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Masters Degrees (English Civil War)

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The centenary of the outbreak of the First World War has seen interest in the Great War reach unprecedented heights, and the University of Wolverhampton is very pleased to announce a new Part Time Masters programme exploring the History of Britain and the First World War. Read more

The centenary of the outbreak of the First World War has seen interest in the Great War reach unprecedented heights, and the University of Wolverhampton is very pleased to announce a new Part Time Masters programme exploring the History of Britain and the First World War.

This is an exciting new programme delivered by a truly world-class team of scholars. Led by Professor Gary Sheffield, it includes Professor Stephen Badsey and Dr Spencer Jones, Professor Peter Simkins, Dr John Bourne, Professor John Buckley and Dr Laura Ugolini. This is the strongest cluster of scholars specialising in the military history of the First World War to be found in any conventional UK university, and the team will be supported by a number of prestigious guest speakers. A particular strength of the programme is the quality of the teaching. You can watch lectures on aspects of the First World War given by some of the team here: Aspects of the history of the First World War

University of Wolverhampton's cluster of First World War historians have excellent links within the wider historical community at home and overseas. Links with the military are very strong.

For further information, please contact Professor Gary Sheffield,  or 

Why Wolverhampton?

University of Wolverhampton's cluster of First World War historians have excellent links within the wider historical community at home and overseas. Links with the military are very strong. The emphasis of the programme is on the military and political history of Britain and the British Empire in the 1914-18 war.

Members of the team:

Professor Gary Sheffield is one of the UK’s highest profile scholars of the First World War. He has published extensively in the field, including Forgotten Victory: The First World War – Myths and Realities (2001)and The Chief: Douglas Haig and the British Army (2011)Sheffield regularly appears on television and radio, writes in the national press. He is President of the International Guild of Battlefield Guides and a Vice-President of the Western Front Association and is advising the government and the Army on their respective commemorative programmes.

Professor Stephen Badsey is one of the world's leading military historians of the First World War, and is a particular authority on propaganda in 1914-18. His publications include Doctrine and Reform in the British Cavalry 1880-1918 (2008) and The British Army in Battle and Its Image 1914-18 (2009). He has made over 50 media appearancesand acted as a consultant to numerous TV programmes.

Professor Peter Simkins MBE is an extremely well-respected historian with an international reputation for excellence. Formerly Senior Historian at the Imperial War Museum, he is President of the Western Front Association. His publications include the seminal Kitchener's Army: The Raising of the New Armies 1914-16 (1988) and The Somme and Beyond: The BEF on the Western Front, 1916-18 (forthcoming in 2014).

Dr Spencer Jones is one of the leading scholars of the emerging generation of British military historians. His books include From Boer War to World War: Tactical Reform of the British Army, 1902-14 (2012) and, as editor and contributor, Stemming the Tide: Officers and Leadership in the British Expeditionary Force, 1914 (2013). In 2013 he was appointed to the prestigious position of Historian of the Royal Regiment of Artillery.

Career path

Successful completion of this course will enhance your career prospects. It will be particularly relevant to researchers, journalists, political and central government professionals, civil servants, military professionals, conflict resolution and NGO workers, charity and campaign workers. Attainment of the MA degree could also lead to doctoral research.

What skills will you gain?

At the end of this course you will be able to:

  • Demonstrate extensive knowledge and detailed understanding of the history of Britain in the First World War.
  • Demonstrate the ability to negotiate, design and undertake independent research based on primary sources
  • Exercise critical, evaluative and analytical skills in relation to historiographical debates and sources
  • Communicate effectively at an appropriate level for a Masters programme


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Develop your knowledge across a range of fields including urban studies, gender studies, race studies, travel writing, postcolonial writing, autobiographical and epistolary studies. Read more

About the course

Develop your knowledge across a range of fields including urban studies, gender studies, race studies, travel writing, postcolonial writing, autobiographical and epistolary studies. You’ll cover contemporary and recent American fiction and the way ‘real history’ appears in the texts. You are also able to take modules in American history offered by the History Department. If you intend to continue to PhD study, you’ll get essential research training.

Your career

You’ll examine early modern texts, language and culture. Staff expertise includes palaeography, rhetoric, news writing, the sermon, drama, and issues of political, sectarian and national identity between 1400 and 1700. Modules (including modules from History) can be tailored to suit your interests. You’ll complete one core module, optional modules and a dissertation.

Cultural life

There is always something going on, and there are plenty of chances to get involved. We have extensive links with arts and heritage organisations including Arts Council England and Sheffield Theatres. Recent poetry readings featured Carol Ann Duffy and Ciaran Carson. Our Arts/Science Encounters events bring together musicians, writers, architects and academics to explore ideas. The English Society, run by our students, organises theatre trips, guest lectures, and seminars. Students also get the chance to take part in drama and readings.

First-rate facilities

We’re based in a brand new building at the heart of the campus. There are computer workstations especially for postgraduates and a DVD library with viewing facilities. Our theatre workshop is a fully equipped teaching/performance area with excellent film-viewing facilities and audio suites.

Specialist resources

The University Library subscribes to the major periodicals and full-text electronic archives, including Early English Books Online and Eighteenth-Century Collections Online. Special collections include an outstanding collection of Restoration drama, the Hope Collection of eighteenth-century periodicals, the Jack Rosenthal scripts collection, and papers of contemporary writers such as Anita Brookner, Marina Warner, Fay Weldon and Peter Redgrove.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by the University. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Research training for PhD

If you intend to progress to a PhD, your course can be tailored to include essential research training. The same applies to students on the online course.

Part-time study

Part-time students usually take one taught module in each semester. In the second year, you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most courses, you’ll need to come in for one half-day per week. The MA Creative Writing is taught in the evening. Some modules, such as Theatre and Performance, may require greater time commitment. We try to be as flexible as possible to accommodate the different needs of our students.

Core module

Reconsidering the Renaissance.

Examples of optional modules – literature

Modules may include: Early Modern Paleography (i.e. training in reading sixteenth and seventeenth-century manuscripts); The English Civil War; The Country House; Directed Reading: Early Modern Books; Pastoral Literature (online module) and Shakespeare and Early Women Dramatists (online module).

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is by seminars. You’ll be assessed on your essays, coursework and a 15,000-word dissertation.

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This programme explores how conflict occurs across a variety of countries and landscapes in the late 19th and 20th centuries, and how such conflict is managed and presented through media and propaganda. Read more

This programme explores how conflict occurs across a variety of countries and landscapes in the late 19th and 20th centuries, and how such conflict is managed and presented through media and propaganda.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/84/war-media-and-society

Course detail

This course takes in different types of conflict, from conventional trench warfare and geopolitical stand-offs to guerrilla tactics and civil defense initiatives. It also examines the application of technology, the impact of the media on public opinion, along with the increasing importance of the home front in 20th-century warfare. The core module provides a strong interpretative and conceptual backbone and introduces you to the demands of postgraduate study in history.

Format and assessment

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year:

- Methods and Interpretations of Historical Research (30 credits)

- War, Propaganda and the Media (30 credits)

- Testimonies of War: Oral History in Theory and Practice (30 credits)

- Ireland and the First World War (30 credits)

- Landscapes of the Great War: Interpretations and Representations (30 credits)

- Landscapes of the Great War: Public Histories (30 credits)

- Work Placement (30 credits)

- Geiger Counter at Ground Zero: Explorations of Nuclear America (30 credits)

- The British Army and the Great War (30 credits)

- Home Front Britain, 1914-18 (30 credits)

All courses are assessed by coursework, and the dissertation counts for half the final grade (comprising one third assessed preparation, two thirds actual dissertation).

Careers

As the job market becomes increasingly competitive, postgraduate qualifications are becoming more attractive to employers seeking individuals who have finely tuned skills and abilities, which our programmes encourage you to hone. As a result of the valuable transferable skills developed during your course of study, career prospects for history graduates are wide ranging. Our graduates go on to a variety of careers, from research within the government to teaching, politics to records management and journalism, to working within museums and galleries – to name but a few.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html



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The Second World War attracts more academic, media and public interest than any other event in history, and it is an integral part of school and further/higher education curricula. Read more

The Second World War attracts more academic, media and public interest than any other event in history, and it is an integral part of school and further/higher education curricula. This programme will enable you to study the subject in detail, to update your knowledge, and to become familiar with the use of personal accounts, including interviews and testimonies. You will be taught by experts in the field, and you will carry out your own research in your favourite area.

You will study in depth some of the key issues in the military, political, and social history of the Second World War, such as strategy, diplomacy and politics of Axis and Allied forces, the war in the air, the victory campaign in the West, and the war in the East, including life under German occupation, the fate of societies under the conditions of total war, and last but not least, the Holocaust.

Why Wolverhampton?

Our part-time Master’s programme will enable you to explore the history of the Second World War. Special consideration will be given to military conflicts, societies at war, and the Holocaust.

You will be guided by a team of historians with the highest international reputation, led by Professor John Buckley and Professor Johannes-Dieter Steinert. The team includes Professor Gary Sheffield, Professor Stephen Badsey; and you will in addition be taught by other international scholars such as Professor John Gooch, Professor Martin Alexander, and Dr Peter Gray.

You will benefit from our international scholarly activities, among them the multidisciplinary conference series “Beyond Camps and Forced Labour. Current International Research on Survivors of Nazi Persecution” (Imperial War Museums, London), “Children and War: Past and Present” (in association with the UN Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict), battlefield tour/study trips to Normandy and the Low Countries and the University of Wolverhampton’s oral history programme and archive.

Career path

Successful completion of the course will enhance your career prospects and could lead to a specialised career in museums, education, armed forces, or as a battlefield guide, along with more general arts-related careers.

It will be particularly relevant to researchers, teachers, journalists, political and central government professionals, civil servants, military professionals, charity and campaign workers.

Attainment of the MA degree could also lead to doctoral research.

What skills will you gain?

At the end of this course you will be able to:

  • Demonstrate critical and analytical understanding of key issues and debates in the history of the Second World War and Holocaust.
  • Demonstrate the ability to negotiate, design and undertake independent research based on primary sources.
  • Exercise critical, evaluative and analytical skills in relation to historiographical debates and sources.
  • Communicate effectively at an appropriate level for a Masters programme.


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The MRes in Humanities offers students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research and writing, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills and project management. Read more

Overview

The MRes in Humanities offers students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research and writing, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills and project management. Students will write a dissertation in a specific field or prepare a portfolio of compositions, recital or a media project with a named supervisor.

Supervision is available in all disciplines where the School has expertise:
- American Studies
- English
- History
- Media, Communications and Culture
- Music and Music Technology
- Philosophy
- Russian

You will be able to develop your research topic within the context of current debates and methodologies in relevant disciplines and within the humanities generally. The course will develop practical, critical and analytical research skills that can be deployed in a variety of professional and intellectual contexts. The programme is tailored to your research and career plans, and we recommend that you contact us before making a formal application.

The MRes degree is intended for applicants who already have a clear dissertation project (or equivalent, e.g. composition portfolio, performance or software development plan). In liaison with the supervisor and discipline lead, a plan of work in semester 1 and 2 is agreed and serves as preparation for the project as well as assessed work in its own right. When you submit your online application, please use your personal statement to describe the dissertation (or equivalent) project you intend to carry out (500-700 words). Include specific research questions and aims. What does the project intend to elucidate? Is any hypothesis proposed? How will the research be carried out (i.e. methodology)?

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/humanitiesmres/

History

The MRes in History introduces students to, and further develops their knowledge of methodological debates within the discipline of history, critical developments in the historiography, and most especially allows students to undertake a substantial piece of personal research under the supervision of an acknowledged expert. Supervision is offered in a wide range of topics, reflecting the expertise of scholars in History in more distant times and cultures, periods of revolutionary change and more recent themes including: Medieval church history and the crusades; Religion, print culture, gender in the Early modern era; the English civil war; the politics of Revolutionary France 1789-1871; modern Irish history; Eastern European Jewry; German occupation policy; Colonial and post-colonial India; the history of African Christianity; Local history, especially of the North Midlands from medieval to recent times; Genocide, political violence and terrorism; Gender and women's history; and the Social history of medicine.

The 2009 and 2010 groups include students working on district medical officers in Poor Law Unions and workhouses in North Staffordshire, the Isle of Man in the early middle ages, women murderers, the English crusaders, the creation of an independent Zambia, Polish holocaust trauma, and the Ukrainian famine.

Course Aims

To enable students to research and write an extended dissertation, whilst developing practical, critical and analytical research skills that can be deployed in a variety of professional and intellectual contexts. Students will develop an understanding of the place of a specific research topic within current debates and methodologies in relevant disciplines, and within the humanities generally. The course will promote the ‘project management skills’ of defining and planning a project, meeting deadlines, and recording and reflecting on outcomes.

Course Content

Students follow a tailor-made programme, comprising three components totalling at least 180 credits.
- A 20,000 word dissertation (or equivalent composition or artistic production) is at the heart of the programme (90 credits).

- Research Training covering research skills and reflective practice in the humanities (2 x 15 = 30 credits).

- Research methods in the field relevant to the thesis topic (30 credits)

- Individual Research Orientation: a module tailored to the needs of the student (30 credits).

Teaching & Assessment

Assessment is by coursework, culminating in the 20,000 word dissertation (or the equivalent composition or artistic production). Research Training is assessed by a portfolio consisting of an annotated bibliography, a project outline and a reflective diary. Each of the other modules will be examined through a 4,000-5,000 word essay or approved equivalent.

The pass mark is 50%. A merit will be awarded where students obtain 60% or over for the dissertation (or equivalent project or performance) and an average of 60% on their other coursework. A distinction will be awarded where students obtain 70% or over for the dissertation, (or equivalent project or performance) and an average of 70% in their other coursework.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Discretionary Award:
A sum of £6,250 has been made available to students enrolling on taught postgraduate course in History by a former member of Keele staff. The money will be distributed at the discretion of the relevant programme director(s) and is available to students entering the programme in 2015 and/or 2016. No application is required.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Erasmus Mundus Journalism, Media and Globalisation at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Erasmus Mundus Journalism, Media and Globalisation at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The Erasmus Mundus Journalism, Media and Globalisation MA is a two-year, truly transnational degree providing a solid foundation for analysing and reporting global changes. Building on journalistic skills, the Erasmus Mundus Journalism, Media and Globalisation MA offers a unique combination of journalism, media studies and the social sciences. An international consortium of universities and media outlets work closely together to run the Erasmus Mundus Journalism, Media and Globalisation programme.

The Erasmus Mundus Journalism, Media and Globalisation MA is offered in the College of Arts and Humanities, home to The Callaghan Centre for the Study of Conflict, Power, Empire. The Callaghan Centre regroups a large number of scholars and postgraduate students with research expertise in the areas of conflict, power and empire. Students of the Erasmus Mundus Journalism, Media and Globalisation programme will benefit from the Callaghan Centre which produces world-class research, manages major Research Council funded projects, and promotes collaboration between scholars, policy-makers and cultural providers.

Year 2 Specialism: War & Conflict, Swansea University

The specialism in war reporting at Swansea comprises three modules: War Reporting, New Media Technology & Social Conflict, and Reporting Risk. Risk Reporting explores the theoretical and conceptual issues that frame the reporting of warfare in modern society. The impact of liveness, technology and 24 hour news amongst other factors on the reporting of war is examined.

War Reporting provides an historical overview of the development of war journalism and war propaganda. Starting with 19th century conflicts such as the Crimean War, the module explores the reporting of conflicts such as the First World War, the Spanish and Ethiopian civil wars, Second World War, Korea, Vietnam and the two Gulf Wars.

New Media Technology and Social Conflict examines the role of new media technologies in the development of social movements and social conflict. The module will examine case studies such as migration, anti-globalisation protests, green movements, religious clashes, gender conflict, racism and xenophobia.

In parallel with the modules a seminar series, Reporting Hot Spots, such as the Middle East, runs as well as non-assessed courses to help students prepare for the dissertation and develop their study skills.

Student Quote

Read Ana Isabel Martinez Molina (Erasmus Mundus Journalism, Media and Globalisation, MA)'s experience studying War and Conflict at Swansea University as part of the Erasmus Mundus Journalism, Media and Globalisation programme.

(http://www.swansea.ac.uk/media/Erasmus%20Mundus%20Student%20Testimonial.pdf)



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The programme examines a range of US literary and historical contexts, introducing ways in which the production of an idea of 'America' is variously achieved and contested between 1776 and the present. Read more

The programme examines a range of US literary and historical contexts, introducing ways in which the production of an idea of 'America' is variously achieved and contested between 1776 and the present.

You will explore the way literary, cultural, political and philosophical texts have contributed to the development, interrogation and revision of American identity and culture between 1776 and the present day.

You will be introduced to the rich diversity of American writing over the past 250 years by academic staff who can offer outstanding research and teaching expertise in this fascinating field. The compulsory courses, specifically developed for this masters programme, offer you the opportunity to think critically about some of the most pressing concerns in literary and cultural studies.

You will find a wealth of resources on hand at the University’s many libraries and the National Library of Scotland, which holds both the Hugh Sharp Collection (more than 300 volumes) of first editions of English and North American authors, and the Henderson Memorial Library of Books on America (more than 700 volumes), containing 19th and early 20th century works mainly on cultural history, description and travel, sociology and biography, and relating mostly to the Civil War.

Programme structure

You will take two courses per semester, one compulsory and one chosen from a range of options, each consisting of a weekly two-hour seminar. You will also take courses in research skills and methods. After your two semesters of taught courses you will work towards your dissertation, with supervisor support.

Compulsory courses:

  • Enlightenment to Entropy: Writing the American Republic from Thomas Jefferson to Henry Adams
  • New Beginnings to the End of Days: Writing the American Republic from Reconstruction to 9/11
  • Research Skills and Methods.

Option courses may include:

  • Poet-Critics: the Style of Modern Poetry
  • Modernism and Empire
  • Cities of Literature: Metropolitan Modernities
  • Global Modernisms: Inter/National Responses to Modernity
  • Victorian Transatlanticism
  • Contemporary American Fiction
  • Green Thoughts: Landscape, Environment and Literature
  • Critical Theory: Issues and Debates

Learning outcomes

Students who successfully complete this programme will gain:

  • a detailed knowledge of a range of literary writing that responds to and informs concepts of American identity
  • an understanding of the role of political and ideological structures in the production of national historiographies
  • a grounding in the research methods of literary studies

Career opportunities

You will develop research and analytical skills that can be extended into future advanced study in English literature. You will also be equipped with skills that could be beneficial for a teaching career or a role within a cultural institution. The array of transferable skills you will acquire, such as communication and project management, will prove highly valuable to potential employers in whatever field you choose to enter.



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Scotland has had a devolution process devoid of civil conflict. Read more
Scotland has had a devolution process devoid of civil conflict. What can we learn from the Scottish experience that can be applied to similar processes in Africa, Eastern Europe and the Middle East? How can the Scottish experiment be sustained and what challenges will politicians, administrators, civil society agents and citizens face in the future? Leading international and Scottish academics and practitioners face these questions in an intensive, practice-orientated, course designed for researchers, professional development and activists.

Why study Devolution & Global Governance at Dundee?

The dissolution of political power and the creation of new forms of governance is a global phenomenon, where the Scottish experience of a peaceful, civil process is not unique, but is remarkable, where there are lessons to be learned from that process that speak to state and inter-state relations, governance and collective action in civil society.

In the MLitt Devolution and Global Governance we explore the lessons of Scotland's experience of devolution and the debate on independence. Scotland has had a devolution process devoid of civil conflict.

What can we learn from the Scottish experience that can be applied to similar processes in Africa, Eastern Europe and the Middle East? How can the Scottish experiment be sustained and what challenges will politicians, administrators, civil society agents and citizens face in the future? Leading international and Scottish academics and practitioners face these questions in an intensive practice-orientated set of qualifications designed for researchers, professional development and activists.

What's so good about Devolution & Global Governance at Dundee?

As a legacy to the 5 Million Questions project, and with the intellectual support of the Centre for Scottish Culture and the Scottish Centre for Global History, this course builds on core strengths of the University of Dundee, and the distinctive role of this university within Scotland, to examine global issues of governance.

An intense, week-long symposium of 'master classes' is offered which features invited researchers and practitioners, split between those whose expertise lies within Scotland and those who work in other parts of the world.

We have organised Devolution & Global Governance so you can study for full-time masters degree (MLitt), taking 12 months, or smaller components of Postgraduate Diploma and Certificate, which can be studied full- or part- time. Some of the optional modules are also available by distance learning.

Who should study this course?

This course is directed towards administrators and practitioners of global governance, and also recent graduates who are looking to advance their career prospects in this area, and undertake advanced professional training including doctoral research preparation.

How you will be taught

This course is co-ordinated by History staff based in the School of Humanities, also teaching on the course are external researchers and practioners. The teaching takes place during two semesters Sept-Dec and Jan-Apr, plus the week-long symposium which takes place in April/May. The group work case study takes from May/June-Aug.

A variety of teaching methods are used, including: small group teaching, supervised study of case studies, plus invited speakers who will hold mastersclasses during the week-long symposium.

studies, plus invited speakers who will hold mastersclasses during the week-long symposium.

What you will study

Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits)

The Postgraduate Certificate is made up of 40-credits from taught modules during the semesters Sept-Dec and Jan-Apr from the list below, plus the week-long symposium which is worth 20 credits.

Scottish National Identities since 1807 (20 credits, distance learning)
Scotland before the Union (20 credits, distance learning)
The Scottish Highlands and Islands - Clearances and Land Settlement (20 credits, distance learning)
Introduction to Historical Theory (20 credits, distance learning)
Government in Early Modern Scotland (40 credits, on campus)
Revolution, Civil War and Nationalism: The Historiography and Politics of Irish State Formation, 1912-2005 (40 credits, on campus)
From Jim Crow to Black Power: The African American Freedom Struggle, 1945-1980 (40 credits, on campus)
Human Rights in International Relations (40 credits, on campus)
Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism in Europe (40 credits, on campus)
International Security of Drugs & Organised Crime (40 credits, on campus)
International Business Strategy (20 credits, on campus)
Global Risk Analysis (20 credits, on campus)
Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits)

The Postgraduate Diploma is made up of three components:

1 - Governance Modules

Two taught modules, one in each semester, which are taught on campus:

Civil Society & Governance (30 credits, on campus)
Governing Scotland (30 credits, on campus)
2 - Week-long symposium

A week-long symposium of masterclasses in April/May.

3 - Other taught modules

Forty credits from other taught modules, as per the Postgraduate Certificate (see above).

Masters (180 credits)

Students wishing to take the Masters complete the Postgraduate Diploma (above) and then spend the summer period (May/June-Aug) working on a group-work case study, worth 60 credits.

In exceptional circumstances, students may be permitted to work on an individual dissertation instead.

All students must attempt the dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

This programme of study is directed toward those who wish to pursue a career within civil society organizations and within local, devolved, and national administrations. The advanced knowledge and practitioner led skills will help you pursue and advance your employment within international bodies and funding agencies, development agencies, NGOs and multinational companies. Sophisticated conceptual analysis and case study training will benefit those who seek professional development within their current employment.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. This one-year part-time course offers a unique opportunity for students to combine focused study of key historical themes and concepts in British and Western European history with either a broad-based approach to history or with the opportunity to specialise by period or in a branch of the discipline (political, social, economic, art, architectural and local). The course culminates in the research and preparation of a substantial dissertation.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies forms part of a two-year Master's programme. Students who successfully complete the Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies are eligible to apply to the Master's of Study in Historical Studies (https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-historical-studies).

This Historical Studies course offers a stimulating and supportive environment for study. As a student of Oxford University you will also be entitled to attend History Faculty lectures and to join the Bodleian Library. The University’s Museums and Art Galleries are within easy walking distance.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/postgraduate-certificate-in-historical-studies

Course content

Unit 1: Princes, States, and Revolutions
The first unit examines the interaction between the state and the individual from medieval to modern times and focuses upon authority, resistance, revolution and the development of political institutions. It introduces the development of scholarly debate, key historical themes and the critical analysis of documentary sources. Students explore disorder and rebellion in medieval and early modern England; the causes and impact of the British Civil Wars; and the causes and impact of the French Revolution.

Unit 2: European Court Patronage c.1400
The second unit explores cultural patronage in late medieval Europe and examines the diverse courtly responses to shared concerns and experiences, including the promotion of power and status; the relationship between piety and power; and the impact of dominant cultures. It introduces comparative approaches to history, the critical analysis of visual sources and the methodological issues surrounding the interpretation of material culture and the translation of written sources. Students compare the courts of Richard II of England, Philip the Bold and John the Fearless of Burgundy, Charles V and Charles VI of France, and Giangaleazzo Visconti of Milan.

Unit 3: Religious Reformations and Movements
The third unit examines the role of organised religion and religious movements in the lives of people in the past. It utilises case studies from different historical periods to explore the impact of local circumstances upon the reception and development of new ideas and further encourages engagement with historical debate and the interpretation of documentary and visual sources. Students explore: medieval monasticism; the English and European reformations of the sixteenth century; and religion and society in nineteenth-century England, including the rise of nonconformity, secularism and the Oxford Movement.

Unit 4: Memory and Conflict
The fourth unit focuses upon a central theme in the study of twentieth-century European history: how societies have chosen to remember (and forget) violent conflicts, and the relationship between public and private memory. It explores the challenges faced by historians when interpreting documentary, visual and oral sources in the writing of recent history. Students examine the theoretical context and methodological approaches to the study of memory and consider two case studies: World War I and the Spanish Civil War.

Unit 5: Special Subjects
In the final unit, students study a source-based special subject and research and write a dissertation on a related topic of their own choice. A range of subjects will be offered, varying from year to year, allowing specialization across both time periods and the historical disciplines. Examples include:

- Visualising Sanctity: Art and the Culture of Saints c1150-1500
- The Tudor Court
- The English Nobility c1540-1640
- The Great Indian Mutiny and Anglo-Indian Relations in the Nineteenth Century
- The British Empire
- Propaganda in the Twentieth Century

The on-line teaching modules

The first module provides a pre-course introduction to history and post-graduate study skills. The second focuses upon the analysis and interpretation of material sources, such as buildings and images and the third upon the analysis and interpretation of a range of documentary sources. All include a range of self-test exercises.

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted.

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students' Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Course aims

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies course is designed to:

- provide a structured introduction to the study of medieval and modern British and European history;

- develop awareness and understanding of historical processes, such as continuity and change, comparative perspectives and the investigation of historical problems;

- provide the methodology required to interpret visual arts as historical evidence;

- equip students to evaluate and interpret historical evidence critically;

- promote interest in the concept and discipline of history and its specialisms;

- enable students to develop the analytical and communication skills needed to present historical argument orally and in writing;

- prepare students for progression to study at Master's level.

By the end of the course students will be expected to:

- display a broad knowledge and understanding of the themes and methodologies studied;

- demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of key topics, the historical interpretation surrounding them and the relationship between local case-studies and the national perspective;

- utilise the appropriate critical and/or technical vocabulary associated with the disciplines, periods and themes covered;

- identify underlying historical processes, make cross-comparisons between countries and periods and explore historical problems;

- assess the relationship between the visual arts and the cultural framework within which they were produced;

- evaluate and analyse texts and images as historical evidence and utilise them to support and develop an argument;

- develop, sustain and communicate historical argument orally and in writing;

- reflect upon the nature and development of the historical disciplines and their contribution to national culture;

- demonstrate the skills needed to conduct an independent research project and present it as a dissertation within a restricted timeframe.

Assessment methods

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies is assessed through coursework. This comprises: four essays of 2,500 words each, two source-based exercises of 1,500 words each and a dissertation of 8,000 words. Students will write one essay following each of the first four units and the dissertation following unit 5. There will be a wide choice of assignment subjects for each unit and students will select a dissertation topic relating to their special subject with the advice of the course team. Students will be asked to write a non-assessed book review following the first pre-course online module and the source-based exercises will follow the second and third online modules.

Assignment titles, submission deadlines and reading lists will be supplied at the start of the course.

Tuition and study

A variety of teaching methods will be used in both the face-to-face and online elements of the course. In addition to lectures, PowerPoint slide presentations and tutor-led discussion, there will be opportunities for students to undertake course exercises in small groups and to give short presentations on prepared topics.

University lectures

Students are taught by the Department’s own staff but are also entitled to attend, at no extra cost, the wide range of lectures and research seminars organised by the University of Oxford’s History Faculty. Students are able to borrow books from both the Department’s library and the History Faculty Library, and are also eligible for membership of the Bodleian Library.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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This Master's degree in politics explores urgent contemporary debates about violence, conflict, security and governance from a global perspective. Read more
This Master's degree in politics explores urgent contemporary debates about violence, conflict, security and governance from a global perspective. As the distinctions between civil wars, terrorism, warlord conflict and conventional war have blurred, the corresponding interventions - humanitarian, regional, international and imperial - have been the subject of considerable academic debate and political controversy. Simultaneously, geopolitical rivalries among global powers and the threat of violence and war between states continue to shape international security. Our approach works across disciplines, incorporating political, theoretical, historical, sociological and public policy approaches to produce comprehensive, balanced analyses of contemporary political controversies.

Core modules will examine the changing nature of war, violence and security, and their relationship with state and society. They provide a historical understanding of the evolution of global military, humanitarian and governance institutions and the ideas that shaped them. You will be equipped with the conceptual ideas, theoretical approaches and analytical research skills needed to study politics at postgraduate level.

You can then choose 2 option modules from a wide variety of topics including international security, American foreign policy, globalisation, political theory and sociology, war and conflict, nationalism and religion, and international political economy. The culmination of the programme is applying the concepts and methods you have learnt to undertake the researching and writing of a dissertation on the subject that interests you most.

Our Department of Politics is a lively and distinguished centre of interdisciplinary research, with a strong reputation for the quality of our teaching. Some of the world’s most famous libraries are on our doorstep in Bloomsbury, central London, and you can walk down to Whitehall, where Parliament and the UK’s most influential and important think-tanks and centres of political research and analysis are located.

Our departmental building was once a key location for members of the Bloomsbury Group, so you could be studying in rooms that have hosted distinguished visitors, including T. S. Eliot, George Bernard Shaw and Maynard Keynes.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

This Master's degree provides the analytical and research tools required to examine security, governance and international relations in a comparative, global context.
The programme allows you to follow your own interests, with a wide choice of option modules, while developing your research skills and undertaking a dissertation in an area that interests you.
Our location in central London puts us at the heart of the UK’s political life and at the centre of academic London. You can walk down to Parliament and Whitehall, while Bloomsbury contains some of the world’s most famous libraries and centres of research.
You can take advantage of the rich research collections nearby, including Senate House Library, which is right next door to Birkbeck, the British Library, which is 5 minutes’ walk away, and the British Library of Political and Economic Science at the London School of Economics, which is walkable from Birkbeck.
Our Department of Politics was ranked 12th in the UK in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) results and is a world-renowned centre of original, influential research.
The department organises a lively programme of seminars and conferences and is home to affiliated research centres, such as the Centre for the Study of British Politics and Public Life, which run seminars, conferences and other events where some of the world's best scholars present their latest research.
Our academic staff are international authorities in their respective fields, publishing and delivering stimulating teaching in a wide range of political topics including civil society and the state, public policy, development, gender, international security and terrorism, and social and political theory, among others.
Birkbeck Library has a large politics collection, including the major specialist journals, and provides you with access to an extensive range of online materials.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), Politics at Birkbeck was ranked 17th in the UK.

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How is the global financial crisis affecting international politics?. Do foreign military interventions in civil wars help or hinder peace-making?. Read more
How is the global financial crisis affecting international politics?

Do foreign military interventions in civil wars help or hinder peace-making?

Why are economic resources so unevenly spread across the world, and what are the prospects for global justice?

If you are interested in these questions, and want to know more, then the PGCert in International Relations is the programme for you. Staff in the School have internationally recognised research strengths in the politics of the developing world, globalisation and development, conflict and war, and critical theory, as well as regional expertise in South America, South East Asia, the Middle East, and Sub-Saharan Africa.

This programme:

Will provide you with a set of cutting-edge analytical skills and knowledge that will allow you to think talk and write critically about contemporary international issues, as well as providing a firm foundation for further study
Is concerned with analysing the key theoretical and empirical issues in international relations
Will discuss the historical significance of globalisation and how it relates to a number of key issues in international relations, including state sovereignty and international order, conflict and war, human rights and the political economy of North-South relations
Will undertake a critical survey of the main theories and concepts associated with the study of international politics.

Why study with us?

The School of Politics and International Relations at Queen Mary was rated amongst the top 20 Politics departments in the UK in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise.

The MA in International Relations will be of particular interest to students looking for a course on contemporary global issues. The school has particular strengths in international security, conflict and war, the political economy of North-South relations, international political theory, Middle East politics, and the transition from the Cold War to the contemporary post-Cold War world.

"...The knowledge gained here will give me the required grounding to excel in my chosen field"
Gloria Caleb

* Cutting-edge critical programme � theory included, with a real focus on developing students' critical thinking and analytical skills
* A focus on the traditional geographic areas of international relations as well as emerging areas of interest in the developing world
* This programme is led by research active staff, who are responding to the very latest global events, so content is very timely
* The diversity of our staff and students, and the local area, mean that Queen Mary is a great place to study International Relations
* The programme is very flexible, so you can choose from a large number of modules, depending on your interests

Facilities

You will have access to postgraduate only facilities which include the Lock-keeper's Cottage Graduate Centre dedicated solely to the use of graduate students in the faculty of Humanity and Social Sciences, with the use of a common room and interdisciplinary training workshops. The Learning Resource centre has 200 networked PCs and is open to students round the clock, there are dedicated workstations for postgraduate students.

You will also have access to Queen Mary's comprehensive libraries, including the Postgraduate Reading Room, and The British Library can also be accessed as a research resource.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Gender and Culture offers an innovative interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approach to the study of Gender and Culture.

Key Features of MA in Gender and Culture

This is an interdisciplinary MA scheme in Gender and Culture taught by Gender specialists across the Arts and Humanities – in the subject areas of Development Studies, Political and Cultural Studies, English Literature, Egyptology, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies.

If you are interested in gender and gender relations in politics, literature, culture, and history, like engaging in discussion and intellectual argument, and are excited about the idea of working within and across different subject areas, this MA in Gender and Culture is ideal for you.

The MA Gender and Culture examines the production, reproduction and transformation of gender in culture and society.

The Gender and Culture degree is supported by the research activity of GENCAS, the Centre for Research into Gender in Culture and Society in the College of Arts and Humanities. The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Gender and Culture course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. In part one, students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. In part two, students are required to write the dissertation component which draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Part-time study is available for the Gender and Culture programme.

Gender and Culture Programme Aims

To develop independent thinking and writing. You devise your own essay projects in consultation with a gender specialist - this combines the benefits of expert guidance with the rewards of shaping an intellectual project for yourself. To sharpen and develop your skills and take them to a new level by providing the chance for original thinking and intellectual freedom in writing the ‘dissertation’ element, where you complete your own research project.

Modules

Modules on the Gender and Culture programme include:

• Women and Politics

• Civil Society and International Development

• Critical Security Studies

• Rights-Based Approaches to Development

• War, Technology and Culture

• Approaches to IR

• Violence, Conflict & Development

• Governance, Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• The Policy Making Process

• State of Africa

• Politics in Contemporary Britain

• War in Space

• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales

• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism

• War, Identity and Society

• Approaches to Political Theory

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Gender Trouble: the Medieval Anchorite, and Issues of Wombs and Tombs

• Women Writers of the 1940’s

• Women Writing India

• ‘The Great Pretender’: Masculinity in Contemporary Women’s Fiction

• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution

• British Women’s Fiction 1918-1939

• Contemporary Women’s Writing

• Angela Carter

• Gender in Contemporary European Culture

• Literature in Social Context

• Women and Gender in Ancient Egypt

• Nature’s Stepchildren: European Medicine and Sexual Dissidents, 1869-1939

• The making of Modern Sexualities, 1650-1800

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Gender and Culture from a Classics and Ancient History, English, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies or related background. Professionals interested in the challenge of digital studying Gender and Culture. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to gender and culture.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Gender and Culture graduates. Our graduates are employed in diverse and dynamic vocations such as education, business, law and finance, marketing, sales and advertising; commercial, industrial and public sectors; media and PR; creative and professional writing; social and welfare professions; heritage and tourism; government and politics; foreign affairs and diplomatic corps; humanitarian organisations and some go on to study a PhD.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Key Features of MA in Gender and Culture

This is an interdisciplinary MA scheme in Gender and Culture taught by Gender specialists across the Arts and Humanities – in the subject areas of Development Studies, Political and Cultural Studies, English Literature, Egyptology, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies.

If you are interested in gender and gender relations in politics, literature, culture, and history, like engaging in discussion and intellectual argument, and are excited about the idea of working within and across different subject areas, this MA in Gender and Culture is ideal for you.

The MA Gender and Culture examines the production, reproduction and transformation of gender in culture and society.

The Gender and Culture degree is supported by the research activity of GENCAS, the Centre for Research into Gender in Culture and Society in the College of Arts and Humanities. The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Gender and Culture course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. In part one, students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. In part two, students are required to write the dissertation component which draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Part-time study is available for the Gender and Culture programme.

The Extended MA (EMA) in Gender and Culture is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA Gender and Culture is the University of Regensburg. Founded in 1962, Regensburg is a renowned international centre of teaching and research. Although it has over 21,000 thousand students, the university offers a broad range of disciplines of study, as well as having excellent infrastructure and a favourable staff-student ratio. Regensburg is also active in research, with six special research areas supported by the German Research Society and a strong presence in German- and EU-funded research initiatives. The university has a significant international presence, offering exchange links with more than 200 European institutions and 45 overseas universities. Students will have access to the complete range of services and facilities offered at the university, along with inclusion in the many academic and social activities that take place. Located right in the heart of the old town of Regensburg, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the university is situated in the centre of a culturally and socially rich area with over 2000 years of history.

Gender and Culture Programme Aims

To develop independent thinking and writing. You devise your own essay projects in consultation with a gender specialist - this combines the benefits of expert guidance with the rewards of shaping an intellectual project for yourself. To sharpen and develop your skills and take them to a new level by providing the chance for original thinking and intellectual freedom in writing the ‘dissertation’ element, where you complete your own research project.

Modules

Modules on the Gender and Culture programme include:

• Women and Politics

• Civil Society and International Development

• Critical Security Studies

• Rights-Based Approaches to Development

• War, Technology and Culture

• Approaches to IR

• Violence, Conflict & Development

• Governance, Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• The Policy Making Process

• State of Africa

• Politics in Contemporary Britain

• War in Space

• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales

• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism

• War, Identity and Society

• Approaches to Political Theory

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Gender Trouble: the Medieval Anchorite, and Issues of Wombs and Tombs

• Women Writers of the 1940’s

• Women Writing India

• ‘The Great Pretender’: Masculinity in Contemporary Women’s Fiction

• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution

• British Women’s Fiction 1918-1939

• Contemporary Women’s Writing

• Angela Carter

• Gender in Contemporary European Culture

• Literature in Social Context

• Women and Gender in Ancient Egypt

• Nature’s Stepchildren: European Medicine and Sexual Dissidents, 1869-1939

• The making of Modern Sexualities, 1650-1800

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Gender and Culture from a Classics and Ancient History, English, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies or related background. Professionals interested in the challenge of digital studying Gender and Culture. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to gender and culture.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Gender and Culture graduates. Our graduates are employed in diverse and dynamic vocations such as education, business, law and finance, marketing, sales and advertising; commercial, industrial and public sectors; media and PR; creative and professional writing; social and welfare professions; heritage and tourism; government and politics; foreign affairs and diplomatic corps; humanitarian organisations and some go on to study a PhD.



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Is there any concept of justice in relations between states? Do states remain the dominant actors in the international system with its current profusion of transnational corporations, international organisations, and regional blocs?. Read more

Is there any concept of justice in relations between states? Do states remain the dominant actors in the international system with its current profusion of transnational corporations, international organisations, and regional blocs?

Our MA in International Relations is one of the foremost programmes in Britain and Europe for the study of international relations (IR). It will enable you to tackle the big issues facing global decision-makers, from war to poverty, from security to the complexities of environmental degradation, from inequality to the study of global elites. Traditionally, the discipline of international relations has been concerned with issues of war and peace, focused on explaining and understanding the behaviour of states in their relationships with each other in the international states-system. More recently, however, IR has broadened and deepened as a discipline and is now much more than the study of war, peace, and states.

Programme content

On this MA programme, you will learn the key theoretical approaches in IR from Realism to Postcolonialism, making theory accessible and understandable and equipping you to evaluate theoretical positions in the light of pressing issues in contemporary political life. IR also incorporates within its theories an understanding of the role of a range of other actors besides states including NGOs, private enterprise, and international bodies. You will use this pluralist theoretical framework to study international cooperation, identity politics, global governance, ethics, and civil society.

You will also investigate major questions of contemporary international relations such as:

  • After the Cold War, after bipolarity, with the United Nations in its sixth decade, where is the world to look for order?
  • Is there any prospect of justice in relations between states?
  • Do states remain the dominant actors in the international system with its current profusion of transnational corporations, international organisations, and regional blocs?
  • How will democratisation, economic liberalism, resurgent nationalisms and religious revivals affect world order?
  • And, most importantly, how should we think about these questions?
  • What are the alternative perspectives to your own?

Those who work at the highest levels in business, government, or the voluntary sector, increasingly need to tackle these issues, and the Masters in International Relations programme offers you the opportunity to do so.



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This interdisciplinary programme addresses the convergence of security and development issues, and its implications for analysing the reconstruction of war-affected societies. Read more

This interdisciplinary programme addresses the convergence of security and development issues, and its implications for analysing the reconstruction of war-affected societies.

The course bridges the themes of conflict, liberal styles of governance and aid policy. You will analyse the ways in which security, development and humanitarian agents adapt to instability. You will also examine the significance of globalisation for the emergence of internal conflict, and for the development of trans-border economics and the political dynamics they may support.

This unique programme gives you the opportunity to study regionally differentiated responses to conflict in, for example Africa and Afghanistan, and to discuss issues relating to humanitarian conditionality, containment and the role of international organisations and NGOs.

Our academics are widely recognised as leading experts in their field. The research-led teaching you will benefit from is directly informed by the cutting-edge research that occurs within the Centre for Global Development, which involves more than 60 academics from across the University, as well as the Leeds University Centre for African Studies (LUCAS), which brings together scholars with an active interest in Africa from across different schools and faculties at the University of Leeds.

In addition, colleagues working in the International Relations and Security research group participate in research clusters on ‘The Responsibility to Protect and Protect’ and ‘Contemporary Democracy and Authoritarianism’ as well as the ‘Middle East Research Group’.

Course content

This programme offers you the most depth and breadth of any course that focuses on the increasing merger of development and security issues. It does so by unparalleled case study expertise on political and social reconstruction from war-affected societies across Africa, Asia and the Middle East.

The compulsory and optional modules studied will give you the opportunity to:

  • take part in cutting-edge academic inquiry with a distinct policy relevance
  • study in an intellectually vigorous environment
  • participate in a dynamic research atmosphere
  • broaden your understanding of complex political emergencies
  • pursue a career in the humanitarian or social reconstruction sector.

The compulsory module examines the economic and political elements of contemporary internal and regionalised conflict. You will look at humanitarian, developmental and security policy responses and investigate the organisational adaptations that are emerging among state and non-state actors in relation to such instability.

You will also be able to hone your research and writing skills in your compulsory dissertation – an independent piece of research on your chosen topic.

The wide-ranging list of optional modules means that you can explore a diverse range of related subjects of interest to you.

If you are a part-time student, you will take one compulsory module and choose one optional module in your first year. You will then take the compulsory dissertation module and two optional modules in your second year to complete your programme.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Conflict, Complex Emergencies and Global Governance 30 credits
  • POLIS MA Dissertation 60 credits

Optional modules

  • The Global Politics of Health: Power and Inequity 30 credits
  • Africa in the Contemporary World 30 credits
  • Gender, Globalisation and Development 30 credits
  • Political Economy of Resources and Development 30 credits
  • European Defence and Security Analysis 30 credits
  • The Rise of China 30 credits
  • American Foreign Policy 30 credits
  • Contemporary Politics of the Middle East 30 credits
  • The Politics of the Israel-Palestine Conflict 30 credits
  • Insurgency 15 credits
  • International Political Economy 30 credits
  • Policing Post-Conflict Cities 15 credits
  • International Relations and the Environment 30 credits
  • Terrorism 15 credits
  • Counterterrorism 15 credits
  • Civil War and Intrastate Conflict 30 credits
  • Global Justice 30 credits
  • Research Methods 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Conflict, Development and Security MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Conflict, Development and Security MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Teaching is through a combination of lectures, lively seminar discussions and guided weekly readings. We expect you to participate fully in taught sessions and to study independently, developing your skills and preparing for lectures and seminars. You will also be able to benefit from an impressive range of research talks and seminars led by outside speakers or colleagues from within the department and University.

Assessment

Within modules, assessment currently consists exclusively of assessed essays. At the end of your studies, a 12,000 word dissertation will allow you to pursue your own research interest under close supervision by one of our expert colleagues.

Career opportunities

This programme provides you with an ideal preparation for a career in the international political arena.

Our graduates have pursued a range of exciting and high-profile careers within academia, think tanks and other organisations. These include: teaching and research positions at universities in the UK, US, Europe and Africa; the public sector in the UK (such as UK Border Agency), Europe (including the External Action Service) and Africa (such as police forces); globally operating consultancy and publishing firms; transnational civil society organisations; and the United Nations.

Many graduates continue to pursue their research interests as PhD students.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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