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The MSc in Human Resource Development (International Development) enables you to critically understand the role of human resource development (HRD) in enhancing performance within your own institutions and societies. Read more
The MSc in Human Resource Development (International Development) enables you to critically understand the role of human resource development (HRD) in enhancing performance within your own institutions and societies. Emphasis is placed on how HRD can support economic and social advancement by improving public services, and in building capabilities within individuals, organisations and communities to effectively cope with social change. The programme aims to develop students' critical appreciation of globalisation processes, policy initiatives and development management plans to support skills development, competitiveness and human capabilities, including development issues associated with eradicating gender inequalities, fostering human well being and maintaining sustainable livelihoods.

The course aims to develop your professional understanding of HRD strategies and development tools to support skill and knowledge acquisition, and build organization and community capabilities. A focus on developing human knowledge and skills enables you to appreciate how education supports skills development. Students also acquire knowledge of the role of International Organizations (through governments and MNCs) such as the World Bank and the UN in supporting education and development initiatives. There is a strong emphasis on acquiring cross cultural leadership knowledge, relevant for many social change and development projects in the public sector, or in the private sector, MNCs, NGOs or international organizations like the World Bank The objectives are that, by the end of the programme, participants will have:
-Knowledge and understanding of the linkage between international development, education and HRD practices and policies

-Knowledge of how approaches to national human resource development affect organisation and societal performance in developing and transitional economies

-Knowledge and understanding of comparative education policy and governance frameworks, for capacity building, the political economy of skills formation and how national HRD training systems affect organization, industrial and societal development, including gender national planning

-Knowledge of globalisation and cross-cultural factors affecting the application of HRD theories and methods in developing, transitional and newly industrialised countries

-An understanding of HRD and development policies in diverse geographic regions and how they enhance human capabilities and support poverty reduction, empowerment, help eradicate gender inequality and advance human well being especially within transitional and developing country contexts

-A critical understanding of cutting edge international HRD policies including talent management, knowledge management, private sector management and entrepreneurship, corporate social responsibility (CSR), social justice and ethics, social capital, and strategies for managing inequality including gender and other differences

-Knowledge of leadership for development (lead4dev) and different HRD strategies for the building of leadership skills in the workplace/society, especially those from disadvantaged/marginalized groups including the poor and women

-An understanding of how to analyse and design HRD strategies at societal and organisational level, including gender national planning and empowerment

The programme is designed for individuals of any professional background in international organisations, public administration, transnational organisations and private sector companies who are involved in the HRD, leadership and capacity planning aspects of organisations in developing and transitional countries. These may include managers/leaders of HRD/training/learning, HRD and education in government administration; direct trainers, staff of training centres, staff involved in human development planning in governments; HRD and Leadership consultants involved in change projects, change consultants involved in community development; NGO managers and line managers concerned with the development of their staff.

Aims

You will gain:
-Knowledge and understanding of the linkage between international development and HRD practices and policies
-Knowledge of globalisation and cross-cultural actors affecting the application of HRD and education theories and methods in developing, transitional and newly industrialised countries
-Knowledge of education and HRD interventions and their role in building leadership skills and capacity
-Knowledge of how approaches to national human resource development (NHRD) affect organisation and societal performance in developing and transitional economies
-Knowledge of how new approaches to HRD strategies including private sector management and development, social capital, knowledge management, gender planning affect the context for competence and performance enhancement in organisations and societies
-Understanding of how to analyse and design HRD strategies at societal and organisational level
-Understanding of your own learning and leadership skills and how they may be improved

Special features

The course usually includes a field visit to a UK or overseas destination, enabling you to visit public sector organisations, companies and agencies to learn about HRD systems and practices. The cost of the visit is included in the course fee.

Career opportunities

Graduates acquire a range of skills and knowledge valuable in the global economy and relevant for a variety of professional careers in international development. Recent graduates have gained positions including: HRD consultants/managers/directors in Ministries of HRD or Ministries of Education and as NGO Leaders (Middle East, Thailand, Indonesia, Latin America); Knowledge Management Consultants (Middle East, Canada); university HRD and training directors (Middle East, Africa); leadership and capacity development advisors in the public sector (Africa, Asia), education and HRD leadership consultants (Pakistan, Middle East). Some go on to work for the UN or World Bank, for example, gender and HRD specialist, or capacity building advisers (Kazakhstan, India, USA, China) and development project leaders (Nigeria). Some students progress to PhD study and a career in academia.

The course is unique as it demonstrates understanding of institutional HRD practices within the context of globalisation, social change and economic development so graduates acquire relevant development, HRD, leadership and education knowledge for directing culture and social change.

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International economics with a strong empirical and analytical emphasis on the low and middle income countries of the Global South. Read more
International economics with a strong empirical and analytical emphasis on the low and middle income countries of the Global South.
This specialisation offers you the opportunity to follow a state-of-the-art curriculum in International Economics with a strong empirical and analytical focus on the low and middle income countries of the Global South. Hosting one of the largest databases for developing countries in the world, we offer you a unique possibility to analyse poverty, inequality, and economic development in these countries in an international context. Using recent theoretical insights and modern empirical methods, you will be actively involved in comparative research on issues in developing countries such as the impact of globalisation on economic growth, corruption, the education of children, child labour and women’s empowerment.

Why should you choose International Economics & Development in Nijmegen?

- A broad perspective on issues pertaining to low and middle income countries
- Strong comparative and empirical orientation
- One of the world’s largest micro-level database for developing countries
- Small group teaching and close contact with professors and their research
- Excellent reputation in the Netherlands and abroad

Change perspective

Radboud University Master’s specialisation in International Economics & Development pushes your curiosity to understand and evaluate the economic situation in low and middle income countries. You will be taught to look at the bigger picture and to analyse micro-level data in order to discover what is going well and what isn’t. Your analysis will provide information on intra-country or cross-national disparities. It aims to inform both national governments as well as international development organisations, and might lead to programmatic action aimed at bringing about positive changes to people’s lives in the poorest regions of our globe.

Career prospects

Scientific and societal relevance go hand in hand in this programme. We address contemporary issues like child labour, women’s empowerment, human development, children’s schooling and economic growth by evaluating societal developments with the help of sound academic theories. We not only discuss pressing issues of today but also issues we believe will be pressing in the near future.
Upon completing the Master’s programme in International Economics & Development, you will be knowledgeable about recent developments in the field. You will be an up-and-coming professional that is able to:
- Understand and reflect on the international, professional and academic literature in the field of international economics & development.
- Report independently on various issues in international economics and development, including state of the art empirical and theoretical studies.
- Use and apply statistical tools and methods.
- Conduct independent research.
- Present and clearly and consistently defend your views and research outcomes.
- Maintain a critical attitude towards your own work and that of others in your field.

We make sure our graduates have the strong academic background they need to be able to work as economists, policy-makers and researchers for international organisations (The World Bank, UN), development-oriented consultancy firms, NGOs, national governments as well as universities and research institutes.

Our approach to this field

The Master’s specialisation International Economics & Development is theoretically unique in that we not only deal with the problems that poor countries face, but also with interesting new developments taking place in the Global South. We will discuss the rise of the BRIC countries, concentrating on both the potential they have as well as the challenges they face. We will also look at unique new economic phenomena within developing countries, like the emergence of a complete pro-poor banking system based on mobile phone credits in Kenya and other parts of Africa (known as m-pesa).

- Understanding economic changes in the developing world
Our unique and interesting combination of subjects will provide you with a well-rounded understanding in this field. Apart from development economics students will get an academic understanding of economics methodology, the role of international financial markets, behavioural economics and the important influence culture has on economic phenomena. And thanks to a choice of elective subjects, you can give your programme a unique focus that meets your academic interests.

Students taking this Master’s specialisation will learn how to understand and analyse economic changes taking place throughout the developing world. Students will be taught how to discover determinants and develop indicators that make it possible to monitor changes at the sub-national level in great detail. These indicators can be used scientifically, but also for creating detailed overview scans of regions for political or humanitarian purposes.

- Database Developing World and the MDGs
One of the tools our students can use is our Database Developing World (DDW). This database constitutes a unique window to the developing world, making it possible to study important processes on a scale and with a degree of detail that is unique in the world.

The DDW also holds indicators for seven of the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) which range from halving extreme poverty rates to empowering woman and providing universal primary education. The target date of 2015 is fast approaching and although enormous progress has been made, the UN is working with governments, civil society and other partners to carry on with a post-2015 sustainable development agenda. As a graduate of this Master’s specialisation, you could go on to be one of the professionals that helps to achieve the MDGs and thereby making a real difference in people’s lives.

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Youth and community work is a unique and value-based practice that seeks to support and foster the development of young people and the wider community to enable all to reach their full potential. Read more
Youth and community work is a unique and value-based practice that seeks to support and foster the development of young people and the wider community to enable all to reach their full potential. Underpinned by strong values of social justice Youth and Community Workers seek to critically analyse the social world and nurture the development of others through collaborative and creative practice leading to social change.

The main aim of the MA in Youth and Community Work with JNC professional qualification is to develop skilled, innovative and reflective practitioners, who are able to engage and develop positive relationships within communities, which lead to education and discovery. Through practice workers will demonstrate a clear commitment to promoting participation and empowerment, equality, partnership working and to the personal, social and political development of those involved.

This new MA Youth and Community Work programme has been designed in partnership with service users and leading professionals employed in the field. This collaboration ensures teaching is current and reflective of today’s youth and community work agenda preparing you effectively for a successful career.


Curriculum

This course is delivered through a full-time (1 year) or part time (2 years) route and will provide you with a blend of academic and practice-based learning to develop both your theoretical understanding and experience through two professional practice placements. Students will build a solid foundation in youth and community work through an exploration of the theoretical frameworks of informal education and community development along with advanced studies examining key youth and community work methods and settings, contemporary issues, youth development, welfare and social policy.
- Youth Work Theory and Practice (20 Credits)
- Practice Placement 1: Linked to Youth Work Theory and Practice, Community Empowerment for Social Change (20 Credits)
- Critical Themes and Issues Influencing Contemporary Practice (20 Credits)
- Managing Youth and Community Work (10 Credits)
- Advanced Research Seminars (20 Credits)
- Dissertation Preparation and Research Methods (10 Credits)
- Practice Placement 2 (20 Credits)
- Dissertation (60 Credits)

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The Master of Science in Capacity Development and Extension is a unique program in Canada that develops the core competencies of students for facilitating social and environmental change. Read more
The Master of Science in Capacity Development and Extension is a unique program in Canada that develops the core competencies of students for facilitating social and environmental change.

Our program focuses on processes of learning, advocacy, leadership, communication and capacity development for rural/remote and small communities in Canada and around the world. Our “students without borders” engage with society through service learning projects during their course work, and through applied research and a range of professional development activities.

Our graduates are innovators in the public and not-for-profit sectors. Many pursue doctoral studies and achieve important careers in community development, policymaking and academia.

Principles of Our Teaching and Learning

CDE is a learner-centered community which is grounded in practice-based theories. We value social justice through shared-decision making, open communication, respect for difference, and commitment to conflict management. We pursue creative and independent thought in our intellectual pursuits.

Examples of CDE Research

-Living at the Intersection: Exploring the Relationship between Youth Health and Wellbeing, Place, and After-School Programs in Small Urban Towns
-Stitching towards Empowerment: Exploring Empowerment of Women in an Embroidery Co-operative in Uganda. A Case Study of Tabiro Ladies’ Club
-Kahawa Yetu – Our Coffee: A need for better organizational capacity in Kenya’s coffee cooperatives. A case study of New Gatanga Coffee Cooperative
-Ethno-cultural vegetable retail analysis: Pricing structure and market information
-Impact of After-School Programs on Rural Youth: A Case Study of Fusion Youth Centre
-Micro-livestock for livelihoods: Meeting practical and strategic needs of women in Sunyani District, Ghana
-The use of stigma as a marker of otherness by RTLM in the Rwandan Genocide
-Campus/community radio in Canada: Linking listeners to broadcasters with Web 2.0 Technologies
-The potential of Agroforestry for Peace Building: The Case of Jonglei – South Sudan
-After the Tornado: An Exploration of Capacity and Vulnerability on Community Engagement in Goderich

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Humber’s Addictions and Mental Health graduate certificate program will empower you with the knowledge and skills you need for a rewarding career. Read more
Humber’s Addictions and Mental Health graduate certificate program will empower you with the knowledge and skills you need for a rewarding career. Learn to deliver responsive, culturally relevant, client-centred assessment and treatment to diverse individuals and groups. Practise ways to effectively collaborate and transform lives as a valuable part of a professional support team.

You will acquire the knowledge, skills and abilities required by front-line workers and supervisors in order to deliver effective addictions and mental health services while promoting empowerment, self-determination and optimum quality of life to individuals with addictions and mental health issues.

Recovery principles, empowerment practice, and the impact of early and ongoing trauma in the lives of individuals across the lifespan are examined in the curriculum.

You will have an opportunity to provide evidence-informed clinical and educational services to diverse individuals and groups experiencing addictions and mental health related challenges.

Course detail

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:
• Analyze and apply current knowledge and services in the addictions and mental health fields using a bio-psycho-social-spiritual framework.
• Provide and evaluate holistic, client-centred, gender-based, and culturally relevant assessments and interventions to individuals, groups and families within social and cultural contexts across the lifespan.
• Integrate skills and knowledge from a range of frameworks and contexts in addictions, mental health and concurrent disorders to provide non-biased services to women and those from diverse and varied populations.
• Educate individuals, families, groups and the community regarding issues and approaches through knowledge translation, knowledge exchange and the dissemination of relevant and current research and practice via formal and informal education.
• Access, utilize and advocate for culturally sensitive community supports and services for individuals, families and the community.
• Actively participate in and contribute to, relevant networks, groups and organizations promoting development, improvement and advancement in the fields of addictions and mental health.
• Work collaboratively within interprofessional teams providing ethical, effective, timely, and coordinated holistic services.
• Practice ethical and responsible behaviour in all aspects of work.
• Research and integrate the contribution and the participation of the client, family, and community as partners in designing and implementing care and services.

Modules

Semester 1

• ADMH 5001: Introduction to Addictions, Mental Health, and Concurrent Disorders
• ADMH 5002: Introduction to Counselling
• ADMH 5003: Chemical Dependency and Substance Use and Abuse
• ADMH 5004: Community Services and Supports in Addictions and Mental Health
• ADMH 5005: Holistic Assessment and Interventions: Determinants of Health
• ADMH 5006: Counselling Gender and Diversity
• ADMH 5007: Ethics, Professionalism and Inter-professional Teams
• ADMH 5016: Field Placement Preparation 1

Semester 2

• ADMH 5008: Group Counselling for Addictions and Mental Health Practitioners
• ADMH 5009: Motivational Interviewing and Change Theory Practice
• ADMH 5010: Working with Youth and Families
• ADMH 5011: Impulse Control Disorders and Behavioural Addiction
• ADMH 5012: An Introduction to Trauma-Informed Practice
• ADMH 5013: Capacity Building and Knowledge Exchange in Addictions and Mental Health
• ADMH 5014: Field Placement Preparation 2

Semester 3

• ADMH 5015: Practicum and Special Topics Seminar

Work Placement

Use and sharpen new skills while gaining crucial on-the-job work experience during a mandatory eight-week, full-time practicum that takes place in semester three. The placement, which is unpaid, is arranged with the assistance of a field placement co-ordinator.

Your Career

Qualify for employment in various organizations including community mental health and addictions services, residential treatment centres, hospitals, children’s centres, services for women, homeless shelters, youth and family services, services for Aboriginal people, ethnocultural centres, and crisis response services.

Our graduates seek career opportunities such as community support worker, team leader, housing worker, case manager, clinician, counsellor, crisis worker, addictions counsellor and mental health worker.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

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This course is a pathway within the MSc 'Advanced Practice Interventions for Mental Health' (APIMH). The information here relates to the Dementia Care pathway within the MSc APIMH, but is listed under the pathway specific title. Read more
This course is a pathway within the MSc 'Advanced Practice Interventions for Mental Health' (APIMH). The information here relates to the Dementia Care pathway within the MSc APIMH, but is listed under the pathway specific title. Other pathways are available in PSI for Psychosis (PSiP) and Primary Mental Health Care.

The programme and pathways have been designed to respond and contribute to the modernisation of mental health care delivery and service design.

Service development and evidence-based guidelines continuously highlight the need for multidisciplinary, multi-agency dementia care services that are accessible, flexible, inclusive and enabling. Importantly, such services and care must be driven by the needs of clients and their carers. It is vital, therefore, that such services are developed and delivered by staff appropriately prepared with relevant expertise, knowledge and skills.

This part-time, multi-disciplinary, practice-focused educational programme aims to equip students with the advanced knowledge and skills necessary to offer high standard, evidence-based interventions that promote the well-being, personhood and empowerment of people living with dementia and their significant others and to act as agents of change contributing to research, service development and leadership in this area of practice.

The programme is delivered by internationally and nationally renowned, published experts in the field, experienced dementia care practitioners, people who are living with dementia and former students, many of whom now operate at senior levels within dementia care services.

The programme involves attendance at the University for one day per week during term-time. Students are required to identify a suitable practice supervisor/mentor to oversee any clinical and/or practice work required for the programme and pathway.

Aims

This programme aims to equip students with the advanced knowledge and skills necessary to offer high standard, evidence-based interventions that promote the well-being empowerment and personhood of people living with dementia and their families/important others and to act as agents of change, contributing to service development, innovation and leadership in this area of practice.

Teaching and learning

Students participate in a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, small-group work, student-led seminars, group-work, problem-based learning scenarios and online learning.

Students will undertake independent study in order to further develop and consolidate their learning. The dementia pathway aims to involve people with dementia and their families in the delivery of sessions where possible.

Coursework and assessment

A variety of assessments are used within each course unit and across the programme as a whole. All assessments require students to integrate knowledge and understanding and make application to their own area of practice relevant to the outcomes of each unit and the focus of each pathway.

Assessment methods may include essays, case studies, assessed seminar presentations and literature reviews.

The dissertation for the MSc requires students to undertake an extended written piece of work (12,000 - 15,000 words) which focuses on a specific aspect of Mental Health Practice in the form of an extended Literature Based Review/proposal for practice development.

Course unit details

The programme consists of pathway-specific and core/compulsory course units. Pathway-specific units focus on the following themes:

Year 1
-Perspectives on Dementia
-Communication Through Person Centred Practice
-Dementia & Social Inclusion
-Critical Appraisal & Evidence Synthesis

Year 2
Core course units are shared with students studying other pathways and programmes, but retain a pathway-specific focus through group work and assessments. Core course units focus on the following themes:
-Research Design (15 credits)
-Evidence Based Practice in Dementia Care
-Working effectively with crisis and complexity in dementia care
-Developing practice, managing change

On completion of the taught units of the programme (PGDip), successful students who meet progression requirements are able to continue onto their research dissertation for the MSc. The dissertation enables students, with the support of an individual supervisor, to undertake an extended written piece of work which focuses on a specific aspect of Mental Health Practice in the form of an extended literature based review/proposal for practice development.

Career opportunities

The course is for existing health and social care professionals and others involved in the care and support of people living with dementia and their significant others. It aims to equip students with advanced knowledge and skills to enhance their own practice, the practice of others and contribute to innovations and developments in dementia care and service delivery.

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This Masters is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. It is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification. Read more
This Masters is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. It is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification. It is fully endorsed by the National Youth Agency and the Joint Negotiating Committee for Youth and Community Workers for pay and qualification purposes. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-applied-anthropology-community-youth-work/

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, the MA offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice. In short, it is at the core of what Goldsmiths is all about.

Established in 1992, it is the first of three pathways, with an additional MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Development launched in 2012 and an MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts started in 2015. The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

What you study

The MA combines an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments with practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other and spend some of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies

The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the autumn it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to youth and community work, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities and young people, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.

Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the three fieldwork placements, each of which is supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (22 days practice)

In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying youth work and community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.

Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (25 days practice)

In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development and youth work practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’.

Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (30 days practice plus five days observations)

This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community and youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation.

All three modules are assessed by a fieldwork report written by the student and a report by the placement supervisor. Overall, at least 50% of all fieldwork must be face-to-face with the 13-19 year age group.

The dissertation presents the culmination of your work, in that it is here that you apply anthropological methods and theories to a specific issue relevant to youth work that you are interested in. It is taught jointly by both departments.

Please note that it is possible to exit with a postgraduate diploma, also fully endorsed by the National Youth Agency, if you do not wish to move onto the dissertation.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This programme provides professional training that leads to eligibility for registration as a counselling psychologist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS). Read more

Summary

This programme provides professional training that leads to eligibility for registration as a counselling psychologist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS).

This programme has recently been updated and re-validated to incorporate new BPS standards. It is at the leading edge of international developments in counselling psychology practice, research and theory; and brings together contemporary understandings from person-centred psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioural models of therapy. There is a strong emphasis on your identity and employability as a practitioner psychologist, including skills in assessment and formulation, leadership, service evaluation, psychological testing, qualitative and quantitative research methods.

The course is based on a relational pluralistic philosophy that values diversity, and promotes individual empowerment and social change. This means that we respect and value a wide range of approaches to psychological intervention and research, view relationships as central to wellbeing, and seek to enable trainees to make a positive difference both at an individual and social level through their clinical and research work.

You will join a vibrant community of practitioners and researchers, who will help you achieve your goals, and enable you to make a valuable contribution to the field of counselling psychology.


•Applications for the coming academic year 2016-17 are now closed.
•However, applications for the academic year 2017-18 are open.
•Selection interviews are likely to take place in February and April 2017.
•Please note that before submitting an application all candidates must read the full 'Programme Outline' and entry requirements.

Content



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The social work profession promotes social change, problem-solving in human relationship and the empowerment and liberation of people to enhance well-being. Read more
The social work profession promotes social change, problem-solving in human relationship and the empowerment and liberation of people to enhance well-being. We believe that at the heart of social work lies the relationship which social workers develop with individual service users, be they children, young people or adults.

The Centre for Social Work at the University of Nottingham aspires to reflect this philosophy in its teaching and research. It is accredited by the General Social Care Council to award degrees in social work that confer the status of a professional qualification on the degree holder.

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This course provides students with the skills to apply anthropological theory and methods to the study of development. Read more
This course provides students with the skills to apply anthropological theory and methods to the study of development. The programme is taught by an active, interdisciplinary team involved in world-class research on development issues with a focus on achieving environmental and social sustainability through participatory approaches and active collaborations with projects for empowerment in the Global South. Geographical areas of expertise include Sub-Saharan Africa, South America, South Asia, South-East Asia, the Middle East, Europe and Melanesia.

The MSc is based around core modules focusing on sustainability, culture and development. Options allow you to pursue special interests. The dissertation offers the opportunity to conduct independent research under the supervision of an expert in your chosen topic.

Compulsory modules

-Dissertation
-Fieldwork and Interpretation
-Society, Energy, Environment and Resilience
-Thinking Anthropologically
-Anthropology and Development

Students will then choose 60 credits from a selection of the following (previous optional modules have included):
-Academic and Professional Skills in Anthropology
-Art in Ecological Perspective
-Computational Methods for Social Sciences
-Context and Challenges in Energy and Society
-Key Issues in Sociocultural Theory
-Public Health Anthropology
-Religion, Contention and Public Controversy
-Anthropology of Global Health
-Body, Politics and Experience
-Energy Society and Energy Practices
-Interrogating Ethnography
-Statistical Analysis in Anthropology
-Foreign language option

Please see http://www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology/postgraduatestudy/taughtprogrammes/sustainability for further information on modules.

Learning and Teaching

The MSc in Sustainability, Culture and Development (full-time) consists of two terms of teaching, during which students are introduced to the range of research questions and methods, and a dissertation, involving the design, development and implementation of an independent research project. Students work closely with academic staff, and have the opportunity to become involved in active research networks and projects.

The programme is delivered through a mixture of interactive lectures, seminars, student-led seminars, film showings and discussion, workshops, and optional fieldtrips, in addition to one-to-one dissertation supervision. Typically, lecture formats deliver key concepts and case study comparisons on progressively more advanced themes and topics. Research seminars provide an opportunity to reflect in more depth upon material delivered in modules and gathered from independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Student-led seminars give students an opportunity to engage with academic issues at the cutting-edge of research in Anthropology, in a learning environment focused on discussion and debate of current issues.

As a Level 4 course we place an emphasis on independent learning. This is supported by the University’s virtual learning environment, extensive library collections and informal contact with tutors and research staff. We consider the development of independent learning and research skills to be one of the key elements of our postgraduate taught curriculum and one which helps our students cultivate initiative, originality and critical thinking.

Full-time students take required taught modules worth a total of 60 credits (av 1.5 hours per week per module), and two or more optional modules, also totalling 60 credits (average 2.3 hours per week). Thus, they have on average 6.1 hours of formal contact per week (a mixture of interactive lectures, seminars, student-led seminars, practical sessions and workshops). Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to devote significant amounts of time to reading, discussing and preparing for classes, assignments and project work. From week 10, students begin formal supervision for their 60 credit dissertation. This crucial piece of work is a significant piece of independent research that constitutes a synthesis of theory, method and practice in anthropology and is supported by an individual supervisor (10 hours, representing approximately monthly meetings December-September), the degree director (as necessary), and other relevant members of staff (e.g. regional specialists).

Throughout the programme, all students have access to the degree director and deputy director who provide them with academic support and guidance. Furthermore, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. In term time, the department also has an extensive programme of departmental and research group seminars which postgraduate students are encouraged and expected to attend. We ensure that we advertise any other relevant seminars and lectures in Durham, Newcastle and further afield, and encourage students to attend relevant conferences, such as the RAI and ASA.

Before the academic year starts, we make contact with incoming students via the postgraduate office. On arrival we have induction sessions and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and attended by both academic and administrative staff. Students also attend an 'Introduction to Research Groups in Anthropology', as well as a specific introduction to the Anthropology in Development Research Group. This allows students to identify key staff.

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The Development and Emergency Practice (DEP) course provides a unique academic setting for the study of international development, conflict, disaster management, urbanisation, humanitarianism and human rights. Read more
The Development and Emergency Practice (DEP) course provides a unique academic setting for the study of international development, conflict, disaster management, urbanisation, humanitarianism and human rights. With its emphasis on practice, the course offers students the opportunity to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes in the rapidly changing fields of development and emergencies.

The programme is targeted at those with, or seeking, careers in NGOs, bilateral or multilateral humanitarian, development and human rights agencies, or governmental and commercial organisations working in international development.

This programme is run by the Centre for Development and Emergency Practice (CENDEP), which is based within the School of Architecture.

Why choose this course?

This programme has an international reputation for excellence. It is based on the expertise developed at Oxford Brookes University in the Centre for Development and Emergency Practice. You will have the option of going on a field trip. Previous trips have been to Asia, Africa and Latin America. Many graduates go on to secure senior positions with international development or emergency organisations.

This course in detail

This Course requires 200 hours of student input, up to 40 hours of which will be devoted to lectures, seminars, or individual tutorials. The remainder of the time is devoted to self-led study. For the postgraduate certificate it is compulsory to pass the core module, Critical Inquiry, Development and Emergencies: Theory and Policy, and pass other modules to achieve a total of 60 credits. For the postgraduate diploma you must pass 120 credits from the taught modules, including both compulsory modules. For the MA you must gain at least 180 credits, including the dissertation.

As courses are reviewed regularly the module list you choose from may vary from that shown here.
-Critical Inquiry Development & Emergencies: Theory and Policy (compulsory 20 credits)
-Human Rights & Governance (optional 20 credits)
-Disasters, Risk, Vulnerability and Climate Change (optional 20 credits)
-The Refugee Experience: Forced migration, protection and humanitarianism (optional 20 credits)
-Conflict, Violence and Humanitarianism (optional 20 credits)
-Shelter after Disaster (optional 20 credits)
-Programming and Partnerships (optional 10 credits)
-Improving Humanitarian Action: Responding to crisis in 21st Century (optional 10 credits)
-Working with Conflict (optional 10 credits)
-Independent Study (optional 10 credits)
-Research Methods (optional 10 credits)
-Dissertation (50 credits)

Teaching and learning

Teaching and learning strategies are grounded in theory, case studies and field based experience. The programme concentrates on the development of intellectual knowledge and the cultivation of academic skills including synthesis, analysis, interpretation, understanding and judgement. The programme also focuses on the practitioner’s approach, with reference in particular to:
-The setting in which they work (poverty, conflict, power, vulnerability, capability, risk, urbanisation, environmental change and the history and dynamics of particular places, their people and their society).
-The set of approaches they adopt (community mobilisation, aid, human rights advocacy, governance, risk reduction, livelihoods, humanitarian protection, accompaniment and empowerment).
-Themselves (the personal motivations that drive and shape their own vocation, their particular personality, temperament, strengths, abilities and weaknesses).

The intention is that a deeper understanding of these factors will enable students to move beyond rigid professional boxes to become more self aware, knowledge based practitioners able to work flexibly around a variety of problems in different situations of poverty, armed conflict and disaster.

Careers and professional development

The course is an ideal platform for you to develop your career in, or move into, international development and emergency organisations. Many graduates are able to secure senior positions.

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If you want to develop your leadership and management knowledge and skills in educational settings and organisations, you will find that this course provides you with that opportunity. Read more

Why take this course?

If you want to develop your leadership and management knowledge and skills in educational settings and organisations, you will find that this course provides you with that opportunity. The programme aims to support reflection and empowerment for the professional working in the field of education.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Use your current educational setting and workplace context, to ensure that your learning is meaningful and professionally relevant
Choose your method of study: full time; part-time (one evening a week over two years); or through flexible distance learning methods.
Stay connected to your lecturers through our online virtual learning environment

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course is intended for teachers, educational trainers, lecturers and instructors in a variety of educational settings and organisations (state, private, public, commercial or voluntary sectors of education who aspire to senior leadership and management positions. Many graduates of the course attain senior management positions in educational organisations.

STRUCTURE & TEACHING

All students must successfully complete a total of 7 assignments and submit a 12,000 - 15, 000 word Dissertation in order to attain the necessary 180 credits for the award of a Master of Science Degree. Students who have successfully submitted 4 assignments and attained 60 credits at MSc level may exit with a Postgraduate Certificate in Educational Leadership and Management, or with a Diploma, providing they have successfully submitted a total of 7 assignments and attained 120 credits.

Curriculum

Education Policy, Strategy and Change (Campus-based only)
Leadership, Policy and Strategy (Distance learning only)
Management of People and Marketing in Public Organisations
Management of Resources, Finance and Information Systems
Research Methods in Education
Dissertation

Teaching and Assessment

Teaching methods include seminars, group work, lectures and student presentations. Students are encouraged to produce work related assignments, although this is not prescriptive if a student encounters difficulty in the work place or is a full time student.

All students are allocated a Personal Tutor who will be pleased to discuss particular issues or specific questions, and who will help each student plan an appropriate course of study and research, discuss progress of work and advise how to construct the dissertation in terms of aims, scope and presentation.

The Virtual Learning Environment (Moodle) and the accompanying course handbook provides a general guide to the most frequent questions relating to the programme and you will be advised about how to study online and the assessment details for each unit, the marking criteria and the academic referencing conventions. At the start of each unit you will be able to access information about the unit including details of the learning outcomes, syllabus, assessment requirements and recommended reading lists.

You will also have the opportunity to meet and interact with your fellow students online through an online discussion forum and other digital media.

How are you assessed?

You will be guided through the assessment process for each unit by your tutors and there will be extensive online supporting materials. Assessments will include online tests and quizzes, reflective commentaries, case study work, article critiques, online discussions, research proposal and a dissertation. Many of the assessments will relate to analyses of your current (and possibly future) workplace contexts.

Exit levels

Students who exit with 60 credits at Msc Level will be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate in Educational Leadership and Management, and those who exit with 120 credits will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma in Educational Leadership and Management.

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Social work, both in the UK and internationally, has been defined as a profession that ‘promotes social change, problem solving in human relationships and the empowerment and liberation of people to enhance social justice.’ Accordingly, social work takes a variety of forms and engages with a broad range of individuals, groups and communities. Read more
Social work, both in the UK and internationally, has been defined as a profession that ‘promotes social change, problem solving in human relationships and the empowerment and liberation of people to enhance social justice.’ Accordingly, social work takes a variety of forms and engages with a broad range of individuals, groups and communities. The scope of social work research is equally broad and requires researchers to be aware of, and able to engage with a variety of disciplines in a range of settings, often working alongside those with different ideas of what social work and social work research are and what each is intended to achieve.

Social work research, in other words, does not simply concern the work of social workers. It may also be concerned, for example, with programmes of community development in the context of poverty or interventions to tackle domestic violence and programmes for young offenders. It may focus on the needs of a particular group, for example children with disabilities or people with severe and long term mental illness, whether or not they receive social work services. It may draw on theories and research methods from any of the social sciences, including economics, law and philosophy.

This programme is designed to build on the links between research and practice in a range of settings in developing the particular skills and capacities needed by practice-based professionals and postgraduate students interested in carrying out social work and social care research.

This programme does not include practical training in social work and does not lead to a professional qualification in social work. If you want to study for a qualification in social work practice, please see the MSc in Social Work: http://www.bris.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/ssl/msc-social-work/

Programme structure

The programme is delivered through a combination of intensive block teaching and weekly delivery so as to be most accessible to postgraduate students, busy policy professionals and practitioners. The delivery of units on the programme is designed to allow students to accumulate credits flexibly and organise the patterns of attendance to suit their own needs and circumstances.

The structure for the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma consists of four core and two optional units. A dissertation of 10-15,000 words is required for the MSc. The Postgraduate Certificate is awarded for the successful completion of three units (two of which must be core units).

Core units
-Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences
-Philosophy and Research Design in the Social Sciences
-Further Qualitative Methods

Optional units - You then choose two of the following units which allow you to develop specialist knowledge of the application of research methods to key areas of social work and social policy.
-Further Quantitative Methods
-Domestic Violence: Research, Policy and Activism*
-Researching Poverty, Inequality and Social Exclusion*
-Health and Social Care Research*
-Researching Child and Family Welfare*
-Economics of Public Policy
-Global Contexts of Rights and Disability
-Disabled Childhoods

*These units are offered in alternate years. To see the full programme and unit description, please check the programme catalogue: http://www.bris.ac.uk/unit-programme-catalogue/RouteStructure.jsa?byCohort=N&ayrCode=17%2F18&programmeCode=9SPOL001T

Careers

The programme stresses the development of social work and social research and analysis methods, as well as substantive knowledge. In addition to careers in academia, this programme prepares students for careers as social work and care researchers and analysts, research commissioners and managers in public or private agencies or organisations, both in the UK and internationally.

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This qualification opens up a challenging and rewarding career in social work, social justice and political activism within the diverse field of social care. Read more
This qualification opens up a challenging and rewarding career in social work, social justice and political activism within the diverse field of social care. This nationally and internationally recognised qualification equips graduates to work in the voluntary, statutory and private sector within fields such as policy, therapeutic intervention, research and management.

Key benefits:

• Qualify as a professional social worker while gaining a Masters degree
• Responsive part-time route with evening study
• Designed with input from service users, practitioners, carers, students and academic staff.

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/social-work

Suitable for

We welcome students of all backgrounds who seek an MA in Social Work that develops critical analysis, open debate, questioning and dismantling of conceptual frameworks.

If you want professional social work training founded on principles of empowerment and social justice for the liberation of the oppressed look no further.

Programme details

This course comprises 50% academic study and 50% practice learning in a social work/care workplace setting.

The University makes every effort to assist students in finding a placement but is unable to guarantee that a placement opportunity will be available or that students will have access to the placement of their choice. There is a nationally recognised shortage of placements and availability is dependent upon external providers who are able to offer a limited number of placements opportunities. If you are unable to take up a placement opportunity you will need to return any funding that you receive from the Student Loan Company if you are not actively attending the programme.

Format

The course is delivered using an action learning approach which places the emphasis on group work and individual responsibility for researching and collaborating.

Module titles

• Introduction to Professional Social Work
• Individuals, Communities and Societies
• Critical Professional Practice
• Professional Capability in Practice 1 (70 day practice placement)
• Developing Critical Professional Practice
• Understanding Social Work Research
• Research in Practice
• Professional Capability in Practice 2 (100 day practical placement)

Assessment

• Assignments
• Practice Portfolio
• Independent Project

Career potential

This programme opens up a challenging and rewarding career in social work, social justice and political activism in the diverse field of social care. This nationally and internationally recognized qualification equips graduates to work in the voluntary, statutory and public sector within field such as policy, therapeutic intervention, research and management.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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Working in this sector is very rewarding. Social workers help some of the most vulnerable people in society. The role provides support and assistance to a host of individuals, families and groups, from the homeless to people with learning and physical disabilities. Read more
Working in this sector is very rewarding. Social workers help some of the most vulnerable people in society. The role provides support and assistance to a host of individuals, families and groups, from the homeless to people with learning and physical disabilities. Social workers often spend their time with people – be it at hospitals, care homes or at people's homes, assessing their circumstances and building relationships.

This is both an academic and a professional qualification with all successful graduates are eligible for registration as professional social workers with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). The aim of the programme is to develop practitioners who can meet the needs of the service users, carers and communities in the context of a complex and changing welfare environment. Founded on holistic, service user-centred model of care, the course produces creative, innovative and reflective social work professionals committed to working in partnership to promote well-being and make a real difference.

On MA Social Work practice-based learning complements university-based lectures, seminars and workshops, drawing on established, contemporary and innovative approaches to work with a diverse range of service users. The course is underpinned by a commitment to inter-professionalism, service-user and carer empowerment and involvement, anti-oppressive and anti-discriminatory values and evidence based practice. The course adopts a systematic approach to the development and assessment of your social work skills and includes a specific programme of social work development.

There are five core areas of knowledge and understanding relevant to social work:
- Social work services and the needs of service users
- The service delivery context
- Values and ethics
- Social work theory
- The nature of social work practice.

These areas are systematically explored throughout the course in relation to the key roles of social work, which include:
- Assessment
- Intervention
- Support
- Managing risk
- Managing your own practice
- Demonstrating professional competence.

Employment based route

It is also possible to study the MA Social Care on an employment based route (EBR). Candidates need to be sponsored and supported by their employing agency to undertake this. It is taught alongside the existing MA Social Work and the structure is the same, but students have the option of doing the dissertation in a third year and completing their qualification over a three year period.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/social-work-ma

Modules

Year 1:
- Readiness for direct practice
This module develops practice relevant skills and awareness of the social work role and responsibilities. It will ensure that you are ready for your initial period of direct practice and to provide you with a foundation for skills development throughout the programme. Service users, carers and practitioners will be involved in the development, delivery and assessments of the module.

- Human growth and development
This module critically explores a range of human growth and development theories across the life course in order to facilitate understanding of ordinary development and the impact of life events, disability, abuse, mental health issues, drug and alcohol use on development throughout life. You will complete a series of child observations over the period of the module which provide a key opportunity to integrate theoretical knowledge with practice, and to develop reflective skills.

- Practice placement 1
70 days practice learning in practice placement.

- Social work Law
This module introduces legal context and statutory responsibilities of social workers in England and Wales. You will be familiarised with the basic principles of English Law and the systems through which the legal process operates. You will be enabled to develop a sound understanding of the key legislation relevant to professional practice. There is a strong focus on the key major current legislation Children Act (1989), the NHS and Community Care Act (1990), the Mental Health Acts (1983 and 2007) and the Mental Capacity Act (2005). The module aims to ensure that you not only understand relevant law but are also able to apply it to specific areas of practice. The module familiarises you with the powers and duties of social workers and others in relation to children and families, and vulnerable adults. It also examines the implications for social work practice of the UK legislation on discrimination and the implications of the incorporation into UK law of the European Convention on Human Rights.

- Methods and theories for practice
This module introduces the core body of knowledge clustered around the major social work theories, processes and methods. A major emphasis will be on anti-discriminatory practice, evidence based practice and critical reflection. You will learn about a range of theoretical perspectives and methods of intervention and their application in practice.

Year 2:
- Society and ethics
This module brings together selected key areas of social policy and ethics relevant to social work. There will be a strong emphasis on the use of social policy to illuminate the challenges facing and social work in contemporary British society. Using a critical analysis of the impact of neo-liberalism and globalisation the module will be a focus on the ethical dimensions of decision making and practice delivery of policy. You will be encouraged to engage with contemporary debates and controversies associated with social work and to relate your work in class, with your reading and developing practice.

- Professional capabilities in social work practice settings
This module covers the four settings of social work; disability, adults at risk, mental health and child and family. It is focused on gaining familiarity with the process and delivery of social work services, with particular regard to safe-guarding and empowering service-users.

- Communication and collaborative working

- Practice learning placement 2
100 days practice learning in practice placement.

- Limited systematic review dissertation
This module provides the opportunity to undertake a limited systematic review into a contemporary and novel topic of choice with reference to the specific profession of social work. The findings would add to the professional evidence base. Dissemination of findings by publication is encouraged and expected.

Employability

- Social work as a career
You will normally specialise in a certain group of society, such as children. Much of the work is around helping decide the level of support or protection required, responding to requests for help and working with other agencies and professionals for the best outcomes. Most opportunities are with local authorities, where salaries can vary substantially between regions - you are likely to earn more working in London. However there are also opportunities available at private care homes, charities and NHS Trusts.

A patient, non-judgemental mind-set is needed, with the ability to communicate effectively with a host of different people and gain their trust. The work demands a level of resilience and a genuine desire to help people, as some cases may be disturbing, and some people won't want your help.

- Career progression
On graduation you will be eligible to register as a Social Worker, with starting salaries ranging from £19,500-£25,000, with this possibly rising to £40,000 with experience and further responsibilities. (National Careers Service)

After qualifying as a social worker there are a variety of postgraduate professional development courses you could undertake. To find out more about what's on offer visit our online CPPD prospectus.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

This course has been developed in partnership with local authority and voluntary sector partners, with input from a wide range of service users and carers. We work in partnership with a number of London local authorities, and other organisations on both the public and private sector, who contribute to planning the programme, to learning and teaching, and to the provision of practice learning opportunities. The MA Social Work is both an academic and professional qualification.

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