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The fields of science communication and public engagement are currently enjoying unprecedented growth. Read more

The fields of science communication and public engagement are currently enjoying unprecedented growth. This is being driven by a greater need to demonstrate the impact of publicly funded research, the need for science to be valued, increased government scrutiny and a desire for a stronger evidence base for policy decisions. Many career opportunities are emerging at the interface between science and various stakeholder groups and ever more creative methodologies for science engagement are being explored.

Our part-time online distance learning programme provides an opportunity to gain a formal qualification in science communication without having to leave your job or move to a different location. You may elect to begin with the Post-Graduate Certificate in the first instance and then decide to study for a Diploma and/or a Master’s degree. You will engage with other students from around the world, from a variety of different academic and professional backgrounds and you will enjoy a rich learning experience while studying on the programme.

You will experience a variety of science communication and public engagement methodologies and issues. In the process, you will develop critical thinking and self-evaluation skills through reflective practice. Your learning in individual courses is transferable, ensuring interconnection across the programme, thus providing opportunities for deeper learning and for the application of key principles in different contexts.

The programme attracts students from across the globe, from a range of academic and professional backgrounds and provides a formal qualification for those working in science communication and public engagement or a conversion route for those interested in moving into this field.

Online learning

Our online learning technology is fully interactive, award-winning and enables you to communicate with our highly qualified teaching staff from the comfort of your own home or workplace.

Our online students not only have access to Edinburgh’s excellent resources, but also become part of a supportive online community, bringing together students and tutors from around the world.

Programme structure

The programme can be studied to PG Certificate, PG Diploma or Masters level – if you are interested, in a formal qualification in science communication then sign up for our Post Graduate Certificate. You can then opt to continue to the Diploma and the Masters degree.

Year 1 (Certificate) - courses currently on offer include:

  • Introduction to Science Communication and Public Engagement
  • Science and Society A
  • Science and Society B
  • Principles and Practice in Public Engagement with Science
  • Science Education
  • The Role of Social Media in Science Communication

Year 2 (Diploma) - courses currently on offer include:

  • Dialogue for Science Communication and Public Engagement
  • Science, Policy and Practice
  • Science and the Media
  • Effective Exhibit and Programme Development
  • Creative Arts in Science Engagement
  • Principles and Practice in Public Engagement with Science

Year 3 (Masters)

Dissertation project.

Career opportunities

To address the need for effective science communication and public engagement with science, there has been a significant rise in opportunities available for professionals with the specialist knowledge, skills and attributes necessary to pursue roles at the interface between scientific research and public.

These roles can be found in, for example, Higher Education Institutions, Research Centres, Museums, Science Centres, Learned Societies and consultancies for democratic decision-making. Examples of specific roles are engagement managers, information and education officers, policy and knowledge brokers, in addition to the traditional science communicator role.



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The field of science communication and public engagement with science is currently enjoying unprecedented growth. This is driven by a greater need to demonstrate the impact of publicly funded research, the need for research to be valued, increased government scrutiny and a desire for a stronger evidence base for policy. Read more

The field of science communication and public engagement with science is currently enjoying unprecedented growth.

This is driven by a greater need to demonstrate the impact of publicly funded research, the need for research to be valued, increased government scrutiny and a desire for a stronger evidence base for policy.

Many career opportunities are emerging at the interface between scientific research and various public groups.

You will experience a variety of science communication and public engagement issues and methodologies. In the process, you will develop critical thinking skills and self-evaluation skills through reflective practice.

The learning gained from one course is transferable to other courses, thus ensuring interconnection across the programme.

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Academies.

Programme structure

This MSc is a twelve-month programme, divided into three semesters. The final semester consists of a choice of research-or practice-based project. Students also complete placements in an organisational setting.

Teaching methods contain a blend of lectures, individual and small-group activities, and practice-based sessions. Teaching styles will be designed to ‘model’ the practices in science communication and public engagement.

Compulsory courses

  • Science and Society
  • Principles and Practice in Science Communication and Public Engagement
  • The Role of Social Media in Science Communication
  • Science Education
  • Dialogue for Science Communication and Public Engagement
  • Science Policy and Practice

Placements

Students will also complete two placements in public engagement workplaces.

The University of Edinburgh has excellent links with many organisations and placement opportunities include: National Museum Scotland, Edinburgh International Science Festival and placements in policy and education.

Career opportunities

There has been a significant rise in opportunities available for scientists with the specialist knowledge, skills and attributes necessary to pursue roles at the interface between scientific research and the public.

These roles can be found in, for example, higher education institutions, museums, science centres, learned societies and consultancies for democratic decision-making.

Examples of specific roles include Engagement Managers, Information and Education Officers, Policy and Knowledge Brokers.



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Marketing – Digital Engagement Strategy is a graduate certificate program, which provides students with digital marketing skills required in the business world today. Read more
Marketing – Digital Engagement Strategy is a graduate certificate program, which provides students with digital marketing skills required in the business world today. Students will learn to analyze trends in technology, derive insights from data, design content management strategies, and execute plans across paid, owned and earned media. Students will also learn how to develop and evaluate digital marketing strategies to maximize customer engagement and create meaningful interactions in support of business growth.

Included are experiential learning opportunities with a marketer, a retailer or an agency serving clients, allowing students to improve their leadership, entrepreneurial, organizational, project management and teamwork skills, while effectively applying learning in a real-world environment. As part of the course work, students are eligible to earn industry certifications such as Google AdWords, Google Analytics and Facebook Blueprint. This program will make use of blended delivery method and will encourage accessing online tools through BYOD. This program also allows students to develop core skills that may be converted into PDU credits towards an Online Marketing Certified Professional (OMCP) designation.

Optional Co-op
This program includes an optional co-op stream. All students are initially admitted to the non-co-op program stream. At the end of semester one, students may apply for the optional co-op (3rd semester).

Career Opportunities

Career Outlook
-Marketing Manager
-Online Marketing Professional
-Digital Marketing Specialist
-Digital Media Planner
-Manager Performance Marketing
-Web Analytics Specialist

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Many patients who go to the dental surgery to receive dental treatment are of an advanced age, with systemic illnesses which require accurate knowledge… Read more
Many patients who go to the dental surgery to receive dental treatment are of an advanced age, with systemic illnesses which require accurate knowledge of them and their implications and interactions in the field of dentistry, or with cardiovascular, immunological, endocrinal and metabolic pathologies, which the dentist must understand to provide treatment correctly, in a manner that is safe to both patient and dentist. Likewise, those with any type of disability present complex challenges that are difficult for dentists to resolve. In addition to this is the appearance of secondary oral lesions as a result of taking certain medications or interactions between them, or as oral manifestations of underlying systemic diseases. All of these are considered special patients.

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Curating Science will enable you to develop an independent academic and curatorial practice at the intersection of histories, philosophies and social studies of science, science communication and museum studies. Read more

Curating Science will enable you to develop an independent academic and curatorial practice at the intersection of histories, philosophies and social studies of science, science communication and museum studies.

You will engage with current debates in science communication and interpretive practice in museums, including cutting-edge art-science practices that are reimagining ways of knowing and being in the 21st Century. Alongside this, you will be encouraged to develop innovative practices of dialogic and participative engagement, developing their own ways of convening public spaces for debate.

You will undertake a range of active learning activities from developing displays, programmes and events to developing digital content and designing their own research projects. You will be supported throughout by an interdisciplinary academic staff team drawn from museum and curatorial studies and the histories and philosophies of science, as well as professionals from our partner institutions.

Students can specialise in their own areas of interest, through choosing from an array of optional modules that explore contemporary curatorial strategies, technologies and media, cultural memory, histories of medicine, audiences, participation and engagement. You will have the option of undertaking a negotiated placement with a museum or heritage organisation.

Course content

All students on the MA in Curating Science will take three core modules.

The History and Theory of Modern Science Communication allows students to explore how science, technology and medicine have been communicated to a wider public in the past. Students will identify how the processes and purposes of science communication has changed over the last two centuries and debate the consequences for science communication of the introduction of new media, ranging from the radio to the internet. The module addresses these questions by surveying the development of science communication since 1750, and by examining the changing theoretical perspectives that have underpinned these developments. Students will learn to re-examine the processes of contemporary science communication in the light of a deeper understanding of this history.

Interpreting Cultures is underpinned by action learning and puts contemporary curation in an international context. From the outset, students work on an interpretation intervention with one of the archives and collections on campus (such as The Stanley & Audrey Burton Gallery; Special Collections; Treasures of the Brotherton; Marks and Spencer Company Archive; ULITA ― an Archive of International Textiles; Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine). This intensive experience of project planning, management, collaboration and team working prepares students for the option of undertaking a negotiated work placement in the second semester or optional modules exploring audiences, participation or engagement.

Through our Advanced Research Skills modules, students are equipped to undertake assessments and ultimately develop their own research project. The modules build to a symposium in Semester 2 where students present initial research findings towards a dissertation on a research topic of interest.

In addition, students choose from a range of optional modules offered by the School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies and the School of Philosophy, Religion and History of Science. These include the opportunity to complete a placement or consultancy project role in either curational approaches or engagement.

Course structure


Compulsory modules

  • Curating Science Individual project (dissertation / practice-led) 50 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 1 5 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 2 5 credits
  • Interpreting Cultures 30 credits
  • History & Theory of Modern Science Communication 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Making Sense of Sound 30 credits
  • Encountering Things: Art and Entanglement in Anglo-Saxon England 30 credits
  • Anthropology, Art and Representation 30 credits
  • Humanity, Animality and Globality 30 credits
  • Technology, Media and Critical Culture 30 credits
  • Placements in Context: Policy, Organizations and Practice 30 credits
  • Historical Skills and Practices 30 credits
  • The Origin of Modern Medicine (Birth of the Clinic) 30 credits
  • Audience Engagement and Impact 30 credits

Learning and teaching

You will be taught by leading researchers and experienced practitioners in their fields, and you’ll benefit from a range of teaching and learning methods. They include lectures and seminars, gallery and museum visits, as well as hands-on experience of specific collections in library sessions.

Assessment

We use a range of assessment methods including essays, presentations, assignments and literature reviews among others, depending on the modules you choose.

Career opportunities

Through a combination of theory and practice, the programme produces graduates who are able to develop professional careers in the museums and heritage sector whilst retaining a critical and reflexive eye on their own practice and that of the institutions in which they work. It will equip you with a good understanding of the issues and approaches to science communication and curation, interpretation and engagement, as well as practical work experience ― a combination which is very valuable to employers.

To get a flavour of the kinds of career trajectories our graduates of allied MAs have taken see the ‘news’ section of the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage and the alumni pages of the School website.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.

Placement opportunities

In Semester 2 you will have the option to undertake a negotiated work placement to gain first-hand experience of curating science.

We have close links with many of the major cultural institutions and organisations in the region, meaning there are plenty of opportunities for you to explore. If you have a particular ambition in mind for your placement, we usually try to find a role that suits you.

Students on allied MAs have completed placements in organisations such as Leeds City Museum, Leeds Art Gallery, Harewood House, the Henry Moore Institute, National Science and Media Museum, York City Art Gallery, National Railway Museum, Impressions Gallery, The Tetley, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Lotherton Hall, Abbey House Museum and the Royal Armouries.



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Aimed at current and future subject leaders and teachers in religious education, this Masters in Advanced Educational Practice. Religious Education programme from Liverpool John Moores University enhances teaching capability and builds on theoretical and practical knowledge. Read more
Aimed at current and future subject leaders and teachers in religious education, this Masters in Advanced Educational Practice: Religious Education programme from Liverpool John Moores University enhances teaching capability and builds on theoretical and practical knowledge. ​


• Programme is part of the 3forRE Scheme supported by the Culham St Gabriel’s Trust
•Study part time over three years on a course designed to support effective change in the classroom
•Develop your subject knowledge and professional practice in religious education
•Enjoy flexible course delivery and fit studying around your work commitments​


We recognise that our students are busy professionals and have taken this into account in the design of our programmes and assessments. Study on this programme is on a part time basis, enabling you integrate your learning with your full time professional role.​



​The course is delivered around school/college term times, with 20 credits being studied per term for the first two years.

During your first year you will study three compulsory (core) modules specialising in key current themes in religious education. Your second year will involve selection of two optional modules from an identified suite, and the core module in Researching Professional Practice. Your final year will involve 60 credits of research-based study through completion of the Dissertation or Professional Enquiry modules.

University-based study includes taught sessions scheduled late afternoon (4pm to 7pm) and occasional conference style days scheduled on Saturdays.

A blended learning approach ensures you can usually study at a time to suit you and all modules are supported by online study resources with additional guidance available through face-to-face or virtual tutorials.

To keep on top of your study you should be prepared to work between five and 10 hours per week (evenings and weekends). The practical applications of the course will involve the integration of study with your professional activity in school or college.​


​During your studies you will have access to LJMU learning resources including our libraries for independent study. You will be allocated a personal tutor to support your academic and professional development and will also receive guidance via email.

Taught sessions mostly take place at the IM Marsh campus, four miles outside Liverpool centre, although some sessions may take place in the city.

The IM Marsh campus has independent study spaces with IT facilities, a library with relevant stock and study spaces, access to student welfare and support, a gym and other sports facilities, a cafeteria and shop. The campus library, open 8am to 11pm, houses the main collections linked to this course and you will also have access to the 24 hour, city centre Aldham Robarts and Avril Robarts libraries.


YEAR 1

Context and Purpose for Religious Education (core)

Provides opportunities to investigate and engage with current thinking and research relating to the nature of religious education and its role in the school curriculum, and encourages practitioners to develop critical reflective practice.

Curriculum and Practice in Religious Education (core)

This module develops understanding of curriculum and pedagogical issues in Religious Education through learning based on engagement with current educational theory, research, and policy and the implications for professional practice.

Controversial Issues in Religious Education (core)

This module investigates the teaching of controversial issues in Religious Education through learning based on engagement with current educational theory, research, policy and practice in relation to your own professional setting.

YEAR 2

Researching Professional Practice (core)

This module provides an introduction to a range of research methods applicable to educational contexts, with a focus on practitioner enquiry, and to the development of a research project proposal and plan.

Approaches to Learning in the 21st Century (option)

This module develops critical professional practice in teaching and learning through analysis of engagement with and reflection on current educational theory, research, and practice in the context of your own professional setting.

Exploring Curriculum Change (option)

Explores key theoretical frameworks and concepts in curriculum models, drivers, innovation and the evaluation and curriculum change and their implications for professional practice.




Learning Through Assessment (option)

Provides a grounding in educational assessment practice in a time dominated by change and developing educational theories, policies and challenge.

Developing the Role of the Subject Leader (option)

Explores the characteristics of effective subject leadership through engagement with current educational theory, research, policy and practice to inform the organisation and management of learning in a range of professional settings and frameworks.

Professional Development for Leadership (option)

Provides professional development for leadership and management through learning based on engagement with current educational theory, research, policy and practice in Leadership and Management and its application within your professional setting.

YEAR 3

Dissertation (option)

This module involves the development and implementation of a major research project relevant to your subject area with the support of an experienced academic tutor.

Professional Inquiry (option)

This module involves the development and implementation of several linked practice based research projects relevant to your subject area with the support of an experienced academic tutor.

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The MA Human Resource Management is of particular interest to those professionals who wish to further their careers and assume senior HR positions. Read more
The MA Human Resource Management is of particular interest to those professionals who wish to further their careers and assume senior HR positions. The course is suited both to those already working in HR (at any level) as well as those who aspire to do so. Successful completion of the course, not only gives you the award of the MA HRM but also gives you the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development’s (CIPD) Advanced Level Diploma, CIPD Associate Membership and the opportunity to apply to upgrade to CIPD Chartered status. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

If you want to advance your career by gaining appropriate professional qualifications within the field of human resource management and recognition for the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development’s (CIPD) own awards, then this is the ideal course.

Based in Moorgate in the City of London, this course enables you to engage with research-led contemporary knowledge and build your own competencies in a global context based in the heart of this exciting world city.

Besides our leading, managing and developing people and contextualising management core modules, the MA HRM course offers you the opportunity to examine Resourcing and Talent Management, Learning and Talent Development, Employment Law and Practice, Managing Employee Relations in Contemporary Organisations and Employee Engagement through specialist academic option modules which include an international perspective. You might wish to consider taking one or two of these MA HRM option modules as short courses to give you a taster of the full MA. Besides these modules, we also offer a specialist cross-cultural management option module within the MA HRM to widen and deepen your knowledge in the HRM field.

Your dissertation will enable you to focus on an area of research and its practical application within organisations – such focus will mark you as an expert in your field and significantly enhances your employability. The dissertation is a key is a key cornerstone of the MA qualification. Before you embark on your dissertation, you will study a ‘Research Methods’ module which provides you with the knowledge and skills needed to conduct your research. You will also be assigned a personal supervisor who will guide and help you throughout your dissertation.

Successful completion of the MA HRM, in conjunction with joining the CIPD, leads to the CIPD’s Advanced Level Diploma, the highest educational award offered by the professional body under its current qualifications scheme. This Advanced Level Diploma plus relevant experience enables you to apply for membership assessment via CIPD, and you can be upgraded to a professional (Chartered) level of CIPD membership.

Achieving the CIPD’s Advanced Level Diploma is of major significance in gaining HR roles not only in the UK but also abroad. Upgrading to Chartered Membership or Chartered Fellowship of the CIPD enables you to use the designate letters CMCIPD or CFCIPD, further enhancing your employability.

Our dedicated CIPD professional adviser can guide you on your application to upgrade to charted status. We look forward to you joining our many successful alumni who, through their engagement with the academic and professional development of Human Resource Management, have contributed to the economic and social development of their chosen spheres of influence fully justifying their Charted Membership and Fellowship of the Charted Institute of Personal and Development.

As a teaching team we place particular emphasis on promoting a friendly, supportive environment. We realise that undertaking a Masters qualification can seem daunting at first and therefore, as academics, we aim to provide an approachable, helpful and enabling culture throughout.

The CIPD has commended the following for this University’s CIPD-related courses:
-High level of commitment and support
-Currency and quality of curriculum
-High standard of teaching and learning
-Use of action learning sets
-Strong ethos and benefits of formative feedback

Our staff are highly research active, bringing their cutting edge research into their teaching. The work of our research centres, the Centre for Progressive Leadership (CPL) and the Working Lives Research Institute (WLRI), along with our excellent libraries, including our specialist Trades Union Congress (TUC) Library, inform much of the work of your lecturers and tutors and thus support your course; you are welcome to participate in their activities too. For example, you will be able to attend many additional seminars on subjects such as: the impact of globalisation; equality, human rights and social justice; public policy; sustainability and corporate social responsibility as well as HRM and business law issues such as engagement, talent management, reward, work-life balance, work organisation and employment rights. In addition, a programme of guest speakers drawn from private industry, the public sector, not-for-profit, consultancy and authors of eminent works is incorporated into your course.

Assessment is both formative and summative. It is designed to appeal to – and test – students from wide range of traditions. Methods are varied and include assignments written in report and essay format, comparative analyses, case studies, a skills development portfolio, presentations and group work. There are also two exams. The exams take place only in the first semester and are required by the CIPD across all approved programmes. Exam briefing is given is giving to help prepare you for these assessments.

There will also be a dissertation which carries 60 credits. The dissertation requires you to conduct a piece of empirical research on a topic of your choice (and approved by your tutor). Most students choose to conduct their research on a key ‘people management’ issue within their own organisation.

Professional accreditation

Students gain Associate Membership of the CIPD and you can apply for professional upgrading with the Institute linked to your professional experience to achieve Chartered Membership or Fellowship following successful completion of your programme of study. Our dedicated CIPD professional adviser can guide you on your application to upgrade to Chartered status.

You will need to join the CIPD when you begin your course.

Upgrading to Chartered Membership or Chartered Fellowship of the CIPD enables you to use the designate letters CMCIPD or CFCIPD, further enhancing your employability.

Modular structure

The MA Human Resource Management course consists of six taught modules and a dissertation. In the first semester only, there is also one Saturday team skills workshop, one afternoon/evening assessment preparation/taught session and a two-day (Friday and Saturday) block release to address business and HRM strategy and exam preparation.

Core modules:
-Leading, Managing and Developing People (20 credits)
-Contextualising Management (20 credits)
-Research Methods in Human Resource Management (20 credits)

Subject-related option choices (a) – choose three from the following:
-HRM: Resourcing and Talent Management (20 credits)
-Employment Law and Practice (20 credits)
-Managing Employment Relations in Contemporary Organisations (20 credits)
-Employee Engagement (20 credits)
-Learning and Talent Development (20 credits)

Students may choose to take one extension of knowledge option (b) from the list below in place of one of the subject-related option choices above:
-Cross-Cultural Management (20 credits) (delivered during the day only)
-Strategic International Human Resource Management (20 credits) (delivered during the day only)
-Diversity and Inclusion: Policy, Practice and the Law (20 credits)

Students may elect to take Cross-Cultural Management (20 credits, delivered during the day only) in place of one of these subject related option choices. Modules usually run in the evenings with daytime delivery depending on demand. Delivery of all option modules also depends on their being sufficient demand for them.

After the course

For candidates who already work in HR or who wish to specialise in particular fields within this profession: successful completion of this CIPD approved Masters Programme and attainment of Chartered Membership or Fellowship of the CIPD is often a vital component to career progression and advancement, either within your current organisation or within another organisation.

For candidates wishing to enter HR: in today’s marketplace, successful completion of this CIPD approved Masters Programme and attainment of Associate CIPD Membership is often a pre-requisite to successful entry to the field of HR within organisations.

Candidates on the MA HRM programme are employed in a variety of organisations in the private, public and voluntary sectors.

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This exciting MSc programme focuses on leadership, change management, evidence-based service innovation and delivery all key to the delivery of high quality health care. Read more
This exciting MSc programme focuses on leadership, change management, evidence-based service innovation and delivery all key to the delivery of high quality health care. The programme is intended for experienced, qualified health care professionals who may work in and across a range of health care settings and in a variety of clinical, managerial and leadership roles.

The course aims to:

• Develop leadership knowledge and skills which can be applied to the delivery of a quality, evidence-based service linked to service user, staff and organisational outcomes
• Develop transformational leaders capable of improving and innovating health and social care delivery in a range of settings
• Develop a critical awareness of self in the leadership of service delivery and innovation
• Enhance critical awareness and reflection on the interfaces between policy, research, commissioning, service and practice
• Enable you to contribute to the advancement of your practice and the service you deliver by your professional development and life-long approach to learning

You have the option to exit after Year 1 with a PgCert Leadership Studies in Health Care and to exit after Year 2 with a PgDip Leadership Studies in Health Care.

The course is delivered one day per week.

Modules

There are two options for this course; a 3 year route and a 4 year route.

Modules for 3 year route:

Year 1
(3 core modules, 20 credits each)

• Research in health and social care
• Strategic leadership in health care
• Innovation for excellence - leading service change

Year 2
(1 core and 2 optional modules, 20 credits each)

Core module:

•Leading continuous quality improvement in health care

Optional modules:

• Mentorship and coaching for leadership
• Leading patient and public engagement in health care
• Professional development through contract learning

Year 3

• Dissertation (60 credits)

Modules for 4 year route:

Year 1
(2 core modules, 20 credits each)

• Research in health and social care
• Innovation for excellence - leading service change

Year 2
(1 core and 1 optional module, 20 credits each)

Core module:

•Strategic leadership in health care

Optional modules:

• Leading patient and public engagement in health care
• Professional development through contract learning

Year 3
(1 core and 1 optional module, 20 credits each)

Core module:
• Leading continuous quality improvement in health care

Optional modules:

• Mentorship and coaching for leadership
• Leading patient and public engagement in health care
• Professional development through contract learning

Year 4

• Dissertation (60 credits)

Professional links

The School of Health and Social Care delivers postgraduate education programmes and applied research linked to practice and workforce innovation and research capacity building. The work undertaken by staff and students is recognised both nationally and internationally.

Employability

With a range of flexible pathways available, our courses and modules are designed to enhance career opportunities by equipping health care professionals with the knowledge and skills to manage change, lead improvement initiatives and become an effective leader.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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This programme gives you the opportunity to study the main contexts of contemporary science and technology; gain a broad base in science policy, communication, sociology and engagement; enjoy flexibility in specialisation; and work in an interdisciplinary environment with research experts. Read more
This programme gives you the opportunity to study the main contexts of contemporary science and technology; gain a broad base in science policy, communication, sociology and engagement; enjoy flexibility in specialisation; and work in an interdisciplinary environment with research experts.

Degree information

The programme provides broad-based training in three disciplines: science policy and governance; science communication, engagement, and evaluation; and sociology of modern science and technology. This programme encourages specialised investigation. It also encourages interdisciplinary integration. Our degree works in dialogue with our sister MSc programme in History and Philosophy of Science, which adds historical and analytical depth to our offer.

MSc students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), three ancillary modules (45 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits) Postgraduate Diploma students undertake modules to the value of 120 credits: one core (15 credits), four optional (60 credits), and three ancillary (45 credits), studied over one year. Postgraduate Certificate students undertake modules to the value of 60 credits. The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), and three optional modules (45 credits), studied over one year.

Core module
-Introduction to Science and Technology Studies

Optional modules - students must take three modules from a prescribed list of options including:
-Practical Science Communication and Engagement
-Curating the History of Science
-Responsible Science and Emerging Technologies
-Science in the 20th Century and Beyond
-Science Policy Beyond Borders
-Science, Media, and Culture
-Science, Security, and Social Research
-Sociology and the Sociology of Science
-Special Topics Seminar in STS
-Ancillary Modules

Students must take two ancillary modules which may be options from our own degrees, for example, Material Culture and Science in the 18th Century OR, Knowledge, Evidence, and Explanation in Science, OR, they might be selected from any other programme at UCL.

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, tutorials and research supervision. Student performance is assessed through coursework such as long and short essays, advocacy work, and project work.

Careers

Our programme provides essential training and study for students wishing to pursue PhD level study in several fields, and also provides appropriate training and qualifications sought by individuals pursuing careers in areas such as education, museum and archival curatorship, or administration and policy-making in science, engineering and health care.

Employability
The programme offers a range of transferable skills and networking opportunities. No matter whether your career plan looks towards the public or private sector, we can help you build a portfolio of skills and contacts that will give your CV the edge. Highlights of the programme include:

the chance to develop practical media skills, including audio production
learning to write for different audiences
developing your skills in both practical and theoretical science communication, including working in a major London museum
to meet and network with policy makers.

Why study this degree at UCL?

There is no UK academic department quite like UCL Science & Technology Studies. The department combines award-winning teaching with award-winning public engagement.

We are research active over an enormous range of topics. Our teaching builds on research not only in our subject specialties but also in the fundamentals of teaching and learning.

Our programme makes unique use of London’s attractions and resources. We have close links with the Science Museum, the National Maritime Museum, the Natural History Museum, the Wellcome Library, and UCL Museums & Collections. We also use the city as a classroom, with custom-made walking tours, site visits, and special excursions.

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The Postgraduate Diploma in Human Resource Management gives rapid access to the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development's (CIPD) Advanced Level Diploma, CIPD Associate Membership and the opportunity to upgrade to CIPD Chartered status. Read more
The Postgraduate Diploma in Human Resource Management gives rapid access to the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development's (CIPD) Advanced Level Diploma, CIPD Associate Membership and the opportunity to upgrade to CIPD Chartered status. This course is suitable for existing HR practitioners and those keen to enter the profession. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

Moorgate in the City of London is the centre of world business and where you will study. Success in completing our Postgraduate Diploma in HRM in one year full-time or 18 months part-time will enable you to obtain the Advanced Level Diploma from HR’s professional body, the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD). The CIPD’s Advanced Level Diploma is the highest professional award you can gain in the HR field. With this, and your own professional experience, you can achieve full recognition of your own abilities by applying for CIPD Chartered Member or Fellow status.

Besides our Leading, managing and developing people and Contextualising management core modules, the PG Dip HRM course offers you the opportunity to examine Resourcing and Talent Management, Learning and Talent Development, Employment Law and Practice, Managing Employee Relations in Contemporary Organisations and Employee Engagement through specialist academic option modules which include an international strategic perspective. You might wish to consider taking one or two of these PG Dip HRM option modules as short courses to give you a taster of the full PG Dip.

Your PG Dip HRM course leads you to propose changes in your organisation through your own research, through the production of a Management Research Report, and enables you to reflect on your own development as a change manager. Successful completion of the PG DIP HRM, in conjunction with joining the CIPD, leads to the CIPD’s Advanced Level Diploma, the highest educational award offered by the professional body under its current qualifications scheme. This Advanced Level Diploma plus relevant experience enables you to apply to upgrade to a professional (Chartered) level of CIPD membership. Achieving the CIPD’s Advanced Level Diploma is of major significance in gaining HR roles not only in the UK but also abroad. Upgrading to Chartered Membership or Chartered Fellowship of the CIPD enables you to use the designate letters CMCIPD or CFCIPD, further enhancing your employability. Our dedicated CIPD professional adviser can guide you on your application to upgrade to Chartered status. We look forward to you joining our many successful alumni who, through their engagement with the academic and professional development of Human Resource Management, have contributed to the economic and social development of their chosen spheres of influence fully justifying their Chartered Membership and Fellowship of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development.

The CIPD has commended the following for this University’s CIPD-related courses:
-High level of commitment and support;
-Currency and quality of curriculum;
-High standard of teaching and learning;
-Use of action learning sets;
-Strong ethos and benefits of formative feedback.

Our staff are highly research active, bringing their cutting edge research into their teaching. The work of our research centres, the Centre for Progressive Leadership (CPL) and the Working Lives Research Institute (WLRI), along with our excellent libraries, including our specialist Trades Union Congress (TUC) Library, inform much of the work of your lecturers and tutors and thus support your course; you are welcome to participate in their activities too. For example, you will be able to attend many additional seminars on subjects such as: the impact of globalisation; equality, human rights and social justice; public policy; sustainability and corporate social responsibility as well as HRM and business law issues such as engagement, talent management, reward, work-life balance, work organisation and employment rights. In addition, a programme of guest speakers drawn from private industry, the public sector, not-for-profit, consultancy and authors of eminent works is incorporated into your course.

Assessment is both formative and summative. It is designed to appeal to - and test - students from a wide range of traditions. Methods are varied and include assignments written in report and essay format, comparative analyses, case studies, a skills development portfolio and learning log, presentations and group work. There are also two exams. The exams take place only in the first semester and are required by the CIPD across all approved programmes. Exam briefing is given to help prepare you for these internally set assessments. There is also a 7,500 word Management Research Report.

Professional accreditation

Students gain Associate Membership of the CIPD and you can apply for professional upgrading with the Institute linked to your professional experience to achieve Chartered Membership or Fellowship following successful completion of your programme of study. Our dedicated CIPD professional adviser can guide you on your application to upgrade to Chartered status.

You will need to join the CIPD when you begin your course.

Upgrading to Chartered Membership or Chartered Fellowship of the CIPD enables you to use the designate letters CMCIPD or CFCIPD, further enhancing your employability.

Modular structure

The course consists of six taught modules. In the first semester only, there is also one Saturday team skills workshop, one afternoon/evening assessment preparation/taught session and a two-day (Friday and Saturday) block release to address business and HRM strategy and exam preparation.

Core modules:
-Leading, Managing and Developing People (20 credits)
-Contextualising Management (20 credits)
-The Reflective Practitioner (30 credits)
-Consultancy, Change and Professional Development (10 credits)

Optional modules - choose two from the following:
-HRM: Resourcing and Talent Management(20 credits)
-Employment Law and Practice (20 credits)
-Managing Employment Relations in Contemporary Organisations (20 credits)
-Learning and Talent Development (20 credits)
-Employee Engagement (20 credits)

The 7,500 word management Research Report and action learning set presentation, which carries 30 credits, is contained within the Reflective Practitioner module. (30 credits)

Modules usually run in the evenings with daytime delivery depending. Delivery of all option modules also depends on their being sufficient demand for them.

After the course

Successful completion of the PG DIP HRM, in conjunction with joining the CIPD, leads to the CIPD's Advanced Level Diploma, the highest educational award offered by the professional body under its current qualifications scheme.

This Advanced Level Diploma plus relevant experience enables you to apply for membership assessment via CIPD, and you can be upgraded to a professional (Chartered) level of CIPD membership.

Achieving the CIPD's Advanced Level Diploma is of major significance in gaining HR roles not only in the UK but also abroad.

Upgrading to Chartered Membership or Chartered Fellowship of the CIPD enables you to use the designate letters CMCIPD or CFCIPD, further enhancing your employability.

Completing the Postgraduate Diploma in HRM at London Metropolitan University leads to significant career advantage: on the strength of their Management Research Reports recent students have gained full-time posts from their placements in financial services, leisure and tourism and major international charities. Many have gained significant promotion for instance in the health sector. Alumni in higher education for example have developed their careers significantly leading to positions such as the head of HR. In the private sector, students have moved from general administrative and PA positions to heading strategic HR project team initiatives while others have moved up into international HR management positions for global companies.

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This course focuses on the Catholic theological tradition in particular, within the more general context of Christian theology. Durham is developing a strong emphasis on a renewed engagement with contemporary Catholicism, and now boasts a Centre for Catholic Studies and the Bede Chair in Catholic Theology. Read more
This course focuses on the Catholic theological tradition in particular, within the more general context of Christian theology. Durham is developing a strong emphasis on a renewed engagement with contemporary Catholicism, and now boasts a Centre for Catholic Studies and the Bede Chair in Catholic Theology. For more information, please contact Professor Paul Murray ()

Course Structure

Classic Texts in Christian Theology core module, Three option modules, Dissertation.
Core Modules:
-Classic Texts in Christian Theology
-Dissertation

Optional Modules in previous years have included:
2-3 choices from:
-Twentieth-Century Catholic Theology
-Conceiving Change in Contemporary Catholicism
-Christian Gender
-Principles of Theological Ethics
-Patristic Ecclesiology
-Patristic Exegesis
-Catholic Social Thought

Plus up to 1 choice from:
-The Anglican Theological Vision
-Liturgy and Sacramentality
-Ritual, Symbolism and Belief in the Anthropology of Religion
-Paul and his Interpreters
-Gospels and Canon
-The Bible and Hermeneutics
-Christian Northumbria 600-750
-Theology, Ethics and Medicine
-Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
-Literature and Religion
-Advanced Hebrew Texts
-Advanced Aramaic
-Middle Egyptian
-The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament
-Ecclesiology and Ethnography
-Doctrine of Creation
-Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme
-Level 3 undergraduate module, or any Level 1 – 2 language module offered by the Department of Theology and Religion, taken in conjunction with the Extended Study in Theology & Religion module
-30 credits from another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the University’s Centre for Foreign Language Study

Learning and Teaching

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology &

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & Religion is ‘research led’ at both BA and MA levels, but particularly at MA level. Research led teaching is informed by staff research, but more importantly it aims to develop students as independent researchers themselves, able to pursue and explore their own research interests and questions. This is why the independently researched MA dissertation is the culmination of the MA programme. Such engagement with texts and issues is not only an excellent preparation for doctoral research, it also develops those skills of critical analysis, synthesis and presentation sought and required by employers.

Many MA classes will contain a ‘lecture’ element, conveying information and exemplifying an approach to the subject-matter that will enable students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and improve their own ability to analyse and evaluate information and arguments. Seminars enhance knowledge and understanding through preparation and interaction with other students and staff, promoting awareness of and respect for different viewpoints and approaches, and developing skills of articulacy, advocacy and interrogation. Through small group discussions and tutorials, feedback is provided on student work, with the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.

The Dissertation module includes training in generic research skills, from the use of the Library to issues in referencing and bibliography. The subject specific core module introduces students to questions of interpretation and argument in the disciplines encompassed by theology and religion, and helps them to develop their own interests and questions that will issue in the MA dissertation. The latter is a piece of independent research, but it is fostered and guided through individual tutorials with a supervisor, with whom students meet throughout the academic year.

Other admission details

*The two principal exceptions to this rule are as follows: graduates of other disciplines who have studied at undergraduate or equivalent level in one or more of the areas in which they hope to work, through their first degrees, through training for the ministry of the churches, and so on; students from overseas universities who have successfully reached a point in their theological studies comparable with completion of a British BA at the standard noted above - for example, on the German model, passing the Zwischenprüfung or Kolloquium and two semesters at the Hauptseminar level.

When applying, please ensure that your two chosen referees send their confidential academic references (using the reference form [Word]) to us in a timely manner. Please note that we are unable to accept ‘open’ references submitted by yourself. The referees may send the references by email directly from their institutional email addresses to provided they are signed, or by post to the address provided on the reference form.

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This course provides graduates of other degrees with the opportunity to qualify for a teaching profession in one year of full-time study. Read more

Professional Recognition

This course provides graduates of other degrees with the opportunity to qualify for a teaching profession in one year of full-time study. Successful graduates can register with the Queensland College of Teachers. International students should consult the relevant authority in their home country.

Who will I teach?

The Graduate Diploma of Education (Secondary) focuses on the education of students in Years 7 to 12. The junior secondary years (Years 7-10) is an exciting phase of learning, while the senior secondary years (Years 11-12) are a critical time for young people as they develop their plans for post-secondary education and work.
You will learn to teach two secondary areas of teaching in Years 7 to 10, specialising in one related secondary area of teaching in Years 11 and 12.

Professional Experience

An integral part of becoming a teacher is gaining practical experience in schools. You will be required to complete 55 days of professional experience in secondary school settings during the course plus an additional 20 days of wider professional education. Placements are allocated in government and non-government schools.

Blue card

You will need a Blue Card (a working with children check issued by the Queensland Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian) before commencing your professional experience.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Graduate Diploma of Education (Secondary), graduates will be able to:
*Demonstrate broad and coherent understanding of professional knowledge, practice and engagement with depth in the National Professional Standards for Teachers
*Demonstrate broad and coherent understanding of underlying principles and concepts, and teaching and learning approaches for the tropics in the areas of Indigenous education, education for sustainability, rural and regional education
*Review critically, analyse, evaluate, consolidate and synthesise professional knowledge, practice and engagement and apply the findings to enhance outcomes for diverse students
*Communicate professional knowledge clearly and coherently through oral and written modes to students and key stakeholders in professional practice and engagement
*Identify and solve problems and make informed decisions in diverse professional contexts with well-developed judgement and initiative
*Demonstrate dispositions required for effective teaching that embrace responsibility and accountability for professional knowledge, practice and engagement including collaboration with stakeholders.

Award title

GRADUATE DIPLOMA OF EDUCATION (SECONDARY) GDipEd(Secondary)

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the following English language proficiency requirements:
An overall IELTS of 7.5 with no component lower than 8 in Speaking and Listening and no score below 7 in Reading and Writing.
Note: All students must attain an overall IELTS (or equivalent) score of 7.5 (with no score below 7 in any of the four skills areas, and a score of no less than 8 in speaking and listening) upon completion as required by the Queensland College of Teachers. The cost of the testing will be met by the applicant. English test results must be no more than two years old.

Why JCU?

James Cook University offers professional development opportunities, student flexibility through course design and structure, as well as a successful history in securing funding for major research programs.

Application deadlines

Last Friday in October the year before commencement

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Our MSc Environmental Surveying focuses on the environmental challenges faced by professionals in today’s construction industry. We aim to produce graduates who desire to pursue continued excellence in both their personal and professional life, aiming to be the best at what they do. Read more
Our MSc Environmental Surveying focuses on the environmental challenges faced by professionals in today’s construction industry.

What's covered in the course?

We aim to produce graduates who desire to pursue continued excellence in both their personal and professional life, aiming to be the best at what they do.

To this end, our programme encourages and enables collaborative activity, engagement with work placements, projects, international exchanges and approaches to, and engagement with, emerging technologies, in order to support your future employability and maximise the investment you have made in your education.

By the end of this course, you will be able to identify, implement and evaluate the processes, tools and outcomes of surveying to create more sustainable places across the built and natural environment.

Over the course of the programme, you will learn to critically assess surveying theory and practice within the context of the environment and sustainability in order to respond to the growing demand for surveying practitioners and consultants who can address contemporary and future challenges within an environmental context.

You will develop the skills required to assess, analyse and offer practical, sustainable solutions to building and development related problems, and will acquire the knowledge needed to interpret the law across a range of environmental subject areas.

You will have the opportunity to apply your learning in an autonomous manner through the use of real problems and case study materials.

You will develop your problem-solving abilities, practical competencies, critical appraisal and written and oral communication skills.

The course will also encourage you to work in an inter-disciplinary manner with graduates and professionals from a variety of backgrounds employed within a planning, surveying, real estate and environmental context.

Why choose us?

-This course has been developed in consultation with industry experts and in collaboration with our students.
-This course is underpinned by extensive staff knowledge and skills.
-You will develop as a confident independent and team problem solver who is willing to take on new challenges and experiences.
-You will become technically proficient and have the ability to transfer your knowledge to a diverse range of activities on graduation.

Course in depth

We take an experiential and practice-led approach to Learning and Teaching, and opportunities to develop relevant employability skills are embedded throughout the programme. This programme will support you in becoming an active, autonomous learner through the teaching, learning and assessment process.

The emphasis is on interactive learning, including student-led workshops, role-plays and simulations to achieve deeper learning and understanding.

We use visiting teachers, field study visits and research-informed teaching to engage students with practical and topical issues. Appropriate modules are shared across courses, which helps to enrich your educational experience and allows you to encounter the perspectives, values and attitudes of students from other disciplines, which will be helpful in your future career.

Throughout the programme you are given the chance to practice surveying skills within an environmental context in order to develop transferable skills which will be valuable whatever your final choice of career.

Many modules are team taught, thus providing you with a wide variety of rich and diverse academic styles and expertise.

The programme encourages you to participate in activities and discussions which are hosted on the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) Moodle. All learning activities are supported both in teaching sessions and on the VLE. The VLE also offers interactive practice-oriented opportunities to test and apply your knowledge.

We expect you to attend all teaching sessions as well as to read and prepare before these sessions. Good preparation will enable you to get the most from your contact time and will help you become an autonomous learner. Advance preparation is also a critical skill which you must develop if you wish to succeed in business or professional practice. Teaching sessions include lectures and small group interactive seminars. We will provide you with feedback on our VLE following seminar sessions.

The MSc programme offers a diverse range of assessments which are practice-led and knowledge-applied, providing an opportunity for you to demonstrate your knowledge and employability skills within each module. Our assessment strategy is designed at programme level and incorporates a broad range of practice-led techniques including essays, evaluations, verbal presentations, posters, reports, design presentations, group work and role play scenarios. Most modules are assessed through a variety of these techniques in the form of a portfolio linked together by a common theme.

Modules
-Commercial Inspection and Surveying 20 credits
-Environmental Science and Design 20 credits
-Tools for Managing Sustainability 20 credits
-Professional Practice 20 credits
-Transitions for Sustainable Futures 20 credits
-Development Project 20 credits
-Dissertation 60 credits

Enhancing your employability skills

We recognise the significance of employability and the investment you have made in your education. Therefore, our programme encourages and enables collaborative activity, engagement with work placements, projects, international exchanges and approaches to, and engagement with, emerging technologies.

Birmingham City University programmes aim to provide graduates with a set of attributes which prepare them for their future careers. The BCU Graduate:
-Is professional and work ready
-Is a creative problem solver
-Is enterprising
-Has a global outlook.

The University has introduced the Birmingham City University Graduate+ programme, which is an extra-curricular awards framework that is designed to augment the subject based skills that you develop through your programme with broader employability skills and techniques that will enhance your employment options when you leave university.

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The Division of Peace Studies and the Bradford Centre for International Development each have a strong set of Master’s programmes; alongside undergraduate, postgraduate research, and Research and Knowledge Transfer programmes. Read more
The Division of Peace Studies and the Bradford Centre for International Development each have a strong set of Master’s programmes; alongside undergraduate, postgraduate research, and Research and Knowledge Transfer programmes. Both have high international reputations in their respective areas, in terms of teaching, research and policy and programme engagement.

The MA in Peace, Conflict and Development Studies aims to combine the strengths of these two Divisions in providing a structured, innovative and challenging taught MA programme on the important interrelationships between peace, conflict and development. It offers a comprehensive introduction and analysis of the interrelationships between development, conflict and security in developing and transitional societies.

It covers: development theory, policy and programming debates; interrelationships between insecurity, poverty and development; peace and peacebuilding (including conflict prevention and post-conflict reconstruction); human security issues; natural resource conflict, co-operation and management; environment and security in developing and fragile political contexts; and conflict-sensitive development principles and practices. It also equips its students with practical skills in order to design and manage projects and programmes in the field.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/peace-conflict-and-development-ma-part-time

Why Bradford?

The MA in Peace, Conflict and Development Studies aims to combine the strengths of these two Divisions: Peace Studies and Development (known as Bradford Centre for International Development). They are both long established within the University of Bradford and both have high international reputations in their respective areas, in terms of teaching, research and policy and programme engagement.

Modules

Core modules
-Issues in Development Theory
-Introduction to Peace Studies
-Natural Resource Governance, Conflict and Co-operation
-Dissertation

Option modules
-Fragile States and the Security-Development Nexus
-Conflict Resolution Theory
-International Politics and Security Studies
-Introduction to African Politics
-Peacekeeping, Peacebuilding and Statebuilding
-Gender, Conflict and Development
-Cities in Conflict
-Applied Conflict Resolution Skills
-African Security Studies
-African Study Visit
-Issues in Development Policy
-Public Policy Analysis and Management
-Sustainable Tourism Development

Work experience

Students are able to opt for a ‘Professional Practice’ module that encourages students to undertake a voluntary placement with a view to gaining experience of working in a team and managing change.

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Students will benefit from practical skills-based training as well as academic education, in relation to engagement with key contemporary policy and programme debates of the key international and national organisations involved in peace, conflict and development. They will benefit from the strong international engagement of the relevant teaching staff in these debates, and the networks that these bring.

The MA in Peace, Conflict and Development Studies combines theoretical and academic debates on these interrelationships with examinations of the relevant policy and programming issues, so it is relevant for decision-makers and stakeholders within developing, fragile or conflict-affected countries and for those concerned with international aid and assistance.

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Our MSc in Science Communication combines professional practice, policy studies and cross-disciplinary theory and skills, to offer an academically stimulating experience and a solid grounding for a career. Read more
Our MSc in Science Communication combines professional practice, policy studies and cross-disciplinary theory and skills, to offer an academically stimulating experience and a solid grounding for a career.

Developed by academic staff from The University of Manchester's Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine and Manchester Institute of Innovation Research , the programme will feature masterclasses and project support from leading professionals in print, broadcast and online journalism, museums and science centres, public policy and advocacy, specialist public relations and editorial services, project and event management, together with experienced science communicators from across the University.

Aims

Science communication deals with the communication of scientific ideas, practices and issues to diverse audiences. Students on this programme will spend time building up practical communication skills, and thinking about the broad range of challenges that science communicators face. Does science communication matter for society? Whose interests are furthered by science news? What are the ethical issues in the communication of health research? When we talk about public engagement, what kind of public do we mean?
The course considers these questions among others through insights drawn from history, innovation and policy research, media studies, and the first-hand experience of long-serving communicators, and feeds the discussion back into its approach to practical skills.

Special features

This programme provides a framework that enables to students to enhance their academic and 'real world' learning at the same time. By bringing practitioners into the classroom, and enabling students to participate in the many forms of science communication that are happening in Manchester, students gain a good sense of the range of science communication activity, and of the personal, intellectual and professional skills that will support them as they set off in their careers.

Applicants may informally request from the Course Director, or may be sent, examples of study materials to enable them to test their ability to engage effectively with the course.

Teaching and learning

Teaching includes a mixture of lectures, small-group seminars, discussions and practical exercises. Activities will be included in the taught elements, for individual students and for groups. Students will engage with primary and secondary academic literatures, with professional literatures, and with mass media products about science, technology and medicine. Students will learn at special sites of science communication, such as museums, media institutions, and public events. Participation and volunteering will be encouraged so that students can further their own interests alongside the taught curriculum. All students will meet regularly with a mentor from the Centre's PhD community, with a designated personal tutor from among the staff, and, from Semester 2, a dissertation supervisor.

Coursework and assessment

All modules are assessed by academic and practical tasks set in parallel. Students should expect assessments, which are written and spoken, and use a format appropriate to the relevant professional group or medium.

Students may choose their own topic or medium for the many of the assessments. There is a small taught element which is assessed through a formal exam. Assessed work also includes a project created under the supervision of a science communication professional.
The final assessment piece is a substantial piece of original research (the dissertation).

Career opportunities

This programme is intended for students interested in science, technology, medicine, mathematics or engineering who are seeking to work in journalism, science policy, science publishing, medical, environmental and other related campaigning and advocacy groups, public relations in the public and private sectors, museums and science centres, science festivals, or other public engagement fields. It also provides an appropriate grounding for PhD-level research in science communication studies.

Past MSc graduates who took our former science communication pathway in History of Science, Technology and Medicine have gone on to a wide range of relevant posts, including:
-Public Engagement Officer, Centre for Life, Newcastle
-Senior Policy Analyst, Department of Energy and Climate Change
-Director, Scientia Scripta (science-focused copywriting agency)
-Assistant Curator of Technology and Engineering, Science Museum
-Education Assistant, Catalyst Science Centre, Widnes
-Junior Consultant, Six Degrees PR
-Technical Author, Calrec Audio
-Researcher, Pioneer Productions (TV)

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