, you’ll examine artistic and literary representations of landscape, and engage with the complex social, cultural and aesthetic factors that contribute to the formation of identity. The module provides a comparative foundation from which you’ll consider representations of the urban encountered in Writing the City.

Term 2
- Representing ‘the Past’
In Representing 'the Past', you will consider how we interpret 'the past' within a cultural context. Looking at both textual and extra-textual appropriations, and by showing how meanings of 'the past' are contested at any one time, you will consider how certain interpretations are naturalised and legitimated within culture.

- Writing the City
In Writing the City you'll explore representations of urban space through set texts and in your own creative writing. In this module you’ll examine texts that explore the urban in literary fiction, particularly throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

- Critical Practice
Critical Practice prepares you for your dissertation through which you'll be able to submit a substantial body of creative work along with a contextualising critical commentary.

- Dissertation
The Dissertation module is your opportunity to create a portfolio of writing, such as a collection of short stories or an excerpt of a novel that you are working on. The creative work will be accompanied by a critical reflection in which you contextualise your writing within a critical framework and with reference to other texts. ​

Learning & Teaching​

​Most modules are taught through group workshops and seminars. Some modules will also include individual tutorials and the dissertation module is delivered entirely through one-to-one tutorials with your supervisor.

In workshops and seminars full use is made of University technology and course materials will be delivered and stored through our Virtual Learning Environment. It will be possible for you to access the Virtual Learning Environment remotely and you will be encouraged to do so.

Most modules are 20 or 30 credits although we also have a 10-credit module and the dissertation is worth 60 credits.

In a 10-credit module you will receive 11 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 89 hours of independent study. In a 20-credit module you will receive 22 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 178 hours of independent study. In a 30-credit module you will receive 33 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 267 hours of independent study. The 60-credit dissertation is mainly conducted with independent study. You will receive 6 hours of tutorial supervision (this includes supervisors looking over your work) and you will be expected to conduct 594 hours of independent study.

Each student is appointed a personal tutor who will be available for academic advice, pastoral support and personal development planning. Tutors also have weekly office hours.

A critical but supportive environment is achieved through a combination of workshops, research seminars and e-learning. You will be introduced to the practicalities of preparing and submitting your work for possible publication.

Assessment

We have a variety of approaches to assessment across the programme depending upon the module.

In some modules (Writing the City) you can choose your method of assessment (creative portfolio and critical essay, or essay, or reflection, for example). In other modules (Literature and Landscapes) you will be asked to produce an essay.

In the introductory Researching the Humanities module you will be ask to produce a visual representation of a chosen research method, in the form of a poster. In other modules, such as Writing the City, you will be asked to post your work to a reflective blog.

Modules also make use of Virtual Learning Environments for assessments and you may be asked to view material online and then to respond to it (Representing ‘the Past’).

You will receive tutor support in class and through our VLE in order to prepare you for each assessment point. We also have library facilities online and at campus.

Employability & Careers​

The MA is also a great choice for those wishing to enhance their employment and professional opportunities in the arts or heritage sectors. The programme is suitable for those who are teachers of English Literature at ‘A’ Level or GCSE and would like to enhance their expertise for professional development purposes.

The course also prepares you for further study at PhD level at Cardiff Metropolitan University and beyond.

This degree will encourage you to develop the valuable transferable skills of autonomy, effective collaboration, self-direction, organisation, initiative and adaptability that are highly regarded in the workplace. A Master's degree in English Literature may lead to a variety of careers which include the particularly relevant areas of teaching, research, journalism, public relations, the Civil Service, publishing, the media, and employment in the public or voluntary sectors.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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The English Language and Literature MA aims to allow you to explore the interconnections between language and literature. Read more
The English Language and Literature MA aims to allow you to explore the interconnections between language and literature. It will provide you with a thorough understanding of the linguistic features of English from a wide range of perspectives (theoretical and applied, synchronic and diachronic), as well as leading you to explore a wide array of texts in connection with the social, historical and political circumstances from which they emerge. Furthermore, the MA will equip you with the intellectual perspectives and the scholarly skills that will prepare you to conduct independent research.

Course content

The MA is suitable for students who have taken English language and/or literature modules at undergraduate level, and others who have taken allied disciplines such as TESOL. It is of particular interest to those wishing to pursue further study and those teaching English who wish to gain a further qualification and investigate recent and current developments in the field.

If pursuing the degree full-time, you will study 180 credits in one academic year; if part-time, you will normally complete 180 credits in two academic years. You will study four core modules (including a 60-credit dissertation on a topic of English language and/or literature), as well as two modules from the list of options. The core modules Subjectivities: Modern and Contemporary Fictions and Institutions and Histories examine classic and contemporary critical texts on literature in relation to ideas in larger contexts, such as history, the visual image, gender, psychoanalysis and post- colonialism, while the module English Language in Use will help you acquire the scholarly tools necessary for the stylistic interpretation of literary and non-literary texts.

The teaching is mainly through weekly two or three hour sessions for each module, which include tutorials, seminars, practical sessions and workshops. There is also independent self-directed study, and you will be prepared for the Dissertation via structured sessions in research methodology. Assessment methods include submitted coursework such as essays, reviews and exercises; there are no formal examinations.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-DISSERTATION
-ENGLISH LANGUAGE IN LITERARY CONTEXTS
-INSTITUTIONS AND HISTORIES IN MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY FICTIONS
-SUBJECTIVITIES IN MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY FICTIONS

Option modules
-ANALYSING SPOKEN AND WRITTEN DISCOURSE
-CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS IN LANGUAGE TEACHING
-EXPERIMENTAL WOMEN’S WRITING, PHOTOGRAPHY AND FILM
-INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCE
-LONDON VORTEX: THE CITY AND MODERNISM
-READING CONTEMPORARY CULTURE
-SEXUALITY AND NARRATIVE
-SOCIOLINGUISTICS
-TRANSLATION STUDIES

Associated careers

The English Language and Literature MA will provide you with sophisticated analytical skills and a widely applicable knowledge base, which will enable you to study at MPhil or PhD levels with a view to pursuing an academic career. The course is also particularly relevant to teaching English as a first or foreign language, and to a range of professions involving the study and use of language and literary texts.

While studying the MA, you will also benefit from the careers workshops organised by the departmental employability coordinator.

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Applied Linguistics is for teachers who are at the beginning of their careers and those who have more experience but would like to develop, deepen and enhance their knowledge, skills and practice. Read more
Applied Linguistics is for teachers who are at the beginning of their careers and those who have more experience but would like to develop, deepen and enhance their knowledge, skills and practice.

The programme covers the areas of linguistics that inform classroom practice (such as syntax, morphology, semantics, pragmatics and phonetics), raising awareness of these fields and applying them to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL).

Practical teaching opportunities are a feature of the programme, including teaching to your peer group and international students from other programmes. There is also the opportunity to visit a local language college and observe classes.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/357/applied-linguistics-and-teaching-english-to-speakers-of-other-languages-tesol

About the Department of English Language and Linguistics

English Language and Linguistics (ELL), founded in 2010, is the newest department of the School of European Culture and Languages (SECL). ELL is a dynamic and growing department with a vibrant research culture. We specialise in experimental and theoretical linguistics. In particular, our interests focus on quantitative and experimental research in speech and language processing, variation and acquisition, but also cover formal areas such as syntax, as well as literary stylistics. In addition to English and its varieties, our staff work in French, German, Greek, Romani, Korean, Spanish and Russian.

Staff and postgraduates are members of the Centre for Language and Linguistic Studies (CLLS), a research centre that seeks to promote interdisciplinary linguistic research. We also have links with research networks outside Kent, and are involved with national and international academic associations including the Linguistics Association of Great Britain, the British Association of Academic Phoneticians, the Linguistic Society of America, the Association for French Language Studies and the Poetics and Linguistics Association.

Course structure

The programme starts with three linguistics modules (Sounds, Structure and Meaning) and a module on language awareness for teachers (Language Awareness and Analysis) so that you have a firm grasp of the linguistic bases of language teaching and how to apply them to the classroom.

In the spring term the focus is on how languages are learned (Second Language Acquisition), how you can improve classroom technique (The Practice of TESOL), plan for your students’ needs (Course and Syllabus Design) and provide them with materials which will be interesting, effective and motivating (Materials Evaluation and Development).

The dissertation will be an opportunity to plan and develop a piece of empirical research which can be of direct relevance to your current or planned teaching situation.

Assessment

Modules are typically assessed by a 3-4,000-word essay, but assessment patterns can include practical/experimental work, report and proposal writing, critiques, problem solving and seminar presentations. You also complete a 12-15,000-word research dissertation on a topic agreed with your supervisor.

Programme aims

- Provide TESOL practitioners with advanced knowledge of linguistics related to language pedagogy, informed by research and scholarship, which will enhance, develop and inform their understanding of language learning and classroom practice.

- To produce graduates who will contribute locally, nationally and internationally to the TESOL community.

- To prepare students to be more effective in the TESOL classroom.

- To provide students with teaching and training which is informed by research, scholarship, practice and experience.

Research areas

Alongside our research centre below, we also have links with research networks outside Kent, and are involved with national and international academic associations including the Linguistics Association of Great Britain, the British Association of Academic Phoneticians, the Linguistic Society of America, the Association for French Language Studies and the Poetics and Linguistics Association.

- Linguistics Lab

The newly established Linguistics Lab is currently housed in Rutherford College and has facilities for research in acoustics, sociophonetics and speech and language processing. English Language and Linguistics (ELL) members also have access to the School of European Culture and Language (SECL) recording studio and multimedia labs which can be used both for research and teaching.

- Centre for Language and Linguistics

English Language and Linguistics is the main contributor to the Centre for Language and Linguistics. Founded in 2007, the Centre promotes interdisciplinary collaboration in linguistic research and teaching. Membership embraces not just the members of English Language and Linguistics but also other SECL members with an interest in the study of language, as well as researchers in philosophy, computing, psychology and anthropology, reflecting the many and varied routes by which individuals come to a love of language and an interest in the various disciplines and subdisciplines of linguistics.

Careers

Postgraduate work in English Language and Linguistics prepares you for a range of careers where an in-depth understanding of how language functions is essential. These include speech and language theory, audiology, teaching, publishing, advertising, journalism, public relations, company training, broadcasting, forensic and computational work, and the civil or diplomatic services.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The course furnishes the student with the opportunity to pursue English literary studies at an advanced level, developing the skills and knowledge required for textual, theoretical and historical analysis in the candidate’s chosen field. Read more
The course furnishes the student with the opportunity to pursue English literary studies at an advanced level, developing the skills and knowledge required for textual, theoretical and historical analysis in the candidate’s chosen field. It offers one-to-one supervision from experts in the field. You are also encouraged to participate in the lively research environment of the School and College, which includes the English Literature research seminar series, scholarly reading groups, workshops and conferences.

The course consists of taught modules (Part One) mainly assessed by essays, followed by a dissertation (Part Two). The modules within the English Literature programme are grouped into four ‘pathways’ . Each of these represents a particular area of research strength at Bangor and offers an aspect of literary study in which MA students may choose to specialise.

The four pathways:

1. Medieval and Early Modern Literature

2. Material Texts

3. Revolution and Modernity, 1750 to the Present

4. Four Nations Literature

Students who prefer not to specialise by following one of the pathways may alternatively pursue a broader portfolio of advanced literary studies in English by completing the compulsory module (see below) and a free choice of three other modules.

Course Structure
Part One:

In the first part of the MA programme, all students are required to study FOUR modules of 30 credits each; for full-time students, this means two modules per semester. Of these four modules, one is compulsory: Literary Theory, Scholarship and Research (in semester 1). This module lays the foundation for the MA by introducing you to key ideas in literary theory, the analysis of texts and the techniques of advanced scholarly writing.

In addition, students are required to choose three further modules from those listed below. You may make an open selection of modules OR follow one of the four pathways described above. In order to complete a pathway, you must choose at least TWO of your three optional modules from that pathway, with the final module being a free choice (from the pathway, from elsewhere in the English Literature MA programme, or from other relevant postgraduate programmes in the School or College).

1. Modules on Medieval and Early Modern Literature:

Pre-Modern Travel
Manuscripts and Printed Books
The European Renaissance
Myth and the Early Modern Author
Women’s Devotional Writing
Medieval Arthur
Post-Medieval Arthur
Advanced Latin for Postgraduates
Editing Texts
2. Modules on Material Texts:

Manuscripts and Printed Books
Material Texts and Contexts
Print, Politics & Popular Culture
Editing Texts
3. Modules on Revolution and Modernity, 1750 to the Present:

Revolution, Modernity: 1790-1930
Welsh Literature in English
Material Texts and Contexts
Modernisms
Print, Politics & Popular Culture
Irish Literature
Editing Texts
4. Modules on Four-Nations Literature:

Revolution, Modernity: 1790-1930
Welsh Literature in English
Modernisms
Irish Literature
Editing Texts
In addition to the above pathway-related modules, the following modules are offered:

Open Essay
The Postgraduate Conference
It is possible to take one optional module from the MA in Creative Writing (if the prerequisites of creative writing experience are met). If you should so wish, and in consultation with the Director of the MA in English Literature, there is also the option of taking one MA module from another School in the College of Arts and Humanities.

Part Two:

After the completion of the four modules which make up Part One of the programme, Part Two consists of a 20,000-word dissertation (60 credits) on a subject of your choice, researched and written under the individual supervision of a subject specialist. If you are following one of the four pathways, you are expected to write your dissertation in a research area relevant to that particular pathway.

Students who have completed Part One of the MA programme but elect not to write a dissertation are awarded the postgraduate diploma.

Read less
The English Language and Literature MA aims to allow you to explore the interconnections between language and literature. Read more
The English Language and Literature MA aims to allow you to explore the interconnections between language and literature. It will provide you with a thorough understanding of the linguistic features of English from a wide range of perspectives (theoretical and applied, synchronic and diachronic), as well as leading you to explore a wide array of texts in connection with the social, historical and political circumstances from which they emerge. Furthermore, the MA will equip you with the intellectual perspectives and the scholarly skills that will prepare you to conduct independent research.

Course content

The MA is suitable for students who have taken English language and/or literature modules at undergraduate level, and others who have taken allied disciplines such as TESOL. It is of particular interest to those wishing to pursue further study and those teaching English who wish to gain a further qualification and investigate recent and current developments in the field.

If pursuing the degree full-time, you will study 180 credits in one academic year; if part-time, you will normally complete 180 credits in two academic years. You will study four core modules (including a 60-credit dissertation on a topic of English language and/or literature), as well as two modules from the list of options. The core modules Subjectivities: Modern and Contemporary Fictions and Institutions and Histories examine classic and contemporary critical texts on literature in relation to ideas in larger contexts, such as history, the visual image, gender, psychoanalysis and post- colonialism, while the module English Language in Use will help you acquire the scholarly tools necessary for the stylistic interpretation of literary and non-literary texts.

The teaching is mainly through weekly two or three hour sessions for each module, which include tutorials, seminars, practical sessions and workshops. There is also independent self-directed study, and you will be prepared for the Dissertation via structured sessions in research methodology. Assessment methods include submitted coursework such as essays, reviews and exercises; there are no formal examinations.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-DISSERTATION
-ENGLISH LANGUAGE IN LITERARY CONTEXTS
-INSTITUTIONS AND HISTORIES IN MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY FICTIONS
-SUBJECTIVITIES IN MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY FICTIONS

Option modules
-ANALYSING SPOKEN AND WRITTEN DISCOURSE
-CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS IN LANGUAGE TEACHING
-EXPERIMENTAL WOMEN’S WRITING, PHOTOGRAPHY AND FILM
-INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCE
-LONDON VORTEX: THE CITY AND MODERNISM
-READING CONTEMPORARY CULTURE
-SEXUALITY AND NARRATIVE
-SOCIOLINGUISTICS
-TRANSLATION STUDIES

Associated careers

The English Language and Literature MA will provide you with sophisticated analytical skills and a widely applicable knowledge base, which will enable you to study at MPhil or PhD levels with a view to pursuing an academic career. The course is also particularly relevant to teaching English as a first or foreign language, and to a range of professions involving the study and use of language and literary texts.

While studying the MA, you will also benefit from the careers workshops organised by the departmental employability coordinator.

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Our taught MA provision offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise. You can learn from the rich variety of research expertise in the Department and you also have the chance to concentrate on a particular area of literary study. Read more
Our taught MA provision offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise. You can learn from the rich variety of research expertise in the Department and you also have the chance to concentrate on a particular area of literary study. Our commitment to research-led teaching means that students are able to explore the cutting edge of the discipline - from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present day, from medieval manuscripts to contemporary crime narrative. We provide an intimate, dynamic and supportive environment for students of all backgrounds and nationalities.

Our programmes offer up-to-date training in research methods and skills and a wide selection of literature modules from which you choose three; you will also write a dissertation. You will have the opportunity to follow up particular interests by studying a named pathway, or to designate your own area of study within the broad MA in English Literary Studies, tailoring an individual programme based on period, theme or genre. An MA in English is often the platform for further research at PhD level, as well as providing an excellent grounding for jobs in education, the arts and the media.

Course Structure

If you choose to take one of the named pathways, you will be expected to select two modules from those available within a pathway and to write your dissertation in an area related to your named pathway. You need not confine your choices to a named pathway, as on the broad MA in English Literary Studies you may choose any three from the full list of modules on offer if you prefer. Students may, with permission, take one module from other modules on offer elsewhere in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities. All students must take the core Research Methods and Resources module and the dissertation alongside their three optional modules.

Core Modules:
Research Methods and Resources
Dissertation

Typical optional Modules might include:
Old Norse
Warrior Poets in Heroic Societies
Old English Language and Literature
Narrative Transformations: Medieval Romance to Renaissance Epic
Middle English Manuscripts and Texts
Issues in Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Renaissance Tragedy
Renaissance Humanism
Lyric Poetry of the English Renaissance and Reformation
John Milton: Life, Works and Influence
Women and the Novel in the Eighteenth Century
Reflections on Revolution, 1789-1922
Second-Generation Romantic Poetry
Romantic Forms of Grief
Women in Victorian Poetry and Painting
Thinking with Things in Victorian Literature
Literary Masculinity at the Fin-de-Siècle
The Literatures of Slavery
Literature of the Supernatural
Modernism and Touch
Representing the Self: From Sophocles to the Sopranos
Life Narratives
Post-War British Drama
Modern Poetry
The Contemporary US Novel
Blood and Soil: Regionalism and Contemporary US Crime Narrative
The Writing of Poetry

Modules are subject to staff availability and normally no more than twenty of the above will run in any one year.

Learning and Teaching

One of the distinctive features of the Durham MA in Literary Studies is that it permits both a broad-based, eclectic study of literary topics from the earliest periods of literature to the present and the possibility of specialisation through designated pathways in such areas as Medieval and Renaissance Studies or Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Studies. All students take 3 optional modules, taught in small seminar groups of up to 10, with each module generating 18 hours of contact time (9 seminars x 2 hours) over the academic year. A strong emphasis is placed on independent research, and seminars usually involve a considerable amount of preparation, including short presentations and workshop activities. Assessment for these modules is usually by coursework essay.

All students also register for the Research Methods and Resources module, which generates an additional 20 hours of contact time over the academic year. Again, a strong emphasis is given to independent research. Both pieces of assessed written work for the Research Methods and Resources module involve significant preparation for the MA dissertation (and in some cases for doctoral study later on). The MA dissertation is supported by 3.5 hours of dedicated individual supervision time. Drafts of the dissertation are read and commented upon by the supervisor.

Each MA student is assigned an Academic Advisor who can guide and support her or his progress during the programme of study. Throughout the taught MA degree programme, all students are strongly encouraged to participate in a lively series of staff-postgraduate research seminars, usually involving invited guest speakers from the UK and beyond.

Other admission requirements

Please use the 'additional comments' section of the application form to provide a personal statement. In addition to your three module choices, you will also need to include a piece of written work of approximately 2,000 words in length on a literary subject. This can be any piece of literary-critical work you have completed recently and may be emailed direct to the Department if you wish (). We welcome applications from holders of international qualifications. For advice on the equivalency of international qualifications, please contact our International Office.

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