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Masters Degrees (Energy Policy)

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The world’s long-term economic development depends on the existence of efficient, innovative and creative energy and resources industries. Read more

Why Specialisation in Energy Policy at Dundee?

The world’s long-term economic development depends on the existence of efficient, innovative and creative energy and resources industries. These in turn rely on individuals who possess a sound grasp of their legal, economic, technical and policy backgrounds.

Energy Studies with specialisation in Energy Policy is at the heart of these issues and provides the best in advanced education in its field, preparing its graduates to meet the challenges posed by the evolving global economy.

This MSc is aimed at graduates and other professionals, both in government and industry, who wish to gain an in-depth understanding of the energy industry and general international impacts of policy and procedure. The position of this programme at the Centre provides the student a unique opportunity to combine studies in general energy management with international Economic policy and specialized courses in the energy/resources industries. This intensive professional and academic training, provided by internationally leading practitioners and professors in this field, leads to a distinctive and reputed advanced academic qualification based on academic excellence and professional relevance.

What's great about Specialisation in Energy Policy at Dundee?

Throughout its history, the Centre for Energy, Petroleum and Mineral Law and Policy as part of the Graduate School of Natural Resources Law, Policy and Management at the University of Dundee has achieved continuous growth and has established international pre-eminence in its core activities. Scholarly performance, high level academic research, strategic consultancy and top-quality executive education. Currently, we have over 500 registered postgraduate students from more than 50 countries world-wide.

Our interdisciplinary approach to teaching, research and consultancy gives us a unique perspective on how governments and businesses operate. We offer flexible courses delivered by the best in the field, devised and continually updated in line with the Centre’s unique combination of professional expertise and academic excellence.

This provides a rigorous training for graduate students and working professionals. Full-time and part-time degrees, intensive training programmes tailor-made for individuals or companies and short-term professional seminars are all on offer.

We will teach you the practical and professional skills you need to mastermind complex commercial and financial transactions in the international workplace, and we will expose you to many varied and exciting opportunities.

How you will be taught

The MSc is made up of compulsory and elective modules with this taught component being followed by either:
A dissertation of up to 15,000 words on a topic approved by an academic supervisor

An Internship report - students who choose this option are required to source an organisation willing to offer a 3-month work placement, approved by an academic supervisor

An extended PhD Proposal - students who propose to follow up the LLM with a PhD may, with the approval of an academic supervisor, submit a 10,000 word PhD proposal

What you will study

Compulsory Modules:
• Natural Resources Sectors: A Multidisciplinary Introduction
• Project Report or Internship
Core Modules:
Core Compulsory Modules:
• Energy Economics: The Issues
• Energy Economics: The Tools
Core Specialist Modules:
• Quantitative Methods for Energy Economists
• Downstream Energy Law and Policy
• International Relations and Energy and Natural Resources
• Public Policies for Resource-Based Development

Elective Modules: Candidates are advised to choose additional modules from what is available on the academic timetable subject to any restrictions that may apply.

How you will be assessed

Each course is assessed by a combination of examinations and a research paper.

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Take on a defining challenge for humanity in the 21st century – creating a global low-carbon economy while providing modern energy services to the world’s population. Read more

Take on a defining challenge for humanity in the 21st century – creating a global low-carbon economy while providing modern energy services to the world’s population.

This MSc is unique in combining ideas from economics, innovation studies and policy studies while requiring no prior training in these fields. The course provides a broad-based, social science training in energy policy, focusing in particular on the role of technological innovation.

You learn from internationally recognised faculty from SPRU – Science Policy Research Unit, a world-leading research centre on science, technology and innovation policy, and the Sussex Energy Group, one of the largest energy policy research groups in the world.

You gain the skills to analyse policy problems and to propose and evaluate viable policy solutions. The course provides an essential foundation for careers in government, international organisations, the private sector and NGOs.

How will I study?

Teaching is via small, highly interactive lectures and seminars that foster a culture of knowledge sharing, ideas generation, critical thinking and enthusiastic debate.

You’ll study a combination of core modules and options, assessed through:

-Coursework

-Group projects

-Examinations

-Extended essays

-Presentations

-Policy briefs

In the summer, you work on a research-based dissertation. We encourage interaction, collaboration and creativity. You’re invited to participate in our programme of research seminars as well as conferences and workshops.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

This course is taught by the Science Policy Research Unit (SPRU) who have a number of £10,000 scholarships available for 2018 entry

SPRU Scholarships 2018

- £10,000 towards fees with any remaining funds to be used to support maintenance.

- Application deadline: 1 July 2018

- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/spru/study/scholarships

For more information on Masters Scholarships visit: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/fees-funding/masters-scholarships

Careers

With the growing importance of energy on political, corporate and even social agendas around the world, there is increasing demand for energy policy professionals.

All our graduates have successfully obtained employment in a variety of sectors. For example, recent MSc graduates have gained employment in:

-International organisations (such as the OECD, UNDP, UNEP, IEA, and IREAN)

-Government departments (such as the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change, Government of British Columbia, Canada)

-Local authorities (such as the Brighton & Hove Council sustainability team)

-Businesses (such as RWE npower, Ecofys, EDF, Unilever, Southern Solar, Renaissance Re, Centro de Apoio a Inovação Social-CAIS)

-NGOs (such as the International Social Science Council, Green Jobs Alliance, People and Planet)

Other graduates have gone on to work for independent consultancies, or to study for PhDs in this area.



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The MSc Global Energy and Climate Policy (GECP) is the first Masters programme to jointly address the issues of climate and energy policy in an interdisciplinary fashion. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MSc Global Energy and Climate Policy (GECP) is the first Masters programme to jointly address the issues of climate and energy policy in an interdisciplinary fashion. It tackles policy and regulatory change, the historical and technological evolution of energy sources, energy markets and their participants, the global governance of climate change as well as the challenges associated with transitioning to a low-carbon economy.

The programme specifically addresses the requirements of those wishing to deepen their theoretical and practical understanding of how energy and climate policies are designed, shaped, advocated and implemented and by whom across a multitude of cases drawn from the Global North and South and across multiple levels of political organisation from global to local arenas.

The MSc is designed for those engaged with or planning a career in professional contexts relating to energy and/or climate policy. It prepares for a multitude of careers in public and private contexts, including in public administration and government departments, strategic policy and risk advisory, government relations and public affairs, policy advocacy, think tanks and academia.

Guest speakers on the programme's modules have included Angus Miller (Energy Advisor, UK Foreign Office), Tom Burke (Founding Director, E3G and Environmental Policy Advisor, Rio Tinto), Jonathan Grant (Asst. Director Sustainability and Climate Change, PwC), Kash Burchett (European Energy Analyst, IHS Global Insight), Chris Dodwell (AEA Technology, former Head of International Climate Policy, UK Department of Energy and Climate Change) and Andrew Pendleton (Head of Campaigns, Friends of the Earth).

The programme draws on the teaching and research strengths of CISD and of the SOAS departments of International Politics, Law, Economics and area studies (especially of Asia, Africa and the Middle East) as well as a wide range of languages. In particular, students will be able to benefit from the expertise located at the Centre for Environment, Development and Policy (CEDEP), the Law School's Law, Environment and Development Centre (LEDC), the Centre on the Politics of Energy Security (CEPES), the Centre for Water and Development, and the SOAS Food Studies Centre.

In addition to the three core modules of Global Energy and Climate Policy (1 unit), Applied Energy and Climate Studies (0.5 units) and Global Public Policy (0.5 units) students choose a fourth module to meet their specific professional needs and personal interests.

Students on this course will have the opportunity to participate in CISD's Study Tour of Paris and Brussels.

Programme objectives

- Excellent understanding of the nature and development of global energy and climate policy, drawing on a variety of contributing disciplines

- Excellent knowledge of regulatory challenges and their impact on public and private stakeholders in both the Global South and North

- Ability to critically contribute to contemporary policy debates about reforms of international energy and climate governance architectures and their interaction with national and sub-national policy and regulatory frameworks

- Development of practical skills including policy analysis and policy advocacy, risk analysis, strategic communication and media

We welcome applications from a wide variety of fields and backgrounds. It is not necessary to have a degree in a discipline directly related to global energy and climate policy.

Each application is assessed on its individual merits and entry requirements may be modified in light of relevant professional experience and where the applicant can demonstrate a sustained practical interest in the international field.

Listen to the MSc Global Energy and Climate Policy and CISD's 1st Annual Energy and Climate Change Conference (May 2011) podcast (http://www.4shared.com/mp3/EdRUc-qq/CISD_Energy_and_Climate_Change.html), organised by students.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/msc-global-energy-and-climate-policy/

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/2016 (pdf; 172kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/msc-global-energy-and-climate-policy/file80890.pdf

Teaching & Learning

The programme may be taken in one year (full time) or in two or three years part time with the schedule designed to allow participation by those in full time employment. Participants may choose a combination of courses to meet their professional needs and personal interests. The programme is convened on a multi-disciplinary basis, and teaching is through lectures, tutorials and workshops conducted by SOAS faculty and visiting specialists.

The Centre endeavours to make as many of the courses for Global Energy and Climate Policy (GECP) accessible to part time students. The majority of CISD lectures are at 18.00 where possible however lecture times will be rotated on a yearly basis for some courses (between evening and daytime slots) so that part time students will have access to as many courses as possible over the duration of their degree. Associated tutorials are repeated in hourly slots with the latest taking place at 20.00. Students sign up for tutorial groups at the start of term and stay in the same group throughout the academic year. There is a minimum of two and a half hours formal teaching a week (lecture and tutorial) for each GECP course taken. Practical exercises may take place at weekends.

Teaching includes:

- Theory and practice of global energy and climate change policy as intertwined global issues

- Practical toolkit including policy analysis and planning, risk analysis, strategic communication, policy advocacy and negotiation skills

- Interaction with policymakers and government officials, energy industry and NGO representatives, and other practitioners

- An elective from a wide range: International Relations, International Law, International Economics, International Security, Multinational Enterprises in a Globalising World or a course offered by other SOAS departments (e.g. Development Studies, Politics, Economics, Law)

Further activities:

Also included in the degree programme:

- Week-long study trip to energy and climate change related organisations in Brussels and Paris
- Advanced media and communication skills training by current and former BBC staff
- Participation in workshops attended by public and private sector stakeholders
- Opportunity to organize and run the Centre’s annual Energy and Climate Policy conference
- Guest lectures by leading scholars and senior practitioners (visit the CISD website (http://www.cisd.soas.ac.uk/all-audios/1) to listen to the podcasts)

This course is also available online and is designed for those engaged with or planning a career in professional contexts relating to energy and/or climate policy and who wish to study in a flexible way. Please click here to view more information http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/msc-global-energy-and-climate-policy-online/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This Master's of Public Administration prepares the next generation of climate and energy leaders and decision makers to tackle complex challenges, from mitigating climate change to developing sustainable and renewable energy. Read more

This Master's of Public Administration prepares the next generation of climate and energy leaders and decision makers to tackle complex challenges, from mitigating climate change to developing sustainable and renewable energy. Graduates gain the tools, practical skills and knowledge to leverage technology and innovate climate and energy policy and gain insights from practising experts.

About this degree

Students are taught the conceptual frameworks, policy analysis tools and analytical methods to develop energy and climate policies. Students also study how energy and climate policies are implemented, evaluated and revised in policy cycles. A focus on leadership and the development of professional skills is emphasised throughout. 

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (105 credits), one optional module (15 credits), an elective module (15 credits), and a major group project module (45 credits) of around 12,000 words.

Core modules

Students undertake three core modules with students from sister MPA programmes, and a specialist module focusing on their degree topic.

  • Introduction to Science, Technology, Engineering and Public Policy
  • Analytical Methods for Policy
  • Energy, Technology and Climate Policy
  • Evidence, Institutions and Power

Optional modules

Students select one optional STEaPP module from the following:

  • Science, Technology and Engineering Advice in Practice
  • Risk Assessment and Governance
  • Communicating Science for Policy
  • Negotiation, Mediation and Diplomacy

Students will then also select one further 15-credit graduate module which is relevant to their degree of study. This module can be selected from any UCL department.

MPA Group Policy Project

In the group project, students work with an external client on a relevant policy challenge. With the support of STEaPP academic staff, the multidiscipinary student groups work together to produce an analysis that meets their clients' needs.

Teaching and learning

The programme combines innovative classroom teaching methods with unique scenario-based learning, enabling students to dynamically engage with real-world policy challenges. Scenarios are designed to help students consolidate knowledge and develop essential practical skills and their understanding of principles. During the programme, students acquire a comprehensive range of relevant skills.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Energy, Technology and Climate Policy MPA

Careers

Graduates of this Master's of Public Administration acquire skills to work in a range of sectors involved in analysis and/or policy-making concerning energy and climate change. Career destinations might include national and local government; international agencies such as the World Bank, United Nations and other global organisations; technology companies focused on sustainable energy; government offices of energy, innovation or development; environment agencies; consultancies and think tanks.

Employability

Throughout the MPA programme, students will:

  • gain a greater awareness of current issues and developments in energy and climate policy and technology
  • develop an understanding of the knowledge systems underpinning successful policy-making processes
  • learn how to communicate with scientists and engineers, policymakers and technology experts
  • develop the skills to mobilise public policy, and science and engineering knowledge and expertise, to address societal challenges relating to energy and climate policy.

Why study this degree at UCL?

A rapidly changing energy landscape and the impacts of climate change are providing opportunities for policy strategy and leadership in almost every country and industry sector. This practical programme offers experiential learning for skills needed in energy and climate policy-making.

Students undertake a week-long scenario activity on the policy-making process where they engage with external experts and UCL academics. Students go on to undertake a nine-month major project for a real-world client. Example policy problems include renewable energy sources, carbon capture and storage, or emerging energy technologies.

Students will gain the opportunity to network with UCL STEaPP's broad range of international partners, expert staff and a diverse range of academics and professionals from across the department's MPA and doctoral programmes.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The. Master in Global Energy Transition and Governance. aims to give a. deep understanding of the complexity of the current energy transformations in Europe and worldwide. Read more

The Master in Global Energy Transition and Governance aims to give a deep understanding of the complexity of the current energy transformations in Europe and worldwide. The programme offers a unique, multidisciplinary approach which distinguishes it from other Master courses in the field of energy studies: It analyses the links between the different levels of energy governance, from an international to a local level, offering problem-focused learning at the crossroads of theory and practice. The one-year Master programme stretches over three terms and takes place in two study locations: Nice and Berlin. Working language is English.

Overview of the year

Nice

The first term in Nice encompasses classes on the basics of the four energy modules (International energy governance, Economic energy governance, the EU energy governance and Energy and territories). Each module is complemented by seminars dealing with current energy issues. An academic or professional expert is invited for each event.

Berlin

For their second term students move on to Berlin where teaching in the four modules continues in the form of workshops. Each module organises a half-ay workshop with an expert. Students prepare the workshops in group work delivering papers on themes linked to the topic of the seminar (climate negotiations, energy stock exchange, the role of the EU interconnections in the European energy market, the EU funds and the territorial energy policy). To better understand the local energy challenges in the framework of the German Energy Transition Field, visits will also be organised in co-peration with local institutions and companies. Another focus of this term will be put on the methodology classes, one dedicated to the research work and the Master'sthesis, the second one to project management.

Nice

In April students return to Nice. The third term aims at deepening their knowledge on the four energy modules. A special focus is also given to the methodological support for the students' work on their  thesis including individual meetings with the academic supervisors. In the two simulations the participants will forge their negotiation techniques with regard to the construction of wind farms at local level and work out of a strategy for an international energy cooperation. Written and oral exams in June will conclude this term.

During this term students will finalise their work on their thesis in close contact with their academic supervisors. The thesis will be delivered in mid-June and defended at the end of June.

Curriculum

International energy governance

This module delivers the theoretical knowledge on the main international energy related issues and conflicts (resource curse, neoinstitutionalism, developmentalism, weak/strong States etc.).

It also provides the participants with concrete examples of the emergence and regulation of energy conflicts worldwide in order to analyse better how they exert pressure on the security and diversification of the energy supply.

With their graduation, students become part of CIFE’s worldwide Alumni network.

Economic energy governance

Economic and market fundamentals are applied to the energy sector in order to understand the current multiple national, regional, and local low carbon energy pathways in the world.

The module examines how the different markets are regulated and how they influence the transitions from fossil fuels to renewable energies. The economic perspective will highlight the role of liberalisation, privatisation and regulation of the sector.

European energy governance

The aim of this module is to highlight the EU priorities and its decision-making process regarding clean energy transition in Europe, thus helping to understand political economy factors that both inhibit and accelerate it.

While focusing on how the different EU policies challenge institutional architectures and multilevel governance schemes, the module provides an insight into issues currently facing European policy makers such as social acceptance, sustainability of renewable energies as well as rapid advancement in clean energy technologies.

Energy and territories

Participants will examine how EU regions and cities and more generally territories develop their own low carbon strategy at the crossroads of many policies (housing, waste management, transport, fuel poverty, environment and energy) and in the framework of a multilevel governance system.

Concrete examples of local and regional strategies will be delivered in order to analyse the levers and obstacles for more decentralisation.

Methodology modules

Students will acquire skills in research methodology, energy project management and the elaboration of energy strategies. They will concretely experiment different methodological tools: first of all through the research work for their thesis, second thanks to the methodological tools of project management. Students will be involved in a simulation game in which they will have to decide on the construction of a wind park in a territory. In a negotiation game, participants will have to elaborate a common strategy in the perspective of international energy cooperation.

Thesis

For their thesis participants will carry out a profound research work on an energy issue, chosen and elaborated in regular coordination with their supervisor.

The thesis will require the application of the methodological tools which the students have acquired during the programme.

The academic work will involve in-depth desk research, possible interviews with external partners and the writing of a thesis of approximately 17,000 words. Candidates will defend their thesis in an oral exam.

Applications and Scholarships

Candidates can submit their application dossier by using the form available on the Institute's website : http://www.ie-ei.eu/en/11/Registration

They should also include all the relevant documents, or send them by post or email. An academic committee meets regularly in order to review complete applications.

A limited number of scholarship funds can be awarded to particularly qualified candidates to cover some of the costs related to studies or accommodation.

The deadline for applications is 22 July 2018.



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Why this course?. The MSc in Global Energy Management (GEM) is an intensive course aiming to produce future leaders in the energy sector. Read more

Why this course?

The MSc in Global Energy Management (GEM) is an intensive course aiming to produce future leaders in the energy sector.

The global energy system is undergoing a process of rapid change including:

  • escalating demand
  • constraints on supplies
  • increasing energy prices
  • regulatory pressures to reduce carbon emissions
  • changing demographics and patterns of energy use and supply

Industries, economies and societies face complex challenges and uncertainties that could become more extreme in the future. Both government and industry need to be able to understand and adapt to this changing context.

Through this course you’ll gain a rigorous analytical training and in-depth real-world knowledge of global energy systems. There’s also hands-on training in the management of energy-related issues. Your training will help to give you an unrivalled edge in the energy job market.

This Masters degree is delivered by the Department of Economics.

You’ll study

Core classes are designed around the latest academic research on the issues facing energy managers today. You’ll also have the opportunity to pursue your own interests through a variety of optional courses.

We run a series of interactive seminars called the Global Energy Forum. Leading international energy experts in business, government and other organisations provide you with practical insights and inside knowledge.

There are also field trips, conferences and you will complete a summer project.

Core classes

  • Global Energy Issues, Industries & Markets
  • Global Energy Technologies, Impacts & Implementation
  • Global Energy Policy, Politics, Business Structures & Finance
  • Global Energy Forum
  • Energy Economics
  • Microeconomics or Macroeconomics

Elective classes

You’ll be able to choose from many postgraduate classes offered in:

  • The Strathclyde Business School
  • The Faculty of Engineering
  • The Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences

Facilities

The Strathclyde Business School is situated in a modern building in heart of Glasgow’s city centre. It’s designed to meet the demands of both corporate clients and students. Our school is equipped with up-to-date computing and technology facilities, study areas and its own café.

Accreditation

The MSc in Global Energy Management is accredited by the Energy Institute, the professional body for the energy industry. It is the first Masters course to hold academic accreditation for the professional status of Chartered Energy Manager.

The Strathclyde Business School is a triple accredited business school. It’s one of only a small percentage worldwide to hold this prestigious status, with full accreditation from the international bodies, AMBA, AACSB and EQUIS.

Energy Master Exchange Programme (EMEP)

Strathclyde Business School and Dauphine Université, Paris, have joined forces to bring future leading energy market professionals together by forming the Energy Master Exchange Programme (EMEP) Workshop.

Further information will be given when you enter the programme.

Learning & teaching

You’ll be taught by highly committed and enthusiastic staff distinguished by their internationally-recognised research in energy and environmental related fields.

The course offers excellent opportunities to network with international energy specialists from a range of organisations.

Careers

Energy is the largest and most critical industry in the global economy today.

Employers are seeking out skilled graduates to work in the energy industry and related fields. As a graduate in global energy management, you’ll be well placed to manage the complex challenges facing the global energy system in the 21st century.

We’ve designed this course to maximise the opportunities for industry engagement. You’ll take part in industry events such as the Scottish Oil Club.

While on the course you’ll become Learning Affiliates of the Energy Institute. You’re entitled to free Energy Institutemembership. Membership includes:

  • access to a wealth of energy related information
  • significant discounts to attend conferences and seminars
  • many opportunities to meet professionals across the energy sector


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This fresh, new programme for 2017 is a collaboration between the School of GeoSciences and the School of Social and Political Sciences. Read more

This fresh, new programme for 2017 is a collaboration between the School of GeoSciences and the School of Social and Political Sciences.

The world is facing an ‘energy trilemma’; how to achieve energy security, energy equity and environmental sustainability. Whilst equipping students with an active understanding of low carbon technologies, policies and markets, this new MSc programme is focused squarely on analysing the social, societal and environmental dimensions of energy transitions. You will examine how citizens are involved in and are affected by changes in energy systems.

On a more theoretical level, the programme will enable you to relate supply-side issues to geo-politics and political economy, whilst energy demand will be studied in relation to broader challenges of sustainable consumption.

On a more practical level you will explore the potential of ‘smart’ ICT to affect consumption and inform strategic choices in sustainable living at household and community level. With Scotland being a world leader in renewable electricity generation (especially wind and marine), but also being economically dependent on declining North Sea oil and gas and suffering from high levels of energy poverty, this interdisciplinary MSc. benefits from close access to a high number of insightful case studies, which will serve to examine links between global and local issues, explore international best practices and identify locally suited pathways to more sustainable energy management.

Applicants receiving an offer of admission, either unconditional or conditional, will be asked to pay a tuition fee deposit of £1,500. Please see the fees and costs section for more information.

Programme structure

The programme has been designed to develop transdisciplinary perspectives on the energy trilemma and integrative analytical skills (qualitative and quantitative) which are in short supply in the energy sector. The full-time programme is divided into two semesters of taught courses, followed by a field trip at Easter before the dissertation period over the summer. We are happy to accommodate different working patterns for part-time students, including a half day a week schedule for three-year part time study.

The programme consists of four core modules (20 credits each, two core courses per semester), two optional modules (20 credits, one for each semester) and a 60 credit dissertation.

Compulsory courses*

Semester 1:

  • Energy and Society I: Key themes and issues
  • Energy in the Global South

Semester 2:

  • Energy and Society II: Methods and applications
  • Energy Policy and Politics

Students will also undertake one 20 credit course per semester. The University of Edinburgh offers an unrivalled selection of relevant optional courses for the MSc in Energy, Society and Sustainability. Bearing in mind your particular background and interests, the Programme Director will assist you in your choice from a large menu of optional courses related to six potential specialisation pathways; sustainable technologies and economics, politics, development, environmental sustainability, science and technology and public policy.

Optional courses may include*:

  • Technologies for Sustainable Energy (10 credits) AND
  • Energy and Environmental Economics (10 credits)
  • Applications in Ecological Economics
  • Global Environment: Key issues
  • Global Environmental Politics
  • Resource Politics and Development
  • Governance, Development and Poverty in Africa
  • Principles of Sustainable Development
  • Human Dimensions of Environmental Sustainability
  • Climate Change Management
  • Case Studies in Sustainable Development
  • Science, Knowledge and Expertise
  • Development, Science and Technology
  • Controversies in Science and Technology
  • Economic Issues in Public Policy (Semester 1)
  • Political Issues in Public Policy (Semester 2)

**Please note, courses are offered subject to timetabling and availability and are subject to change.

Learning outcomes

The programme aims for students to develop transdisciplinary skills in the assessment of the transition potential of energy systems towards greater sustainability, focussing especially on the human dimension of technological change and working and experimenting with energy users to co-produce knowledge about pathways to change.

Upon successful completion of the programme, students will have gained:

  • Understanding of energy systems and the energy trilemma
  • Understanding of social theories that underpin human attitudes and behaviour in relation to energy use
  • Understanding the non-technical and more-than-technical aspects of energy transitions
  • Understanding how energy-related decisions are linked to other societal challenges and socio-technical developments
  • Understanding of energy literacy

Career opportunities

UK research councils cite a major skills gap in the energy sector, one of the biggest growth sectors within the UK economy in recent years. Demand has never been higher for sound evidence on behavioural change, public engagement with energy issues, and public support for community and commercial investments in low carbon energy generation. We train our graduates to translate complex science into effective policies and new business opportunities. We have strong links with government departments, energy relevant NGOs and key industry players who want to make use of these skills. Committed to helping you meet prospective employers and network with those active in the field, we organise careers events and encourage dissertations conducted in partnership with external organisations.



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The MSc in Science of Energy consists of.  six taught modules.  worth 10 ECTS each. These are structured around a . Read more

The MSc in Science of Energy consists of six taught modules worth 10 ECTS each. These are structured around a cross-cutting introductory module. The introductory module is designed to furnish students with all of the basic physics, chemistry and engineering concepts that are required to become an "Energy Scientist". These basics are complemented by essential "Economics of Energy" and "Principles of Energy Policy".

Now with the ability to understand and analyse the competing aspects of all of the essential science, engineering and economics pertinent to the energy discipline, the students proceed to Five specialised technically orientated core modules; "Conventional Energy Sources & Technologies", "Electric Power Generation and Distribution", "Sustainable Energy Sources & Technologies I & II", and "Managing the impact of Energy Utilisation".

With these modules completed and examined in the months September to April, students proceed to a 15 week research project worth 30 ECTS in a leading research laboratory or in industry in the months of May-August.

Course Structure

The curriculum is designed to allow students from a science, engineering, or other backgrounds with relevant experience, to gain the scientific knowledge needed to contribute to the energy sector. This can be through industry, business, academia, government policy or media communication. Students will examine the fundamental and applied science of how energy resources could be diversified from conventional polluting sources (e.g. CO2, NOX, SMOG) to renewable sources, where the sustainability of both the energy source and the conversion technology is presently unknown.

Programme at a Glance

1. Introductory Module - September to November

  • Energy Policy and Economics of Energy
  • Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer & Reaction Kinetics
  • Energy Generation & Storage Electromagnetism
  • Greenhouse Gases and the Carbon Cycle

2. Specialised Modules - December to March

  • Conventional Energy Sources & Technology
  • Electric Power Generation and Distribution
  • Sustainable Energy Sources & Technologies
  • Managing the Impact of Energy Consumption

3. Dissertation by Research - April to August

  • 15 week Research Placement in Industry or Academia

Programme Information

The programme includes interactive lessons, workshops and group projects. Students can also undertake research in the form of a company project instead of the standard dissertation.



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Overview. This is a 12 month full-time Masters degree (See http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-renewable-energy-development-red-/ ) course taught at our Orkney Campus. Read more

Overview

This is a 12 month full-time Masters degree (See http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-renewable-energy-development-red-/ ) course taught at our Orkney Campus. It involves studying 8 taught courses and completing a research dissertation equivalent to 4 taught courses. If you can demonstrate that you have already mastered the subject, you may apply for an exemption from one of the taught courses and undertake a Design Project instead.

For more information visit http://www.hw.ac.uk/schools/life-sciences/research/icit.htm

Distance learning

The Renewable Energy Development MSc/Diploma is also available for independent distance learning. For distance learners, the main difference is that you will undertake the Development Project alone rather than as part of a group. You can still obtain the full MSc in Renewable Energy Development, or you can opt to study fewer courses, depending on your needs.

Programme content

- Energy in the 21st Century

This course is designed to give you a broad understanding of the environmental, political and socio-economic context for current developments in renewable energy. The course examines the extent of current energy resources and how energy markets function. It covers some energy basics you will need for the rest of the programme (e.g. thermodynamics, efficiency conversions) as well as environmental issues associated with energy use, climate change and the political and policy challenges involved in managing energy supply and achieving energy security.

- Economics of renewable energy

This course gives an understanding of the economic principles and mechanisms which affect energy markets today. It covers price mechanisms, the economics of extracting energy and the cost-efficiency of renewable energy technologies. You will learn about economic instruments used by policy-makers to address environment and energy issues, economic incentives to stimulate renewable energy development and about environmental valuation.

- Environmental Policy & Risk

This course explores the legal and policy context in which renewable energy is being exploited. You will gain an understanding of international law, particularly the Law of the Sea, property rights and how these relate to different energy resources. The course also looks at regulatory issues at the international, European and UK level, which affect how energy developments are taken forward, as well as risk assessment and management in the context of renewable energy developments.

- Environmental Processes

Particularly for those without a natural science background, this course provides a broad overview of the environmental processes which are fundamental to an understanding of renewable energy resources and their exploitation. You will study energy flows in the environment, environmental disturbance associated with energy use, and an introduction to the science of climate change. You will also learn about ecosystems and ecological processes including population dynamics and how ecosystems affect and interact with energy generation.

- Renewable Technology I: Generation

This course explores how energy is extracted from natural resources: solar, biomass, hydro, wind, wave and tide. It examines how to assess and measure the resources, and the engineering solutions which have been developed to extract energy from them. You will develop an understanding of the technical challenges and current issues affecting the future development of the renewable energy sector.

- Renewable Technology II: Integration

This course explores the technical aspects of generating renewable energy and integrating it into distribution networks. You will learn about the electricity grid and how electrical power and distribution systems work. You will find out about different renewable fuel sources and end uses, and the challenges of energy storage.

- Development Appraisal

Looking at what happens when renewable energy technologies are deployed, this course examines development constraints and opportunities: policy and regulatory issues (including strategic environmental assessment, environmental impact assessment, landscape assessment, capacity issues and the planning system). It also looks at the financial aspects (valuation of capital assets, financing projects and the costs of generating electricity) and at project management.

- Development Project

This is a team project, where students have the opportunity to apply what they have learned through the other courses in relation to a hypothetical project. You have to look at a range of issues including resource assessment, site selection, development layout, consents, planning and economic appraisal, applying the knowledge and tools you have studied.

- Optional design project

For students who can demonstrate existing knowledge covered by one of the courses, there is the option of understanding a design project supervised by one of our engineers.

- Dissertation

This research project (equivalent in assessment to 4 taught courses) allows you to focus on a specific area of interest, with opportunities to collaborate with businesses and other stakeholders. You choose your dissertation subject, in discussion with your supervisor.

- Additional information

If you study at our Orkney Campus, you will also benefit from a number of activities including guest lectures and practical sessions, which help to develop your skills and knowledge in your field of study, and offer opportunities to meet developers and others involved in the renewable energy industry.

Scholarships available

We have a number of fully funded Scottish Funding Council (SFC) scholarships available for students resident in Scotland applying for Renewable Energy Development (RED) MSc. Find out more about this scholarship and how to apply http://www.hw.ac.uk/student-life/scholarships/postgraduate-funded-places.htm .

English language requirements

If your first language is not English, or your first degree was not taught in English, we’ll need to see evidence of your English language ability. The minimum requirement for English language is IELTS 6.5 or equivalent. We offer a range of English language courses to help you meet the English language requirement prior to starting your masters programme:

- 14 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with no more than one skill at 4.5);

- 10 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with minimum of 5.0 in all skills);

- 6 weeks English (for IELTS 5.5 with minimum of 5.5 in reading & writing and minimum of 5.0 in speaking & listening)

Distance learning students

Please note that independent distance learning students who access their studies online will be expected to have access to a PC/laptop and internet.

Find information on Fees and Scholarships here http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-renewable-energy-development-red-/



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This MSc is unique in the UK in focusing on five core areas which have risen rapidly up the public agenda – environment, climate and energy economics, modelling and policy – and for which there is a need for highly qualified practitioners with the skills to analyse the issues and relate the results to policy. Read more

This MSc is unique in the UK in focusing on five core areas which have risen rapidly up the public agenda – environment, climate and energy economics, modelling and policy – and for which there is a need for highly qualified practitioners with the skills to analyse the issues and relate the results to policy.

About this degree

Students will reach a deep understanding of different economic and policy approaches to the resource and environmental problems facing the global community and nation states, especially in respect to energy and climate change. They will learn how to apply a variety of analytical methods to resolve these problems in a broad range of practical contexts.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Environmental and Resource Economics
  • Environmental Measurement, Assessment and Law
  • Introduction to modelling methods and scenarios
  • Planetary Economics and the Political Economy of Energy and Climate Change
  • Research Concepts and Methods

Optional modules

  • Advanced Energy-Environment-Economy Modelling
  • UK Energy and Environment Policy and Law
  • Energy, Technology and Innovation
  • Energy, People and Behaviour
  • Business and Sustainability
  • Advanced Environmental Economics
  • Econometrics for Energy and the Environment

The list of optional modules is correct for the 2018-19 academic year. Enrolment on modules is subject to availability.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 10,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials and project work. Assessment is through examination, coursework and by dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Economics and Policy of Energy and the Environment MSc

Careers

Graduates of this programme will be equipped to become leaders and entrepreneurs in their chosen area of specialisation, whether in terms of policy-making, the business management of sustainable issues, energy system modelling or their understanding and application of innovative systems.

The skills that they will acquire will make them strong applicants for employment in a range of sectors in which sustainability has become an important consideration, including business, central and local government, think tanks and NGOs and universities and research institutes.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Analyst, Accenture
  • Business Analyst, Octane
  • Guest Researcher, BC3 (Basque Centre for Climate Change)
  • Operations Manager, KiWi Power
  • PhD Transport and Energy, UCL

Employability

The uniquely interdisciplinary nature of this Master's provides students with practical skills which are in demand by employers from a variety of fields. Students will have the opportunity to attend networking events, career workshops and exclusive seminars held at the UCL Energy Institute.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Energy Institute is world leader in a range of areas covered by the programme; for example, energy systems, energy economics, energy and environmental policy and law and behavioural aspects of energy use.

Our sister institute, the UCL Institute of Sustainable Resources, provides additional expertise on resource economics. These areas are increasingly important due to related challenges, such as climate change, resource exhaustion and energy affordability.

There is a definite need for quantitative, practical environment and resource economists who understand policy. The appeal of this MSc is twofold: it offers those with quantitative first degrees the chance to acquire high-level, energy-environment-economy modelling skills, but in relaxing the level of mathematical skills required, it is also ideal for those with largely non-quantitative first degrees.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Bartlett School of Environment, Energy & Resources

81% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The energy industries, which include power, oil and gas, mining and alternative energy, are among the few that are growing worldwide. Read more
The energy industries, which include power, oil and gas, mining and alternative energy, are among the few that are growing worldwide. Demand for managers with specific knowledge of these industries is high, so this course is aimed at developing those who seek to establish or further their careers in these industries achieve their ambitions.

Why study Managing in the Energy Industries at Dundee?

The Centre for Energy, Petroleum and Mineral Law and Policy (CEPMLP) is one of the few centres in UK universities with the background and specialist skills to offer such a course. Over the past few years it has been high successful in developing its teaching, research and industry contacts in management. Courses are designed in conjunction with industry specialists and industry related learning is a core element of all courses in the Centre.

What's great about Managing in the Energy Industries?

The course aims are to develop the required knowledge, skills and other attributes (KSAs) that employers in the energy industries consider essential for managers to pursue their career ambitions. Participants will learn about the fundamentals of different energy industries, generic and sector specific management KSAs through classroom and work-based learning, which is facilitated by specialist academics and industry specialists.

Who should study this course?

This course suits graduates in any discipline who wish to widen their subject knowledge and career aspirations in the energy industries world-wide. The course is open to full time, part time and flexible learners.

How you will be taught

Modules start at the beginning of the academic session in September. The course is taught predominantly in a student centred manner through seminars, workshops and work-based individual and group learning. This includes web-supported learning for full-time and part-time students.

What you will study

The course comprises core taught modules, optional modules plus a dissertation:

Compulsory modules:
Natural Resources Sectors: A multidisciplinary Introduction
Management in Natural Resources and Energy Industries
Energy Economics: The Issues
Business Strategy in Energy and Extractive Industries
Compulsory core choice - choose one from
Critical Business Analysis & Report
Internship Report
Dissertation

Compulsory core choice - choose at least two from the following Business & Management modules:
Foundation Accounting
Foundation Finance
Human Resource Management
Leadership and Decision Making
Stakeholder Management and Business Ethics
Financial and Project Analysis of Natural Resources and Energy Ventures
Risk and Crisis Management

Compulsory core choice - choose at least two from the following Specialist modules:
Energy Economics: The Tools
International Law of Natural Resources and Energy
Downstream Energy Law and Policy
Renewable Energy: Technology, Economics and Policy
Environmental Law and Policy for Natural Resources and Energy
Energy and Climate Change Law and Policy
International Developments in Energy Policy
Mineral and Petroleum Taxation
Petroleum Policy and Economics
Politics of the Environment and Climate Change

How you will be assessed

Each module is assessed through coursework, typically a research paper or project, and a final examination. It is also assessed by a individual business project

Careers

Graduates should be able to enter the energy industries as management trainees. Existing managers completing this course will have enhanced knowledge and skills in management.

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See the department website - http://www.rit.edu/cla/publicpolicy. This innovative master of science degree in science, technology, and public policy enables students to work at the intersection of engineering, science, and public policy. Read more
See the department website - http://www.rit.edu/cla/publicpolicy

This innovative master of science degree in science, technology, and public policy enables students to work at the intersection of engineering, science, and public policy. The program builds on RIT’s strengths as a technological university, enabling students to interact with faculty members and researchers who are working on scientific developments and technological innovations that drive new public policy considerations.

The program is interdisciplinary and draws significantly from disciplines and courses of study in RIT’s colleges of Applied Science and Technology, Business, Engineering, Liberal Arts, and Science. The program is geared toward producing graduates who will make significant contributions in the private, public, and not-for-profit sectors.

All students take a set of policy core courses that emphasize analysis, problem solving, and interdisciplinary approaches. Students work with an adviser to choose electives that focus their policy studies in a particular area, such as environmental policy, climate change policy, healthcare policy, STEM education policy, telecommunications policy, or energy policy. Typical students include those with science or engineering backgrounds seeking to broaden their career opportunities in government or business settings, as well as those with liberal arts undergraduate degrees (e.g., economics) interested in science, technology, and policy issues. Full-time students can typically finish the program in one to two years. The program prides itself on working one-on-one with students to ensure that their educational needs and academic goals are attained.

Plan of study

The program requires a minimum of 30 credit hours and consists of five required core courses, three elective courses, and the completion of a thesis or comprehensive exam. The thesis option allows students to work with a faculty adviser on an independent research project in their area of interest.

- Electives

Students choose three elective courses based on their interests and career goals. Courses may be offered in various colleges throughout the university, including the colleges of Applied Science and Technology, Business, Engineering, and Science. Course selection is completed jointly with a faculty adviser and typically aims to develop a specialized area of interest for the student (e.g., biotechnology policy, environmental policy, energy policy, communications policy, etc.).

International Students

International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language TOEFL). Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required.

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This is a 12 month full-time MSc degree course (See http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-marine-renewable-energy/#overview ) taught at our Orkney Campus. Read more

Overview

This is a 12 month full-time MSc degree course (See http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-marine-renewable-energy/#overview ) taught at our Orkney Campus. It involves studying 8 taught courses. If you can demonstrate that you have already mastered the subject, you may apply for an exemption from one of the taught courses and undertake a Design Project instead. The MSc programme is completed with a research dissertation equivalent to 4 taught courses.

For more information visit http://www.hw.ac.uk/schools/life-sciences/research/icit.htm

Distance Learning

The Marine Renewable Energy MSc/Diploma is also available for independent distance learning. For distance learners, the main difference is that you will undertake the Development Project alone rather than as part of a group. You can still obtain the full MSc in Marine Renewable Energy, or you can opt to study fewer courses, depending on your needs.

Scholarships available

We have a number of fully funded Scottish Funding Council (SFC) scholarships available for students resident in Scotland applying for Marine Renewable Energy. Find out more about this scholarship and how to apply http://www.hw.ac.uk/student-life/scholarships/postgraduate-funded-places.htm .

Programme content

The Diploma and MSc degree course involves studying the 8 taught courses outlined below. If a student can demonstrate that they have already mastered the subject, they may undertake a Development Project instead of one of these courses.

- Energy in the 21st Century
This course is designed to give you a broad understanding of the environmental, political and socio-economic context for current developments in renewable energy. The course examines the extent of current energy resources and how energy markets function. It covers some energy basics you will need for the rest of the programme (e.g. thermodynamics, efficiency conversions) as well as environmental issues associated with energy use, climate change and the political and policy challenges involved in managing energy supply and achieving energy security.

- Economics of renewable energy
This course gives an understanding of the economic principles and mechanisms which affect energy markets today. It covers price mechanisms, the economics of extracting energy and the cost-efficiency of renewable energy technologies. You will learn about economic instruments used by policy-makers to address environment and energy issues, economic incentives to stimulate renewable energy development and about environmental valuation.

- Environmental Policy & Risk
This course explores the legal and policy context in which renewable energy is being exploited. You will gain an understanding of international law, particularly the Law of the Sea, property rights and how these relate to different energy resources. The course also looks at regulatory issues at the international, European and UK level, which affect how energy developments are taken forward, as well as risk assessment and management in the context of renewable energy developments.

- Oceanography & Marine Biology
This course is designed to give you an understanding of the science of waves and tides, and how this affects efforts to exploit energy from these resources. You will also learn about marine ecosystems and how these may be impacted by energy extraction and about the challenges and impacts associated with carrying out engineering operations in the marine environment.

- Marine Renewable Technologies
You will gain an understanding of renewable energy technologies which exploit wind, wave and tidal resources. The focus is on technical design issues which developers face operating in the marine environment, as well as the logistics of installation, operations and maintenance of marine energy converters.

- Renewable Technology: Integration
This course explores the technical aspects of generating renewable energy and integrating it into distribution networks. You will learn about the electricity grid and how electrical power and distribution systems work. You will find out about different renewable fuel sources and end uses, and the challenges of energy storage.

- Development Appraisal
Looking at what happens when renewable energy technologies are deployed, this course examines development constraints and opportunities: policy and regulatory issues (including strategic environmental assessment, environmental impact assessment, landscape assessment, capacity issues and the planning system). It also looks at the financial aspects (valuation of capital asses, financing projects and the costs of generating electricity) and at project management.

- Development Project
This is a team project, where students have the opportunity to apply what they have learned through the other courses in relation to a hypothetical project. You have to look at a range of issues including resource assessment, site selection, development layout, consents, planning and economic appraisal, applying the knowledge and tools you have studied.

- Dissertation
This research project (equivalent in assessment to 4 taught courses) allows you to focus on a specific area of interest, with opportunities to collaborate with businesses and other stakeholders. You choose your dissertation subject, in discussion with your supervisor.

- Additional information
If you study at our Orkney Campus, you will also benefit from a number of activities including guest lectures and practical sessions which help to develop your skills and knowledge in your field of study, and offer opportunities to meet developers and other involved in the renewable energy industry.

English language requirements

If your first language is not English, or your first degree was not taught in English, we’ll need to see evidence of your English language ability. The minimum requirement for English language is IELTS 6.5 or equivalent. We offer a range of English language courses (http://www.hw.ac.uk/study/english.htm ) to help you meet the English language requirement prior to starting your masters programme:
- 14 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with no more than one skill at 4.5);
- 10 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with minimum of 5.0 in all skills);
- 6 weeks English (for IELTS 5.5 with minimum of 5.5 in reading & writing and minimum of 5.0 in speaking & listening)

Distance learning students

Please note that independent distance learning students who access their studies online will be expected to have access to a PC/laptop and internet.

Find information on Fees and Scholarships here http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-marine-renewable-energy/#overview

Visit the Marine Renewable Energy MSc/Diploma page on the Heriot-Watt University web site for more details!

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Who is it for?. This course is for students who want to engage with different types of settings to research and establish the energy, environmental and technological implications that exist within them. Read more

Who is it for?

This course is for students who want to engage with different types of settings to research and establish the energy, environmental and technological implications that exist within them. Energy and Environmental Technology and Economics students will care for the environment as a sustainable system and ultimately have a desire to improve conditions for the wider population.

Students come from a range of backgrounds, including engineering, finance and economics – and from within the energy industry itself.

Objectives

This MSc degree has been designed to give you a wide perspective when it comes to analysing and forecasting the future for energy, environmental technology and economics.

The Energy and Environmental Technology and Economics MSc will help you:

  • Understand the technologies for energy production: fossil fuels, nuclear and renewable
  • Assess the economic factors affecting energy production and supply
  • Know the economics governing consumer use and purchase of energy
  • Analyse and forecast the future of energy, environmental technology and economics
  • Evaluate the environmental effects of energy and other industrial production
  • Gain a real-world understanding of the issues – from regulation and government funding, to behavioural psychology and emerging technologies
  • Understand the technologies for reducing environmental impact and their economics
  • Consider ethical responsibilities in relation to energy use
  • Rapidly assess the most important features of a new technology
  • Integrate information across a broad range of subject areas, from engineering
  • through economics to risk assessment
  • Identify a range of perspectives, and look at the influence of a myriad of other forces at play by engaging with practising businesses and trade associations
  • The discipline of auditing energy consumption
  • Monitoring performance and engaging with international energy management standards
  • Relate to professionals from a wide variety of backgrounds, academic, commercial and industrial, from professors in engineering and mathematics through to consulting engineers to senior managers and directors of large, publicly quoted companies.

Accreditation

The course is accredited by the Energy Institute and fulfils the learning requirement for Chartered Engineer status.

Placements

There is no formal requirement to do an industry-based placement as part of the programme. However, some students arrange to undertake their dissertation research within a company or within their part of the world. A recent student investigated the future of coal-fired generation in Turkey, and another student is combining a work placement at The World Energy Council with their dissertation.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is organised into modules comprising four consecutive day courses taken at a rate of one a month or so. This format makes the programme accessible for students who want to study part-time while working. Full-time students are also welcome.

Whether you choose to take the course as a part-time or full-time student, we will offer a great deal of support when it comes to helping you prepare for the modules and project work. You will be expected to devote a significant part of your non-taught hours to project work as well as private study.

Our course is led by an exceptional group of experts in energy, supply, demand management and policies. As an example, one of our module leaders leads the UK contribution to writing international energy management standards and informing policy through the European Sector Forum for Energy Management. This forum looks at methodologies across the continent.

There is also input to global standards development through the International Standards Organisation (ISO). At City we bring on board people with well-established academic careers, as well as leaders from the energy industry. The programme has strong links with industry and commerce and involves many visiting lecturers who hold senior positions in their fields.

You will be assessed by examination on the four core modules and you will need to complete a post modular assessment (a 2,000 to 3,000-word essay) on all of the eight modules.

Modules

You will take four core modules and have six elective modules from which you can choose four topics from diverse subjects relating to energy supply and demand.

Each course module is taught over four consecutive days of teaching with one module each month. Alongside the teaching, you will have coursework to complete for each module. The modules run from October to April, and in the remaining time, you will concentrate on your dissertation, which forms a significant part of the programme.

You are normally required to complete all the taught modules successfully before progressing to the dissertation.

The dissertation gives you the opportunity to create your own questions and to decide on your own area of interest. It should be a detailed investigation into a subject on energy supply and/or demand, with your own analysis and conclusions outlining the way forward. You may see the focus of your dissertation as a future career path, but whatever your area of study, these final few months of the degree should embody your vision of the future.

If you are interested in sustainability, you have the option of taking up to two elective modules from the MSc in Environmental Strategy offered by the University of Surrey.

Core modules

  • Introduction to energy and environmental issues (15 credits)
  • Energy policies and economic dimensions (15 credits)
  • The energy market from the purchaser's perspective (15 credits)
  • Corporate energy management (15 credits)

Elective modules

  • Energy, economics and finance (15 credits)
  • Transport energy and emissions (15 credits)
  • Energy in industry and the built environment (15 credits)
  • Renewable energy and sustainability (15 credits)
  • Risk management (15 credits)
  • Water supply and management (15 credits).


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This programme is appropriate for you if are seeking to develop the skills and confidence to address the critical global challenges of energy and diminishing natural resources. Read more

This programme is appropriate for you if are seeking to develop the skills and confidence to address the critical global challenges of energy and diminishing natural resources. Clean energy, optimal use of resources and the economics of climate change are the key issues facing society, and form the fundamental themes of this programme.

Course details

You explore the world’s dependency on hydrocarbon-based resources, together with strategies and technologies to decarbonise national economies. The course examines global best practice, government policies, industrial symbiosis and emerging risk management techniques. You also address the environmental, economic and sociological (risk and acceptability) impacts of renewable energy provision and waste exploitation as central elements. 

The programme develops the problem-solvers and innovators needed to face the enormous challenges of the 21st century - those who can play key roles in driving energy and environmental policies, and in formulating forward-looking strategies on energy use and environmental sustainability at corporate, national and global scales.

What you study

For the PgDip award you must successfully complete 120 credits of taught modules. For an MSc award you must successfully complete the 120 credits of taught modules and a 60-credit master's research project. 

Energy, environment, risk managing projects, sustainability and integrated waste management are the main foci of the programme, but you also explore the financial aspects of energy and environmental management. Economics is integral to the development of policies and is often a key influencing factor.

This programme aims to develop a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the role and place of energy in the 21st century and the way the environment impinges on the types of energy used and production methods. It also aims to investigate the environment as it is perceived, and contextualise its actual importance to mankind. Specific objectives for this course are to establish the financial validity for the pursuit of alternative energy forms and management of the environment.

You are encouraged to take up opportunities of voluntary placements with local industries to conduct real-world research projects. These placements are assessed in line with the assessment criteria and learning outcomes of the Project module. 

Examples of past MSc research projects

  • The taxonomy of facilitated industrial symbioses
  • Assessment of the climate change impacts of the Tees Valley
  • Exploring the links between carbon disclosure and carbon performance
  • Hydrothermal carbonisation of waste biomass
  • Quantifying the impact of biochar on soil microbial ecology
  • Potential for biochar utilisation in developing rural economies
  • Carbon trading opportunities for renewable energy projects in developing countries
  • Exploring the potential for wind energy in Libya
  • Demand and supply potential of solar panel installations
  • A feasibility study of the application of zero-carbon retrofit technologies in building communal areas
  • Energy recovery from abandoned oil wells through geothermal processes

Course structure

Core modules

  • Concepts of Sustainability
  • Economics of Climate Change
  • Energy and Global Climate Change
  • Global Energy Policy
  • Integrated Waste Management and Exploitation
  • Project
  • Research Methods and Proposal

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

How you learn

The course provides a number of contact teaching and assessment hours (through lectures, tutorials, projects, assignments), but you are also expected to spend time on your own, called 'self-study' time, to review lecture notes, prepare course work assignments, work on projects and revise for assessments. For example, each 20-credit module typically has around 200 hours of learning time. 

In most cases, around 60 hours are spent in lectures, tutorials and in practical exercises. The remaining learning time is for you to gain a deeper understanding of the subject. Each year of full-time study consists of modules totalling 180 credits; hence, during one year of full-time study a student can expect to have 1,800 hours of learning and assessment.

How you are assessed

Modules are assessed by a variety of methods including examination and in-course assessment with some utilising other approaches such as group-work or verbal/poster presentations.

Employability

Work placement

There may be short-term placement opportunities for some students, particularly during the project phase of the course. This University is also in the process of seeking accreditation for the Waste Management module from the Chartered Institution of Wastes Management.

Career opportunities

Successful graduates from this course are well placed to find employment. As an energy and environmental manager, you might find yourself in a role responsible for overseeing the energy and environmental performance of private, public and voluntary sector organisations, as well as in a wide range of engineering industries.

Energy and environmental managers examine corporate activities to establish where improvements can be made and ensure compliance with environmental legislation across the organisation. You might be responsible for reviewing the whole operation, carrying out energy and environmental audits and assessments, identifying and resolving energy and environmental problems and acting as agents of change. Your role could include the training of the workforce to develop the ability to recognise their own contributions to improved energy and environmental performance.

Your role may also include the development, implementation and monitoring of energy and environmental strategies, policies and programmes that promote sustainable development at corporate, national or global levels.



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