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Masters Degrees (English Essay)

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This Pathway in English Literature considers the relationship between literatures from a variety of historical periods. Register your interest. Read more

This Pathway in English Literature considers the relationship between literatures from a variety of historical periods.

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The English Literature MA pathway is ideal if you don’t wish to be confined to a specific period or disciplinary area. It asks fundamental questions about our ideas of literature and how these might have changed over time.

The pathway’s compulsory module, ‘The Production of Texts in Contexts’, opens up these questions by looking at a broad array of literature from a variety of historic periods. It considers how innovations in printing and publishing have affected writing, and asks to what extent political and social change conditions and defines authorial identities and practices.

Apart from the compulsory core module briefly described below, students taking the generic English Literature pathway can freely choose their remaining three modules from all the other existing pathways and thus sample different topics from different periods. Below are additional links to those pathways that allow you to see the rich variety of staff research interests and specialisms.

The Production of Texts in Context

The Production of Texts in Context is a trans-historical module that ranges across many different literary periods from the early middle ages to the present day. The module is team-taught so students experience teaching by ten to eleven different staff members, each of whom presents a topic related to their own particular interests and period specialisms. The teaching team and the topics represented vary from year to year according to staff availability, with recent topics including Ballad and Carol (Alfred Hiatt), The Making of Paradise Lost (Joad Raymond), The Eighteenth-Century Newspaper (Chris Reid), Victorian Serialised Fiction (Matt Ingleby), Experimental Writing and Early Twentieth-Century Publishing (Scott McCracken), The Coming of Age Novel in Global Literature (Charlotta Salmi), Book Prizes and Literary Production (Huw Marsh), and Contemporary Graphic Narrative (Sam McBean). For the essay assignment students pick a subject relating to one of the topics and can seek advice from the relevant staff member. There is also a designated member of staff who acts as module convenor, sits in with students on the weekly seminars, and is able to offer general help and guidance.

Compulsory modules:

You also choose one of the following

Researching Modern CultureLondon Panoramas: Research, Culture and the Long Eighteenth Century, or The Material Text, 1300-1700

Option modules:

You choose three modules from a wide-ranging list of options that changes from year to year. 

In 2017-2018 we hope to offer the following. If members of our specialist research staff win research funding it will mean that their module won’t run, so for that reason this list is indicative only. 

Students may also opt to take a cognate elective module offered by the Schools in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and by other Colleges of the University of London. 

In addition to taught modules, we run a range of research seminars to which all MA students are invited. Some of these are linked to our interdisciplinary Research Centres, such as the Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies, the Centre for Religion and Literature in English and the Centre for the History of the Emotions. Others are collaborations with other institutions, such as the London-Paris Romanticism Seminar. With visiting speakers from across the world, these seminars are an opportunity to meet other postgraduate students and members of staff and to learn about the latest developments in research.



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The MLitt English Language and Linguistics offers students the opportunity to study the intricate workings of language and explore its central role in society. Read more

Introduction

The MLitt English Language and Linguistics offers students the opportunity to study the intricate workings of language and explore its central role in society.
We investigate how language works, how people use it, what people use it for, where it came from and how it changes. The range of research expertise represented by the three dedicated members of staff teaching on the course are reflected in a comprehensive suite of modules that include cognitive, sociolinguistic, historical, evolutionary, and discourse analytical topics.

Key information

- Degree type: MLitt, Postgraduate Certificate
- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time
- Duration: Full-time: MLitt-12 months, PG Diploma-9 months, PG Certificate-3 months Part-time: MLitt-27 months, PG Diploma-21 months, PG Certificate-9 months
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Bethan Benwell | Dr Andrew Smith

Course objectives

Students will be expected to graduate with a knowledge of contemporary linguistic theories, including both generative and cognitive approaches to linguistic description, and the contexts in which these theories arose.
They will also acquire knowledge and understanding in specialist selected areas of study (e.g. Old and Middle English, historical, social and regional varieties of English, language and cognition, discourse analysis and evolutionary linguistics), including critical understanding of research in these areas.
They will be able to apply a variety of descriptive linguistic tools to language data and linguistic theories to selected specialist areas of study within English Language and Linguistics, according to their areas of interest.
They will learn to plan and manage a Research Project under supervision, undertaking independent research, including keeping track of relevant developments in the chosen field(s) and being able to set them in an appropriate context; they will be able to structure and communicate ideas effectively; gather, evaluate and organise information from multiple sources; and engage with other researchers by writing, debating, and delivering oral and written presentations.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Career opportunities

Postgraduate degrees in English Language and Linguistics are much sought-after by students across the world, providing a grounding in theories and methods essential for a range of research and teaching careers in disciplines including English Studies, Education, English as a Foreign Language and English for Specific Purposes.
Students with postgraduate degrees in English Language and Linguistics are prized for their excellent communication and problem-solving skills, and their ability to analyse and synthesise information rapidly and accurately. They are generally very adaptable and go on to a wide range of careers in all sectors of the economy, such as: private and public sector management and research, marketing and advertising, government administration, journalism, banking and finance, speech therapy.
Former graduates from the MLitt have gone on to, for instance, Linguistics Research (in the Healthcare sector) and further study in Speech Therapy (for which a Master's in Linguistics was a prerequisite).
In a recent report, graduates of English were as likely (if not more) to be in professional or managerial jobs three to three and a half years after graduation than graduates in other subjects (including science and social science subjects). Almost fifty percent of English graduates pursue further education within three years of graduating from their undergraduate degree, often as a route to a professional career, such as teaching or law.

Employability

Your MLitt in English Language and Linguistics will provide you with important transferable skills which you will be able to make use of throughout your career. Our course will help you develop your oral and written communication skills so that you can engage in confident and informed debate with a range of audiences. You will be able to design, plan and manage your own independent research projects; you will develop your skills in collecting, analysing and interpreting information, and will be able to structure, contextualise and communicate your ideas and findings effectively.
You will play an active part in our regular Language Research Group meetings, which discuss articles on important and controversial linguistic topics. You will have the opportunity to introduce articles of your choice to the group and will develop important skills in leading and managing open-ended discussions.

- Skills you can develop through this course
An MLitt in English Language and Linguistics is acknowledged by potential employers as providing important skills, such as motivation, intelligence and the ability to meet deadlines. Although English is not a specifically vocational degree it offers a number of important transferable skills, such as the ability to write clearly, effectively, accurately and persuasively.
Seminar discussion and oral presentations (required by many of our modules) help to develop your spoken communication skills. The critical and reflexive study of a variety of texts (literary and non-literary) teaches you how to analyse and interpret complex information and to apply abstract concepts and theories. Our criteria for assessment also require students to be able to synthesise conclusions, to assimilate existing research and to construct and defend an argument clearly and cogently.
Throughout their degrees, our students are also trained to use library and bibliographic resources effectively and appropriately, to reference accurately, and to present their work professionally. All of these skills are essential to many kinds of work, which is why so many employers recognise the value of a MLitt in English Language and Linguistics.

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This programme provides professional development for English language teachers, and focuses on the theory and practice of teaching the English language in a variety of contexts, drawing on innovative research carried out by members of the School of Humanities, which includes work on Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL), corpus linguistics, Academic English and telecollaboration. Read more
This programme provides professional development for English language teachers, and focuses on the theory and practice of teaching the English language in a variety of contexts, drawing on innovative research carried out by members of the School of Humanities, which includes work on Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL), corpus linguistics, Academic English and telecollaboration.

A distinctive feature of the programme is that you will have opportunities to observe English Language classes in higher education and undertake microteaching practice. You will also develop digital expertise with state-of-the-art e-learning tools and focus on specific English Language issues relating to your own educational contexts.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

Students on the programme state that staff provide them with excellent academic and pastoral support and that their learning experience is very positive (evidence from module and course evaluation questionnaires). The course also focuses on the future world of work and students may apply for part-time paid teaching opportunities and work placements within Coventry University, including placements overseas.

The assessment on the programme is varied and includes essays, reports, presentations, digital learning object design, microteaching and seen in-class tests. The course also offers extra-curricular activities, such as participation in lectures and workshops with renowned visiting applied linguists andeducation experts.

There also is a free field trip relevant to the curriculum. In 2014 for example we went to the British Museum in London and then designed intercultural teaching tasks based on the objects viewed at the museum (activity linked to the mandatory module on materials design).

You will moreover be offered other field trips at competitive rates as they are supported by the Faculty of Arts and Humanities and by the Centre for Global Engagement.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

You will:
-Discuss theory and practice of English language learning and teaching
-Develop skills in the evaluation and design of teaching materials for a variety of settings
-Explore the role played by new technologies for learning, teaching and communicating
-Analyse English as it is spoken and written in the UK and in the rest of the world
-Have the opportunity to practice teaching and observe experienced teachers in a variety of face-to-face and blended-learning settings

The mandatory modules are:
-Theories, Approaches and Methods of Language Learning and Teaching
-Developing Language Teaching Materials
-Analysing Written and Spoken Discourse
-Grammar and Phonology for the English Language Teacher
-Teaching English in Higher Education
-Computer Assisted Language Learning: Theory and Practice
-Dissertation in ELT/Applied Linguistics

In addition, you will choose three of the following optional modules:
-Business English;
-Sociolinguistics and English Language Teaching
-Teaching English Through Literature
-Corpus Analysis and Pedagogy
-English for Academic Purposes Course Design and Language Testing
-Understanding Academic English

HOW WILL THIS COURSE BE TAUGHT?

The full-time, face-to-face, programme runs over three semesters. There are two entry points: September and January. Students normally take four 15-credit modules in semester 1, four 15-credit modules modules in semester 2, and complete a Dissertation in semester 3.

Modules are taught face-to-face with lectures, workshops, laboratory sessions and seminars. All students are asked to submit a diagnostic task on arrival (normally a short essay). One-to-one support is available for students who need practise in academic English writing.

The delivery of all modules is supported by an online learning environment that is used, for example, to display content material, to submit assignments and provide electronic feedback, to discuss seminar topics (discussion forums), to design student-centred glossaries and to engage in online assessment and practice.

Students are also offered the opportunity to discuss English language teaching and analyse the English language with dedicated e-learning platforms for specific purposes (e.g. Corpus Linguistics tools, Computer Assisted Language Learning and Mobile Assisted Language Learning platforms).

Staff teaching on the programme also make use of the new learning spaces in the Disruptive Media Learning Laboratory in the Lanchester Library, to encourage students to practise English teaching in a variety of settings.

A part-time programme is available for UK/EU applicants, and can be tailored to the needs of each applicant.

HOW WILL I BE ASSESSED?

A variety of assessed tasks have been integrated into this programme, offering you a stimulating assessment experience and to enable you to reflect on your work, as the programme is designed to train teachers who will assess work themselves. Each module will normally have two assessment tasks and you will receive feedback on the first task before you submit the second one. The assessment tasks include seen examinations, presentations, essays and reports, corpus-based syllabus and course design, microteaching, reflective test design, e-learning object design in group and peer observation reports.

The external examiners have commented very positively on the variety, innovation and appropriateness of the assessment tasks on this programme. For example in 2013-2014 the External Examiner commented in his annual report: 'The assessment tasks are of good quality - well conceived, often imaginative, and in many cases appropriately practical, matching well with intended learning outcomes. I commend this.'

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

English looks likely to continue as the international language for the foreseeable future, and this MA programme leads to a variety of career destinations in teaching the language and/or in education management. Qualifications of this kind are often seen as important for access to senior management posts in both private and state educational institutions around the world. In addition to classroom teaching you will be well equipped to perform roles such as materials developer, resource manager and examiner.

Graduates from the MA in ELT are currently employed as professors in Jordan and China, as Pre-sessional Programme Coordinators in the UK and China and as Academic English Consultants for both the private and public sector, just to provide a few examples.

WORK PLACEMENTS

You will be provided support to find a work placement by dedicated staff in the careers office and in the Centre for Global Engagement.

OPPORTUNITIES FOR AN INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE

You will be offered the opportunity to take part in the global leaders programme (additional fees apply, see further details below) that includes international experiences. There will also be international trips organised by the School in collaboration with the Centre for Global Engagement. As English is a global language, international perspectives on learning and teaching English are fully embedded in the curriculum.

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​MA English Literature & Creative Writing is a rewarding taught degree, combining the study of English Literature with the theoretical and practical component of fiction writing. Read more

Course Overview

​MA English Literature & Creative Writing is a rewarding taught degree, combining the study of English Literature with the theoretical and practical component of fiction writing.

The MA is taught by published writers and researchers. The course is aimed to support you while you develop and hone your critical and creative writing skills, particularly in the field of fiction. You can take our MA for professional development purposes, in order to enhance your career and to increase your likelihood of publication. The MA will also help you specialise in the areas of creative practice as well as contemporary and historical literature in relation to place and space in order to pave the way for doctoral study.

We have expertise across a number of fields and our academic community is vibrant and dynamic with strong industry links.

The English Literature part of the degree analyses historic and contemporary textual representations of place, theorising cultural practices of location and space. The Creative Writing modules are specifically designed to develop you as a writer of fiction.

One of the great strengths of the programme is its flexibility. MA English Literature and Creative Writing can be studied either full or part time. Modules can be taken individually, allowing you to control the pace and depth of your postgraduate study. Programme delivery is enhanced by the university’s commitment to e-learning​.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/education/courses/Pages/English-and-Creative-Writing---MA.aspx

Course Content​​

All of our modules are core and are delivered over one year full time or two years part time.
Term 1
- Researching Humanities
Researching Humanities will introduce you to research methods at MA level. The module provides a thorough breakdown of research methods across the fields of Creative Writing and English Literature. This module is taught across all of our MA Creative Writing and English Literature pathways and it is also a great opportunity for you to get to know your peers.

- Short Story Writing
Short Story Writing provides a thorough introduction to the short story. This is done through two distinct, but integrated, approaches: a critical analysis of the development of the short story, with particular focus on twentieth century and contemporary writing; and through the creative practice itself. Each week you'll be encouraged to explore key techniques and approaches in your own writing through writing workshops.

- Literature and Landscapes
In Literature and Landscapes, you’ll examine artistic and literary representations of landscape, and engage with the complex social, cultural and aesthetic factors that contribute to the formation of identity. The module provides a comparative foundation from which you’ll consider representations of the urban encountered in Writing the City.

Term 2
- Novel Writing
Novel Writing extends and deepens your engagement with fiction writing. The module provides you with a thorough introduction to the novel as a distinct fictional genre focussing on the contemporary. As well as examining key works, you'll also be working on your own creative practice. A key part of the module focuses on the preparation of your work for publication.

- Writing the City
In Writing the City you'll explore representations of urban space through set texts and in your own creative writing. In this module you’ll examine texts that explore the urban in literary fiction, particularly throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

- Critical Practice
Critical Practice prepares you for your dissertation through which you'll be able to submit a substantial body of creative work along with a contextualising critical commentary.

- Dissertation
The Dissertation module is your opportunity to create a portfolio of writing, such as a collection of short stories or an excerpt of a novel that you are working on. The creative work will be accompanied by a critical reflection in which you contextualise your writing within a critical framework and with reference to other texts.

Learning & Teaching​

​Most modules are taught through group workshops and seminars. Some modules will also include individual tutorials and the dissertation module is delivered entirely through one-to-one tutorials with your supervisor.

In workshops and seminars full use is made of University technology and course materials will be delivered and stored through our Virtual Learning Environment. It will be possible for you to access the Virtual Learning Environment remotely and you will be encouraged to do so.

Most modules are 20 or 30 credits although we also have a 10-credit module and the dissertation is worth 60 credits.

In a 10-credit module you will receive 11 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 89 hours of independent study. In a 20-credit module you will receive 22 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 178 hours of independent study. In a 30-credit module you will receive 33 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 267 hours of independent study. The 60-credit dissertation is mainly conducted with independent study. You will receive 6 hours of tutorial supervision (this includes supervisors looking over your work) and you will be expected to conduct 594 hours of independent study.

Each student is appointed a personal tutor who will be available for academic advice, pastoral support and personal development planning. Tutors also have weekly office hours.

A critical but supportive environment is achieved through a combination of workshops, research seminars and e-learning. You will be introduced to the practicalities of preparing and submitting your work for possible publication.

Assessment

We have a variety of approaches to assessment across the programme depending upon the module. All creative practice modules (Short Story Writing, Novel Writing, Dissertation) are assessed through portfolios of creative work and accompanying critical essays in which you are required to reflect on your creative practice and to contextualise your work with reference to other texts. These modules also include class-based formative peer-assessment in the form of writing workshops. These do not count towards your final grade but the sessions do help you grow and reflect as a critical and creative writer.

In some modules (Writing the City) you can choose your method of assessment (creative portfolio and critical essay, or essay, or reflection, for example). In other modules (Literature and Landscapes) you will be asked to produce an essay.

In the introductory Researching the Humanities module you will be ask to produce a visual representation of a chosen research method, in the form of a poster. In other modules, such as Writing the City, you will be asked to post your work to a reflective blog.

Modules also make use of Virtual Learning Environments for assessments and you may be asked to view material online and then to respond to it.

You will receive tutor support in class and through our VLE in order to prepare you for each assessment point. We also have library facilities online and at campus.​

Employability & Careers​

Many of our students use the course to generate and hone their own writing for publication. Our creative practice modules are designed with eventual publication in mind. For example, in our Novel Writing module you will be taught how to write a synopsis for submission to an agent or publisher. Several of our students have had publication success (see below).

The MA is also a great choice for those wishing to enhance their employment and professional opportunities in editorial and publishing careers. The programme is suitable for those who would like to become teachers of English literature and creative writing as well as those who are already teachers. For example, teachers of English at ‘A’ Level and GCSE often find the course suitable for professional development purposes, providing them with skills to enhance their teaching of English literature creative writing within their current curricula or skilling them up to deliver the new Creative Writing ‘A’ Level.

Our MA is appropriate for those who would like careers in community-based education and practice. The course also prepares you for further study at PhD level at Cardiff Metropolitan University and beyond.

This degree will encourage you to develop the valuable transferable skills of autonomy, effective collaboration, self-direction, organisation, initiative and adaptability that are highly regarded in the workplace.

Recent student publishing successes:
Barbara A Stensland (MA Creative Writing) writes a blog about living with MS that has recently been published as a book, Stumbling in Flats (2015). It has been shortlisted for The International Rubery Book Award 2015.

Emre Karatoprak (MA Creative Writing) had his first novel published on Amazon, Türbülans (2013).

Alex Sambrook (MA Creative Writing) had a short story shortlisted in the prestigious Bridport Short Story Competition (2012).

​Stacey Taylor, (MA English & Creative Writing), won the It Started With a Kiss competition run by Authonomy in November 2011 with a 416 word flash fiction.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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This is an innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme, combining taught modules and a dissertation, which allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris. Read more
This is an innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme, combining taught modules and a dissertation, which allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris.

The programme allows you to choose from the full range of our MA literature modules. The list of what’s on offer is regularly added to by academics keen to explore new areas of thinking with students and to draw you in to our established areas of research strength.

Following a similar path to our English and American Literature MA, the Paris option allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent academic and recreational facilities. For the spring term you relocate to our Paris centre, studying in a historic corner of Montparnasse - close to the famous Latin Quarter, the Sorbonne University and the glorious Jardin du Luxembourg.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/223/english-and-american-literature-canterbury-and-paris

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)
EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
FR866 - Literature and Theory (30 credits)
EN871 - Origins of Modern Poetry (30 credits)
FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12,000 word dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- extend and deepen through coursework and research your understanding of a body of literatures in English, with special emphasis on modern and postcolonial literatures, and on literary and critical theory

- enable you to develop an historical awareness of literary traditions

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement

- introduce you to bibliographic method and scholarship and to foster in you the research methods that facilitate advanced literary study

- provide a basis in knowledge and skills if you intend to teach English and American literature, especially in higher education

- develop your understanding and critical appreciation of the expressive resources of language

- offer opportunities for you to develop your potential for creative writing (where such a module is taken)

- offer scope for the study of literature within an interdisciplinary context, notably that provided by history

- develop your ability to argue a point of view with clarity and cogency, both orally and in written form

- develop your knowledge and understanding of relevant aspects of contemporary Paris and the cultural history of the city as reflected in modern European, English and American literatures and other artistic media.

Research areas

Research in the School of English comes roughly under the following areas. However, there is often a degree of overlap between groups, and individual staff have interests that range more widely.

Eighteenth Century
The particular interests of the Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century converge around gender, class, nation, travel and empire, and the relationship between print and material culture. Staff in the Centre pursue cutting-edge approaches to the field and share a commitment to interdisciplinary methodologies.

The Centre regularly hosts visiting speakers as part of the School of English research seminar programme, and hosts day symposia, workshops and international conferences.

Nineteenth Century
The 19th-century research group is organised around the successful MA in Dickens and Victorian Culture and the editorship of The Dickensian, the official publication outlet for new Dickens letters. Other staff research interests include literature and gender, journalism, representations of time and history, sublimity and Victorian Poetry.

American Literature
Research in north American literature is conducted partly through the Faculty-based Centre for American Studies, which also facilitates co-operation with modern US historians. Staff research interests include 20th-century American literature, especially poetry, Native American writing, modernism, and cultural history.

Creative Writing
The Centre for Creative Writing is the focus for most practice-based research in the School. Staff organise a thriving events series and run a research seminar for postgraduate students and staff to share ideas about fiction-writing. Established writers regularly come to read and discuss their work.

Medieval and Early Modern
The Faculty-based Canterbury Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies has a distinctive brand of interdisciplinarity, strong links with local archives and archaeological trusts, and provides a vibrant forum for investigating the relationships between literary and non-literary modes of writing in its weekly research seminar.

Modern Poetry
The Centre for Modern Poetry is a leading centre for research and publication in its field, and participates in both critical and creative research. Staff regularly host visiting speakers and writers, participate in national and international research networks, and organise graduate research seminars and public poetry readings.

Postcolonial
Established in 1994, the Centre for Colonial and Postcolonial Research has acquired an international reputation for excellence in research. It has an outstanding track record in publication, organises frequent international conferences, and regularly hosts leading postcolonial writers and critics. It also hosts a visiting writer from India every year in association with the Charles Wallace Trust.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Our Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) MA will provide you with a thorough introduction to current research, teaching theory, principles and practices in English language teaching. Read more

Our Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) MA will provide you with a thorough introduction to current research, teaching theory, principles and practices in English language teaching. You will have the opportunity to observe actual language classes, plan and teach real lessons and carry out research on language learning and teaching.

Key benefits

  • Develop theoretical knowledge and practical skills for teaching English in different contexts.
  • Four weeks of supervised teaching practice.
  • Gain a professional certificate in TEFL at the same time as your MA in TESOL.
  • Observe lessons and learn from experienced teachers at International House London.
  • Excellent tutorial support and extensive course-specific training in research methods and academic writing.
  • Staff have extensive experience of teaching and training teachers in a wide variety of contexts.

Description

Through our Master’s course you will learn sophisticated approaches to second-language pedagogy, second-language learning theories, linguistic analysis and research methods. This will give you a solid foundation of professional knowledge and expertise in preparation for a teaching placement and provide skills to continue your professional development. Our optional modules and dissertation module will allow you to connect this knowledge to specialist areas such as language assessment, the development of teaching materials and teaching English in a variety of contexts. You will also have the option of four weeks of supervised teaching practice through our collaboration with International House, the leading provider of the initial teacher training certificate. If you are successful in the placement you will gain an additional qualification through International House, either the Cambridge English CELTA or the IH Certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language.

This course provides you with a thorough introduction to current research, theory, principles and practices in English language teaching. It will enable you to acquire a range of practical skills for teaching English as a second/foreign language, and will prepare you to engage independently and critically with current language teaching and research issues. It will give you the basic research skills you need to investigate language learning, and to help you to develop your individual pedagogic style by reflecting on practice.

Course purpose

The programme provides students with a thorough introduction to current research, theory, principles and practices in English language teaching. It enables students to acquire a range of practical skills for teaching English as a second/foreign language, and prepares students to develop the capacity to engage independently and critically with current language teaching and research issues. It will provide students with basic research skills to investigate language learning, and help students to develop their individual pedagogic approaches by reflecting on practice.

Course format and assessment

We will teach you through lectures, teacher-led class discussions and group work, and you will typically have 40 hours of this for every 30-credit required module. We also expect you to undertake 260 hours of independent study per 30-credit required module. Contact hours for optional modules may vary slightly. During your dissertation we will provide you with seven hours of one-to-one contact with a supervisor and 20 hours of lectures on research skills to complement your 573 hours of independent study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

We will assess your performance on our required modules through essays, language analysis tasks, oral presentations and lesson planning tasks. We assess most of our optional modules through one 3,500-word essay per module, although assessment methods may vary depending on the optional modules you choose. You will also write a 15,000-word dissertation.

Career prospects

The skills and knowledge that you develop over the course of our MA will prepare you for a career in English language teaching, a research-oriented career, or a mixture of the two.

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This course offers a flexible, challenging Master’s programme, delivered by a team of tutors with internationally recognised academic expertise in specialist areas. Read more
This course offers a flexible, challenging Master’s programme, delivered by a team of tutors with internationally recognised academic expertise in specialist areas.

There are three routes: you can choose a specialised pathway in Contemporary Literature, Film & Theory or The Gothic, and a general English Studies route where students can build their own bespoke programme, choosing units from either pathways to create a Master's level experience reflecting your own interests in the further study of English.

Features and benefits of the course

Taught in small groups, you will benefit from the expertise of research active staff, rapidly developing your specialist subject knowledge and acquiring professional levels of research skills and conference presentation skills.

Research in the department has been rated highly in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise with some rated as world leading.

You will benefit from regular seminars by visiting speakers as well as a thriving conference schedule.

A personal tutoring system is in place, ensuring that all students have a tutor with whom they can discuss any aspect of their academic developments.

The Manchester Centre for Gothic Studies was launched in 2013 to capitalise on the expertise of a high number of internationally renowned Gothic scholars housed in the Department of English. Founding Centre Head, Linnie Blake along with Xavier Aldana Reyes and Sorcha Ni Fhlainn form the Centre’s core members.

About the Course

There are three routes: you can choose a specialised pathway (MA English Studies: Contemporary Literature, Film and Theory or MA English Studies: The Gothic) or a general route (MA English Studies), selecting from the range of units to construct a Master's level experience reflecting your interests in the further study of English.

MA English Studies: Contemporary Literature, Film and Theory focuses on contemporary cultural practices and critical theoretical interventions. This pathway reflects research strengths in contemporary literary and film studies, critical and cultural theory, memory and trauma studies, the critical medical humanities and queer, postcolonial and cultural disability studies.

MA English Studies: The Gothic begins with the pre-history of the Gothic mode in the seventeenth century, explores its eighteenth and nineteenth-century incarnations and concludes with contemporary manifestations of the mode. Students study plays and novels, films and television, framed by socio-cultural perspectives and critical and theoretical analyses.

MA English Studies (general pathway) allows students to freely select units from the full range on offer.

Assessment details

The programme is examined mainly through written work, with an essay of around 6000 words (or equivalent) in each unit usually forming the basis of that assessment. All MA students submit a Dissertation of around 15,000 words. Each year, we run an MA Day when you will present your dissertation proposals to the teaching team and the rest of the group.

MA English Studies students submit all their written coursework online, and the Programme makes extensive use of easily accessible online provision of teaching and learning support materials.

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Delve in depth into the fast-evolving world of international English language education and gain fresh perspectives for teaching it in your own country. Read more

Delve in depth into the fast-evolving world of international English language education and gain fresh perspectives for teaching it in your own country.

The MA Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) is a specialist master's course suitable for anyone working - or aspiring to work - in the field of teaching English as an international language.

You will gain exposure to the latest developments in TESOL research, policy and practice, and work with expert tutors who, collectively, have taught English across five continents and are leading the way with their research.

Throughout the course we will challenge your thinking and assumptions about how English is used, taught and learned worldwide, analysing its role as the world’s major international language and exploring current issues and debates.

We place particular emphasis on helping you to apply the latest thinking about English language teaching to different social and cultural contexts, including your own.

In addition to core units, you will attend specialised teaching training workshops to gain expertise in relevant classroom procedures, and complete an academic writing and study skills course.

You will also have opportunities to share experiences with language educators from a range of backgrounds and build an international network of professional contacts.

By the end of the course you will be able to:

  • develop appropriate teaching methods and materials to enhance how English is taught in your own country
  • use the latest research to reflect on, and inform, your daily practice and decision-making
  • enhance your employability in a range of fields, including English language teaching, bilingual education, language teacher education, intercultural communication and business communication
  • build an international profile and contribute academically and professionally to this rapidly evolving field

This course is suitable for students with academic and professional backgrounds in applied linguistics, English language education, linguistics, international education and cultural studies. It is relevant for those already working in the field, and for those aspiring to do so.

Course structure

This course lasts 1 year. Occasionally we make changes to our programmes in response to, for example, feedback from students, developments in research and the field of studies, and the requirements of accrediting bodies. You will be advised of any significant changes to the advertised programme, in accordance with our Terms and Conditions.

Units

Compulsory course units

These compulsory units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

Semester 1

  • Research methods for second language education 1
  • Second language acquisition
  • Language awareness

Semester 2

  • Research methods for second language education 2
  • Language policy, curriculum and and methodology
  • Teaching and assessing English as an international language

Summer

  • Dissertation for the MA TESOL

Learning and assessment

Learning

  • Lectures
  • Online resources
  • Seminars
  • Tutorials
  • Workshops

Assessment

  • Dissertation
  • Essay
  • Online assessment
  • Oral assessment


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The MA English Literature is a rewarding taught degree offering an exhilarating analysis of English Literature using texts from the 'long nineteenth century' to the present day.​. Read more

Course Overview

The MA English Literature is a rewarding taught degree offering an exhilarating analysis of English Literature using texts from the 'long nineteenth century' to the present day.​

The degree focuses on historic and contemporary textual representations of place, theorising cultural representations and practices of location, space, history and textuality, and the effect of these on constructions of identity. Where possible, the modules encourage you to explore interdisciplinary boundaries and texts.

The MA is taught by published writers and researchers. The course is aimed to support you while you develop and hone your critical writing and research skills, particularly in relation to literature that addresses history, place and space. You can take our MA for professional development purposes, in order to enhance your career and to increase your employability in the arts and heritage sectors. The MA will also help you specialise in the areas of contemporary and historical literature in relation to place and space in order to pave the way for doctoral study.

We have expertise across a number of fields and our academic community is vibrant and dynamic with strong industry links.

One of the great strengths of the programme is its flexibility. MA English Literature can be studied either full or part time. Modules can be taken individually, allowing you to control the pace and depth of your postgraduate study. Programme delivery is enhanced by the university’s commitment to e-learning​.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/education/courses/Pages/English---MA.aspx

​Course Content​​

All of our modules are core and are delivered over one year full time or two years part time.

Term 1
- Researching Humanities
Researching Humanities will introduce you to research methods at MA level. The module provides a thorough breakdown of research methods across the fields of Creative Writing and English Literature. This module is taught across all of our MA Creative Writing and English Literature pathways and it is also a great opportunity for you to get to know your peers.

- New & Experimental Writing
In New and Experimental Writing you will encounter a range of transgressive texts from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Starting with the avant-garde, the module proceeds chronologically to the contemporary. We interrogate what it means to transgress aesthetic norms at various points in time and take into consideration historical and cultural context to consider whether there might be a connection between the challenging of literary and social standards. You will be able to approach these texts via a number of methodologies, including theoretical and creative.

- Literature and Landscapes
In Literature and Landscapes, you’ll examine artistic and literary representations of landscape, and engage with the complex social, cultural and aesthetic factors that contribute to the formation of identity. The module provides a comparative foundation from which you’ll consider representations of the urban encountered in Writing the City.

Term 2
- Representing ‘the Past’
In Representing 'the Past', you will consider how we interpret 'the past' within a cultural context. Looking at both textual and extra-textual appropriations, and by showing how meanings of 'the past' are contested at any one time, you will consider how certain interpretations are naturalised and legitimated within culture.

- Writing the City
In Writing the City you'll explore representations of urban space through set texts and in your own creative writing. In this module you’ll examine texts that explore the urban in literary fiction, particularly throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

- Critical Practice
Critical Practice prepares you for your dissertation through which you'll be able to submit a substantial body of creative work along with a contextualising critical commentary.

- Dissertation
The Dissertation module is your opportunity to create a portfolio of writing, such as a collection of short stories or an excerpt of a novel that you are working on. The creative work will be accompanied by a critical reflection in which you contextualise your writing within a critical framework and with reference to other texts. ​

Learning & Teaching​

​Most modules are taught through group workshops and seminars. Some modules will also include individual tutorials and the dissertation module is delivered entirely through one-to-one tutorials with your supervisor.

In workshops and seminars full use is made of University technology and course materials will be delivered and stored through our Virtual Learning Environment. It will be possible for you to access the Virtual Learning Environment remotely and you will be encouraged to do so.

Most modules are 20 or 30 credits although we also have a 10-credit module and the dissertation is worth 60 credits.

In a 10-credit module you will receive 11 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 89 hours of independent study. In a 20-credit module you will receive 22 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 178 hours of independent study. In a 30-credit module you will receive 33 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 267 hours of independent study. The 60-credit dissertation is mainly conducted with independent study. You will receive 6 hours of tutorial supervision (this includes supervisors looking over your work) and you will be expected to conduct 594 hours of independent study.

Each student is appointed a personal tutor who will be available for academic advice, pastoral support and personal development planning. Tutors also have weekly office hours.

A critical but supportive environment is achieved through a combination of workshops, research seminars and e-learning. You will be introduced to the practicalities of preparing and submitting your work for possible publication.

Assessment

We have a variety of approaches to assessment across the programme depending upon the module.

In some modules (Writing the City) you can choose your method of assessment (creative portfolio and critical essay, or essay, or reflection, for example). In other modules (Literature and Landscapes) you will be asked to produce an essay.

In the introductory Researching the Humanities module you will be ask to produce a visual representation of a chosen research method, in the form of a poster. In other modules, such as Writing the City, you will be asked to post your work to a reflective blog.

Modules also make use of Virtual Learning Environments for assessments and you may be asked to view material online and then to respond to it (Representing ‘the Past’).

You will receive tutor support in class and through our VLE in order to prepare you for each assessment point. We also have library facilities online and at campus.

Employability & Careers​

The MA is also a great choice for those wishing to enhance their employment and professional opportunities in the arts or heritage sectors. The programme is suitable for those who are teachers of English Literature at ‘A’ Level or GCSE and would like to enhance their expertise for professional development purposes.

The course also prepares you for further study at PhD level at Cardiff Metropolitan University and beyond.

This degree will encourage you to develop the valuable transferable skills of autonomy, effective collaboration, self-direction, organisation, initiative and adaptability that are highly regarded in the workplace. A Master's degree in English Literature may lead to a variety of careers which include the particularly relevant areas of teaching, research, journalism, public relations, the Civil Service, publishing, the media, and employment in the public or voluntary sectors.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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Kent's MA in Applied Linguistics with TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) provides teachers with advanced knowledge of linguistics and language pedagogy, informed by research and scholarship, to enhance, develop and inform an understanding of language learning and classroom practice. Read more

Kent's MA in Applied Linguistics with TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) provides teachers with advanced knowledge of linguistics and language pedagogy, informed by research and scholarship, to enhance, develop and inform an understanding of language learning and classroom practice.

The programme is offered by the Department of English Language & Linguistics, and benefits from staff expertise in areas of linguistics that inform classroom practice (such as syntax, morphology, semantics, pragmatics and phonetics), raising awareness of these fields and applying them to TESOL. Students gain an understanding of the theory, methodology and interdisciplinary nature of TESOL, as well as a firm foundation in linguistics.           

Practical teaching opportunities are a feature of the programme, including teaching to peer groups and international students. There is also the opportunity to observe language classes.

Students begin by studying eight modules across the Autumn and Spring terms, before writing a 12,000-word dissertation or teaching portfolio over the summer, supervised by an expert in the department.

The programme is an ideal for teachers aiming to improve their understanding and abilities in communicating across the barriers of language and those who wish to build an international dialogue.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/ell/postgraduate/taught-applied-linguistics-for-tesol.html

About the Department of English Language and Linguistics

English Language and Linguistics (ELL), founded in 2010, is the newest department of the School of European Culture and Languages (SECL). ELL is a dynamic and growing department with a vibrant research culture. We specialise in experimental and theoretical linguistics. In particular, our interests focus on quantitative and experimental research in speech and language processing, variation and acquisition, but also cover formal areas such as syntax, as well as literary stylistics. In addition to English and its varieties, our staff work in French, German, Greek, Romani, Korean, Spanish and Russian.

Staff and postgraduates are members of the Centre for Language and Linguistic Studies (CLLS), a research centre that seeks to promote interdisciplinary linguistic research. We also have links with research networks outside Kent, and are involved with national and international academic associations including the Linguistics Association of Great Britain, the British Association of Academic Phoneticians, the Linguistic Society of America, the Association for French Language Studies and the Poetics and Linguistics Association.

Course structure

The programme starts with two core linguistics modules (Sounds and Structure), the choice between two modules (Meaning or Research Skills) and a module on language awareness for teachers (Language Awareness and Analysis for TESOL) so that you have a firm grasp of the linguistic bases of language teaching.

In the spring term the focus is on how languages are learned (Second Language Acquisition), how you can improve classroom technique (Methods and Practice of TESOL), plan for your students' needs (Course and Syllabus Design for TESOL) and the option between two modules (Materials Evaluation and Development for TESOL or one of the linguistics modules offered that term). 

Students can choose to do either a Research Dissertation or a Teaching Portfolio in the summer term. The dissertation will be an opportunity to plan and develop a piece of empirical research which can be of direct relevance to your current or planned teaching situation. The teaching portfolio functions both as the culmination of the year's work on the program and as preparation for students' professional development as language teachers.

Assessment

Modules are typically assessed by a 3-4,000-word essay, but assessment patterns can include practical/experimental work, report and proposal writing, critiques, problem solving and seminar presentations. You also complete a 12-15,000-word research dissertation on a topic agreed with your supervisor.

Programme aims

- Provide TESOL practitioners with advanced knowledge of linguistics related to language pedagogy, informed by research and scholarship, which will enhance, develop and inform their understanding of language learning and classroom practice.

- To produce graduates who will contribute locally, nationally and internationally to the TESOL community.

- To prepare students to be more effective in the TESOL classroom.

- To provide students with teaching and training which is informed by research, scholarship, practice and experience.

Research areas

Alongside our research centre below, we also have links with research networks outside Kent, and are involved with national and international academic associations including the Linguistics Association of Great Britain, the British Association of Academic Phoneticians, the Linguistic Society of America, the Association for French Language Studies and the Poetics and Linguistics Association.

- Linguistics Lab

The newly established Linguistics Lab is currently housed in Rutherford College and has facilities for research in acoustics, sociophonetics and speech and language processing. English Language and Linguistics (ELL) members also have access to the School of European Culture and Language (SECL) recording studio and multimedia labs which can be used both for research and teaching.

- Centre for Language and Linguistics

English Language and Linguistics is the main contributor to the Centre for Language and Linguistics. Founded in 2007, the Centre promotes interdisciplinary collaboration in linguistic research and teaching. Membership embraces not just the members of English Language and Linguistics but also other SECL members with an interest in the study of language, as well as researchers in philosophy, computing, psychology and anthropology, reflecting the many and varied routes by which individuals come to a love of language and an interest in the various disciplines and subdisciplines of linguistics.

Careers

Postgraduate work in English Language and Linguistics prepares you for a range of careers where an in-depth understanding of how language functions is essential. These include speech and language theory, audiology, teaching, publishing, advertising, journalism, public relations, company training, broadcasting, forensic and computational work, and the civil or diplomatic services.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/



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The course furnishes the student with the opportunity to pursue English literary studies at an advanced level, developing the skills and knowledge required for textual, theoretical and historical analysis in the candidate’s chosen field. Read more
The course furnishes the student with the opportunity to pursue English literary studies at an advanced level, developing the skills and knowledge required for textual, theoretical and historical analysis in the candidate’s chosen field. It offers one-to-one supervision from experts in the field. You are also encouraged to participate in the lively research environment of the School and College, which includes the English Literature research seminar series, scholarly reading groups, workshops and conferences.

The course consists of taught modules (Part One) mainly assessed by essays, followed by a dissertation (Part Two). The modules within the English Literature programme are grouped into four ‘pathways’ . Each of these represents a particular area of research strength at Bangor and offers an aspect of literary study in which MA students may choose to specialise.

The four pathways:

1. Medieval and Early Modern Literature

2. Material Texts

3. Revolution and Modernity, 1750 to the Present

4. Four Nations Literature

Students who prefer not to specialise by following one of the pathways may alternatively pursue a broader portfolio of advanced literary studies in English by completing the compulsory module (see below) and a free choice of three other modules.

Course Structure
Part One:

In the first part of the MA programme, all students are required to study FOUR modules of 30 credits each; for full-time students, this means two modules per semester. Of these four modules, one is compulsory: Literary Theory, Scholarship and Research (in semester 1). This module lays the foundation for the MA by introducing you to key ideas in literary theory, the analysis of texts and the techniques of advanced scholarly writing.

In addition, students are required to choose three further modules from those listed below. You may make an open selection of modules OR follow one of the four pathways described above. In order to complete a pathway, you must choose at least TWO of your three optional modules from that pathway, with the final module being a free choice (from the pathway, from elsewhere in the English Literature MA programme, or from other relevant postgraduate programmes in the School or College).

1. Modules on Medieval and Early Modern Literature:

Pre-Modern Travel
Manuscripts and Printed Books
The European Renaissance
Myth and the Early Modern Author
Women’s Devotional Writing
Medieval Arthur
Post-Medieval Arthur
Advanced Latin for Postgraduates
Editing Texts
2. Modules on Material Texts:

Manuscripts and Printed Books
Material Texts and Contexts
Print, Politics & Popular Culture
Editing Texts
3. Modules on Revolution and Modernity, 1750 to the Present:

Revolution, Modernity: 1790-1930
Welsh Literature in English
Material Texts and Contexts
Modernisms
Print, Politics & Popular Culture
Irish Literature
Editing Texts
4. Modules on Four-Nations Literature:

Revolution, Modernity: 1790-1930
Welsh Literature in English
Modernisms
Irish Literature
Editing Texts
In addition to the above pathway-related modules, the following modules are offered:

Open Essay
The Postgraduate Conference
It is possible to take one optional module from the MA in Creative Writing (if the prerequisites of creative writing experience are met). If you should so wish, and in consultation with the Director of the MA in English Literature, there is also the option of taking one MA module from another School in the College of Arts and Humanities.

Part Two:

After the completion of the four modules which make up Part One of the programme, Part Two consists of a 20,000-word dissertation (60 credits) on a subject of your choice, researched and written under the individual supervision of a subject specialist. If you are following one of the four pathways, you are expected to write your dissertation in a research area relevant to that particular pathway.

Students who have completed Part One of the MA programme but elect not to write a dissertation are awarded the postgraduate diploma.

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The MA in English Literature offers an exciting and challenging course of graduate study covering a range of periods and genres from the Renaissance to the Contemporary. Read more

The MA in English Literature offers an exciting and challenging course of graduate study covering a range of periods and genres from the Renaissance to the Contemporary.

The course enables you to develop subject expertise at an advanced level, and carry out independent research projects in your own areas of interest.

The core compulsory module provides a secure grounding in the key methods and critical contexts of postgraduate study. Elective modules cover the full range of periods and genres offered by the Department, while Independent Study Modules and the Dissertation offer the chance to pursue a personalised project matching your interests.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/english/

Why choose this course?

  • A curriculum that allows you to study either a broad range of literary texts, or specialise in periods and genres from the Renaissance to the present day 
  • You have the opportunity to study with internationally-renowned scholars who regularly publish in their field.
  • You have access to a state-of-the-art learning environment, and use of Oxford's world-famous Bodleian Library.
  • You have access to the Man Booker Prize archive, based here at Oxford Brookes.
  • Oxford is a vibrant student city that has much on offer, including the Ashmolean and Pitt Rivers Museums, Modern Art Oxford and a wide range of lively food and music cultural events.
  • The Oxford Brookes Poetry Centre is home to a thriving poetry community. 

Teaching and learning

The MA course is taught through small-group seminars, workshops and individual tutorials. Classes are held in the evenings, with sessions running from 6.30pm to 9.00pm. 

Part-time students attend the University one evening per week and should be able to devote an additional 12-15 hours per week to private study. 

Full-time students attend classes on two evenings per week and spend 30 hours per week in private study. 

Assessment is entirely by written work and occasional oral presentations. There are no examinations.

Specialist facilities

Oxford Brookes houses the Booker Prize Archive and has research and teaching strengths in fiction, drama, and poetry.

Our virtual learning portals provide core materials relating to learning and assessment online. These include lecture schedules, module guides, supporting materials, guidelines and criteria for coursework along with notes on essay writing and report presentation.

The Oxford Brookes Poetry Centre hosts a range of readings and research presentations, and regularly includes world class poets and researchers in its activities.

In addition to Oxford Brookes’ own specialised library collections, our MA students get full reader access to the Bodleian Library, one of the most important research collections in the world.

How this course helps you develop

The MA English Literature offers you the opportunity to develop your literary critical skills to a high level, but it also fosters your professional and personal growth through improving:

  •  advanced critical thinking skills
  •  verbal and literary presentation skills
  •  interpersonal and teamwork skills
  •  research skills
  • management and strategy skills
  •  digital literacy skills.

Careers

Our alumni go on to a wide range of careers in different sectors, including teaching, publishing, NGO/charity work, media production, and the creative industries. Employers value our postgraduate students’ advanced problem-solving, research, and communication skills. 

Recently, Jenny Mayhew, English PhD student, had her first novel published, A Wolf in Hindelheim. A significant number of successful MA students continue into further research and academic careers, at Brookes and other institutions. 

The MA course offers an excellent grounding in further study in English no matter what you decide to do afterwards, and provides the research experience and training you need to pursue a successful PhD project.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:

  • studying at a Brookes partner college
  • studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

How Brookes supports postgraduate students

Throughout your time at Brookes you will receive support from our Faculty staff, both academically and personally. Our student support co-ordinators are there to support you in all aspects of your academic career, from module choices to any personal issues you may experience. 

Your academic adviser will be allocated when you start, and will provide support throughout your studies.

We have a dedicated English librarian who will help you access relevant materials and guide you through the huge range of information available to you. The University library boasts an impressive range of materials including e-journals, e-books and databases.

Supporting your learning

From academic advisers and support co-ordinators to specialist subject librarians and other learning support staff, we want to ensure that you get the best out of your studies.

Personal support services

We want your time at Brookes to be as enjoyable and successful as possible. That's why we provide all the facilities you need to be relaxed, happy and healthy throughout your studies.



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English Literature at Cardiff is taught by staff with an international reputation for innovative and influential research. Our passion for the subject and the strength and range of our scholarship enable us to offer a degree which is. Read more
English Literature at Cardiff is taught by staff with an international reputation for innovative and influential research. Our passion for the subject and the strength and range of our scholarship enable us to offer a degree which is:

• Inclusive. We teach across the whole chronological span of English Literature, from Middle English to literature of the twenty-first century. We offer modules in a range of critical approaches, from bibliography and textual studies to contemporary women’s writing, and from Barthesian semiotics and postcolonial ways of reading, to theories of gender and queer studies. We are intrigued by the connections between literature and popular culture and literature and theory, and our teaching reflects these interests.

• Challenging. Staff offer modules on their research areas of expertise. This means that students engage with new, up-to-date ideas that are helping to shape and define the future of the discipline.

• Diverse. There are no compulsory modules. You have the freedom to use any critical, theoretical perspective to analyse any type of (aesthetic, cultural, historical) material.

• Engaged. The MA in English Literature is a successful programme of study that has a strong reputation for offering a comprehensive range of modules from all periods and genres that bring the latest developments in literary and critical theory to bear upon the reading of literary and cultural texts.

Distinctive features

• A wide-ranging programme of research-led modules taught by specialists in the field
• A series of dedicated research pathways, including Medieval and Renaissance Studies; Romantic and Victorian Studies; Modern and Contemporary Literature; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Cultural and Critical Theory
• Access to skills training and various research activities
• The freedom to assemble a programme of study tailored to personal and professional interests
• High-level training in the latest research methods, critical theory and scholarly writing and presentation skills in a non-assessed core module
• Popular two-day residential conference and workshop at Gregynog Hall, where you will present short 15-minute papers in a supportive and lively atmosphere
• One-day symposium dedicated to increasing your employability skills
• Opportunities to take part in a series of dynamic research seminar series
• Access to specialist library collections

Structure

Our flexible structure allows you to assemble programmes of study tailored to your personal and professional interests. You can opt for the open pathway, or choose one of our specialist pathways: Medieval and Renaissance; Romantic and Victorian Studies; Modern and Contemporary Literature; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Cultural and Critical Theory, which groups together groups of taught modules with related research activities and skills training available in the School.

The degree is structured in two parts.

• Part one

You choose four modules from a range of specialist options. You take two modules per semester (one module per semester for part-time study)

All teaching is by seminars and workshops structured around student participation, featuring opportunities to present your work. Each module consists of a two-hour seminar per week and is assessed by a 4,000-word essay (or equivalent).

In addition to the taught modules, you attend weekly workshops on research methods and scholarly presentation.

• Part Two

You undertake a dissertation of 16,000-20,000 words on a subject of your choice, developed in consultation with a supervisor in the field. You begin to plan and research your dissertation in the second semester for submission in September.

Core module:

English Literature Ma Dissertation

Optional modules:

The Myth of King Arthur in The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
Violent Death in Renaissance Drama
Reading/Theory
Constructing Shakespeare
Neo-Victorian Metatextualities
Writing and Experimentation
Heroes and Villains from Chaucer to Shakespeare
Spectral Femininities
Writing Victorian Science
Children's Fantasy Fiction Since 1900
Before Homosexuality? Representing Same Sex Desire from Smollett to Sexology
Romantic Poetry and Place
Project Management and Advanced Research Skills
Narrative and Nation: Romantic Prose 1980-1830
White
Virginia Woolf's Modernism
Ecotheories
Digital Theory

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in seminar groups for all modules. The teaching for each module is text-based and revolves around the exploration of concepts and ideas from a range of literary, historical, and theoretical perspectives within the broad field of English Literature.

The learning activities vary from module to module as appropriate, but will include such as activities as interactive discussions of prepared texts/topics and, in some cases, student-led presentations.

Encouraged to explore our excellent library resources, you are expected to undertake preparation including wide-ranging reading to enable full participation.

Assessment

Each module on Part One is assessed by a 4,000-word essay or equivalent (which can include up to 10% of the module being assessed by oral presentation).

Part Two is examined by a 16,000-20,000-word dissertation.

Career prospects

Postgraduate study is a gateway to many careers within and beyond academia.

Many of our alumni enter (or return to) various professions including academia, primary and secondary education, journalism, publishing, archival and library work, the Civil Service, arts administration and the creative industries.

In addition to taught modules and academic workshops, we also offer dedicated sessions to increase your transferable skills and employability prospects. We also encourage all students on the programme to work closely with the University’s Careers and Employability office.

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Why Surrey?. This programme encourages you to consider the relationship between literature from a variety of historical periods, regions, contexts and theoretical paradigms. Read more

Why Surrey?

This programme encourages you to consider the relationship between literature from a variety of historical periods, regions, contexts and theoretical paradigms.

You will benefit from the expertise of a vibrant, multidisciplinary group of published authors and academics and will have access to a full calendar of thought provoking literary events.

Programme overview

The MA in English Literature will equip you with a critical understanding of English literary studies, and the ability to reflect on significant questions: How have ideas about literature and literary value changed over time? What effects do innovations in printing and publishing have on writing? How much do political and social factors condition and define authorial identities and practices?

It is ideal for students wishing to pursue doctoral research, those who seek a broad overview of Anglophone literary culture, and those looking to develop expertise in specific literary areas.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

On successful completion of the programme, students may go on to do the PhD in English literature.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Academics and events

As a student on this Masters, you will benefit from the expertise of a vibrant, multidisciplinary group of published academics and authors.

You will also have access to a number of conferences, seminars and workshops hosted throughout the year. These events cover a range of topics to broaden your thinking in the fields of literature, language and linguistics, cultural studies and creative writing.

Academics to have recently spoken at the University of Surrey include:

  • Rod Mengham
  • Bernard O’Donoghue
  • Edward Larrisy
  • Robert Hampson
  • Adam Roberts
  • Helen Hester
  • John Wrighton
  • J.H. Prynne
  • Robert Fitterman
  • Allen Fisher
  • Barbara Hardy
  • Gilbert Adair

They have been joined by novelists Iain Sinclair, Monica Ali, Jaspreet Singh and Nikita Lalwani, to name a few.

Each year’s cultural activities begin with the Morag Morris Poetry Lecture on campus by a visiting speaker and feature readings by students at the Guildford School of Acting.

Educational aims of the programme

The English Literature MA programme will prepare graduates to undertake a PhD programme in the relevant field.

It will also provide students with the transferable skills of critical thinking, analysis, communication, and textuality that are attractive to a wide range of employers, from the cultural industries to marketing and advertising to tourism and leisure to the civil service and public/private partnerships.

Devoted to the requirements and complexities of textual analysis and critical reading, the programme also provides advanced understanding of the contexts, theoretical paradigms, methodologies and modes of interpretation that are vital in contemporary literary studies.

The main aims are to:

  • Acquire sound knowledge of the major principles of literary criticism
  • Develop the critical language and terminology to carry out in-depth analyses of literary texts from across the diverse range of periods, areas, and approaches to the study of English literature
  • Reflect on their own practice as literary critics

The programme will help students to apply scholarly approaches to critically evaluate the major schools of literary criticism and literary theory in light of current and the possibilities of future development.

As a Master’s level programme, it also aims to instil in students the capacity for carrying out independent research in an area of literary studies.

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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Introduction. Read more

Introduction

Contemporary culture is characterised by nothing if not a reawakened interest in the Gothic, be that in the form of the current vogue for horror film, in the heightened preoccupation with terror and monstrosity in the media, the extraordinary success of writers such as Stephen King and Stephenie Meyer, or in manifestations of an alternative Gothic impulse in fashion, music and lifestyle.

As the countless adaptations and retellings of texts such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818; 1831) and Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897) in our own day attest, the Gothic, though once relegated to a dark corner of literary history, has assumed a position of considerable cultural prominence.

The MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at the University of Stirling provides students with the unique opportunity to steep themselves in the scholarly appreciation of this mode, providing a rigorous and intensive historical survey of its literary origins and developments, and charting its dispersal across a broad range of media and national contexts. In so doing, the course equips its graduates with the necessary theoretical vocabulary to address, and critically reflect upon, the Gothic as a complex and multi-faceted cultural phenomenon, while also preparing them for further postgraduate research in the rich and vibrant field of Gothic Studies. In addition to these subject-specific objectives, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination also provides its graduates with several invaluable transferable skills, including critical thinking, theoretical conceptualisation, historical periodization and independent research.

Key information

- Degree type: MLitt, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate

- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time

- Duration: Full-time; MLitt-12 months, Part-time: MLitt-27 months,

- Start date: September

- Course Director: Dr Timothy Jones

Course objectives

- The MLitt in the Gothic Imagination consists of four core modules, two option modules, and a dissertation. Across these components, the course aims to provide students with a rigorous grounding in the work and thematic preoccupations of the most influential Gothic writers, both historical and contemporary. Supplemented by relevant historical and theoretical material throughout, the course aims to provide as rich and varied an exposure to the academic study of the Gothic as possible.

- The first two core modules seek to provide a searching historical overview of the genesis and development of the Gothic aesthetic, taking students systematically from the circulation of the term ‘Gothic’ in the political and aesthetic discourses of the late seventeeth and eighteenth centuries, through the late eighteenth-century writings of Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis and Charlotte Dacre, and into the nineteenth-century fictions of writers such as Charles Maturin, Mary Shelley, Charles Dickens, the Brontës, Sheridan Le Fanu, Robert Louis Stevenson, Bram Stoker and Oscar Wilde.

- The second and third core modules, on Gothic in modern, modernist and postmodern writing, include texts by authors such as Gaston Leroux, Algernon Blackwood, H.P. Lovecraft, Djuna Barnes; Mervyn Peake, Shirley Jackson, Stephen King, Anne Rice, Joyce Carol Oates, Toni Morrison and Patrick McGrath.

- Option modules vary from year to year, depending on student interest and demand. Recent option topics have included the Gothic on the Romantic Stage; Nineteenth-century American Gothic; Transmutations of the Vampire; The Gothic in Children’s Literature; Monstrosity; The Female Gothic; Queer Gothic; and Gothic in/and Modern Horror Cinema.

- At the dissertation stage, students are encouraged to undertake independent, supervised research on any particular interest within Gothic studies that they might wish to pursue. Subject to the agreement of the course director, a creative writing dissertation may be undertaken at this stage.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:

- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill

- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C

- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component

- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Two hours of seminars per module per week, plus individual consultations and supervisions with members of staff. Assessment is by means of a 4,000-word essay for each core module, and a variety of skills-based assessments (such as presentations; portfolios; blog-entries) for optional modules. All students complete a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic of their choice once optional and core modules have been completed.

Employability

With course-work assessed solely by means of independently devised, researched and executed essays, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination equips students with a number of the skills and abilities that are prized and actively sought after by employers across the private and public sectors. These include the ability to process and reflect critically upon cultural forms; the ability to organise, present and express ideas clearly and logically; the ability to understand complex theoretical ideas; and the ability to undertake extended independent research.

Previous graduates of the course have gone on to pursue successful careers in such fields as teaching, publishing, research, academia, advertising, journalism and the film industry.

The 15,000-word dissertation that is submitted towards the end of the course allows students to devise, develop, support and defend their own academic ideas across an extended piece of written work; addition to the skills of independence, organisation and expression fostered by this exercise, the dissertation also provides an excellent point of entry into more advanced forms of postgraduate research, including the Doctoral degree.



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