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The discipline of Counselling is still forming within the field of the Social Sciences and Humanities; many new exciting research developments have opened up, and the interdisciplinary approach which underpins this programme, offers to contemporary trainee Counselling practitioners a fusion of new and traditional approaches backed by research. Read more
The discipline of Counselling is still forming within the field of the Social Sciences and Humanities; many new exciting research developments have opened up, and the interdisciplinary approach which underpins this programme, offers to contemporary trainee Counselling practitioners a fusion of new and traditional approaches backed by research.

Course Overview

This programme in Psychotherapeutic Practice: Emotion-Focused Therapy offers a part-time Counselling training opportunity at Master’s level in a Humanistic modality.

Lesley Greenberg, one of the co-researchers and founder of the modality states that:

“Emotion-focused treatment was developed as an empirically informed approach to the practice of psychotherapy grounded in contemporary psychological theories of functioning. Emotion-focused therapy (EFT) was developed by my colleagues and I in the 1980s out of empirical studies of the process of change and has developed into one of the recognized evidence-based treatment approaches for depression and marital distress as well as showing promise for trauma, eating disorders, anxiety disorders, and interpersonal problems.” FOCUS 2010;8:32-42.

This model of therapy has now been approved of by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence, the quality gatekeepers of the NHS, as having demonstrated significant positive outcome research in a number of areas.

The foundation of this therapeutic modality draws on the work of Carl Rogers and his work on the ‘therapeutic relationship’; from the ‘focusing’ work of Eugene Gendlin and the dialogic and experiential work of the Gestalt tradition. Significantly, however, EFT opens up a greater access to human emotion, as it engages with close interest in the growing understanding of neuroscience and how emotions function differently from cognition in the functioning of the brain. These insights from the work of Damasio and LeDoux, and others, are enabling practitioners in the field to develop a new language and method of addressing psychological distress and putting emotions back at the centre of the constituted self.

The programme will be taught in small groups so that students have a significant opportunity to engage in the practice and development of their therapeutic competence. In addition students will be taught through lecture format and small seminar group, where there will be the opportunity to discuss with each other and the tutor the rich, diverse and sometimes complex issues addressed in the programme.

Modules

The programme is divided into two parts:

PART 1:
The theory and practice of Emotion-Focused Therapy sets the philosophical, ideological and research base of the programme. The module on ‘The Nature and Experience of Human Functioning’ will address the conceptualization of human wellness and distress as described by the EFT model and establish the research base for the formulation and development of these ideas. The concept of ‘dialectical constructivism’ will be investigated in its formation of human meaning, and its implications to human perception and feeling. The module will engage in the most recent research regarding the emotions and the part they play in our human functioning.

The module ‘The principles of working with EFT’ introduces the practice work of the modality, which is initially founded on the establishing of the therapeutic relationship and qualities of empathy. The modules will develop a wider understanding of the concept of ‘treatment’ in the engagement of therapeutic work.

Running alongside these two practice modules will be modules on ethical practice and professional benchmarks; supervision; personal development; identity: sameness and difference; and the context of psychological distress and mental health.

PART 2:
Part two of the programme consists of a dissertation which is undertaken by the student as a supported research project. A student will receive regular supervision and opportunities to attend research workshops on topics which can help to underpin their knowledge of research.

Key Features

-The interdisciplinary approach which underpins this programme, offers to contemporary trainee Counselling practitioners a fusion of new and traditional approaches backed by research.
-The programme will be taught in small groups so that students have a significant opportunity to engage in the practice and development of their therapeutic competence.

Assessment

The programme will offer a range of different assessment methods to give students the opportunity to extend practical and academic skills and encourage your independent learning, these could include: essays, presentation, reflection, practice.

As a Counselling practice programme written up to BACP accreditation/registration standard there are two additional requirement of the course:
-A student will need to complete a minimum of 100 hours of supervised clinical practice as a trainee Counsellor
-Complete a minimum of 12 hours of personal therapy

Career Opportunities

This programme is ideal for those wishing to develop their career within counselling practice using research-led methods to enhance their professional practice.

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Early Childhood Studies at Roehampton is committed to babies and young children as people with agency and unique capacities, and to their overall wellbeing from the prenatal period. Read more

Summary

Early Childhood Studies at Roehampton is committed to babies and young children as people with agency and unique capacities, and to their overall wellbeing from the prenatal period.

The postgraduate programme draws on Froebel’s understanding of the transformative power of young children’s play on their thinking, and the crucial way that adults can either seek to assist or control young children’s intrinsic creativity. In adults’ interactions with children, however, Froebel recognised the profound influence of the community and social context.

The syllabus is underpinned by an awareness of the influence of these social, cultural and political contexts on young children’s lives, and of the roots and structures of inequality that arise from these issues. The programme will strengthen your awareness and understanding of these influences and explore how you take account of them in action. In these respects, the programme also draws inspiration from the work of Paulo Freire, the radical and pioneering educator.

The teaching is informed by active research and scholarship in early years policy and practice, as well as leading research into young children’s well-being, thinking and understanding. There is a deep commitment to working in partnership with families and communities and to the development of students’ professionalism, advocacy and leadership.

The programme is relevant, engaging and of professional and personal value for a variety of roles within the early years sector. For those working directly with young children, engagement with the course content will provide a platform for continuing professional development and career progression, while for those involved in early years policy or research, the course offers an opportunity to engage with up current thinking in a broad range of issues.

Content

Students will first look at babies' and children’s capacity for play, how they think, and how they communicate their ideas and emotions though a variety of ‘languages’ such as talk, mark-making, drawing, construction, movement, music and dance. This is studied from a variety of theoretical perspectives, critically looking at the values and assumptions underpinning these views.

There is special focus on Froebel’s legacy in early childhood practice and other key pioneers in the child-centred tradition, which embodies advocacy and respect for children and their families. You will gain an understanding of the political nature of this work, learn advocacy skills for the well-being of young children and their families and develop effective leadership and collaboration techniques across disciplines in the field of early childhood. Alongside modules going deeper into young children’s emotions and well-being, students will learn skills for undertaking their own social and educational research. These skills will be put into practice with an extended in-depth research-based project, critically enquiring into an identified social or educational problem.

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This Masters is especially designed for students who don't already have a Philosophy degree. It will provide you with an in-depth knowledge of analytic philosophy, for instance, moral and political philosophy, the history of philosophy, philosophy of the mind and philosophy of mathematics and language. Read more
This Masters is especially designed for students who don't already have a Philosophy degree. It will provide you with an in-depth knowledge of analytic philosophy, for instance, moral and political philosophy, the history of philosophy, philosophy of the mind and philosophy of mathematics and language. The MLitt is also exceptional in providing a fast-track route into a PhD in Philosophy.

Why this programme

-If you have a degree (or equivalent) in any other field, whether science, social science, arts or humanities, but an interest in philosophy, then the Philosophy MLitt will allow you to develop your philosophical interests in a variety of different courses as well as undertake a dissertation on a topic of your choice.
-If you want to do a PhD in Philosophy but don't already have a Philosophy degree, then the MLitt will allow you to apply straightaway for the PhD.
-We offer courses to bring you up to speed in a wide variety of philosophical topics, including ethics and politics, the history of philosophy including Russell, Wittgenstein and the Scottish Enlightenment, philosophy of mind - including consciousness, perception, the emotions, pain and pleasure - philosophy of language, and philosophy of mathematics.
-You will work closely with an expert member of staff on a master’s dissertation on a topic of your choice.
-MLitt students are encouraged to attend and participate in research seminars, workshops, conferences and reading groups hosted by the Centre for the Study of Perceptual Experience, the Forum for Philosophy and Religion, and the Forum for Quine and the History of Analytic Philosophy. Students will also present their work at the weekly postgraduate seminar where they will receive feedback from postgraduate students and staff. We also host an annual reading party in the Highlands at which students present papers and are coached on their writing and presentation skills.
-Philosophy at Glasgow University has an illustrious history of original thinkers going against the grain of orthodoxy. Its past professors include such giants of empiricism as Adam Smith and Thomas Reid.

Programme structure

The Philosophy MLitt has three components:
1. Introduction to Analytic Philosophy (40 credits)

2. A choice of four of the following courses (20 credits each):
-Aesthetics: philosophical questions about art and beauty
-Origins of analytic philosophy including Russell and Wittgenstein
-Philosophy of the Scottish Enlightenment including Hume and Reid
-Philosophy of mind: consciousness, emotions, pain and pleasure
-Moral philosophy: philosophical questions about value and well being
-Political philosophy: philosophical questions about justice and the state
-Metaphysics including existence, natural laws and the nature of time
-Philosophy of language including meaning, translation and truth
-Philosophy of mathematics: the nature and existence of numbers and sets

3. A dissertation on a topic of your choice guided by individual support from an expert supervisor (60 credits).

Career prospects

Philosophy students at Glasgow receive rigorous and personalised training in problem solving skills, writing skills, presentation and research skills.

All these skills are widely applicable and recognised to be exceptionally valuable in a wide range of careers, including journalism, teaching, the Civil Service, local government, business, publishing, law, and the arts.

You will also be well equipped to carry onto a further degree in philosophy such as the PhD.

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Our MSc Social Psychology programme looks at a range of topical social issues through the lens of social psychological theories. It is concerned with the scientific study of how we think about ourselves and other people, and how we influence and relate to one another. Read more
Our MSc Social Psychology programme looks at a range of topical social issues through the lens of social psychological theories. It is concerned with the scientific study of how we think about ourselves and other people, and how we influence and relate to one another.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

As an MSc Social Psychology student you will learn theories, methods, and empirical findings in the field of social psychology, which are relevant to current social issues.

These include: prejudice and discrimination; the relationship between moral judgement and emotions; the study of how individuals and groups interact to construct and maintain identities; and how these are related to social change and influence in contexts such as family systems and romantic dyads.

The programme aims to provide you with an awareness of the historical and philosophical background of social psychology, an in-depth knowledge of contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches and research findings, and the ability to conduct quantitative and qualitative research in the field.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Social Change and Influence
-Crafting Research: Linking Theory and Methods
-Dissertation
-Qualitative Research Methods
-Preparation for Academic Research in Psychology
-Intergroup Relations
-Social Cognition
-Conducting Health Psychology Research
-Chronic Conditions
-Psychological Aspects of Health Care
-Maintaining Health Throughout the Lifespan
-Aspects of Experimental Psychology
-Ergonomics and Human Factors
-Inquiry and Design
-Psychological Neuroscience: Electrophysiology
-Psychological Neuroscience: Psychophysics & fMRI
-Key Questions in Environmental Psychology: People and Place
-History and Social Psychology
-Psychology of Sustainable Development
-The Self and Relationships
-Morality and Emotions

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

-To provide students with theoretical and qualitative/quantitative methodological expertise to conduct social psychological research by training them in the informed and systematic conduct of basic and applied research involving the critical reading of theories and empirical findings
-To provide students with an in depth knowledge of contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches to the discipline
-To enable students to link theoretical and empirical questions to social issues and to provide them with an in depth understanding of the practical applications and action implications of social psychological theories and empirical findings
-To provide students with the skills to evaluate possible interventions in a variety of social domains
-To offer opportunities to develop the basic interpersonal, technical and creative skills required for the effective analysis and formulation of problems into research questions and, where appropriate, testable hypotheses

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-Of contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches to social psychology
-Of the practical applications and action implications of social psychological theories and empirical findings
-Of the principles of research design
-Of quantitative and qualitative techniques and strategies to manage and analyse psychological data
-Of ethical considerations when undertaking research and framing interventions

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-To critically assess and comment on sources of research relevant to social psychology
-To critically evaluate the contributions and limitations of social psychological theories and research methods in addressing social problems
-To evaluate actual and potential psychologically informed interventions in a variety of social domains
-To design, conduct and evaluate social psychological research
-To apply insights from social psychological theory and research to other domains of psychology

Professional practical skills
-Communicate work in a professional manner for academic and non-academic audiences in written and verbal formats
-Apply problem solving techniques to social and psychological topics effectively
-Use effective learning strategies
-Analyse and interpret social psychological theoretical analyses and quantitative and qualitative empirical evidence in a competent and critical manner

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate theories and methods in relation to social psychology by oral and written means
-Use information technology effectively
-Manage own personal development

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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Britain was the world’s earliest modern democracy, its first industrial nation and, until the era of the superpowers, the greatest modern empire. Read more
Britain was the world’s earliest modern democracy, its first industrial nation and, until the era of the superpowers, the greatest modern empire. Even today, Britain retains global reach, known for its cultural innovation, its economic power, its particular brand of politics, and its sustained international ambitions.

On this MA, you will study British history from the nineteenth century to the present, and develop an advanced understanding of historical approaches and research methods. You will also have the opportunity to take part in the high profile activities of the Mile End Group (MEG). Working with the School of History, MEG has unrivalled links to government, think tanks, the media and industry.


This programme will:

- Expose you to the major themes in 19th, 20th and 21st century British history and will challenge you to think about how historians research and explain them
- Concentrate on politics, contemporary politics, international affairs, war and its memory, gender and emotions
- Allow you to design a bespoke programme that reflects your interests
- Give you exceptional research skills

Why study Modern and Contemporary British History at Queen Mary?

Our high-quality teaching is inspired and informed by our research, and carried out in a friendly atmosphere. Our academic staff have outstanding research reputations and include six Fellows of the British Academy, the former President of the Royal Historical Society and two recipients of the French distinction of the Ordre des Palmes Académiques.
We have been renowned for excellence in the modern and contemporary history of Britain for over 25 years. Now, with 15 British historians, the School of History have research and teaching expertise from the nineteenth century to the twenty-first and their research specialities range from the history of government and politics, foreign affairs and war to gender, emotions, medicine and psychology.

The Mile End Group seminar series attracts major speakers from national politics, the civil service, industry and the media. Recent speakers include Sir John Major, Dame Eliza Manningham-Buller, Jeremy Paxman, Lord Melvyn Bragg, Lord Douglas Hurd and John Bercow MP. They are an unrivalled forum in which students work and study and gain access to influential figures.
Members of the School co-convene seminars at the Institute of Historical Research and host regular international symposia.

-We have an excellent reputation for research and teaching in modern and contemporary British history
-Three fully funded Mile End Group bursaries are offered annually
-Our London location is close to research libraries, the Institute of Historical Research, and the National Archives

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Understanding all aspects of Human-Robot interaction. the programming that coordinates a robot’s actions with human action as well the human appreciation and trust in the robot. Read more
Understanding all aspects of Human-Robot interaction: the programming that coordinates a robot’s actions with human action as well the human appreciation and trust in the robot.
At present, there are many sensors and actuators in every device – so they may become embedded in a physical reality. For robots that move around in a specific setting there is a pressing need for the development of proper methods of control and joint-action. The embedded, embodied nature of human cognition is an inspiration for this, and vice versa. Computational modelling of such tasks can give insight into the nature of human mental processing. In the Master’s specialisation in Robot Cognition you’ll learn all about the sensors, actuators and the computational modelling that connects them.
Making sense of sensor data – developing artificial perception – is no trivial task. The perception, recognition and even appreciation of sound stimuli for speech and music (i.e. auditory scene analysis) require modelling and representation at many levels and the same holds for visual object recognition and computer vision. In this area, vocal and facial expression recognition (recognition of emotion from voices and faces) is a rapidly growing application area. In the area of action and motor planning, sensorimotor integration and action, there are strong links with research at the world-renowned Donders Centre for Cognition.
At Radboud University we also look beyond the technical side of creating robots that can move, talk and interpret emotions as humans do. We believe that a robot needs to do more than simply function to its best ability. A robot that humans distrust will fail even if it is well programmed. Culture also plays a role in this; people in Japan are more open to the possibilities of robots than in, for example, the Netherlands. We will teach you how to evaluate humans’ attitudes towards a robot in order to use that information to create robots that will be accepted and trusted and therefore perform even better.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/robot

Why study Robot Cognition at Radboud University?

- We offer a great mix of technical and social aspects of robot cognition.

- This programme focuses on programming robot behaviours and evaluating them rather than building the robots themselves. We teach you to programme robots that will be used in close contact with human beings, for example in healthcare and education, rather than in industry.

- Our cognitive focus leads to a highly interdisciplinary AI programme where students gain skills and knowledge from a number of different areas such as mathematics, computer science, psychology and neuroscience combined with a core foundation of artificial intelligence.

- This specialisation offers plenty of room to create a programme that meets your own academic and professional interests.

- Together with the world-renowned Donders Institute, the Max Planck Institute and various other leading research centres in Nijmegen, we train our students to become excellent researchers in AI.

- To help you decide on a research topic there is a semi-annual Thesis Fair where academics and companies present possible project ideas. Often there are more project proposals than students to accept them, giving you ample choice. We are also open to any of you own ideas for research.

- Our AI students are a close-knit group; they have their own room in which they often get together to interact, debate and develop their ideas. Every student also receives personal guidance and supervision from a member of our expert staff.

Our research in this field

The programme is closely related to the research carried out in the internationally renowned Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour. This institute has several unique facilities for brain imaging using EEG, fMRI and MEG. You could also cooperate with the Behavioural Science Institute and work in its Virtual Reality Laboratory, which can be used to study social interaction between humans and avatars.

An example of a possible thesis subject:
- Engaging human-robot interactions in healthcare for children and/or the elderly
Social robots are often deployed with 'special' user groups such as children and elderly people. Developing and evaluating robot behaviours for these user groups is a challenge as a proper understanding of their cognitive and social abilities is needed. Depending on the task, children for example need to be engaged and encouraged in a different way than adults do. What are effective robot behaviours and strategies to engage children and/or elderly people? How can these robot behaviours be evaluated in a proper way?

Career prospects

Our Artificial Intelligence graduates have excellent job prospects and are often offered a job before they have actually graduated. Many of our graduates go on to do a PhD either at a major research institute or university with an AI department. Other graduates work for companies interested in cognitive design and research. Examples of companies looking for AI experts with this specialisation: Philips, Siemens, Honda, Mercedes, Google. Some students have even gone on to start their own companies.

Job positions

Examples of jobs that a graduate of the specialisation in Robot Cognition could get:
- PhD Researcher on Cognitive-Affective Modelling for Social Robots
- PhD Researcher on Automatic analysis of human group behaviour in the presence of robots
- PhD Researcher on Automatic analysis of affective quality of conversations in human-robot interaction
- Advisor and innovation manager in the healthcare industry
- Social robotics and affective computing for robots expressing emotions
- Developer of control algorithms for using optic flow in drones
- Advisor for start-up company on developing new uses for tactile displays
- Team member in design of emotion recognition and training for autistic children

Internship

Half of your second year consists of an internship, giving you plenty of hands-on experience. We encourage students to do this internship abroad, although this is not mandatory. We do have connections with companies abroad, for example in China, Finland and the United States.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/robot

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The MA in Philosophy provides a combination of taught core and option modules which aim to make you familiar with what is at the centre of contemporary debates. Read more
The MA in Philosophy provides a combination of taught core and option modules which aim to make you familiar with what is at the centre of contemporary debates. Additionally, in the first term, you will attend dissertation preparation seminars to enable you to write your dissertation proposal. Further support is given during the second and third terms and you will write your dissertation under the guidance of a supervisor. During your third term you and your peers will hold an in-house conference.

This MA will give you up-to-date knowledge of contemporary philosophy across a broad range of subjects and provides essential training for students considering going on to do a PhD.

The MA Seminar

The MA Seminar is designed to provide students with detailed knowledge of the core areas of Philosophy. The Seminar consists of four modules:
-Topics in Theoretical Philosophy
-Topics in Practical Philosophy
And 2 Option Modules - The option modules offered in 2016/17 are:
-Contemporary Issues in Bioethics
-German Idealism: Moral, Legal and Political Philosophy
-MA Project Essay*
-Metaphysics of Mind
-Philosophy of Emotions
-Philosophy of Film
-Pragmatism

Postgraduate Research Skills Seminar

The Postgraduate Research Skills Seminar is taught over two terms and is designed to provide students with a grounding in the skills necessary to contribute to contemporary philosophical debates. They attend at least one research seminar or colloquium every two weeks and maintain a reflective journal of their research experiences throughout the Autumn and Spring Terms. Tutorials are held every two weeks during which students discuss their responses to research events as recorded in their journals and provide mentoring and peer support.

Dissertation Preparation

This module will start immediately and continue over the three terms. It is designed to facilitate applicants for AHRC PhD funding who need to have a thesis proposal worked up by the end of the calendar year. This will be particularly beneficial to those who will be pursuing a PhD in Philosophy.

*The Project Essay

This module is designed to enable students with specialised interests to pursue independently a topic of their own choosing. Students taking this module propose an independent study topic. The proposal will then be considered by the Board of Studies and, if accepted, the student will be assigned a suitable member of staff who will supervise the project. The Project Essay is compulsory for part-time students but can also be taken by full-time students as one of their two option modules.

Dissemination Practice

This module is designed to provide students with the opportunity to practise disseminating their work, which is a distinctive and challenging feature of Philosophy as a discipline.
Students will organise and present a paper at a one-day ‘conference’, which will be attended by at least two members of staff.

The Dissertation

As an application of the core knowledge, skills and experience gained in the previous stages of the course, the Dissertation enables students to produce a sustained piece of critical writing on a topic of their choosing. A member of staff with expertise in the relevant area will provide supervision.

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Welcome to one of the most exciting periods of English literature and history. Read more
Welcome to one of the most exciting periods of English literature and history. The transformations in religion, politics, the technologies of writing and publication, science, and global exploration that took place during these turbulent years, and which continue to resonate today, prompted some of the most vibrant, difficult, and rewarding writing ever produced.

We invite you to join a team of world-leading scholars, working at the cutting edge of our discipline to explore this extraordinary world, and trace some of its local, European, and global contexts. In our core seminars, research events, trips, and collaborations you will build up a comprehensive set of research skills, whilst our ambitious and imaginative option modules will extend your current interests, and open up a novel set of perspectives upon both canonical and little-known texts.

York’s long history and prime location makes it an excellent place to study this period, and you can choose to take classes in the beautiful Minster Library, learn palaeography in one of the biggest archive repositories outside London, study Latin or a range of other languages or join us for trips – destinations have included a behind-the-scenes look at the Castle Museum, and the magnificent Fountains Abbey, Castle Howard, Burton Agnes Hall, and Hardwick Hall.

You will have the opportunity to work with distinguished scholars across a variety of fields. In particular, we specialise in:
-History of the book and textual cultures
-Religion, literature, and politics
-The reception and transformation of the Classics
-The poetics and pragmatics of translation
-Shakespeare, Heywood, and the drama of the English Renaissance
-The history and literature of science and medicine
-Material culture
-Women and literary production
-The history of emotions

Many of our students go on to PhD study; others have pursued a diverse range of careers including publishing, arts management, librarianship, and education.

Assessment

-Four assessed essays of 4,500 words
-A 14,000-16,000 word dissertation, written in consultation with a supervisor on an agreed topic

Careers

We have an excellent employment record for our postgraduates who are highly prized by top level employers, both in the UK and on the international stage. A combination of outstanding teaching and a supportive collegiate environment enable our students to develop their creativity, intellectual independence and ability to filter complex information and present it persuasively in person and in writing. These are important transferable skills which will always hold their value at the top end of the jobs market.

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Anyone interested in child development, or planning to work with children in the future, will be fascinated by this course. Read more
Anyone interested in child development, or planning to work with children in the future, will be fascinated by this course. As well as core modules in Social, Developmental, Biological and Cognitive Psychology, Research Methods and Statistics that will give you a BPS-recognised Psychology degree, you will take a series of specialist Child Development modules in years one, two and three that will give you a chance to study children’s thoughts, emotions and behaviour in great detail. You will be able to do a work placement in a child-centred setting, and you will complete an original research study under the supervision of an active developmental researcher. If you want to see how children play or how they interact with their carers or peers, you will have access to our purpose-built Child Observation Suite. If you want to see what is happening inside their heads, we have a fantastic Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience lab with a wide range of imaging equipment designed for children of all ages. If you are interested in Educational Psychology, we have lots of links with local schools and other children’s services, providing opportunities to study language development, literacy, peer relations, online safeguarding, antisocial behaviour and bullying.

DBS CHECKS

This course will involve access to children and/or vulnerable adults. You will be required to obtain a satisfactory Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service clearance (formerly termed CRB) and we will guide you through this process.

INDUSTRY LINKS

We continuously engage with employers to make sure our curriculum delivers the skills and knowledge industry needs. These include a number of professionals from various sectors, including NHS Trusts, patient groups, medical practitioners, allied health professionals, the Prison Service, police forces, local education authorities, schools and professional sports organisations.

PROFESSIONAL ACCREDITATION

Accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) as conferring eligibility for Graduate Membership of the Society with the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership, provided a minimum standard of qualification of second class honours is achieved.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

You’ll be taught by academics that produce first-class research, which has an impact not just in academia but in our working and everyday lives. Much of our psychological research was rated as ‘internationally excellent’ and ‘world-leading’ in the last research assessment exercise.

Year 1 is assessed by coursework and Multiple Choice Question exams; Year 2 through coursework, MCQ and essay exams; Year 3 through coursework or essay exams and the project. Percentage of coursework to exams is roughly 50/50.

OPPORTUNITIES

You can get involved in the research carried out by our staff, both as a participant and as a researcher, and not just through your classes and final year projects - there are paid research student internships and part-time research assistant positions available. You can also take part in conference talks, research publications and research grants - our current students regularly publish themselves, or become members of the editorial panel of ‘Diffusion’, UCLan’s own undergraduate research journal.

Some of our graduates pursue a career in psychology by undertaking postgraduate training to become professional psychologists, including our BPS-accredited Master’s programmes. However, UCLan graduates are valued more broadly, and others utilise the skills that our degree encourages to take graduate-level positions in a range of organisations, including the Police, Prison Service, NHS, social and community services, health authorities and in the pharmaceutical industry, and in education and training.

FURTHER INFORMATION

All our Psychology degrees share a common first year, with the opportunity to start specialising from Year 2. You can choose BSc routes in (i) Developmental Psychology, (ii) Forensic Psychology, (iii) Health Psychology, (iv) Neuropsychology, (v) Psychology with Psychotherapy and Counselling and (vi) Psychology and Criminology.

The Psychology syllabus is informed by the professional body, the British Psychological Society (BPS). All core modules are completed by Year 2, after which you can choose your specialism and, if you like, progress straight onto a Master's degree, which can provide stage 1 of your training towards becoming a professional psychologist.

In Year 1 you will attend lectures, seminars, workshops and labs. You will take part in Psychology practicals and develop your skills in statistical analysis and report-writing. Lectures are delivered to large groups, but other classes contain about thirty students. These small groups allow you to develop your understanding of psychology and to practise your communication skills. You should get to know your fellow group members, and learn to use your Academic Advisor as a source of academic advice.

In Year 2, you will study core areas of psychology in more depth, including Social and Developmental Psychology, Cognitive and Physiological Psychology, and Psychological Research Methods. You will continue to develop your skills in psychological research and report-writing but work in smaller groups, and take a role in designing your own studies.

In Year 3, you will complete a double module research project on a Developmental topic. This can be the most exciting part of your degree because it lets you investigate a subject in which you have a particular interest, supported by one-to-one discussions with your supervisor. The rest of Year 3 is made up of a mixture of specialist and general modules including two core Developmental Psychology and Educational Psychology modules.

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The MA in Anthropology and Cultural Politics is an interdisciplinary programme in anthropology, directed at students from a wide range of disciplines in the humanities, social and political sciences, artists, and professionals in the media and cultural sectors. Read more
The MA in Anthropology and Cultural Politics is an interdisciplinary programme in anthropology, directed at students from a wide range of disciplines in the humanities, social and political sciences, artists, and professionals in the media and cultural sectors. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-anthropology-cultural-politics/

The objective of the MA is to address contemporary issues in culture and politics from an anthropological perspective, drawing on the commitment of the Department of Anthropology at Goldsmiths to build a public anthropology.

The MA is organised around a critical investigation of the central thematic concepts of its title: 'culture', 'power', and 'politics', as well as 'anthropology' itself.

Each of these terms are posited in this programme as questions for critical reflection and students are encouraged to pursue independent research projects that investigate the meanings attributed to these terms in contemporary social contexts.

The programme is particularly interested in the intersections of 'culture' and 'power', and the consideration of what may be called 'cultural politics'.

- How and when does 'culture' become apprehensible as 'political'?
- How and when does 'power' operate upon or within 'culture'? Is it even tenable to uphold and retain this distinction?
- If so, what are the analytical or interpretive benefits?
- What may be the disadvantages or pitfalls?
- If not, what is implicated in the politicisation of 'culture' or the culturalisation of 'power' and 'politics'?
- How can these concerns be studied in the ongoing struggles over 'culture' in everyday life?

In addition to the core modules, options can be selected from several departments and centres.

See the website http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-anthropology-cultural-politics/

Core Modules

The MA is made up of four parts:
- Anthropology and Cultural Politics (30 credits)
- Anthropology Theory (30 credits)
- Option modules [within the Department of Anthropology, or the Departments of English and Comparative Literature, Media & - Communications, Politics, Sociology, or Centre for Cultural Studies] (60 credits)
- Dissertation (60 credits)

- Anthropology and Cultural Politics:

What is the relationship between culture and power?; How is power manifested or articulated 'culturally'?; In what ways may culture be understood to be 'political'?

This module is centrally preoccupied with social and political theories organised around the question of 'culture' and its relation to 'power', and vice versa, and with comprehending what may be the stakes of the politics of 'culture'. The module elaborates upon the problem of 'politics' and its always complex configuration with respect to what comes to be deemed to be 'cultural', specifically in relation to creative and productive labour, alienation, capitalism and commodification, the state, ideology, and hegemony.

We also consider the concepts of the critique of everyday life, the society of the spectacle, and the production of space. While principally concerned with a series of theoretical problems, the module will nonetheless also marshal the insights that may be gleaned from ethnography, in the effort to situate the discipline of socio-cultural anthropology in relation to the problems posed by or for 'cultural politics'.

- Anthropological Theory:

The aims and objectives of this module are to introduce you to major subfields of modern anthropology and to do so in a broadly historical and comparative framework.

The lectures will enable you to see how different anthropologists approach a number of central contemporary issues. The topics chosen will focus upon some of the theoretical developments and methodological strategies pursued in response to profound and widespread social transformations. Each week the module will focus on a single technique, methodology or strategy in anthropology in the work of a specific anthropologist.

Assessment

Dissertation – a thorough critical discussion of existing knowledge in a relevant area; reports; take-home papers. Options may require a presentation or production of visual material.

Department: Anthropology

Investigate a variety of fascinating areas that have real relevance to modern life.

As a department we’re interested in pushing the discipline forward. We’re known for pioneering new fields including visual anthropology and the anthropology of modernity. And we tackle other contemporary issues like urban planning, development, emotions and aesthetics, and new social movements.

Skills & Careers

The programme is great preparation for any role that involves research and communication. Graduates have pursued opportunities in journalism, other media, policy, education and public debate; they have also gone on to research degrees, either at Goldsmiths or elsewhere.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/apply/

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Our MA in English Studies invites you to choose from a number of distinctive pathways through the programme. Our Eighteenth-Century Literature and Romanticism pathway takes a truly interdisciplinary approach, and explores the history of genres, philosophy, politics, history, and visual culture, amongst other topics. Read more
Our MA in English Studies invites you to choose from a number of distinctive pathways through the programme.

Our Eighteenth-Century Literature and Romanticism pathway takes a truly interdisciplinary approach, and explores the history of genres, philosophy, politics, history, and visual culture, amongst other topics.

In your first semester you might explore the popular culture of coffee house and tavern, the political world on the street and in parliament, the vocations of women poets and polemicists, polite society and its interest in the management of emotions and arts, and the metropolitan life of London.

In the second semester, you can examine Romantic poetics and manifestos, the theoretical and political growth of philosophical and cultural enlightenment, Orientalism, travel, and the French Revolution and its aftershocks.

This pathway aims to prepare students to formulate a research topic, identify research materials, and present an argument in written and oral form that is formed by alternative interpretations. Students who complete the pathway will be aware of the interdisciplinary debates concerning the literature and history of this period, and will have engaged with a variety of materials: theoretical, visual, historical, and literary. You will also be able to deploy a range of appropriate skills in research, bibliography, and IT.

You will be taught in small seminar groups, and will be introduced to a number of key research resources in London through a module in research skills.

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Our research expertise centres around three themes. Identities, the Sociology of Health and Life Sciences and Social Transformations. Read more

Course overview

Our research expertise centres around three themes: Identities, the Sociology of Health and Life Sciences and Social Transformations. Our research tradition covers sociology, social policy and social anthropology. We have strengths in the fields of family studies, health studies, political economy, sexuality, citizenship, and youth and student lives.

Our MPhil and PhD projects cover a wide spectrum of contemporary sociology including: bodies, identities and experiences; culture and material life; 'development' and the global south; emotions and intimacy; environment and society; imagining pasts and futures; sexualities and gender; sociology of ethics; sociologies of health and life sciences; sociology of law; visual and aesthetic cultures.

Each of these themes represents the expertise of a member of staff actively engaged in sociological research.

Most of our research students are based in the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, with some based in the Policy, Ethics and Life Sciences (PEALS) Research Centre.

Training and Skills

As a research student you will receive a tailored package of academic and administrative support to ensure you maximise your research and future career. The academic information is in the programme profile and you will be supported by our doctoral training centres, Faculty Training Programme and Research Student Support Team.

For further information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/sociology-mphil-phd/#training&skills

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/sociology-mphil-phd/#howtoapply

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This exciting degree offers you the opportunity to study one of the major areas in contemporary media and communications – branding- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-brands-communication-culture/. Read more
This exciting degree offers you the opportunity to study one of the major areas in contemporary media and communications – branding- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-brands-communication-culture/

The unique programme introduces you to the variety of ways in which brands are developed and used, and helps you to understand how the growth of branding – in business, but also in politics, government, sport and culture – has changed the societies we live in.

What happens when the state starts to use branding techniques to communicate with its citizens?

And how does the rise of digital and social media change the relationship between brands and their publics?

What, for example, are the consequences of understanding political parties, artists or sports teams as ‘brands’?

An introduction to contemporary branding debates

The MA in Brands, Communication and Culture aims to provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the history and development of brands and branding, and their relationship to contemporary forms of communication and culture. Specifically, you should acquire an in-depth knowledge of the social, political and economic backdrop against which branding has become so important, and an understanding of the key themes and debates surrounding its development and use, including the relationship between brands and intellectual property, and the extent to which branding promotes or inhibits openness and transparency within organisations.

You will also improve your ability to think critically and creatively about contemporary communications and cultural practices. When you have completed the programme you will have at your disposal a range of tools that will enable you to analyse contemporary communications, to make judgments about their significance and value and be able to thoughtfully contribute to contemporary communications.

A unique approach to the study of brands

This MA is not a conventional branding or marketing course. Instead it offers a unique approach to the study of brands. This is reflected in the topics taught on our core modules, which include:

The role of brands in and beyond markets
The rise of consumer culture
Critical perspectives on brand management and governance
Intellectual property
Immaterial labour and the rise of ‘branded workers’
Gender, colonial history and branding
Attachment, identity and emotions in branding
Ethics and transparency
The emergence of brand experiences and ‘staging’ of brands
Fair trade and accountability
Branded spaces and communities
Social media and open source cultures
Geodemographics and new forms of social classification
The MA Brands, Communication and Culture is taught across two departments: Media & Communications and Sociology. This gives you access to experts in many fields. In addition to the two core courses you will have the opportunity to customize your degree by choosing from a range of modules from different departments to allow you to explore your own interests and make wider connections.

We welcome students who bring to the course a range of experiences and interests in communication, management, politics, design and the cultural industries.

Recent dissertation topics include:

Branding post-capitalism? An investigation of crowdfunding platforms
Trespassed City: Mapping London’s privately owned public spaces
The rise of co-working spaces
Craft Entrepreneurs: an inquiry into the rise of artisanal production in post-industrial cities
Hashtags in photo sharing social media apps
Consumer culture in contemporary Shanghai
Branding of NGOs
Sustainable brand strategies - good for the environment or just a selling strategy?
Fashion bloggers and cultural capital
Medical tourism and branded healthcare
Intellectual property in the fashion industry
Branding London's districts

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Kat Jungnickel.

Overview

The programme is made up of two core modules (60 credits in total), between two and four options modules (60 credits in total), and a dissertation (60 credits).

The first core module, Branding I, introduces you to contemporary definitions and theories of branding, its history and development, changes in the role of marketing, promotion and design, and their place in the global economy.

The second core module, Branding II, puts greater emphasis on contemporary themes and issues in branding, and their relationship to wider debates in society, economy and culture.

Throughout the core components of the degree, you will examine the wide range of ways in which branding is currently used, in organisations ranging from large corporations to public sector bodies, charities and other third sector organisations.

For the optional modules, you'll have an opportunity to explore some of the wider contexts for brands and branding by taking up to 60 credits of modules provided elsewhere in Media and Communications or neighbouring departments such as Sociology, Cultural Studies and Anthropology.

Part-time students typically take the two core modules in their first year, and the options modules plus the dissertation in their second year.

Vocational elements

The department offers some practice-based options in areas such as:

Media Futures
Online Journalism
Campaign Skills
Media Law and Ethics
Design Methods
Processes for Innovation

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills

The programme helps students to develop a high-level understanding of contemporary branding and communications techniques and their social, economic and political contexts. You will be encouraged to develop your critical reasoning skills and your understanding of contemporary cultural and media theory, but also to develop greater visual literacy and a capacity for creative thinking. Assessments are designed to ensure that you are able to apply these skills in practical ways.

Careers

The programme equips you with the skills necessary to pursue a wide range of careers related to branding and communication in the media and other industries. Students are encouraged to seek work experience and work placements during the programme as time allows. Regular seminars with visiting speakers will enable you to gain an understanding of how your degree can be used in a professional context. The MA also allows you to pursue further academic research in one or more of the areas covered on the programme.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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How do athletes overcome setbacks? What is the best way for coaches to develop a great team dynamic? How do referees and officials deal with criticism? What factors influence people to take part in exercise?. Read more
How do athletes overcome setbacks? What is the best way for coaches to develop a great team dynamic? How do referees and officials deal with criticism? What factors influence people to take part in exercise?

Sport and exercise psychologists seek to understand the ways in which thoughts and emotions can affect performance and exercise participation. They use this knowledge to provide psychological skills support, increase motivation and develop self-belief at all levels, whether that’s encouraging the public to adopt a more active lifestyle or improving the performance of elite competitors.

This British Psychological Society (BPS) accredited Masters degree will develop the advanced psychological knowledge to understand critical issues in sport and physical activity, from recreational to elite level.

For more information on the part time option of this course, please view this web-page: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/sport-and-exercise-psychology-dtpsxp6/

Learn From The Best

The teaching team includes a number of BPS Chartered and HCPC registered Sport and Exercise Psychologists who have links to high profile governing bodies and sporting organisations including The Football Association (FA), Newcastle United Foundation and the English Institute of Sport, so when you choose this course you can be sure the knowledge and skills you will gain will be current and industry-relevant.

You will learn from research-active academics from across the Department of Psychology and Department of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation, a valuable combination not found in most institutions. The experienced, cohesive teaching team have been praised by the BPS, external examiners and students alike for their knowledge, enthusiasm and high levels of student support.

Teaching And Assessment

At Northumbria, we take a practical approach to learning and assessment. Based in our well-equipped laboratory facilities and the state-of-the art Sport Central, you will be given the opportunity to work with athletes and client groups.

You’ll find that many modules use real-world scenarios, providing an opportunity to satisfy your intellectual curiosity as you work your way through evidence that often seems contradictory or controversial. You may find yourself helping to solve a real-life athlete issue; implementing intervention strategies to assist with performance; or developing a strategy to encourage behaviour change.

Assessment methods are varied and include exams, critical reviews and essays. Much of the course-based assessment has been developed to illustrate how the principles of sport and exercise psychology are applied in real world contexts. These may include reflections, case study reports, client/athlete needs assessments presentations, and handouts to coaches.

Moduler Overview
PY0756 - Exercise Psychology (Core, 20 Credits)
PY0757 - Motor Processes in Sport (Core, 20 Credits)
PY0758 - Psychological Skills for Sport Performance (Core, 20 Credits)
PY0759 - Counselling and Interpersonal Processes in Sport and Exercise (Core, 20 Credits)
PY0774 - Qualitative and Quantitative Methods (Core, 20 Credits)
PY0775 - Professional Skills (Core, 20 Credits)
PY0776 - MSc Thesis (Core, 60 Credits)

Learning Environment

You will be working within our modern, purpose-built teaching rooms and laboratories for taught and practical based sessions.

You will develop data analysis and interpretation skills using advanced statistical software packages as well as online survey platforms and bespoke laboratory software, including psychometric and cognitive tests.

As a postgraduate psychology student you will also have access to a dedicated common room for study, informal learning and socialising.

Research-Rich Learning

Throughout the course you will develop an understanding of research-informed practice and learn to apply this practically, through solving case studies, assessing clients for psychological skills intervention, and interpreting patterns of behaviour.

You will draw from the strengths of research active academics whose interests cover wide-ranging subjects from investigating the effects of venue on sports performance, interpersonal processes in sport, the psychological influence of injury, alcohol consumption in student athletes and the impact of physical activity on psychological wellbeing.

Your MSc thesis is submitted in journal format which allows for ongoing review and evaluation. This eases the process of submitting for publication, can strengthen a scholarship or funding application, and improve the prospect of securing employment in an academic environment.

Give Your Career An Edge

As the link between psychological wellbeing and physical activity becomes more defined, the demand for exercise psychologists in the healthcare sector has increased – particularly in the areas of health promotion and rehabilitation. Similarly, there is a growing demand for sports psychologists to deliver support from grassroots level through to performance athletes. This Masters degree programme will help develop the professional skills that will give you the edge in this evolving area of psychology.

For applicants who already possess the Graduate Basis for Chartered membership (GBC) and who successfully complete the course, you can then go on to complete the BPS Stage 2 Qualification in Sport and Exercise Psychology. After completing both Stage 1 and Stage 2 qualifications this will then enable you to become an HCPC registered Sport and Exercise Psychologist practitioner, a legally protected title.

Your Future

You will graduate with a wide range of professional skills, which include the ability to:
-Critically evaluate current theories and evidence which can be applied to understand and solve complex issues in real world contexts.
-Communicate your ideas and findings effectively to variety of audiences, whether it be coaches, parents, athletes or exercise enthusiasts.
-Apply relevant ethical, legal and professional practice frameworks (such as those required by the BPS and HCPC).

Your transferable skills will include oral and written communication, critical evaluation, problem solving, time management, IT and advanced statistical and qualitative analysis techniques.

Graduates with Stage 1 and Stage 2 qualifications who are interested in sport psychology will be in a strong position to work with major sports teams or field-based consultation at major sporting events. Options for exercise psychologists include working in private rehabilitation, gyms, the NHS, GP exercise referral schemes and local Councils.

Some of our recent graduates now work as teachers, coaches, consultants, in the healthcare sector and for organisations including the English Institute of Sport and Sunderland Association Football Club (SAFC). Many of our students have gone on to further postgraduate opportunities such as Ph.D. study whilst some have also secured placement opportunities in elite, amateur and recreational level sport.

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Sociology at Edinburgh is one of the premier research units in the UK, as indicated by our excellent rating in the latest Research Assessment Exercise. Read more

Research profile

Sociology at Edinburgh is one of the premier research units in the UK, as indicated by our excellent rating in the latest Research Assessment Exercise.

We have a long-standing commitment to original empirical and theoretical work on society, and to the production of cultural and scientific knowledge.

We work closely with other colleagues in the School and supervise many cross-disciplinary projects. Applications are particularly welcome from students wishing to specialise in:

refugee and migration studies
auto/biography and narrative studies
comparative sociology
South Asian studies
Southern Africa
family and intimate relations
innovation in genomics
medical sociology
political sociology
nationalism studies
constitutional change and governance
social studies of finance and markets
social, cultural and feminist theory
gender, inequality and social stratification
work, consumption and organisations
Scottish society and politics
science and technology studies
sociology of emotions

Training and support

You will work with a supervisor on an original research dissertation and participate in advanced sociology research-training workshops, work-in-progress seminars and a writing workshop.

The Graduate School provides a suite of ESRC-recognised research training courses for social science students across the University. We are developing an exciting package of flexible, web-based training courses in line with the increased emphasis on ongoing training throughout your doctoral studies.

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