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The discipline of Counselling is still forming within the field of the Social Sciences and Humanities; many new exciting research developments have opened up, and the interdisciplinary approach which underpins this programme, offers to contemporary trainee Counselling practitioners a fusion of new and traditional approaches backed by research. Read more
The discipline of Counselling is still forming within the field of the Social Sciences and Humanities; many new exciting research developments have opened up, and the interdisciplinary approach which underpins this programme, offers to contemporary trainee Counselling practitioners a fusion of new and traditional approaches backed by research.

Course Overview

This programme in Psychotherapeutic Practice: Emotion-Focused Therapy offers a part-time Counselling training opportunity at Master’s level in a Humanistic modality.

Lesley Greenberg, one of the co-researchers and founder of the modality states that:

“Emotion-focused treatment was developed as an empirically informed approach to the practice of psychotherapy grounded in contemporary psychological theories of functioning. Emotion-focused therapy (EFT) was developed by my colleagues and I in the 1980s out of empirical studies of the process of change and has developed into one of the recognized evidence-based treatment approaches for depression and marital distress as well as showing promise for trauma, eating disorders, anxiety disorders, and interpersonal problems.” FOCUS 2010;8:32-42.

This model of therapy has now been approved of by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence, the quality gatekeepers of the NHS, as having demonstrated significant positive outcome research in a number of areas.

The foundation of this therapeutic modality draws on the work of Carl Rogers and his work on the ‘therapeutic relationship’; from the ‘focusing’ work of Eugene Gendlin and the dialogic and experiential work of the Gestalt tradition. Significantly, however, EFT opens up a greater access to human emotion, as it engages with close interest in the growing understanding of neuroscience and how emotions function differently from cognition in the functioning of the brain. These insights from the work of Damasio and LeDoux, and others, are enabling practitioners in the field to develop a new language and method of addressing psychological distress and putting emotions back at the centre of the constituted self.

The programme will be taught in small groups so that students have a significant opportunity to engage in the practice and development of their therapeutic competence. In addition students will be taught through lecture format and small seminar group, where there will be the opportunity to discuss with each other and the tutor the rich, diverse and sometimes complex issues addressed in the programme.

Modules

The programme is divided into two parts:

PART 1:
The theory and practice of Emotion-Focused Therapy sets the philosophical, ideological and research base of the programme. The module on ‘The Nature and Experience of Human Functioning’ will address the conceptualization of human wellness and distress as described by the EFT model and establish the research base for the formulation and development of these ideas. The concept of ‘dialectical constructivism’ will be investigated in its formation of human meaning, and its implications to human perception and feeling. The module will engage in the most recent research regarding the emotions and the part they play in our human functioning.

The module ‘The principles of working with EFT’ introduces the practice work of the modality, which is initially founded on the establishing of the therapeutic relationship and qualities of empathy. The modules will develop a wider understanding of the concept of ‘treatment’ in the engagement of therapeutic work.

Running alongside these two practice modules will be modules on ethical practice and professional benchmarks; supervision; personal development; identity: sameness and difference; and the context of psychological distress and mental health.

PART 2:
Part two of the programme consists of a dissertation which is undertaken by the student as a supported research project. A student will receive regular supervision and opportunities to attend research workshops on topics which can help to underpin their knowledge of research.

Key Features

-The interdisciplinary approach which underpins this programme, offers to contemporary trainee Counselling practitioners a fusion of new and traditional approaches backed by research.
-The programme will be taught in small groups so that students have a significant opportunity to engage in the practice and development of their therapeutic competence.

Assessment

The programme will offer a range of different assessment methods to give students the opportunity to extend practical and academic skills and encourage your independent learning, these could include: essays, presentation, reflection, practice.

As a Counselling practice programme written up to BACP accreditation/registration standard there are two additional requirement of the course:
-A student will need to complete a minimum of 100 hours of supervised clinical practice as a trainee Counsellor
-Complete a minimum of 12 hours of personal therapy

Career Opportunities

This programme is ideal for those wishing to develop their career within counselling practice using research-led methods to enhance their professional practice.

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Why study at Roehampton. We are ranked best modern university in London for the quality of our research (Research Excellence Framework 2014). Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • We are ranked best modern university in London for the quality of our research (Research Excellence Framework 2014).
  • Roehampton’s School of Education has a historical association with Froebel College which was founded in 1892. As a result, the programme is supported by the renowned Froebel Archive for Childhood Studies, and has developed an international reputation in the field attracting students at postgraduate level from around the world.
  • Students become part of the early childhood research centre with its internationally highly respected research team.
  • Students graduate with a high level of knowledge and expertise in early childhood and strengthened confidence to contribute to, and advance in their chosen career.

Course summary

Early Childhood Studies at Roehampton is committed to babies and young children as people with agency and unique capacities, and to their overall wellbeing from the prenatal period.

The postgraduate programme draws on Froebel’s understanding of the transformative power of young children’s play on their thinking, and the crucial way that adults can either seek to assist or control young children’s intrinsic creativity. In adults’ interactions with children, however, Froebel recognised the profound influence of the community and social context. 

The syllabus is underpinned by an awareness of the influence of these social, cultural and political contexts on young children’s lives, and of the roots and structures of inequality that arise from these issues. The programme will strengthen your awareness and understanding of these influences and explore how you take account of them in action. In these respects, the programme also draws inspiration from the work of Paulo Freire, the radical and pioneering educator. 

The teaching is informed by active research and scholarship in early years policy and practice, as well as leading research into young children’s well-being, thinking and understanding. There is a deep commitment to working in partnership with families and communities and to the development of students’ professionalism, advocacy and leadership.

The programme is relevant, engaging and of professional and personal value for a variety of roles within the early years sector. For those working directly with young children, engagement with the course content will provide a platform for continuing professional development and career progression, while for those involved in early years policy or research, the course offers an opportunity to engage with up current thinking in a broad range of issues.

Content

Students will first look at babies' and children’s capacity for play, how they think, and how they communicate their ideas and emotions though a variety of ‘languages’ such as talk, mark-making, drawing, construction, movement, music and dance. This is studied from a variety of theoretical perspectives, critically looking at the values and assumptions underpinning these views. 

There is special focus on Froebel’s legacy in early childhood practice and other key pioneers in the child-centred tradition, which embodies advocacy and respect for children and their families. You will gain an understanding of the political nature of this work, learn advocacy skills for the well-being of young children and their families and develop effective leadership and collaboration techniques across disciplines in the field of early childhood. Alongside modules going deeper into young children’s emotions and well-being, students will learn skills for undertaking their own social and educational research. These skills will be put into practice with an extended in-depth research-based project, critically enquiring into an identified social or educational problem.

Modules

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation
  • Play, Thinking and Communication

Required module

  • Undertaking Social and Educational Research

Optional modules

  • Early Childhood Pedagogy and Practice
  • Exploring the Froebelian Legacy in Early Childhood Practice
  • Professionalism, Leadership and Advocacy
  • Emotion and the Roots of Wellbeing

Career options

  • Careers in professional practice and leadership in early childhood, education, health and social welfare.
  • Careers in policy making, implementation and administration of early childhood provision.
  • Careers in research and developing the early years workforce in further and higher education.

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GET READY TO JOIN A BOOMING INDUSTRY. Gaming and multimedia have assumed an important place in our society, giving rise to a booming industry with turnovers exceeding those of the movie industry and generating leaps in computer software and hardware development. Read more

GET READY TO JOIN A BOOMING INDUSTRY

Gaming and multimedia have assumed an important place in our society, giving rise to a booming industry with turnovers exceeding those of the movie industry and generating leaps in computer software and hardware development. The Master’s programme in Game and Media Technology focuses on the technological aspects of gaming and multimedia in the context of computer science.

In the research programme of gaming and simulation, you will explore:

  • Modelling virtual worlds
  • Creating character animation and behavior
  • Generating effective scenarios
  • Building multi-sensory interfaces

DRAMA, STYLE AND EMOTIONS

It also incorporates such aspects as drama, style, and emotions, with a focus on the technical aspects. Simulating the physics, biology, and psychology of the real world and bringing it to life in multi-sensory simulations are major challenges you will explore in our dynamic programme.

New types of games and hardware reach the market regularly. Moreover, there is increasing recognition of the value of games as an educational tool and the integration of multimedia tools into everyday life is continuing. This creates fertile grounds for those with an advanced degree in the area of Game and Media Technology.

PROGRAMME OBJECTIVE 

This Master’s programme in Game and Media Technology provides you with both fundamental and applied knowledge of the techniques for handling spatial data. You will gain the skills to perform research, analyse, and solve scientific problems — and to keep up with research progress in the fields of geometry, imaging, and virtual environments. Game and Media Technology graduates are highly valued employees in many companies and research facilities. 



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This Masters is especially designed for students who don't already have a Philosophy degree. Read more

This Masters is especially designed for students who don't already have a Philosophy degree. It will provide you with an in-depth knowledge of analytic philosophy, including such core areas as metaphysics, ethics, social and political philosophy, the history of philosophy, philosophy of the mind and philosophy of mathematics and language. The MLitt is also exceptional in providing a fast-track route into a PhD in Philosophy.

Why this programme

  • If you have a degree (or equivalent) in any other field, whether science, social science, arts or humanities, but an interest in philosophy, then the Philosophy MLitt will allow you to develop your philosophical interests in a variety of different courses as well as undertake a dissertation on a topic of your choice.
  • If you want to do a PhD in Philosophy but don't already have a Philosophy degree, then the MLitt will allow you to apply straightaway for the PhD.
  • We offer courses to bring you up to speed in a wide variety of philosophical topics, including ethics and politics, the history of philosophy including Russell, Wittgenstein and the Scottish Enlightenment, philosophy of mind - including consciousness, perception, the emotions, pain and pleasure - philosophy of language, metaphysics, epistemology – including virtue epistemology - and philosophy of mathematics.
  • You will work closely with an expert member of staff on a master’s dissertation on a topic of your choice.
  • MLitt students are encouraged to attend and participate in research seminars, workshops, conferences and reading groups hosted by the Centre for the Study of Perceptual Experience and the Forum for Quine and the History of Analytic Philosophy as well as by externally funded events in (among other areas) epistemology, metaphysics, ethics and political philosophy. Students will also present their work at the weekly postgraduate seminar where they will receive feedback from postgraduate students and staff. We also host an annual reading party in the Highlands at which students present papers and are coached on their writing and presentation skills.
  • Philosophy at Glasgow University has an illustrious history of original thinkers going against the grain of orthodoxy. Its past professors include such giants of empiricism as Adam Smith and Thomas Reid.

Programme structure

The Philosophy MLitt has three components:

1. Introduction to Analytic Philosophy (40 credits)

2. A choice of four of the following courses (20 credits each):

  • Aesthetics: philosophical questions about art and beauty 
  • Origins of analytic philosophy including Russell and Wittgenstein
  • Philosophy of the Scottish Enlightenment including Hume and Reid
  • Philosophy of mind: consciousness, emotions, pain and pleasure
  • Moral philosophy: philosophical questions about value and well being
  • Political philosophy: philosophical questions about justice and the state
  • Epistemology: the nature and scope of human knowledge
  • Metaphysics including existence, natural laws and the nature of time
  • Philosophy of language including meaning, translation and truth
  • Philosophy of mathematics: the nature and existence of numbers and sets

3. A dissertation on a topic of your choice guided by individual support from an expert supervisor (60 credits).

Career prospects

Philosophy students at Glasgow receive rigorous and personalised training in problem solving skills, writing skills, presentation and research skills. 

All these skills are widely applicable and recognised to be exceptionally valuable in a wide range of careers, including journalism, teaching, the Civil Service, local government, business, publishing, law, and the arts. 

You will also be well equipped to carry onto a further degree in philosophy such as the PhD.



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Britain was the world’s earliest modern democracy, its first industrial nation and, until the era of the superpowers, the greatest modern empire. Read more
Britain was the world’s earliest modern democracy, its first industrial nation and, until the era of the superpowers, the greatest modern empire. Even today, Britain retains global reach, known for its cultural innovation, its economic power, its particular brand of politics, and its sustained international ambitions.

On this MA, you will study British history from the nineteenth century to the present, and develop an advanced understanding of historical approaches and research methods. You will also have the opportunity to take part in the high profile activities of the Mile End Group (MEG). Working with the School of History, MEG has unrivalled links to government, think tanks, the media and industry.


This programme will:

- Expose you to the major themes in 19th, 20th and 21st century British history and will challenge you to think about how historians research and explain them
- Concentrate on politics, contemporary politics, international affairs, war and its memory, gender and emotions
- Allow you to design a bespoke programme that reflects your interests
- Give you exceptional research skills

Why study Modern and Contemporary British History at Queen Mary?

Our high-quality teaching is inspired and informed by our research, and carried out in a friendly atmosphere. Our academic staff have outstanding research reputations and include six Fellows of the British Academy, the former President of the Royal Historical Society and two recipients of the French distinction of the Ordre des Palmes Académiques.
We have been renowned for excellence in the modern and contemporary history of Britain for over 25 years. Now, with 15 British historians, the School of History have research and teaching expertise from the nineteenth century to the twenty-first and their research specialities range from the history of government and politics, foreign affairs and war to gender, emotions, medicine and psychology.

The Mile End Group seminar series attracts major speakers from national politics, the civil service, industry and the media. Recent speakers include Sir John Major, Dame Eliza Manningham-Buller, Jeremy Paxman, Lord Melvyn Bragg, Lord Douglas Hurd and John Bercow MP. They are an unrivalled forum in which students work and study and gain access to influential figures.
Members of the School co-convene seminars at the Institute of Historical Research and host regular international symposia.

-We have an excellent reputation for research and teaching in modern and contemporary British history
-Three fully funded Mile End Group bursaries are offered annually
-Our London location is close to research libraries, the Institute of Historical Research, and the National Archives

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Understanding all aspects of Human-Robot interaction. the programming that coordinates a robot’s actions with human action as well the human appreciation and trust in the robot. Read more

Understanding all aspects of Human-Robot interaction: the programming that coordinates a robot’s actions with human action as well the human appreciation and trust in the robot.

At present, there are many sensors and actuators in every device – so they may become embedded in a physical reality. For robots that move around in a specific setting there is a pressing need for the development of proper methods of control and joint-action. The embedded, embodied nature of human cognition is an inspiration for this, and vice versa. Computational modelling of such tasks can give insight into the nature of human mental processing. In the Master’s specialisation in Robot Cognition you’ll learn all about the sensors, actuators and the computational modelling that connects them.

Making sense of sensor data – developing artificial perception – is no trivial task. The perception, recognition and even appreciation of sound stimuli for speech and music (i.e. auditory scene analysis) require modelling and representation at many levels and the same holds for visual object recognition and computer vision. In this area, vocal and facial expression recognition (recognition of emotion from voices and faces) is a rapidly growing application area. In the area of action and motor planning, sensorimotor integration and action, there are strong links with research at the world-renowned Donders Centre for Cognition.

At Radboud University we also look beyond the technical side of creating robots that can move, talk and interpret emotions as humans do. We believe that a robot needs to do more than simply function to its best ability. A robot that humans distrust will fail even if it is well programmed. Culture also plays a role in this; people in Japan are more open to the possibilities of robots than in, for example, the Netherlands. We will teach you how to evaluate humans’ attitudes towards a robot in order to use that information to create robots that will be accepted and trusted and therefore perform even better.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/robot

Why study Robot Cognition at Radboud University?

- We offer a great mix of technical and social aspects of robot cognition.

- This programme focuses on programming robot behaviours and evaluating them rather than building the robots themselves. We teach you to programme robots that will be used in close contact with human beings, for example in healthcare and education, rather than in industry.

- Our cognitive focus leads to a highly interdisciplinary AI programme where students gain skills and knowledge from a number of different areas such as mathematics, computer science, psychology and neuroscience combined with a core foundation of artificial intelligence.

- This specialisation offers plenty of room to create a programme that meets your own academic and professional interests.

- Together with the world-renowned Donders Institute, the Max Planck Institute and various other leading research centres in Nijmegen, we train our students to become excellent researchers in AI.

- To help you decide on a research topic there is a semi-annual Thesis Fair where academics and companies present possible project ideas. Often there are more project proposals than students to accept them, giving you ample choice. We are also open to any of you own ideas for research.

- Our AI students are a close-knit group; they have their own room in which they often get together to interact, debate and develop their ideas. Every student also receives personal guidance and supervision from a member of our expert staff.

Our research in this field

The programme is closely related to the research carried out in the internationally renowned Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour. This institute has several unique facilities for brain imaging using EEG, fMRI and MEG. You could also cooperate with the Behavioural Science Institute and work in its Virtual Reality Laboratory, which can be used to study social interaction between humans and avatars.

An example of a possible thesis subject:

- Engaging human-robot interactions in healthcare for children and/or the elderly

Social robots are often deployed with 'special' user groups such as children and elderly people. Developing and evaluating robot behaviours for these user groups is a challenge as a proper understanding of their cognitive and social abilities is needed. Depending on the task, children for example need to be engaged and encouraged in a different way than adults do. What are effective robot behaviours and strategies to engage children and/or elderly people? How can these robot behaviours be evaluated in a proper way?

Career prospects

Our Artificial Intelligence graduates have excellent job prospects and are often offered a job before they have actually graduated. Many of our graduates go on to do a PhD either at a major research institute or university with an AI department. Other graduates work for companies interested in cognitive design and research. Examples of companies looking for AI experts with this specialisation: Philips, Siemens, Honda, Mercedes, Google. Some students have even gone on to start their own companies.

Job positions

Examples of jobs that a graduate of the specialisation in Robot Cognition could get:

- PhD Researcher on Cognitive-Affective Modelling for Social Robots

- PhD Researcher on Automatic analysis of human group behaviour in the presence of robots

- PhD Researcher on Automatic analysis of affective quality of conversations in human-robot interaction

- Advisor and innovation manager in the healthcare industry

- Social robotics and affective computing for robots expressing emotions

- Developer of control algorithms for using optic flow in drones

- Advisor for start-up company on developing new uses for tactile displays

- Team member in design of emotion recognition and training for autistic children

Internship

Half of your second year consists of an internship, giving you plenty of hands-on experience. We encourage students to do this internship abroad, although this is not mandatory. We do have connections with companies abroad, for example in China, Finland and the United States.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/robot

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence. Read more

Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence

Are you interested in applications of Artificial Intelligence in communication techniques? Are you triggered by the question of how human reasoning can be represented in computer systems? Would you like to work for a company like Google or Philips? Then our interdisciplinary Master’s track Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence is your right choice!

The CSAI program draws on breakthrough discoveries and insights in the two closely related scientific disciplines Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence. Cognitive Science is the study of human reasoning, emotions, language, perception, attention, and memory. Artificial Intelligence is the study and design of computers and software that are capable of intelligent behavior.

Are you interested in applications of Artificial Intelligence in communication techniques? Are you triggered by the question of how human reasoning can be represented in computer systems? Would you like to work for a company like Google or Philips? Then our interdisciplinary Master’s track Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence is your right choice!

The CSAI program draws on breakthrough discoveries and insights in the two closely related scientific disciplines Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence. Cognitive Science is the study of human reasoning, emotions, language, perception, attention, and memory. Artificial Intelligence is the study and design of computers and software that are capable of intelligent behavior.

Career Prospects Communication Design

Graduates will be able to contribute to advancements in working fields like artificial intelligence and robotics, data science, data mining, knowledge technology and decision support systems.

This is a small selection of positions you may apply for after you have completed your programme:

•Intelligent Software Developer

•Web Analyst

•Social Media Analyst

•Data Journalist

•Social Robot Developer

•Web Data Entrepreneur

•E-Health and Healthcare Quality Analyst



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Welcome to one of the most exciting periods of English literature and history. Read more
Welcome to one of the most exciting periods of English literature and history. The transformations in religion, politics, the technologies of writing and publication, science, and global exploration that took place during these turbulent years, and which continue to resonate today, prompted some of the most vibrant, difficult, and rewarding writing ever produced.

We invite you to join a team of world-leading scholars, working at the cutting edge of our discipline to explore this extraordinary world, and trace some of its local, European, and global contexts. In our core seminars, research events, trips, and collaborations you will build up a comprehensive set of research skills, whilst our ambitious and imaginative option modules will extend your current interests, and open up a novel set of perspectives upon both canonical and little-known texts.

York’s long history and prime location makes it an excellent place to study this period, and you can choose to take classes in the beautiful Minster Library, learn palaeography in one of the biggest archive repositories outside London, study Latin or a range of other languages or join us for trips – destinations have included a behind-the-scenes look at the Castle Museum, and the magnificent Fountains Abbey, Castle Howard, Burton Agnes Hall, and Hardwick Hall.

You will have the opportunity to work with distinguished scholars across a variety of fields. In particular, we specialise in:
-History of the book and textual cultures
-Religion, literature, and politics
-The reception and transformation of the Classics
-The poetics and pragmatics of translation
-Shakespeare, Heywood, and the drama of the English Renaissance
-The history and literature of science and medicine
-Material culture
-Women and literary production
-The history of emotions

Many of our students go on to PhD study; others have pursued a diverse range of careers including publishing, arts management, librarianship, and education.

Assessment

-Four assessed essays of 4,500 words
-A 14,000-16,000 word dissertation, written in consultation with a supervisor on an agreed topic

Careers

We have an excellent employment record for our postgraduates who are highly prized by top level employers, both in the UK and on the international stage. A combination of outstanding teaching and a supportive collegiate environment enable our students to develop their creativity, intellectual independence and ability to filter complex information and present it persuasively in person and in writing. These are important transferable skills which will always hold their value at the top end of the jobs market.

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This programme provides practical, career-orientated training in social science research methods, including research design, data collection and data analysis relating to both qualitative and quantitative modes of inquiry. Read more

This programme provides practical, career-orientated training in social science research methods, including research design, data collection and data analysis relating to both qualitative and quantitative modes of inquiry.

Students will have the opportunity to specialise in particular methodologies and to learn more about the application of these methodologies to illuminate important issues and debates in contemporary society.

Course Details

The programme is designed to provide a fundamental grounding in both quantitative and qualitative research skills, along with the opportunity to specialise in more advanced training in quantitative research, qualitative research or in practical applications of research techniques.

CORE MODULES:

Semester 1

Approaches to Social Research (20 CATS)

This module offers an introduction to the different styles of social science research as well as guidance and illustrations of how to operationalize research questions and assess them empirically. Students will be shown how to conduct systematic literature searches and how to manage empirical research projects. The module will also explore issues around the ethics of social science research as well as the connection between social science research and policy concerns. It is designed as preparation for undertaking postgraduate research and dissertation work.

Theory and Debates in Social Research (20 CATS)

This module aims to deepen students' understanding of key debates in social theory and research, providing advanced level teaching for those building upon basic knowledge and undertaking postgraduate research. It is designed to demonstrate and explore how social theory is utilised, critiqued and developed through the pursuit of social science research.

The Sources and Construction of Qualitative Data (10 CATS)

The purpose of this module is to illuminate the theoretical underpinnings of qualitative research. The module will discuss the impact of various theories on the nature and conduct of qualitative research particularly around questions of epistemology and ontology. The role of different types of interviewing in qualitative research will be utilised in order to explore the relationship between theory and methods.

The Sources and Construction of Quantitative Data (10 CATS)

The aim of the module is to provide a comprehensive overview of the theory and practice of measurement and constructing quantitative data in the social sciences. Through lectures and practical exercises, this module will provide students with relevant knowledge of secondary data sources and large datasets, their respective uses and usefulness, and their relevance for the study of contemporary social issues

Semester 2

Qualitative Data Analysis (10 CATS)

The module will provide students with an overview of different approaches to qualitative data analysis. It will include introductory training to this skill that includes such techniques as thematic analysis and discourse analysis, as well as computer assisted qualitative data analysis. It will provide the knowledge necessary for the informed use of the qualitative data analysis software package NVivo. The module gives students a base level introduction to the analytical and technical skills in qualitative data analysis appropriate to the production of a Master's dissertation and/or use of CAQDAS software for social science research purposes.

Quantitative Data Analysis: Foundational (10 CATS)

This module provides an introduction to the basics of quantitative data analysis. The module will begin with a brief review of basic univariate and bivariate statistical procedures as well as cover data manipulation techniques. The module is taught through a series of seminars and practical workshops. These two strands are interwoven within each teaching session. Please note that students may be granted an exemption from this module if they have already successfully completed a module that has the equivalent learning outcomes.

Quantitative Data Analysis: Intermediate (10 CATS)

This module advances students' confidence and knowledge in the use of SPSS. The module focuses on multivariate regression models, including the appropriate use and awareness of statistical assumptions underlying regression and the testing and refinement of such models.

Dissertation (60 CATS)

A dissertation of no more than 15,000 words on a topic relevant to social science research methods training. The thesis will involve either carrying out and reporting on a small social science research project which includes a full and considered description and discussion of the research methods employed or the discussion of a research issue or technique to a level appropriate for publication.

OPTIONAL MODULES (all 10 CATS)

We offer a range of advanced modules in quantitative and qualitative research methods, for example, logistic regression, internet-based research and visual research methods. We also provide specialist modules which reflect the teaching team’s diverse research interests, from the social logic of emotional life to conflict and change in divided societies. Optional modules generally run during the Spring semester and are offered subject to sufficient student demand and staff availability. Students will be able to choose a maximum of three to four option modules (depending on whether they need to complete Quantitative Data Analysis: Foundational). Please note that it is unlikely that all the following modules will be available for 2017/8. Please check with the Programme Director for queries about specific modules.

  • Advanced Qualitative Research Methods
  • Social Science Research Online
  • Visual Research Methods
  • Longitudinal Analysis
  • Advanced Quantitative Research Methods
  • Conflict and Change in Northern Ireland: New Sociological Research
  • Researching Emotions and Social Life
  • University Research and Civil Society Organisations


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Anyone interested in child development, or planning to work with children in the future, will be fascinated by this course. Read more
Anyone interested in child development, or planning to work with children in the future, will be fascinated by this course. As well as core modules in Social, Developmental, Biological and Cognitive Psychology, Research Methods and Statistics that will give you a BPS-recognised Psychology degree, you will take a series of specialist Child Development modules in years one, two and three that will give you a chance to study children’s thoughts, emotions and behaviour in great detail. You will be able to do a work placement in a child-centred setting, and you will complete an original research study under the supervision of an active developmental researcher. If you want to see how children play or how they interact with their carers or peers, you will have access to our purpose-built Child Observation Suite. If you want to see what is happening inside their heads, we have a fantastic Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience lab with a wide range of imaging equipment designed for children of all ages. If you are interested in Educational Psychology, we have lots of links with local schools and other children’s services, providing opportunities to study language development, literacy, peer relations, online safeguarding, antisocial behaviour and bullying.

DBS CHECKS

This course will involve access to children and/or vulnerable adults. You will be required to obtain a satisfactory Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service clearance (formerly termed CRB) and we will guide you through this process.

INDUSTRY LINKS

We continuously engage with employers to make sure our curriculum delivers the skills and knowledge industry needs. These include a number of professionals from various sectors, including NHS Trusts, patient groups, medical practitioners, allied health professionals, the Prison Service, police forces, local education authorities, schools and professional sports organisations.

PROFESSIONAL ACCREDITATION

Accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) as conferring eligibility for Graduate Membership of the Society with the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership, provided a minimum standard of qualification of second class honours is achieved.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

You’ll be taught by academics that produce first-class research, which has an impact not just in academia but in our working and everyday lives. Much of our psychological research was rated as ‘internationally excellent’ and ‘world-leading’ in the last research assessment exercise.

Year 1 is assessed by coursework and Multiple Choice Question exams; Year 2 through coursework, MCQ and essay exams; Year 3 through coursework or essay exams and the project. Percentage of coursework to exams is roughly 50/50.

OPPORTUNITIES

You can get involved in the research carried out by our staff, both as a participant and as a researcher, and not just through your classes and final year projects - there are paid research student internships and part-time research assistant positions available. You can also take part in conference talks, research publications and research grants - our current students regularly publish themselves, or become members of the editorial panel of ‘Diffusion’, UCLan’s own undergraduate research journal.

Some of our graduates pursue a career in psychology by undertaking postgraduate training to become professional psychologists, including our BPS-accredited Master’s programmes. However, UCLan graduates are valued more broadly, and others utilise the skills that our degree encourages to take graduate-level positions in a range of organisations, including the Police, Prison Service, NHS, social and community services, health authorities and in the pharmaceutical industry, and in education and training.

FURTHER INFORMATION

All our Psychology degrees share a common first year, with the opportunity to start specialising from Year 2. You can choose BSc routes in (i) Developmental Psychology, (ii) Forensic Psychology, (iii) Health Psychology, (iv) Neuropsychology, (v) Psychology with Psychotherapy and Counselling and (vi) Psychology and Criminology.

The Psychology syllabus is informed by the professional body, the British Psychological Society (BPS). All core modules are completed by Year 2, after which you can choose your specialism and, if you like, progress straight onto a Master's degree, which can provide stage 1 of your training towards becoming a professional psychologist.

In Year 1 you will attend lectures, seminars, workshops and labs. You will take part in Psychology practicals and develop your skills in statistical analysis and report-writing. Lectures are delivered to large groups, but other classes contain about thirty students. These small groups allow you to develop your understanding of psychology and to practise your communication skills. You should get to know your fellow group members, and learn to use your Academic Advisor as a source of academic advice.

In Year 2, you will study core areas of psychology in more depth, including Social and Developmental Psychology, Cognitive and Physiological Psychology, and Psychological Research Methods. You will continue to develop your skills in psychological research and report-writing but work in smaller groups, and take a role in designing your own studies.

In Year 3, you will complete a double module research project on a Developmental topic. This can be the most exciting part of your degree because it lets you investigate a subject in which you have a particular interest, supported by one-to-one discussions with your supervisor. The rest of Year 3 is made up of a mixture of specialist and general modules including two core Developmental Psychology and Educational Psychology modules.

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The MA in History is innovative, creative, free-thinking, stimulating, diverse and challenging – everything that is distinctive about history at Goldsmiths. Read more

The MA in History is innovative, creative, free-thinking, stimulating, diverse and challenging – everything that is distinctive about history at Goldsmiths.

The Department of History’s approach is thematic and interdisciplinary, with staff expertise spanning the histories of Britain, East and West Europe, South Asia and Africa.

We are on the cutting-edge of our fields and the student-teacher ratio allows us to devote an unmatched amount of time to individual supervision.

Our focus is primary research and we encourage students to follow their own historical interests.

The MA in History aims to develop your research skills, and your understanding of key debates and methods in historiography. In addition, it allows you to develop their specific subject interests through a range of option modules and the dissertation.

Consequently, in addition to the compulsory core module (Explorations and Debates) and the Research Skills modules, you choose two options, one of which, if you wish, can be from another department at Goldsmiths or from the wide-ranging intercollegiate list (a list of MA modules available at other colleges of the University of London).

You'll end the programme by writing a 10,000-word dissertation on a topic of your own choice, based on primary research. The process of writing the dissertation includes participating in organising, and presenting at, the department's dissertation conference.

Modules & structure

Compulsory modules

You take the following two compulsory modules:

Option modules

You also take two thematic option modules. You could:

  • choose both options from those offered by the Department of History
  • choose one departmental option and another from a different Goldsmiths department
  • choose one departmental option and another from the list of 30+ options available each year in other History departments that participate in the University of London MA Intercollegiate Sharing Scheme

The Department of History options encompass a diverse regional, conceptual and methodological range to investigate religious, cultural and political history in both the Western and non-Western world from the 15th century to the present. All options are based on the tutors’ current research, and currently include:

You also undergo training in Research Skills, which develops expertise in a variety of methodologies including the use of oral, visual and material, as well as textual, sources.

There will be a one-day, student-led, interdisciplinary research workshop to share ideas about projects and methodologies, and gain experience in event organisation.

And you'll complete a 10,000-word dissertation, based on primary research.

Skills

This MA develops a range of transferable skills which are highly valued in the jobs market. These include advanced research and analytical expertise; increased independence of thought; the ability to marshal, evaluate and communicate, in written and oral form, complex information and ideas; project management; teamwork and workshop organisation.

Careers

Graduate students from the department have continued to careers in museums and galleries, archives, journalism, charities, university and arts administration, local government and teaching as well as doctoral research.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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Our MA in English Studies invites you to choose from a number of distinctive pathways through the programme. Our Eighteenth-Century Literature and Romanticism pathway takes a truly interdisciplinary approach, and explores the history of genres, philosophy, politics, history, and visual culture, amongst other topics. Read more
Our MA in English Studies invites you to choose from a number of distinctive pathways through the programme.

Our Eighteenth-Century Literature and Romanticism pathway takes a truly interdisciplinary approach, and explores the history of genres, philosophy, politics, history, and visual culture, amongst other topics.

In your first semester you might explore the popular culture of coffee house and tavern, the political world on the street and in parliament, the vocations of women poets and polemicists, polite society and its interest in the management of emotions and arts, and the metropolitan life of London.

In the second semester, you can examine Romantic poetics and manifestos, the theoretical and political growth of philosophical and cultural enlightenment, Orientalism, travel, and the French Revolution and its aftershocks.

This pathway aims to prepare students to formulate a research topic, identify research materials, and present an argument in written and oral form that is formed by alternative interpretations. Students who complete the pathway will be aware of the interdisciplinary debates concerning the literature and history of this period, and will have engaged with a variety of materials: theoretical, visual, historical, and literary. You will also be able to deploy a range of appropriate skills in research, bibliography, and IT.

You will be taught in small seminar groups, and will be introduced to a number of key research resources in London through a module in research skills.

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Navigate new adventures in sound on this award-winning, industry-accredited MA. Bring your existing knowledge and experience to analyse radio from a theoretical and practical perspective. Read more

Navigate new adventures in sound on this award-winning, industry-accredited MA. Bring your existing knowledge and experience to analyse radio from a theoretical and practical perspective.

Radio has the potential to be transformative, to further the human experience. It’s a medium that creates a sense of intimacy while continually generating questions. This is a programme that empowers you to create something permanent, something with a life beyond your own – something only sound can achieve.

The questions we explore

The MA poses questions about the influence of radio as a medium and the power it has to stir emotions, evoke feelings, and conjure vivid mental images. We look at the ways in which recording technologies can preserve and hold on to an aspect of our existence – be that a cultural exchange or an artistic communication – and how we can inspire future generations with the work we create. 

The processes we use

The degree blends theory and practice so you’ll work within professional standard broadcast and post-production suites and use sound studios linked to a networked newsroom. We also have our own student radio station broadcasting online with an FM restricted service licence. As an MA Radio student you can also learn online production skills and publish sound-specific features on Londonmultimedianews.com

The approach we take

We adopt a reflective, humanitarian approach to storytelling because we think that to develop the creative imagination, we need to embrace all kinds of belief systems. It’s why our students go and spend time within communities, continue questioning, continue listening, and research everything from academic journals to novels. 

We give you the space and time to consider how different strands of thought and aspects of communication intertwine. And we don’t get in the way of talent; we encourage and support it. 

Come and develop your own idea of the sonic arts and create everything from investigative journalism to interactive soundscapes.

This degree is part of our School of Journalism. Find out more about what we do and other degrees we teach.

Modules & structure

You work in practice and theory groups, and take modules that cover:

  • radio features and drama
  • radio journalism and documentary
  • key media law and ethical issues in relation to UK and US media law
  • the cultural history of radio (primarily in Britain and the USA)
  • adapting prose, film and theatre for radio dramatisation

Throughout the year, the programme includes workshops and seminars by visiting professionals and artists in the radio journalism and radio drama fields. We are happy to support work experience placements in professional newsrooms and radio drama productions. The programme offers students the opportunity to learn Teeline shorthand, television recording techniques and online applications for radio.

We also encourage you to support the Goldsmiths student radio station Wired FM.

Modules

The MA is composed of the following modules:

Assessment

Portfolio of recorded work; unseen examination; essay; 30-minute radio drama script.

Skills & careers

Our graduates go on to work as broadcast journalists, creative programme makers, and foreign correspondents – and MA students are consistently winning significant awards for their work. For example in 2012, MA Radio students had considerable success in the Charles Parker student radio feature awards and the Broadcast Journalism Training Council (BJTC) Awards for Best Radio News Feature and Best Online News Website.

In 2013 MA Radio students took Gold and Silver in the Charles Parker awards, and in the 2015 BJTC awards all the awards for Best Radio Feature and Best Radio Documentary went to Goldsmiths radio students. Our MA Radio alumni are also winning awards in the UK and abroad for their professional work too.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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Our research expertise centres around three themes. Identities, the Sociology of Health and Life Sciences and Social Transformations. Read more
Our research expertise centres around three themes: Identities, the Sociology of Health and Life Sciences and Social Transformations. Our research tradition covers sociology, social policy and social anthropology. We have strengths in the fields of family studies, health studies, political economy, sexuality, citizenship, and youth and student lives.

Our MPhil projects cover a wide spectrum of contemporary sociology including:
-Bodies, identities and experiences
-Culture and material life
-'Development' and the global south
-Emotions and intimacy
-Environment and society
-Imagining pasts and futures
-Sexualities and gender
-Sociology of ethics
-Sociologies of health and life sciences
-Sociology of law
-Visual and aesthetic cultures

Each of these themes represents the expertise of a member of staff actively engaged in sociological research.

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This exciting degree offers you the opportunity to study one of the major areas in contemporary media and communications – branding. . Read more

This exciting degree offers you the opportunity to study one of the major areas in contemporary media and communications – branding. 

The unique programme introduces you to the variety of ways in which brands are developed and used, and helps you to understand how the growth of branding – in business, but also in politics, government, sport and culture – has changed the societies we live in.

What happens when the state starts to use branding techniques to communicate with its citizens?

And how does the rise of digital and social media change the relationship between brands and their publics?

What, for example, are the consequences of understanding political parties, artists or sports teams as ‘brands’?

An introduction to contemporary branding debates

The MA in Brands, Communication and Culture aims to provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the history and development of brands and branding, and their relationship to contemporary forms of communication and culture. Specifically, you should acquire an in-depth knowledge of the social, political and economic backdrop against which branding has become so important, and an understanding of the key themes and debates surrounding its development and use, including the relationship between brands and intellectual property, and the extent to which branding promotes or inhibits openness and transparency within organisations.

You will also improve your ability to think critically and creatively about contemporary communications and cultural practices. When you have completed the programme you will have at your disposal a range of tools that will enable you to analyse contemporary communications, to make judgments about their significance and value and be able to thoughtfully contribute to contemporary communications.

A unique approach to the study of brands

This MA is not a conventional branding or marketing course. Instead it offers a unique approach to the study of brands. This is reflected in the topics taught on our core modules, which include:

  • The role of brands in and beyond markets
  • The rise of consumer culture
  • Critical perspectives on brand management and governance
  • Intellectual property
  • Immaterial labour and the rise of ‘branded workers’
  • Gender, colonial history and branding
  • Attachment, identity and emotions in branding
  • Ethics and transparency
  • The emergence of brand experiences and ‘staging’ of brands
  • Fair trade and accountability
  • Branded spaces and communities
  • Social media and open source cultures
  • Geodemographics and new forms of social classification

The MA Brands, Communication and Culture is taught across two departments: Media & Communications and Sociology. This gives you access to experts in many fields. In addition to the two core courses you will have the opportunity to customize your degree by choosing from a range of modules from different departments to allow you to explore your own interests and make wider connections.

We welcome students who bring to the course a range of experiences and interests in communication, management, politics, design and the cultural industries.

Recent dissertation topics include:

  • Branding post-capitalism? An investigation of crowdfunding platforms
  • Trespassed City: Mapping London’s privately owned public spaces
  • The rise of co-working spaces
  • Craft Entrepreneurs: an inquiry into the rise of artisanal production in post-industrial cities
  • Hashtags in photo sharing social media apps
  • Consumer culture in contemporary Shanghai
  • Branding of NGOs
  • Sustainable brand strategies - good for the environment or just a selling strategy?
  • Fashion bloggers and cultural capital
  • Medical tourism and branded healthcare
  • Intellectual property in the fashion industry
  • Branding London's districts

Modules & structure

The programme is made up of two core modules (60 credits in total), between two and four options modules (60 credits in total), and a dissertation (60 credits).

The first core module, Branding I, introduces you to contemporary definitions and theories of branding, its history and development, changes in the role of marketing, promotion and design, and their place in the global economy.

The second core module, Branding II, puts greater emphasis on contemporary themes and issues in branding, and their relationship to wider debates in society, economy and culture.

Throughout the core components of the degree, you will examine the wide range of ways in which branding is currently used, in organisations ranging from large corporations to public sector bodies, charities and other third sector organisations.

For the optional modules, you'll have an opportunity to explore some of the wider contexts for brands and branding by taking up to 60 credits of modules provided elsewhere in Media and Communications or neighbouring departments such as SociologyCultural Studies and Anthropology.

Part-time students typically take the two core modules in their first year, and the options modules plus the dissertation in their second year.

Vocational elements

The department offers some practice-based options in areas such as:

  • Media Futures
  • Online Journalism
  • Campaign Skills
  • Media Law and Ethics
  • Design Methods
  • Processes for Innovation

Assessment

Assessment consists of coursework, extended essays, reports, presentations, practice based projects or essays/logs, group projects, reflective essays, and seen and unseen written examinations.

Download the programme specification. If you would like an earlier version of the programme specification, please contact the Quality Office.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Skills

The programme helps students to develop a high-level understanding of contemporary branding and communications techniques and their social, economic and political contexts. You will be encouraged to develop your critical reasoning skills and your understanding of contemporary cultural and media theory, but also to develop greater visual literacy and a capacity for creative thinking. Assessments are designed to ensure that you are able to apply these skills in practical ways.

Careers

The programme equips you with the skills necessary to pursue a wide range of careers related to branding and communication in the media and other industries. Students are encouraged to seek work experience and work placements during the programme as time allows. The MA also allows you to pursue further academic research in one or more of the areas covered on the programme.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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