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Qualifications have a strong impact on the career development of managers, and as these roles in hospitality organisations become more complex, the nature of the management role will increasingly require the skills and knowledge that a Masters degree can develop. Read more
Qualifications have a strong impact on the career development of managers, and as these roles in hospitality organisations become more complex, the nature of the management role will increasingly require the skills and knowledge that a Masters degree can develop.

Our MA International Hospitality Management online degree is accredited by the Institute of Hospitality and has been designed to meet the needs of the dynamic international industry, equipping you with practical and relevant skills, which combined with your existing experience, can help you to advance your career within the industry.

Institute of Hospitality Educational Membership Scheme (EMS)

Through our partnership with the Institute of Hospitality you'll be given free access to the Institute's Educational Membership Scheme (EMS) once you've enrolled onto this course. This gives you access to management guides, monthly specialist newsletters, e-journals, webinars and much more.

Theory and skills for direct application

You'll gain an understanding of operational, tactical and strategic issues, coupled with the necessary management tools which will allow you to apply theories directly to your workplace situation.

You'll develop skills and awareness of the various management functions, as part of the total business structures in a variety of organisations. This will include an understanding of globalisation and the impacts of a multicultural workforce that can present organisational and operational challenges, as the concepts of service quality and customer satisfaction change rapidly in the market place.

As all of your resources are online, you have the flexibility to fit your study periods around your existing work commitments and shift patterns. Course modules still operate within a fixed trimester but you can choose to study during the day, in the evenings or at the weekend rather than having to attend fixed lectures. Through webinars and online discussion forums, you will connect with your online tutor and fellow students from around the world to discuss and debate key topics and share experiences within this dynamic industry.

Learn more about our online Hospitality courses

With a choice of dates to start your course (September, January or May) and interactive online learning materials, you've got the flexibility to study whenever and wherever is most convenient for you. The course modules still operate within a fixed trimester but you can choose to study during the day, evenings or at the weekend instead of having to attend fixed lectures.

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This programme is run by the Centre for Environmental Strategy (CES), which is a leading centre for environmental and sustainability-related research and postgraduate teaching. Read more
This programme is run by the Centre for Environmental Strategy (CES), which is a leading centre for environmental and sustainability-related research and postgraduate teaching.

CES accommodates a wide range of disciplines dedicated to resolving environmental problems, and this Masters programme prepares future environmental and sustainability professionals for the challenges faced by the corporate world.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

This programme gives you a solid grounding in issues key to the sustainable development debate. The views of stakeholders such as business groups, environmentalists, government agencies and development institutions will be considered.

You will acquire the necessary skills to evaluate existing frameworks, inquire into environmental issues in organisations and industries, and develop sensitive business practices.

The programme provides excellent preparation for any corporate-focused environmental career. It provides a route to graduate membership of the Institute of Environmental Management & Assessment. We encourage you to read about the past and present student experiences of our environment and sustainability programmes.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over 12 months and part-time for up to 60 months. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Environmental Law
-Foundations of Sustainable Development
-Environmental Auditing and Management Systems
-Corporate, Social and Environmental Responsibility
-Life Cycle Thinking
-Ecological Economics
-Environmental Science and Society
-Industrial Placement
-Integrated Assessment
-Sustainable Development Applications
-Transitions to a Low Carbon Economy
-Life Cycle Assessment
-Psychology of Sustainable Development
-Energy Policies and Economic Dimensions
-Corporate Energy Management
-Energy-Consumer Goods in the Home
-The Energy Market from the Purchaser’s Perspective
-Energy in Industry and the Built Environment
-Renewable Energy and Sustainability
-Transport Energy and Emissions
-Emissions Trading
-Risk Management Optional
-Dissertation

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

-Provide participants with a solid grounding in the sustainable development debate from the wide-range of perspectives, i.e. business groups, environmentalists, government agencies, development institutions, etc.
-Equip participants to evaluate existing political, socio-economic, ethical, cultural and regulatory frameworks to inform decisions regarding environmental practice
-Equip participants to develop a sensitive business practice towards environmental and social issues
-To equip students with the necessary skills for critical inquiry related to environmental issues in organisations and industries

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
Knowledge and understanding
-Intra and inter-organisational contexts in which corporate environmental strategies are developed
-Concepts of sustainable development and their usefulness to business ethics
-Evolving regulatory and policy framework as part of engendering an anticipatory view of environmental management
-Knowledge of a range of corporate environmental management strategies and control mechanisms
-Accessing and using environmental data

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Absorb complex environmental information and communicate them effectively through logically constructed argumentsCreatively formulate new ideas (MSc, PGDip and PGCert)
-Learn the value of teamwork to solve problems that require multi-disciplinary engagement
-Independent learning and study through self-directed assignments and dissertation
-Critical reading and analysis of environmental policy and regulation
-Inductive reasoning: using specific examples/observations and forming a more general principal
-Deductive reasoning: use stated general premise to reason about specific examples

Professional practical skills
-Comprehend how corporations build, implement and maintain an Environmental Management System (EMS)
-To perform an EMS Audit according to the ISO standards
-Give coherent presentations
-Lead discussions on complex subject areas
-See the other side of the argument given that there are varying and often conflicting perspectives in the environment field
-Competently handle environment information
-Self-motivation, self-regulation and self-assurance

Key / transferable skills
-Acquire knowledge and skills to prepare and deliver a structured and successful presentation
-Write effectively as a means of communicating important ideas
-Communication of findings and presentation of research to a non-specialist audience
-Lead discussion of small/large groups
-Organise and manage a research project
-Basic to advanced IT skills, depending on type of electives and dissertation topic
-Willingness to learn

ACADEMICS

Several high-profile guest lecturers have assisted with the delivery of some of the modules. CES modules make maximum use of guest lecturers, drawing on the practical skills and experience of key experts from government and industry to complement the theoretical components of the modules offered.

For example, Jonathon Porritt, former chairman of the Sustainable Development Commission, gives a guest lecture on the Sustainable Development Applications module, analysing the standing of sustainable development in business and policy making.

The extensive expertise of CES academics and researchers is also drawn upon in modules. Professor Tim Jackson, advisor to the government and international bodies and author of the seminal book, Prosperity without Growth – economics for a finite planet–also lectures on some CES modules.

INDUSTRIAL PLACEMENT

Full-time students are able to undertake an industrial placement module which enables them to spend six to twelve weeks working for a company or NGO, doing the type of work they will aim to find on graduation.

Examples of organisations at which recent industrial placements have taken place include:
-Minimise Solutions
-Portsmouth City Council
-GAP
-Diocese of London
-The Radisson
-LC Energy
-AECOM
-Solar Aid
-NUS
-CAREERS

Graduates go on to a diverse range of careers implementing sustainable development and dealing with the real environmental challenges facing humanity.

Recent examples include working as an energy efficiency officer for a local government, an environmental officer in multi-national chemical company, a sustainability advisor for a national television / radio station, an environmental consultant for an engineering consultancy, and a programme officer with a sustainability charity.

Other graduates use the research skills they developed to go on and do PhDs.

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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This is a broad based and flexible course that will enable you to pursue a range of environmental careers, from environmental specialist to a manager with an environmental remit. Read more
This is a broad based and flexible course that will enable you to pursue a range of environmental careers, from environmental specialist to a manager with an environmental remit. Alternatively the course, or modules within it, can provide valuable continuing professional development (CPD) should you be a professional wanting to refresh or expand your skills in environmental management. This can be done by taking the whole course or individual modules as stand-alone CPD items.

This course has been developed following extensive consultation with industry. Unusually, and perhaps uniquely, for an Environmental Management Master’s, you can include Business Management modules in your options; something that is seen as a real benefit by our industry partners. In addition, through choosing particular modules and assessment options, the course can be tailored to suit a range of environmental interests and therefore careers in the environmental and management sectors. For example this course will suit you if you wish to pursue a career in ecological consultancy, pollution control or environmental hazards and liabilities.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

You will study two compulsory 30 credit modules (one in each taught trimester) that will provide a detailed overview of environmental management practices, principles, tools and techniques. These will include topics such as pollution, EMS, biodiversity, environmental monitoring, GIS, environmental decision-making and communication skills.

Modules amounting to a further 30 credits are also selected in each taught trimester, from a choice of environmental management or business management topics. You must take a minimum of 30 credits in environmental management and there are four 15 credit environmental management modules available. These are focused on: ecosystem management; environment and society; applied geomorphology; and wastes, energy and pollution. Business management modules are available in topics such as: contemporary management issues; entrepreneurship; financial management; marketing; and managing people.

Finally, you will complete a 60 credit independent research project that will allow you to demonstrate your environmental understanding in an area relevant to your interests and career; from biodiversity to business. You may also elect to use an existing project related to your employment as your dissertation.

MODULES

TRIMESTER 1
You will study the following modules in Trimester 1:

Principles of Environmental Management (30 credits):
This compulsory module provides an overview of environmental management principles, tools, and legislation: including sustainability, resource management, environmental hazards and ecosystem services.

Plus optional modules totalling 30 credits:

Waste, Energy and Pollution Management (15 credits) optional:
Develop your understanding of the potential negative impacts that arise through human interactions with the environment. Key aspects will include resource use and polluting emissions, especially through our generation of waste and utilisation of energy sources. It will also enable you to appreciate the role of new technologies in alleviating such effects.

Environment and Society: Global Perspectives on Policy and Practice (15 credits) optional:
Gain a deeper, critical understanding of the human dimensions of environmental change. Develop your sense of the multi-layered and contested nature of environmental ‘problems’ and the ‘solutions’ variously proposed. A broad, interdisciplinary and critical awareness is encouraged through consideration of academic and policy literatures from different global and historical contexts.

Business Management Options:
Environmental managers often need a range of management skills, and these modules will allow you to develop some of these important skills. Modules available include: Financial Management, Marketing, Entrepreneurship, Managing People, and Management in Practice. Management in Practice is a 30 credit module providing an excellent overview if you have no formal business training. The other modules are 15 credit modules and will allow the development of specific skills.


TRIMESTER 2
You will study the following modules in Trimester 2:

Professional Practice for Environmental Management (30 credits):
This compulsory module develops key professional skills, including: GIS, environmental risks and decision- making, survey and monitoring, sampling design, data management and analysis, reporting and communication.

Plus optional modules totalling 30 credits:

Ecosystem Management (15 credits) optional:
Modern economic theory (ecological economics) considers ecosystem sustainability as the foundation of all economic sustainability and its crucial role in underpinning business and political decisions. Hence, this module investigates the natural environment in terms of ecosystem functions and resource management, both of which can provide benefits and provide challenges for human beings and the wider environment. It also considers the extent to which we can assign economic value to nature.

Applied Geomorphology (15 credits) optional:
Develop the theoretical and practical skills to equip you to undertake integrated and applied geomorphological projects relevant to the environmental management and consultancy sectors.

Business Management Options:
From a range of management skills and specialisms (see Trimester 1 options)

TRIMESTER 3
In this trimester you complete a 60 credit research project, which will require you to research an applied environmental question. There is considerable flexibility in subject choice and the project focus will reflect your core interests, and may range from the influence of environmental issues on business decision-making, to monitoring biodiversity. This could include industry-based/work placement projects, with our industry partners.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

Teaching is a mix of lectures, seminars, small tutor groups, practical/field work sessions and online/desk- based study.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

The dependence of economic sustainability and social wellbeing on a sustainable natural environment is now accepted, and through several international agreements, Governments across the world have acknowledged the urgent need to secure environmental sustainability. The need for well- informed Environmental Managers has therefore never been greater. This means managers who not only understand the environment, but also understand its importance to economic and social well being.

This Master’s will provide you with the expertise, practical skills and confidence to pursue specialist careers in environmental management, environmental consultancy or ecology and provide crucial environmental understanding for successful careers in local government, the civil service, engineering, planning or business.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

A range of assessment methods are used, all with a strong emphasis on applying the skills you learn during your course to workplace scenarios. These include writing technical reports, presentations and the use of electronic media, such as developing a specialist wiki. There will be no written examinations.

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Gain advanced knowledge and understanding of the Earth's natural systems and how they can be managed. You'll explore Environmental Management Systems (EMS) and gain practical experience of dealing with the complex issues they raise in a systematic and creative way. Read more

What will I study?

Gain advanced knowledge and understanding of the Earth's natural systems and how they can be managed. You'll explore Environmental Management Systems (EMS) and gain practical experience of dealing with the complex issues they raise in a systematic and creative way.

Through your choice of topics you will have the opportunity to both prepare for your Research Project and to explore your wider fields of interest, while learning to put into practice key skills in research. These modules will require you to interact effectively with research literature and data, for the structured production of poster, oral and written presentations.

Course modules

-IEMA Approved Associate Certificate Course in Environmental Management (UK)
-Environmental Management Systems (ISO 14001) (20 credit points)
-Practical Resource Management (20 cp)
-Research Methods and Bioethics (20 cp)
-Scientific Analysis, Review and Presentation (20 cp)
-Research Project (60 cp)

COME VISIT US ON OUR NEXT OPEN DAY!

Register here: https://www.ntu.ac.uk/university-life-and-nottingham/open-days/find-your-open-day/science-and-technology-postgraduate-and-professional-open-event2

The course is a part of the School of Science and Technology (http://www.ntu.ac.uk/sat) which has first-class facilities (http://www.ntu.ac.uk/sat/facilities).

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The MA in International Development is a unique interdisciplinary programme taught by academics, practitioners and policymakers to understand the multifaceted political, economic and legal processes that shape development. Read more
The MA in International Development is a unique interdisciplinary programme taught by academics, practitioners and policymakers to understand the multifaceted political, economic and legal processes that shape development. It is suitable for students seeking to understand the field of international development as well as for practitioners who already have substantive experience. It provides conceptual tools and practical skills for a variety of careers in international affairs.

The programme seeks to contribute to a critical understanding of contemporary issues in development and provides practical tools for a future engagement. It considers theoretical, practical and ethical issues by interrogating development discourses, objectives and effects, and by seeking to understand forms of inclusion/exclusion and intervention in societies. Issues covered include economic development, poverty eradication, legal empowerment, public-private partnerships, social entrepreneurship, trade and privatisation, informal economies and finance, and technological initiatives.

The programme is offered jointly by the School of Politics and International Relations, Kent Law School and the School of Economics, to provide you with an interdisciplinary approach to development and to allow you to specialise in your field of interest, such as development economics, development and migration, development and conflict, or human rights. You may choose between an economic stream and a politico-legal stream, complemented by a wealth of elective modules from various departments.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/55/international-development

About the Brussels School of International Studies (BSIS)

The Brussels School of International Studies (BSIS) is a multidisciplinary postgraduate School of the University of Kent. We bring together the disciplines of politics, international relations, law and economics to provide in-depth analysis of international problems such as conflict, security, development, migration, the political economy and the legal basis of a changing world order.

We are a truly international School: our students are drawn from over 50 countries. The strong international composition of our staff and student body contributes significantly to the academic and social experience at BSIS (http://www.kent.ac.uk/brussels/studying/index.html). Being located in Brussels allows us to expose students to the working of major international organisations, such as the EU and NATO, and to the many international and non-governmental organisations based here. Students also have the opportunity to undertake an internship with one of these organisations.

Course structure

We are committed to offering flexible study options at the School and enable you to tailor your degree to meet your needs by offering start dates in September and January; full- and part-time study; split-site options, and allowing students to combine two fields of study leading to the award of a degree that reflects both disciplines.

Specialisations

The MA in International Development allows students to choose secondary areas of specialisation from the range of programmes offered at BSIS. Thus, a focused programme of study can be constructed by studying International Development in the context of International Relations; Conflict and Security; Human Rights Law and other subject areas we cover.

This leads to the award of an MA degree in, for example, 'International Development with Human Rights Law'.

Standard and extended versions

The LLM is offered in both a standard version (90 ECTS credits) and an extended version (120 ECTS credits) and in each case students may take the programme with or without a secondary specialisation. Those on the extended version will take more modules to gain extra credit.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- provide a postgraduate qualification of value to those intending to pursue a career in the field of international development

- provide a detailed knowledge and a high level of understanding of a range of specialised subject areas

- provide access to a range of disciplinary perspectives on international development, in the framework of an interdisciplinary graduate school with cognate programmes in international relations, conflict analysis, international law, and migration studies

- provide a sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures and policy fields of international development

- provide a degree of specialisation in areas of international development of individual interest from among the range of options that are available and which require you to engage with academic work that is at the frontiers of scholarship

- encourage you to develop a critical awareness of the discourses and practices associated with the field of international development, particularly in contexts which are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution

- provide you with a research-active learning environment which gives you a good grounding in the study of the contending approaches and issues in international development, and allows you to place the subject in its proper context within the broader field of international studies

- encourage you to develop critical, analytical, communicative and problem-solving skills which can be applied to a wide range of contexts (transferable skills).

- develop skills in the written presentation of arguments in a manner which meets relevant academic conventions

- contribute to widening participation in higher education by taking account of past experience of applicants in determining admissions whilst ensuring that all students that are admitted possess the potential to complete the programme successfully

- develop your general research skills and personal skills (transferable skills), in particular through a substantial dissertation.

Careers

The School of Politics and International Relations has a dedicated Employability, Placements and Internships Officer who works with students to develop work-based placements in a range of organisations. Centrally, the Careers and Employability Service can help you plan for your future by providing one-to-one advice at any stage of your postgraduate studies.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution. Our graduates have gone on to careers in academia, local and national government and public relations.

A postgraduate degree in the area of economics is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work as economists in international organisations, the financial sector, business, UK and overseas governments, and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at Kent, UK and overseas universities. Recent MSc graduates have gone on to work for companies in the UK such as BNP Paribas, AXA, FactSet and PwC.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The MA in Heritage Management is a unique programme combining the worlds of archaeology and business and is taught in Athens at Eleusis, an area of world-class archaeological significance. Read more
The MA in Heritage Management is a unique programme combining the worlds of archaeology and business and is taught in Athens at Eleusis, an area of world-class archaeological significance.

It focuses on teaching the skills required for the management of heritage sites across the world and how to work effectively with archaeologists, architects, conservators, marketing and education specialists while also fundraising and supervising specific projects.

The programme is a collaborative dual award from the University of Kent and the Athens University of Economics and Business (AUEB), a partnership that ensures world-class tuition and an interdisciplinary learning environment. It is overseen by the Initiative for Heritage Conservancy, a dynamic new research and education project with international funding, which is creating its own opportunities in the field.

As a collaborative programme between the Kent and AUEB, the programme is taught by staff from the Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies and the AUEB, at a centre in Eleusina, an Athenian suburb. The programme is entirely based in Eleusina, and taught over a 15-month period.

For more details on this programme, please see its dedicated site: http://www.heritage.aueb.gr

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/301/heritage-management

Course structure

The mode of study for this programme is 16 months full-time, running over three academic semesters from September 2015 to December 2016.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

HM802 - Tourism Marketing and the Promotion of Cultural Heritage (15 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/HM802
HM803 - Human Resources Management and Strategic Planning (15 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/HM803
HM804 - Finance For Cultural Organisations (15 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/HM804
HM805 - Archaeological Site Management and Planning I-III (45 credits) - http://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/HM805
HM806 - Project Management (15 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/HM806
HM811 - Architectural Planning of Archaeological Sites and Visitor Management (15 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/HM811
HM814 - Public Archaeology (15 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/HM814
HM816 - Education and Archaeology I (15 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/HM816
HM817 - Museum Management (15 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/HM817
HM899 - Dissertation (Heritage Management) (60 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/HM899

Assessment

The programme is assessed through a combination of coursework, oral presentation, and/or examinations as well as by the dissertation.

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Kent’s MA in Roman History and Archaeology is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence. Read more
Kent’s MA in Roman History and Archaeology is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence.

Roman civilisation produced one of the largest empires of the ancient world. The Roman Empire had one of the most advanced technologies of the ancient world, producing major architectural, cultural and artistic achievements. The extensive remnants left behind enable us to recreate and understand Roman culture thousands of years later.

Our Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/index.html) contains one of the largest concentrations of experts in Roman History and Archaeology with experts in Pompeii, Rome, Egypt, as well as in the study of artefacts and of ancient medicine. You spend your first term at our beautiful campus overlooking the Roman and Medieval city of Canterbury, just one hour from London. While in Canterbury, you gain training in research skills in both Roman History and in Archaeology.

The second term is based in Rome, at the campus of the American University of Rome (http://www.aur.edu), where you study the sites and museums of ancient Rome. All teaching is in English. The experience of staying in Rome and studying the city alters brings into focus new ideas and a new perspective of the ‘Eternal City’.

Each week is structured around a series of site visits, so that you gain an in-depth knowledge of the ancient city. In the final term, you complete your MA by writing a dissertation of up to 15,000 words on a research topic defined in collaboration with your supervisor. The programme can also be studied at Canterbury only.

This is an ideal programme for graduates of history, ancient history, classics or the wider humanities, wanting to gain practical experience in applying their expertise and benefit from the experience and confidence gained from living and studying overseas.

Course structure

During the first term at Canterbury you take two core modules. Your second term is in Rome and you take one core module and one optional module. Over the course of these two terms you discuss with the course director your ideas and plans for your 15,000-word dissertation. The writing of the dissertation takes place in the summer with completion in August.

Modules

Term 1 (Canterbury):
Compulsory modules:

CL900 - Research Skills in Ancient History
CL805 - Contemporary Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Issues

Term 2 (Rome):
Compulsory Module:

CL828 - Rome: The Imperial City

One option from:

Optional modules in Rome are taken through the American University in Rome and change each year. Past options have included:

Rome: Writing the city

This upper level Classics course will examine depictions of the city of Rome in classical literature. It will examine the fabric of the city and the idea of Rome as a symbol of civilization. The buildings and public spaces of Rome were the backdrop for performance, spectacle, ceremony and daily and these activities generated meaning and symbolism. For the Romans specific locations were connected to history, myth and collective memory and were protected by the genius loci. Amongst others, the following authors will be studied: Cicero, Livy, Lucan, Ovid, Propertius, Tacitus, Virgil. All texts will be studied in translation.

Etruscan Art and Archaeology

This is an upper level course studying the art and archaeology of the Etruscans from their emergence at the beginning of the first millennium BCE until their absorption by the Romans. The course will take full advantage of the rich museum collections of Etruscan material in Rome and will include a field trip to the sites of Cerveterii and Tarquinia. The course will look at the origins of the Etruscans, their art and material culture, their interactions with other groups and their eventual absorption by the Romans.

Global Heritage

This upper level seminar course examines global heritage concerns looking in particular at how the past conditions the present and influences identity. Lectures and seminars will be built around four topics: the role of international organizations, heritage and memory, heritage and economic development and contemporary issues in global heritage. Each topic unit will be completed by a seminar where students will present case studies that illustrate the issues raised.

Term 3: Dissertation

CL897 - Dissertation
CL805 - Contemporary Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Issues (30 credits)
CL828 - Rome-The Imperial City (30 credits)
CL829 - Rome Optional Module (30 credits)
CL900 - Research Skills in Ancient History - Understanding the City in Antiquit (30 credits)
CL897 - CL Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

The programme is assessed by coursework for each of the modules, an examination in Latin or ancient Greek, if these modules are taken, and by the dissertation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/postgraduate/taught.html

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This programme seeks to develop a critical understanding of concepts and principles of applied behaviour analysis. 2016 Postgraduate Tizard programmes will close to applicants at 23:59 hrs on Thursday 21 April 2016. Read more
This programme seeks to develop a critical understanding of concepts and principles of applied behaviour analysis.

2016 Postgraduate Tizard programmes will close to applicants at 23:59 hrs on Thursday 21 April 2016. Applications received after this time will be held for consideration for 2017 entry. The final tranche of interviews for 2016 will be held during the week of 23 May 2016. Applicants unable to make themselves available this week (in person or via skype or telephone) will be considered for 2017 entry.

It provides you with a detailed knowledge of intellectual and developmental disabilities and experience of practice or conducting research in this field. The programme is for both recent graduates and experienced practitioners. Benefits include academic and professional support from some of the UK’s leading applied behaviour analysts and intellectual and developmental disability researchers. The programme also provides the necessary coursework to apply to sit the international examination for certification as a behaviour analyst.

Please note, the PCert cannot be studied on a part-time basis but the PDip and MSc can be studied either full-time or part-time.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/105/applied-behaviour-analysis

About the Tizard Centre

The Tizard Centre is part of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR) and has excellent links with health and social care organisations, and other relevant establishments.

The Centre is at the forefront of learning and research in autism, intellectual disability and community care, and in 2013 received a Queen’s Anniversary Prize in recognition of its outstanding work in these areas.

The Centre has strong links with health and social care organisations, and other relevant establishments. Our primary aims, through research, teaching and consultancy, are:

- to find out more about how to effectively support and work with people with learning disabilities
- to help carers, managers and professionals develop the values, knowledge and skills that enable better services
- to aid policymakers, planners, managers and practitioners to organise and provide enhanced services.

The Tizard Centre is recognised as leading the field in deinstitutionalisation and community living, challenging behaviour, quality of staff support, sexuality and autism, and has had a significant impact on national policies in these areas. We are committed to addressing issues arising from social inequality.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

TZ830 - Research Methods (15 credits)
TZ861 - Social Psychology of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (10 credits)
TZ862 - Behaviour Analysis and Intervention (10 credits)
TZ863 - Service issues in Intellectual and Development Disabilities (10 credits)
TZ868 - Values, Ethics and Professional Practice (15 credits)
TZ869 - Concepts of Applied Behaviour Analysis (15 credits)
TZ870 - Observation and Analysis of Behaviour (15 credits)
TZ871 - Developing and implementing interventions (15 credits)
TZ872 - Work-Based Learning in Applied Behaviour Analysis (60 credits)
TZ865 - Extended Essay (15 credits)

Assessment

Modules are assessed by examination, essay, practical assignment, video. Dissertation of 10,000 words or, for work-based learning option, 7,000-word case report and video.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- develop a critical understanding of the concepts and principles of applied behaviour analysis

- encourage values- and evidence-based, ethically stringent practice or research in applied behaviour analysis

- provide you with detailed knowledge of intellectual and developmental disabilities and experience of practice or conducting research in this field

- produce graduates equipped to play a leading role in public services for children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Research areas

Current research areas include: social inequalities and community care; intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Careers

Our postgraduate courses improve employability prospects for both those with established careers and new entrants to the field. Many of our students already work with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in professional, management or supporting capacities. Our programmes support their continuing professional development and enhance their opportunities for career advancement. Other students, who are at the beginning of their careers, move on to a range of professional roles in health and social care including working as psychologists in learning disability or behavioural specialists in community learning disability teams; service management of development roles; clinical psychology training or a PhD.

Our Applied Behaviour Analysis programme includes a course sequence approved by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board. Its completion, therefore, meets two of the requirements for certification as a Behaviour Analyst. Successful students will need to obtain appropriate supervised experience and pass the BACB exam. Many of our ABA students hope to take this career path, applying their skills either in work with children or adults with autism (ie early intervention programmes or in schools using an ABA approach) or with children/adults with learning disabilities whose behaviour is described as challenging. Every week we are asked to notify our students of opportunities in these fields. Our ABA programme is also suitable for parents of children/adults with autism or learning disability, who are looking to increase their own understanding of ABA.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The Advanced Child Protection MA is a distance learning programme which runs on a part-time basis for two or more years. The programme is for experienced professionals and is fully accredited by the University of Kent. Read more
The Advanced Child Protection MA is a distance learning programme which runs on a part-time basis for two or more years. The programme is for experienced professionals and is fully accredited by the University of Kent.

The MA gives a 360-degree perspective on child protection, introducing you to the viewpoints of academics, practitioners, organisations, parents, children and young people, integrated with contemporary research theory and policy. The impact that technology has on protecting children as well as the effect of the globalisation of the abuse and exploitation of vulnerable children is considered throughout.

The MA has attracted national and international students, all with a variety of experience in child protection. The opportunity to access this diverse pool of knowledge, within an environment that allows you to question and excel, has made the Advanced Child Protection MA a success.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/326/advanced-child-protection

About the Centre for Child Protection

The Centre for Child Protection is part of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR) and is the first centre of its kind in Europe. Combining research with distance learning programmes and a range of innovative serious training games, the Centre for Child Protection is leading the way in building knowledge and training opportunities for professionals working in this area.

The Centre is led and informed by a team of experts in the field of child protection. With many years of experience in both research and practice, we are committed to improving the provision of continued professional development to enhance the skills of those involved in child protection.

The Centre’s range of serious game simulations provide research-based case studies and opportunities to explore the complex dynamics involved in making professional assessments and decisions in these contexts.

The University was presented with the 2016 Guardian University Award (http://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/ccp/news/news-summary.html?view=2805) for digital innovation in recognition of the ground-breaking 'Lottie' project, which provides an interactive simulation tool to help children become more aware of the dangers of sexual grooming.

Course structure

Teaching is based on guided study using an online learning environment (Moodle), videoed expert lectures, online seminars, 'serious games', acted and filmed role play, as well as web-based weekly forums.

The Centre for Child Protection is a leader in developing and disseminating interactive simulations dealing with a range of child protection issues.

During the programme you:

- develop innovative techniques for professional training and support

- translate and apply the latest research and knowledge to inform best practice

- create diverse and flexible learning programmes

- address gaps in post-qualification training provision and opportunities

- facilitate safe and realistic environments in which child protection professionals can develop and enhance their skills and professional practice.

We also offer a variety of 10 week online distance learning standalone MA modules. Visit the Centre's pages for more information.

The modules can be taken on their own or as a taster to Master's-level study. All the work is completed online where you participate in online forums and have access to journal articles and specialist materials. After successful completion of the assignment, the module is equivalent to 20 credits at Master’s level. For further information, see the Centre for Child Protection website (http://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/ccp).

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

SO926 - Understanding Social Research (20 credits)
SO927 - Definitions, Prevalance, Causes and Consequences of Child Abuse and Neg (20 credits)
SO928 - Contemporary Child Protection Practice and Policies (20 credits)
SO931 - The 'Unconscious at Work': The OrganizationalDimensions of Risk-Managem (20 credits)

Assessment

A range of assessment methods ensure that theory and research relate to contemporary professional practice.

Programme aims

Our aims are to provide students with:

- detailed knowledge of child protection and safeguarding research, practice and policy from a variety of inter-professional perspectives

- the knowledge to understand, respect and reflect on the roles of all professionals involved in child protection and to explore methods of communication between agencies

- advanced knowledge of contemporary child protection practice in the UK and globally

- the ability, through the use of innovative techniques, to explore the potential complexities and risk involved in child protection assessment and to explore different methods of working

- the opportunity to visit and revisit complex child protection scenarios, through the use of serious games, case studies, research, forum discussions and acted, filmed role plays, and the ability to apply knowledge from Serious Case Reviews to promote best practice

- with opportunities to critically evaluate support, help and current intervention strategies in child protection

- the ability to reflect on your own practice and situations that promote ‘hot cognitions’ in child protection and to explore how to react in an emotionally intelligent way

- to critically evaluate research and theoretical perspectives in key areas of child protection work

- the ability to work in a manner which respects diversity and equality.

Careers

Our Master’s and stand-alone modules give you the opportunity to further your career and expertise in child protection. As well as benefiting from Kent’s academic excellence, you gain insight into multi-agency relationships and responsibilities. The Centre attracts students from across social work, health, education, probation and the third sector, and widens your potential learning experience. The distance learning delivery of the Master’s programme enables you to fit learning around your life and work commitments and you have the chance to apply your knowledge as you progress. Each cohort contains a unique mix of experiences and professions, providing a valuable opportunity for information exchange and networking.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This programme, delivered by School of Arts and specialist visiting lecturers, develops your skills and provides experience relevant to a career in curating. Read more
This programme, delivered by School of Arts and specialist visiting lecturers, develops your skills and provides experience relevant to a career in curating.

Based at the School of Arts Studio 3 Gallery, you are involved in all aspects of the running of the Gallery. You work closely with partner organisations such as Canterbury museums and the Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA).

You have the opportunity to develop your own project, working within the Gallery’s exhibition programme.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/96/curating

About the Department of History & Philosophy of Art

The History & Philosophy of Art Department within the School of Arts, provides opportunities for graduate study with well-established researchers in the fields of art history, philosophy of art and aesthetics. Staff research covers contemporary art and aesthetics, modernism, theories of art, the historiography of art and the Cold War; biographical monographs, the photograph (in its historical, contemporary and critical contexts), and the historical interplay of image, theory and institutions from the Renaissance to the present (especially European and North American).

Developing areas of interest include the cultural and historical significance of the print, and the role of performance and new media in contemporary art practices, which draw upon our links with other subjects within the School of Arts and the Faculty of Humanities. In particular, postgraduates have the opportunity to participate in the activities of the multidisciplinary Aesthetics Research Centre and the Art History and Visual Cultures Research Centre. There is also a full programme of visiting speakers from across the constituent subject areas within the School of Arts, which includes Film and Drama.

Course structure

Compulsory modules provide an overview of the history of collecting and exhibitions through a series of case studies, taking advantage of our proximity to major London collections. We also cover theoretical issues relating to curating and museology.

Optional modules focus on providing practice-based opportunities for developing curatorial skills.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

HA826 - History and Theory of Curating (30 credits)
HA827 - Curatorial Internship (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is through a combination of coursework essays, critical logbooks and practice-based exercises. A long dissertation is required for the Exhibition Development and Design module.

[[Programme aims
This programme aims to:

- create and interpret knowledge at the forefront of the discipline through the development of critical, conceptual and practical abilities

- develop a self-directed programme of practice and related research

- contextualise and theorise practice in relation to, and through critical evaluation of, the work of contemporary practitioners and leading researchers within the discipline

- develop a comprehensive understanding of methodologies applicable to independent research

- develop autonomy in practice work within a context that fosters collaborative learning

- sustain an advanced practice that encompasses the disciplines of writing, discussion and producing practice-based outcomes

- achieve high-level skills and competencies as a preparation for professional practice and further development in the field of curating

- embed your research within the context of the University and utilise the resources offered in the research environment such as staff expertise, symposia and colloquia

- develop public outcomes outside the University in a range of formats

- attract students from a diversity of arts contexts and contexts that inform artistic practice, including fine art, history of art, sociology, journalism, English literature, film studies architecture and philosophy

- attract intellectually able and talented students who are enquiring, open to experimentation, discussion and collaboration as well able to work independently

- provide a forward-thinking, dynamic learning environment that responds to the current climate of debate and production in the arts.

- forge an international identity within the field of study through developing partnerships with international universities and non-HEIs

- support specialism and progression by allowing students to opt for specific routes of study that include curating, art history, cultural history, arts management, conservation or museum studies.

Research areas

The Department has a collective interest in developing interdisciplinary projects, including projects informed by art history and philosophy of art or aesthetics. Shared areas of research interest include: photography, art theory from the Renaissance to recent times and contemporary art.

Careers

Arts postgraduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to marketing and gallery assistants. Our graduates have found work with Tate Britain, the V&A, Museum of Childhood and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The MA in Ancient History has a focus on research training that will place you in a strong position for further study for a PhD or for careers outside academia that require research skills. Read more
The MA in Ancient History has a focus on research training that will place you in a strong position for further study for a PhD or for careers outside academia that require research skills.

The major civilisations of the ancient world, including those of Egypt, Greece and Rome, still shape global culture today. Our MA in Ancient History enables you to gain an advanced understanding of ancient culture, whether you focus on literature, thought, art or religion. The MA gives you an opportunity explore the history, political and social organisation, or material artefacts of ancient cultures, to demonstrate a critical engagement and develop an informed sense of the similarities and differences between them and our own culture.

The programme allows you to develop your research skills and to become by the end of the degree an independent researcher, well equipped for future work for a PhD or to undertake research outside academia. The programme begins by focusing on research skills, which you study alongside either an option module or a language module (in ancient Greek or Latin). For the Spring Term, you choose two option modules that reflect the research interests of staff within the Department of Classical and Archaeological Studies (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/index.html).

In the summer, you write a dissertation of up to 15,000 words with advice from one of our experts to demonstrate the skills that you will have gained during your 12 month MA.

This is an ideal programme for graduates of history, ancient history, classics or the wider humanities, wanting to gain practical experience in applying their expertise.

This programme is taught at our Canterbury campus. There is also a version of this programme which allows you to spend a term in Rome. This gives you direct access to Roman sites, museums and architecture, in order to see how the Roman Empire has shaped the city to this day.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/postgraduate/taught-ancient-history.html

Assessment

The programme is assessed by coursework for each of the modules, an examination in Latin or ancient Greek, if these modules are taken, and by the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide research training in the subject area of ancient history

- expand your depth of knowledge of key subject areas in ancient history

- attract outstanding students, irrespective of race, background, gender or physical disability from both within the UK, and EU, and also from overseas

- develop new areas of postgraduate teaching in response to the advance of scholarship

- provide you with the skills to equip you for a further career either for doctoral research in ancient history, or in employment, with the use of these transferable skills

- develop your competence in applying skills to analysis of a diverse body of ancient evidence

- develop your critical and analytical powers in relation to the ancient material

- provide you with the skills to adapt and respond positively to change

- develop critical, analytical problem-based learning skills and the transferable skills to prepare you for graduate employment

- enhance the development of your interpersonal skills

- provide you with opportunities for shared multidisciplinary learning with archaeology, religious studies and philosophy

- assist you to develop the skills required for both autonomous practice and team-working.

Careers

Our MA programmes include much scope for vocational training, skills acquisition and guided project work, often with use of our extensive facilities. These aspects of our programmes have been praised by external assessors in recent years. Recent graduates have progressed to careers in a wide range of related professional and leadership areas, including national and local museums, teaching and senior roles with archaeological organisations (national government institutions, contracting units and trusts). A large proportion of completing Master’s students have progressed onto PhD study.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The MA in Roman History and Archaeology is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence. Read more
The MA in Roman History and Archaeology is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence.


Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/307/roman-history-and-archaeology#!overview

Course detail

Roman civilisation produced one of the largest empires of the ancient world. The Roman Empire had one of the most advanced technologies of the ancient world, producing major architectural, cultural and artistic achievements. The extensive remnants left behind enable us to recreate and understand Roman culture thousands of years later.

The Department of Classical and Archaeological Studies contains one of the largest concentrations of experts in Roman History and Archaeology with experts in Pompeii, Rome, Egypt, as well as in the study of artefacts and of ancient medicine. You spend your first term at our beautiful campus overlooking the Roman and Medieval city of Canterbury, just one hour from London. While in Canterbury, you gain training in research skills in both Roman History and in Archaeology.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/postgraduate/taught-roman-history-and-archaeology.html

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus*, but is also available with a term in Rome:
https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/postgraduate/taught-roman-history-and-archaeology-rome.html

Purpose

This is an ideal programme for graduates of history, ancient history, classics or the wider humanities, wanting to gain practical experience in applying their expertise.

Format and assessment

In your first term, the focus is on research skills in both Roman history and in archaeology to provide the foundation from which you may develop as a postgraduate researcher. Your second term is focussed on specialist modules that directly engage with research conducted in the Department. You also have the opportunity to engage with our postgraduate community that comes together with our staff at our research seminar series to which we invite leading speakers from across the UK and Europe.

In the summer, you write a dissertation of up to 15,000 words with advice from one of our experts to demonstrate the skills that you will have gained during your MA.

The programme is assessed by coursework for each of the modules and by the dissertation.

Careers

Our MA programmes include much scope for vocational training, skills acquisition and guided project work, often with use of our extensive facilities. These aspects of our programmes have been praised by external assessors in recent years. Recent graduates have progressed to careers in a wide range of related professional and leadership areas, including national and local museums, teaching and senior roles with archaeological organisations (national government institutions, contracting units and trusts). A large proportion of completing Master’s students have progressed onto PhD study.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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This unique MA is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence. Read more
This unique MA is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence. A key focus of the MA is on the cities of the Roman Empire, especially the capital, Rome. A term is spent in Rome, in which you study the monuments and artefacts of the ancient city at first hand, visiting relevant sites and museums, with options to study site conservation and museum presentation as well as the history and archaeology of Rome.

Roman civilisation produced one of the largest empires of the ancient world. The Roman Empire had one of the most advanced technologies of the ancient world, producing major architectural, cultural and artistic achievements. The extensive remnants left behind enable us to recreate and understand Roman culture thousands of years later.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/postgraduate/taught-roman-history-and-archaeology-rome.html

About the Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies

Our Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies contains one of the largest concentrations of experts in Roman History and Archaeology with experts in Pompeii, Rome, Egypt, as well as in the study of artefacts and of ancient medicine. You spend your first term at our beautiful campus overlooking the Roman and Medieval city of Canterbury, just one hour from London. While in Canterbury, you gain training in research skills in both Roman History and in Archaeology.

The second term is based in Rome, at the campus of the American University of Rome, where you study the sites and museums of ancient Rome. All teaching is in English. The experience of staying in Rome and studying the city brings into focus new ideas and a new perspective of the ‘Eternal City’.

Each week is structured around a series of site visits, so that you gain an in-depth knowledge of the ancient city. In the final term, you complete your MA by writing a dissertation of up to 15,000 words on a research topic defined in collaboration with your supervisor. The programme can also be studied at Canterbury only.

Course Structure

During the first term at Canterbury you take two core modules. Your second term is in Rome and you take one core module and one optional module. Over the course of these two terms you discuss with the course director your ideas and plans for your 15,000-word dissertation. The writing of the dissertation takes place in the summer with completion in August.

The programme is assessed by coursework for each of the modules, an examination in Latin or ancient Greek, if these modules are taken, and by the dissertation.

Careers

Our MA programmes include much scope for vocational training, skills acquisition and guided project work, often with use of our extensive facilities. These aspects of our programmes have been praised by external assessors in recent years.

Recent graduates have progressed to careers in a wide range of related professional and leadership areas, including national and local museums, teaching and senior roles with archaeological organisations (national government institutions, contracting units and trusts). A large proportion of completing Master’s students have progressed onto PhD study.

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This MA offers an intellectually dynamic introduction to one of the most exciting eras in literary history. Read more
This MA offers an intellectually dynamic introduction to one of the most exciting eras in literary history.

Grounded in and administered from the Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century, this is an interdisciplinary MA programme that builds upon the expertise and common research interests of 18th-century researchers and teachers across the Faculty of Humanities. The Centre provides an excellent research context for the MA programme and any further postgraduate work that will arise from it.

Among the teachers involved in this MA are Jennie Batchelor (English), Jonathan Friday (History and Philosophy of Art), Donna Landry (English), Paddy Bullard (English) and Ben Thomas (History & Philosophy of Art).

The Eighteenth-Century Studies MA is also available at Canterbury and Paris (https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/221/eighteenth-century-studies-paris). After spending your first term at our Canterbury campus, you relocate to our Paris centre for the spring term to study in the heart of historic Montparnasse.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/220/eighteenth-century-studies

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

You take two modules in the autumn term and two in the spring term; two core modules and two optional modules. You are also expected to attend the Faculty and School Research Methods Programmes.

You then write a dissertation or an editorial project between the start of the Summer Term and the end of August.

Modules

In the 2014/15 academic year the following two core specialist modules were available: EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eighteenth Century and EN895 - Jane Austen and Material Culture. These should be considered indicative of the types of modules available, which may vary from year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
HI826 - Literary Undergrounds and Anarchists in the Basement (12 credits)
HI874 - Religion and Society in Seventeenth-Century England (30 credits)
MT864 - Reading the Medieval Town: Canterbury, an International City (30 credits)
MT865 - Encountering the Holy: Devotion and the Medieval Church (30 credits)
EN834 - Imagining India (30 credits)
EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN836 - Dickens and the Material Culture of the Victorian Novel (30 credits)
EN842 - Reading the Contemporary (30 credits)
EN850 - Centres and Edges: Modernist and PostcolonialQuest Literature (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
EN857 - Body and Place in the Postcolonial Text (30 credits)
EN862 - Contemporary Arab Novel (30 credits)
EN865 - Post-45: American Literature and Culture in the Cold War Era (30 credits)
EN866 - The Awkward Age: Transatlantic Culture and Literature in Transition, 18 (30 credits)
EN872 - Provocations and Invitations (30 credits)
EN876 - Dickens and the Condition of England (30 credits)
EN888 - Extremes of Feeling: Literature and Empire in the Eighteenth Century (30 credits)
EN889 - Literary Theory (30 credits)
EN897 - Advanced Critical Reading (30 credits)
EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12-15,000-word dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- extend and deepen through coursework and research your understanding of eighteenth-century literary, visual and material culture and its political and cultural contexts

- develop your understanding of, and engagement with, the critical and methodological paradigms that inform the field of eighteenth-century studies today

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement.

- introduce you to the research methods that facilitate advanced study in the field

- provide a basis in knowledge and skills for those intending to teach eighteenth-century studies, especially in higher education

- provide an interdisciplinary context for the study of eighteenth-century literary, visual and material culture.

- develop your ability to argue a point of view with clarity and cogency, both orally and in written form

- provide teaching which is informed by current research and scholarship and which requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- develop your research skills to the point where you are ready to undertake a research degree.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The Faculty of Humanities at the University of Kent encourages interdisciplinary study and students at the Paris Centre are offered a range of modules inspired by Paris and its unique cultural history. Read more
The Faculty of Humanities at the University of Kent encourages interdisciplinary study and students at the Paris Centre are offered a range of modules inspired by Paris and its unique cultural history.

This twelve-month programme allows students of literature the opportunity to augment their study with visits to some of places that have inspired many of the greatest authors of the last several hundred years. Students can also make use of the use of the research resources and archives that are only available in Paris to develop a dissertation over the summer term.

You take two modules in each of the first two terms and a dissertation in the third.

You are required to take:

One Paris module from your own subject area (compulsory)
The School of English is offering a new module entitled: The Verbal and the Visual: Dialogues between Literature, Film, Art and Philosophy
A further three from the selection of Paris modules available

Teaching and Assessment

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12,000 word dissertation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only or split site between Canterbury and Paris.
http://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/search/subject_category/English

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