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Masters Degrees (Emotion)

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The discipline of Counselling is still forming within the field of the Social Sciences and Humanities; many new exciting research developments have opened up, and the interdisciplinary approach which underpins this programme, offers to contemporary trainee Counselling practitioners a fusion of new and traditional approaches backed by research. Read more
The discipline of Counselling is still forming within the field of the Social Sciences and Humanities; many new exciting research developments have opened up, and the interdisciplinary approach which underpins this programme, offers to contemporary trainee Counselling practitioners a fusion of new and traditional approaches backed by research.

Course Overview

This programme in Psychotherapeutic Practice: Emotion-Focused Therapy offers a part-time Counselling training opportunity at Master’s level in a Humanistic modality.

Lesley Greenberg, one of the co-researchers and founder of the modality states that:

“Emotion-focused treatment was developed as an empirically informed approach to the practice of psychotherapy grounded in contemporary psychological theories of functioning. Emotion-focused therapy (EFT) was developed by my colleagues and I in the 1980s out of empirical studies of the process of change and has developed into one of the recognized evidence-based treatment approaches for depression and marital distress as well as showing promise for trauma, eating disorders, anxiety disorders, and interpersonal problems.” FOCUS 2010;8:32-42.

This model of therapy has now been approved of by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence, the quality gatekeepers of the NHS, as having demonstrated significant positive outcome research in a number of areas.

The foundation of this therapeutic modality draws on the work of Carl Rogers and his work on the ‘therapeutic relationship’; from the ‘focusing’ work of Eugene Gendlin and the dialogic and experiential work of the Gestalt tradition. Significantly, however, EFT opens up a greater access to human emotion, as it engages with close interest in the growing understanding of neuroscience and how emotions function differently from cognition in the functioning of the brain. These insights from the work of Damasio and LeDoux, and others, are enabling practitioners in the field to develop a new language and method of addressing psychological distress and putting emotions back at the centre of the constituted self.

The programme will be taught in small groups so that students have a significant opportunity to engage in the practice and development of their therapeutic competence. In addition students will be taught through lecture format and small seminar group, where there will be the opportunity to discuss with each other and the tutor the rich, diverse and sometimes complex issues addressed in the programme.

Modules

The programme is divided into two parts:

PART 1:
The theory and practice of Emotion-Focused Therapy sets the philosophical, ideological and research base of the programme. The module on ‘The Nature and Experience of Human Functioning’ will address the conceptualization of human wellness and distress as described by the EFT model and establish the research base for the formulation and development of these ideas. The concept of ‘dialectical constructivism’ will be investigated in its formation of human meaning, and its implications to human perception and feeling. The module will engage in the most recent research regarding the emotions and the part they play in our human functioning.

The module ‘The principles of working with EFT’ introduces the practice work of the modality, which is initially founded on the establishing of the therapeutic relationship and qualities of empathy. The modules will develop a wider understanding of the concept of ‘treatment’ in the engagement of therapeutic work.

Running alongside these two practice modules will be modules on ethical practice and professional benchmarks; supervision; personal development; identity: sameness and difference; and the context of psychological distress and mental health.

PART 2:
Part two of the programme consists of a dissertation which is undertaken by the student as a supported research project. A student will receive regular supervision and opportunities to attend research workshops on topics which can help to underpin their knowledge of research.

Key Features

-The interdisciplinary approach which underpins this programme, offers to contemporary trainee Counselling practitioners a fusion of new and traditional approaches backed by research.
-The programme will be taught in small groups so that students have a significant opportunity to engage in the practice and development of their therapeutic competence.

Assessment

The programme will offer a range of different assessment methods to give students the opportunity to extend practical and academic skills and encourage your independent learning, these could include: essays, presentation, reflection, practice.

As a Counselling practice programme written up to BACP accreditation/registration standard there are two additional requirement of the course:
-A student will need to complete a minimum of 100 hours of supervised clinical practice as a trainee Counsellor
-Complete a minimum of 12 hours of personal therapy

Career Opportunities

This programme is ideal for those wishing to develop their career within counselling practice using research-led methods to enhance their professional practice.

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This MA introduces you to recent debates on gender in the disciplines of sociology and media and communications studies, and to the interdisciplinary domains of feminist social and cultural theory. Read more

This MA introduces you to recent debates on gender in the disciplines of sociology and media and communications studies, and to the interdisciplinary domains of feminist social and cultural theory.

Drawing on the internationally recognised and pioneering expertise of staff in the Department of Sociology and Department of Media and Communications, as well as the Centre for Feminist Research (CFR), the programme offers you the opportunity to develop cutting-edge critical skills in relation to cultural approaches to gender formation and gender theory.

As well as these theoretical and analytical points of orientation, the MA in Gender, Media and Culture aims to help you grasp the importance of epistemology and methodology for the evaluation of empirical investigations of gender formations.

The programme therefore introduces you to, and offers training in, the key socio-cultural methods for the study of gender in the contemporary world, including methods for the study of visual culture; the body and affect; and memory.

These two elements of the programme are brought together in a dissertation study, which involves tailored supervision in the application of research methods to a specific topic.

This programme relates to the following disciplines:

  • Sociology
  • Media and Communications
  • Humanities
  • Science and Technology Studies
  • Philosophy

Overall the programme has the following interrelated aims

  • to provide in-depth interdisciplinary knowledge of contemporary gender formations
  • to provide theoretical, analytical and methodological points of orientation for understanding gender and culture transnationally and across different societies and geo-political regions
  • to offer skilled supervision in the development and completion of a small research project which tests thoroughly a range of research skills
  • to expose students to a lively research environment and the relevant expertise of the research-led Departments of Sociology and Media and Communications

Modules & structure

Core components of the programme will familiarise you with the wide range of debates integral to the fields of gender studies, feminist theory, and cultural studies. These include:

  • questions about sexual difference and the performativity of gender
  • gender, science, debates on affect and emotion
  • gender and migration and the new international division of labour
  • feminism

You complete one core module and one option module each term, as well as a dissertation module in the spring term. The first core module introduces key debates and developments in feminist theory, cultural theory and, in particular, feminist cultural theory. It introduces both early debates which defined these fields and contemporary developments and departures. More specifically, you will be introduced to social constructivist and post-structuralist perspectives, to ‘new materialism’, to debates on feminism and the critique of universalism; to key questions in relation to feminism and biology; to debates on psycho-analysis and the emergence of queer theory and its intersection with feminist theory.

The second core module examines the place of gender, affect and the body in feminist theory and feminist practice. The course offers you different angles on what has become known as “the affective turn,” placing a strong emphasis on the history of feminist contributions to the study of affect and emotion as well as the body. We ask how bodies are constructed, experienced and lived from a variety of feminist perspectives, attending to questions of corporeal difference, as well as the intimacy of bodies, spaces, objects and technologies. We also reflect on the significance of affect and the body for feminist and queer cultural practices, as well feminist and queer activisms. This module therefore offers instruction in some of the most cutting edge issues in contemporary feminist theory. A team of leading feminist scholars based in the departments of Sociology and Media Communications at Goldsmiths teach this module on the basis of their research specialisms. 

There will be a series of dissertation workshops to help you plan and develop your dissertation, especially in regard to issues of methodology and method. Each student will be assigned a supervisor who will work with you to develop your proposal and undertake independent research.

Core modules

Option modules

You have 60 credits at your disposal, you can choose any 30 credit modules related to gender from postgraduate modules across the University. You can choose either a regular option (30 credits) or two ‘mini-options’ (2 x 15 credits).

For your other options, you can choose modules from either the Department of Sociology or the Department of Media and Communications as they co-convene the programme. You can also choose from the following departments across Goldsmiths:

Please note that not all modules are suitable for students from all academic backgrounds; you will discuss your choices with the Programme Convenor at the start of your degree.

Assessment

Assessment consists of coursework, extended essays, reports, presentations, practice based projects or essays/logs, group projects, reflective essays, and seen and unseen written examinations.

Skills

Graduates from this programme gain conceptual and methodological knowledge of the key concepts and debates in the study of gender and culture; the skills of critical analysis; the ability to distinguish and appraise a range of socio-cultural research methodologies; the skills to design and develop a research project; and the ability to recognise and account for sensitive ethical issues relating to research and representation.

The two core courses provide you with the necessary skills to understand the relationships between early debates in the fields of gender studies, feminist theory and feminist cultural theory, and the ability to critically engage with new developments in these fields. Furthermore, you will gain a critical appreciation of the role and place of the body and affect in the development of feminist cultural theory and gender theory, and the challenges that contemporary socio-cultural changes bring to the theorisation of the body.

Careers

Previous graduates have embarked on professional careers in social research, think tanks, the arts and cultural sectors, government and public administration, development, human rights, NGOs, and in media and communications globally. They have also progressed to PhD study.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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Do our categories of behaviour – normal and abnormal – translate across cultures?. Why do ethnic minorities have different experiences of mental health?. Read more

About the course

Do our categories of behaviour – normal and abnormal – translate across cultures?
Why do ethnic minorities have different experiences of mental health?
Is there a ‘human nature’ underneath all the cultural differences?

Anyone interested in psychological processes, feeling and expression, memory and trauma, culture and personality, will have asked themselves questions of this kind. However, they are less likely to have asked themselves how (or if) we can recognise and analyse different emotions in other cultural settings.

In this new MSc degree, the first of its kind anywhere in Europe, we tackle these and other issues from an anthropological perspective, looking at the social and cultural dimensions of human experience.

By engaging with debates on these important topics and through the examination of world ethnography (including the UK), participants will learn about selfhood, emotion, madness and identity in cultural context.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork: as well as undertaking rigorous intellectual training, all our students are expected to get out of the library and undertake their own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present their findings in a dissertation. Students take this opportunity to travel to a wide variety of locations across the world – see “Special Features” for more details.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

This MSc gives candidates a solid grounding in key topics in psychological and psychiatric anthropology.

Through detailed consideration of cases from Britain and around the world, we explore the ways in which person, emotion, and subjectivity are shaped through cultural practices.

Candidates from backgrounds in health, therapy, social work and psychology will be able to challenge the categories and assumptions inherent in standard approaches to psychological and behavioural issues.

Course Content

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full-time

Compulsory modules:

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Dissertation in Psychological and Psychiatric Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
Themes in Psychiatric Anthropology
Themes in Psychological Anthropology

Optional modules:

Anthropology of the Body
Anthropology of the Person
Kinship, Sex and Gender
The Anthropology of Childhood
The Anthropology of Youth
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the arena of Global Health
Anthropology of Education
Anthropology of Learning
Ethnicity, Identity and Culture
Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings

Part-time

Year 1

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Themes in Psychiatric Anthropology
Themes in Psychological Anthropology

Year 2

Dissertation in Psychological and Psychiatric Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
and optional modules

Assessment

Assessment is by essay, practical assignment (e.g. analysis of a short field exercise), and dissertation. There are no examinations.

Special Features

This degree looks at psychological and psychiatric topics from an anthropological perspective. There is an overlap with psychology and psychiatry in the things we look at (identity, consciousness, cognition, mental health, etc), but the approach is quite different; indeed, the findings can be startlingly different.

In all cases, we explore the point of view and experience of the insider, the ‘native’, in a range of cultures, we analyse this inside view in relation to the social and cultural environment. What we seek is a dynamic conception of human nature that is true to experience as well as illuminating broader social processes of which the individual may be only partly aware.
 
This degree challenges standard assumptions about normality and deviance, social and personal identity, the boundaries of the self, and the constituents of experience.

For those employed in the health, social and educational sectors, it will enhance professional practice and broaden understanding. But for every student it will open up new avenues.

The programme is run by experts in their field, who have worked in countries across the globe including Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, sub-Saharan Africa, Melanesia, India and Sri Lanka, as well as Britain.

All our degrees (whether full- or part-time) combine intensive coursework, rigorous training in ethnographic research methods, and a period of fieldwork in the summer term (final summer term if part-time) leading to an up to 15,000 word dissertation.

Students are free to choose their own research topic and geographic area, in consultation with their academic supervisor. In all cases, the dissertation research project provides valuable experience and in many cases it leads to job contacts – forming a bridge to a future career or time out for career development.

In recent years, students have undertaken fieldwork in locations across the world, including India, Mexico, Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, China, Nepal, Peru, Morocco, and New Zealand as well as within the UK and the rest of Europe.

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Research profile. The MSc by Research in Clinical Psychology offer the chance to work with, and be supervised by, a range of clinical academics across many areas of psychology. Read more

Research profile

The MSc by Research in Clinical Psychology offer the chance to work with, and be supervised by, a range of clinical academics across many areas of psychology.

Candidates should note that these programmes do not lead to Chartered Clinical Psychologist status.

Our research involves national and international collaborations, with many projects involving NHS partnerships.

We have specific research strengths in the areas of children and adolescents; developmental psychopathology of mental health; ageing and older adulthood; adult psychological problems; brain injury; chronic health conditions; psychological therapies research, including cognitive behavioural interventions; emotions and emotion regulation; sex offenders; learning disability; neuropsychology; quality of life; severe and enduring mental health problems; and the development and validation of measures.

Specific areas of interest include cognitive behaviour therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, psychosis, health psychology, and qualitative approaches.

We have an active research group in the area of applied developmental psychology and psychological therapies research for severe mental health issues. We coordinate the Edinburgh Child and Adolescent Psychology Network. The group’s research areas include child and adolescent health and mental health; cognition, language and learning; social development and relationships; and atypical development.

For more detailed information about potential PhD supervisors in this area, their research interests and publications, please visit our website.

Our research interests include:

  • onset and recovery from severe and enduring psychological disorder
  • mindfulness and third wave approaches
  • medically unexplained symptoms
  • child and adolescent mental health
  • eating behaviours and disorders
  • attachment and emotion regulation and sex offenders.

Training and support

The MSc by Research programme allows you to conduct an independent research project that makes a significant contribution to your chosen field of study and to further develop your research skills. We provide expertise in a variety of research methods including qualitative and quantitative approaches.

You will be assigned two supervisors (usually one for MSc by Research) and you will meet with your supervisors regularly. Workshops, seminars and courses in research methods are available to postgraduate students undertaking a higher degree by research.

We work in close collaboration with the Graduate School of Social & Political Science, enabling School of Health in Social Science research students to benefit from the extensive suite of social science research courses offered by both Schools.

With close ties with other humanities disciplines and with colleagues in the College of Medicine & Veterinary Medicine, we offer PhD students excellent opportunities for interdisciplinary supervision and research project development.



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Understanding all aspects of Human-Robot interaction. the programming that coordinates a robot’s actions with human action as well the human appreciation and trust in the robot. Read more

Understanding all aspects of Human-Robot interaction: the programming that coordinates a robot’s actions with human action as well the human appreciation and trust in the robot.

At present, there are many sensors and actuators in every device – so they may become embedded in a physical reality. For robots that move around in a specific setting there is a pressing need for the development of proper methods of control and joint-action. The embedded, embodied nature of human cognition is an inspiration for this, and vice versa. Computational modelling of such tasks can give insight into the nature of human mental processing. In the Master’s specialisation in Robot Cognition you’ll learn all about the sensors, actuators and the computational modelling that connects them.

Making sense of sensor data – developing artificial perception – is no trivial task. The perception, recognition and even appreciation of sound stimuli for speech and music (i.e. auditory scene analysis) require modelling and representation at many levels and the same holds for visual object recognition and computer vision. In this area, vocal and facial expression recognition (recognition of emotion from voices and faces) is a rapidly growing application area. In the area of action and motor planning, sensorimotor integration and action, there are strong links with research at the world-renowned Donders Centre for Cognition.

At Radboud University we also look beyond the technical side of creating robots that can move, talk and interpret emotions as humans do. We believe that a robot needs to do more than simply function to its best ability. A robot that humans distrust will fail even if it is well programmed. Culture also plays a role in this; people in Japan are more open to the possibilities of robots than in, for example, the Netherlands. We will teach you how to evaluate humans’ attitudes towards a robot in order to use that information to create robots that will be accepted and trusted and therefore perform even better.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/robot

Why study Robot Cognition at Radboud University?

- We offer a great mix of technical and social aspects of robot cognition.

- This programme focuses on programming robot behaviours and evaluating them rather than building the robots themselves. We teach you to programme robots that will be used in close contact with human beings, for example in healthcare and education, rather than in industry.

- Our cognitive focus leads to a highly interdisciplinary AI programme where students gain skills and knowledge from a number of different areas such as mathematics, computer science, psychology and neuroscience combined with a core foundation of artificial intelligence.

- This specialisation offers plenty of room to create a programme that meets your own academic and professional interests.

- Together with the world-renowned Donders Institute, the Max Planck Institute and various other leading research centres in Nijmegen, we train our students to become excellent researchers in AI.

- To help you decide on a research topic there is a semi-annual Thesis Fair where academics and companies present possible project ideas. Often there are more project proposals than students to accept them, giving you ample choice. We are also open to any of you own ideas for research.

- Our AI students are a close-knit group; they have their own room in which they often get together to interact, debate and develop their ideas. Every student also receives personal guidance and supervision from a member of our expert staff.

Our research in this field

The programme is closely related to the research carried out in the internationally renowned Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour. This institute has several unique facilities for brain imaging using EEG, fMRI and MEG. You could also cooperate with the Behavioural Science Institute and work in its Virtual Reality Laboratory, which can be used to study social interaction between humans and avatars.

An example of a possible thesis subject:

- Engaging human-robot interactions in healthcare for children and/or the elderly

Social robots are often deployed with 'special' user groups such as children and elderly people. Developing and evaluating robot behaviours for these user groups is a challenge as a proper understanding of their cognitive and social abilities is needed. Depending on the task, children for example need to be engaged and encouraged in a different way than adults do. What are effective robot behaviours and strategies to engage children and/or elderly people? How can these robot behaviours be evaluated in a proper way?

Career prospects

Our Artificial Intelligence graduates have excellent job prospects and are often offered a job before they have actually graduated. Many of our graduates go on to do a PhD either at a major research institute or university with an AI department. Other graduates work for companies interested in cognitive design and research. Examples of companies looking for AI experts with this specialisation: Philips, Siemens, Honda, Mercedes, Google. Some students have even gone on to start their own companies.

Job positions

Examples of jobs that a graduate of the specialisation in Robot Cognition could get:

- PhD Researcher on Cognitive-Affective Modelling for Social Robots

- PhD Researcher on Automatic analysis of human group behaviour in the presence of robots

- PhD Researcher on Automatic analysis of affective quality of conversations in human-robot interaction

- Advisor and innovation manager in the healthcare industry

- Social robotics and affective computing for robots expressing emotions

- Developer of control algorithms for using optic flow in drones

- Advisor for start-up company on developing new uses for tactile displays

- Team member in design of emotion recognition and training for autistic children

Internship

Half of your second year consists of an internship, giving you plenty of hands-on experience. We encourage students to do this internship abroad, although this is not mandatory. We do have connections with companies abroad, for example in China, Finland and the United States.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/robot



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Under supervision, graduates can pursue careers in the professional practice of psychology including clinical, forensic or organisational psychology, counselling, health and community psychology, research, and other specialist areas. Read more
[[About the program
The Graduate Diploma of Psychological Science is designed to provide students with an integrated, comprehensive, and complete education in the discipline of psychology. Students undertake advanced training in a range of methodological (research methods, psychometrics, statistics) and applied areas, and develop competence in conducting research. All applied material is based on the scientist-practitioner model, and evidence-based approaches to psychological intervention are stressed.

The Graduate Diploma of Psychological Science provides students with advanced education and training in the core psychology graduate attributes, including but not limited to the following:
- Advanced theoretical and empirical knowledge in some of the core research areas of the discipline
- Knowledge of the theoretical and empirical bases underpinning the construction, implementation and interpretation of some of the most widely used cognitive and personality assessments
- Knowledge of the theoretical and empirical bases underpinning evidenced based approached to psychological intervention
- Explaining how the science and practice of psychology is influenced by social, historical, professional and cultural contexts

The Graduate Diploma of Psychological Science prepares graduates for a career in psychology. On completion of this course, graduates may apply for provisional registration as a psychologist providing they enrol in further postgraduate studies or undertake two years’ supervised training.

See the website https://bond.edu.au/program/graduate-diploma-psychological-science

- Professional recognition
This program has been granted accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC).

Further study
- Master of Psychology (Clinical)
- Master of Psychology (Forensic)

Professional outcomes

Under supervision, graduates can pursue careers in the professional practice of psychology including clinical, forensic or organisational psychology, counselling, health and community psychology, research, and other specialist areas.

Find out how to apply here https://bond.edu.au/future-students/study-bond/how-apply

Thesis overview

The most challenging aspect of 4th year studies is the research thesis. The thesis component is designed for students to demonstrate their ability to conceive, conduct, and report on, high level, original research. The research thesis is carried out under the supervision of an academic member of staff, and is assessed against a number of criteria. Briefly, these criteria relate to the student’s command of the area under investigation, from the conceptualisation of the problem, through the development of an appropriate strategy to investigate the problem, to clear interpretation and reporting on the outcomes of the research. The research thesis consists of two subjects.
- PSYC71-400 Diploma Thesis 1: Research Seminar and Ethics
- PSYC72-420 Diploma Thesis 2

The thesis subjects are to be completed in two consecutive semesters, regardless of full- or part-time enrolment status.

- Fourth Year Orientation Session
Students are expected to attend the fourth-year orientation session held during Bond Orientation Week, which is the week before classes start. During this session students are given full details of the requirements for their fourth year of studies in psychology.

Important notes for students

Upon completion of 4th year training (e.g., the Graduate Diploma or the Honours program) many students apply for provisional registration as a psychologist. Provisional registration permits the professional practice of psychology and can be achieved either through a Board approved Supervised Practice Program (two years of supervised practice), or through Postgraduate studies in Psychology. Students who intend to apply for provisional registration following their 4th Year studies should be aware of the registration requirements as administered by the Psychology Board of Australia under the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law Act 2009. Information on Psychology Board of Australia registration requirements can be obtained from http://www.psychologyboard.gov.au

Students who obtain their undergraduate qualifications outside of an ‘approved qualification’ in Australia must have them assessed as being equivalent to an accredited three year sequence of study in psychology in Australia, prior to being granted provisional registration. Undergraduate transcripts of students wishing to undertake their 4th year studies at Bond from non-Australian institutions are carefully checked by the 4th Year Coordinator to determine equivalence with an APAC accredited 3-year sequence of study in Australia. Transcripts are checked to ensure that subject matter undertaken in the undergraduate sequence matches core areas within the discipline (e.g., perception, memory, learning, motivation and emotion, psychobiology, personality, emotion, developmental psychology, social psychology, and abnormal psychology), and includes statistics and research methods. When assessing suitability for entry into 4th year programs, Bond University makes every effort to ensure that core topics covered in undergraduate degrees obtained outside of Australia are equivalent to those required in an accredited three-year sequence of study in psychology in Australia, however we do not guarantee the equivalence of these degrees.

Students who obtained their three year undergraduate qualifications outside of Australia should be aware that successful completion of the 4th year program might not be sufficient for registration as a psychologist and/or the membership requirements of the Australian Psychological Society (APS). Equivalency assessments may be required by the Psychology Board of Australia. For more information on equivalency assessments please visit http://www.psychology.org.au

See the website https://bond.edu.au/program/graduate-diploma-psychological-science

For contact information see here https://bond.edu.au/program/graduate-diploma-psychological-science

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Opportunities to see live demonstrations and attend practical workshops will help you apply theory to practice. You'll gain an understanding of how developmental theory and research is integrated into psychological/non-psychological organisational practice, documentation and policy. Read more

Why choose this course?

• Opportunities to see live demonstrations and attend practical workshops will help you apply theory to practice
• You'll gain an understanding of how developmental theory and research is integrated into psychological/non-psychological organisational practice, documentation and policy
• Our research-active teaching team are experts in applied developmental psychology - their research informs the content of this course and ranges from topics such as maternity and the newborn through to the role of emotion in recognising words
• Our specialist facilities include a video observation suite, EEG, eye-tracking equipment, and a psychology test bank
• Studying this course will equip you with an excellent basis to pursue PhD study or bridge the gap between further training in developmental, educational or clinical psychology
• The combination of contemporary and applied study ensure that you'll be equipped to consider global opportunities when you graduate

About this course:

Developmental psychology is a dynamic and evolving subject area with an increasing emphasis on the application of knowledge to real-life settings. Our course focuses on the application of theory to various settings which have real world implications, and is consistent with a more impactful relationship between academic and professional psychology in a range of employment contexts.

An expert teaching team

Dr Christopher Barnes: Special research interests include Developmental/Health Psychology: Maternity and the Newborn; Cognitive, Motor and Social Development; Maternal Mental Health; Parenting; Self-Efficacy, Self-Esteem and Attachment

Dr Simon Bignell: Special research interests include Developmental Disorders (e.g. ADHD; Autism; Behavioural Disorders); Children’s Language and Literacy; Cyberpsychology (e.g. Technology-Enhanced Learning, Multi-User Virtual Worlds & Gaming); Psychology of Vegetarianism & Veganism

Dr Jenny Hallam: Special research interests include Exploring children's experiences of art in the classroom and how children would like to see art taught, Designing, implementing and evaluating art interventions designed to enable primary teachers to teach art more effectively

Dr Sigrid Lipka: Special research interests include Language processing in adults: sentence & text comprehension; the role of emotion in recognising words; sentence comprehension strategies across different language; individual differences in language processing; dyslexia

Strong career focus

The content of the course has been developed to ensure that graduates have an up-to-date understanding of the role of psychological theory, research and methodology in the context of applied developmental psychology, as well as developing a range of transferable skills. In order to help you decide on a career pathway, and to facilitate employer links, modules will include lectures from guest speakers across a variety of developmental psychology careers, for example working within the NHS, mental health, teaching, research and consultancy.

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The Master of Research (MRes) degree prepares you for study at MPhil/PhD level. We welcome proposals for research in any area connected with media, communications, and cultural theory and practice. Read more

The Master of Research (MRes) degree prepares you for study at MPhil/PhD level.

We welcome proposals for research in any area connected with media, communications, and cultural theory and practice.

The programme combines taught modules in research methodology with a 20,000-word dissertation, and offers advanced-level training to appropriately qualified students. 

We give priority to those with proposals for research within the areas of interest of our staff.

You will be assessed through your research dissertation, and a portfolio of two essays.

Research

Having celebrated its 35th anniversary in 2013, Goldsmiths’ Department of Media and Communications is one of the oldest and largest media departments in the UK. It is also unique in its diversity of approaches to, and articulations of, the disciplinary conjunctures around media and culture.

The Department has equal research strengths in media and communications and in cultural studies research, in humanities and in social sciences approaches, and in theory- and practice-driven work. Its work spans a wide range of topics and modes of enquiry – from philosophical studies of technology and human life to sociological investigations of media production and use; from issues of identity, embodiment and becoming to post-feminism, queer theory and critical race studies; from global screen studies and transnational investigations of media and culture to news’ role in contemporary democracy. 

The Department’s research falls into five main strands which make up our research groupings:

(1) Media and Democracy: building on the work of the Leverhulme programme on the media’s contribution to democracy, including the changing nature of journalism and political communication; studying globalisation in relation to issues of diaspora and nationhood 

(2) Economy, Culture and Communication: investigating communication and discourse in finance and financial media; everyday representations and understandings of the economy and economic life; creative labour, neoliberalism and organisational practices in the arts and cultural industries; the impact of the promotional professions (branding, PR, marketing) on the economy, culture and society

(3) Media Futures: bringing together humanities and social sciences approaches to understanding the changing role of media technologies and global media flows in society, economy and science 

(4) Gender, Feminism and Contemporary Cultures: connecting the long tradition of work within the Department on culture, representation, embodiment and affect to its specific strengths in gender, race, sexuality and labour in national and international contexts 

(5) Screen Cultures and Media Arts: consolidating the long-standing focus on screen cultures within the Department, as concentrated within the Leverhulme programme, combined with an exploration of media arts such as photography, video, digital imagining, sound and performance.

Many of the projects undertaken within the Department are collaborative in nature - such as the work conducted under the umbrella of Goldsmiths Leverhulme Media Research Centre, funded with a 2006 Leverhulme grant to study the design and significance of various contemporary media spaces. Members of the Department have also received funding from AHRC, British Academy, British Council, Carnegie Trust UK, Council for British Research in the Levant, ESRC, EPSRC, Guggenheim Foundation, Higher Education Academy, Hong Kong Research Grants Council, JISC, London Centre for Arts and Cultural Exchange, Media Trust and Open Society Foundation.

As well as working on collaborative projects, members of the Department have published many books with high-impact international presses, on a diverse range of topics: affect and emotion, artificial intelligence, bioethics, the body and experience, branding, broadcasting, democracy, film history, the future of journalism, media geographies, the mediation of power, post-feminism, postcolonial politics, sound and video cultures.

Members of the Department edit leading academic journals, including Body and SocietyCulture Machine and its sister project, Photomediations Machine), Global Media and CommunicationInternational Journal of Cultural StudiesSubjectivity and photographies.

Recent Research Projects

Skills & careers

The Department of Media and Communications aims to develop students who should be able to express themselves creatively and self-critically in theoretical and/or practice work. 

You'll also develop: 

  • an understanding of the workings of the media and their broad cultural and social impacts
  • an understanding of the pleasures of media consumption

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.



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Take your career to the next level. With Massey’s Master of Applied Linguistics, you’ll help make second-language teaching work in a multilingual world. Read more

Take your career to the next level

With Massey’s Master of Applied Linguistics, you’ll help make second-language teaching work in a multilingual world.

The Master of Applied Linguistics provides professionals in all areas of second-language teaching, including Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), with a qualification that meets their specific combination of professional and research needs. This combination is increasingly important in both domestic and international settings.

Get real-world skills

You’ll use theories, methods and problem-based approaches that address real-world language issues. The Master of Applied Linguistics focuses on second-language acquisition and language use in an increasingly globalised and digitally mediated world.

Explore areas such as contextually relevant teaching of languages, reflective practices to enhance teaching and learning, and the sociocultural demands of language learning and teaching.

Draw on Massey’s research strengths

Massey’s research strengths include:

  • Heritage language learning
  • Mother tongue maintenance
  • Online second-language communities
  • Distance/online language learning
  • Sociocultural adjustment of international students and their teachers to their presence in New Zealand universities
  • Language learning and emotion
  • Bi/multilingualism
  • Oral proficiency

Research opportunities

Master’s study includes a research component. On the Master of Applied Linguistics you’ll complete a research report (60 credits) or thesis (120 credits). Recent areas of student research include:

  • Investigating needs of non-income earning students in community English classes
  • The development of teacher identity among student teachers in Thailand
  • Navigating cultural conflict and dissonance in the immigrant ESL classroom
  • The role of motivational beliefs in self-regulated learning for Kanji acquisition
  • Vocational tertiary students’ imagined experiences of learning English with native speakers in an Indonesian rural setting
  • Perceptions of Bhutanese students, parents and teachers of their learning progress in a New Zealand secondary school
  • A case study of teacher beliefs and student attitudes on L1 use in multilingual classrooms

Careers

With a Master of Applied Linguistics you’ll be prepared for careers in language teaching, research and practice in national and international multilingual contexts. You’ll be supporting those who operate in multilingual contexts, such as migrants and former refugees, and international students in New Zealand. Our graduates are employed as educators, consultants and practitioners.



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The Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) programme at Tallinn University is a multidisciplinary curriculum that emphasises technology for the benefit of people.This curriculum brings together computing, design and cognitive psychology. Read more

The Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) programme at Tallinn University is a multidisciplinary curriculum that emphasises technology for the benefit of people.This curriculum brings together computing, design and cognitive psychology. It offers a research-based approach to designing interactive, software and technical systems.It enables you to shape the world through what you design.

Who are we looking for?

We welcome students with a wide variety of backgrounds. We favour everyone who is interested in improving the way technology is made available to people and intertwined with their lives. We favour:

  • Developers
  • Designers
  • Anthropologists
  • Psychologists

Why study with us?

This is your chance to become a well grounded Human-Computer Interaction specialist, able to act as a scholarly design researcher, a knowledgeable interaction designer, or a discerning user experience professional. It’s an opportunity to mould your future, our future, and study in the most E of all countries, Estonia.

Not only will you be able to systematically go from an idea, opportunity or challenge, to a technology-based solution, you will also be able to do it based on sound theoretical grounds. You will:

  • Combine computational thinking with design thinking
  • Integrate academic and practitioner perspectives

Our programme starts with a sound and thorough introduction to the field of Human-Computer Interaction, moves on to a semester long integrated interaction design project and rounds up with topics such as:

  • Ambient and ubiquitous computing
  • Physiological and affective computing
  • Perception and attention
  • Cognition and emotion

The capstone is your master thesis. Research-based, practice-base, many configurations are possible but surely it will be a in-depth experience.



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Affective computing is an exciting, multi-disciplinary strand of computing that addresses how computers, and other technologies, will become more interactive and efficient by recognising, and responding to, human emotions. Read more

Affective computing is an exciting, multi-disciplinary strand of computing that addresses how computers, and other technologies, will become more interactive and efficient by recognising, and responding to, human emotions.

This course offers students a unique opportunity to be at the forefront of intelligent, emotionally interactive technologies as they come to fruition in the industry and marketplace over the next 10 years. Utilising emergent technologies, such as the Internet of Things (IoT), wearable and mobile devices, and Big Data, the course combines theory and practice, as it prepares students to seize the opportunity to create innovative computers that are powerful, customisable, adaptive, and responsive to their users.

Ultimately, affective computing can provide a way for humans to seamlessly filter out a lot of the information they are presently swamped with and to get to the services and systems that are right for them. 

Indications from the Tech Partnership skills council show that there is a need for 1 million new employment roles in the digital economy between now and 2025 and that 52% of digital businesses currently struggle to fill specialist vacancies.

Key course features

  • Gain hands-on experience of working with a range of sensors and equipment in building experimental, affective computing systems.
  • Learn about the emerging fields of Affective Computing, the Internet of Things (IoT), and Big Data.
  • The course is taught and assessed by active researchers in the field, who all belong to the University’s Affective Audio and/or ARClab groups.
  • The ability to critically appraise and disseminate research results.
  • Provides students with a sound basis for further research and/or professional development.

What will you study

The course provides students with immersion in several distinct subject disciplines that support the design, development, and evaluation of affective computing systems. The course modules cover the practical skills of computing, necessary to build affective, interactive technologies, supported by learning the theories, investigation techniques, and research skills that allow them to work successfully with leading edge, emerging technologies and devise solutions that are fit for purpose.

 

ALL MODULES ARE CORE.

 

As with most masters programmes this has 2 parts, a taught part followed by a dissertation.

 

Students study 5 core modules, totalling 120 credits, followed by a 60 credit dissertation, making a total of 180 credits.

 

MODULES:

  • Affective Computing: This module introduces students to the theory and practical application of affective computing. Students will gain insight into the multi-disciplinary aspects and influences of affective computing and the various models and paradigms of emotion. Students will learn to design, construct, and test affective systems to address specific problems. As such, students will gain experience in configuring a range of sensors, and interpreting the data they produce, in a hands-on fashion.
  • Human Factors Engineering: This module provides a range of skills that can be applied in the development efficient technologies that are easy to use and highly effective. As such, the module provides students with a deep knowledge of the societal, psychological, physical, and technical factors relating to human factors engineering. Students will develop a degree of expertise in human factors engineering, particularly focused on the evaluation of existing information and computer systems. In practical terms, students will conduct and report upon usability studies in a mature and professional manner, with an awareness of the legal and ethical issues involved.
  • Advanced Artificial Intelligence: In this module students are given the opportunity to study problem-solving techniques that are applicable to artificial intelligence with the intention of providing them with the ability to develop intelligent systems. Investigating the role of human intelligence from the Computer Science point of view will enable students to appreciate the role of problem solving. Typical techniques include identification trees, neural nets, genetic algorithms, sparse spaces, near misses particularly applicable to nearest neighbours will be studied. These techniques will enable students to tackle problems in the areas of machine learning, pattern recognition, natural language processing and understanding, perception and expert systems.
  • Postgraduate Study and Research Methods: This module will provide the necessary underpinning skills to ensure that competent work and standards are achieved and maintained throughout the student’s chosen programme of study. This will encompass the development of professional level information handling and analysis skills, as well as ensuring students become proficient at recognising and managing their own professional development.
  • Future and Emerging Technologies: The module explores emerging and future technologies in the field of computing and affords students the opportunity to investigate novel application and research areas and environments where computing can be potentially beneficial. Consideration is given to the the legal, ethical, social, political, economic, environmental, demographic, philosophical and cultural issues on which future technologies may have influence, and be influenced by. Students are expected to apply research methods and forecasting techniques to make and justify credible predictions in their field of study.
  • Dissertation: The dissertation is a study-led piece of work that focuses on applying a wide range of the technical and critical analysis skills that have been developed throughout the course. Students will agree a topic of study with their academic supervisor that falls within the remit of affective computing. This typically follows the development and implementation of a computer system and or may be based upon a research investigation.

For a full-time student, the taught components (all modules apart from the Dissertation) of the course, requiring attendance in a classroom or lab, will be in the region of 12 hours per week during each semester. In addition, students are expected to study independently outside of the classroom for around 15 hours per week. The commitment for a part-time student is approximately half that of a full-time student.

The information listed in this section is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal academic framework review, so may be subject to change.





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This programme is a unique, research-based course, which doesn’t follow the traditional model of lectures and exams. You have the opportunity to pursue specific study areas such as. Read more

This programme is a unique, research-based course, which doesn’t follow the traditional model of lectures and exams. You have the opportunity to pursue specific study areas such as:

  • Action observation
  • Attention
  • Emotion
  • Memory
  • Methodological aspects of cognitive neuroscience
  • Movement
  • Multisensory processing
  • Perception

What will you gain?

In addition to the in-depth knowledge of the subject matter, you will also gain the practical skills to conduct industry level cognitive neuroscience research as well as the statistical and analytical skills to appraise the findings. You will also have expertise and experience in neuroimaging and brain stimulation techniques.



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The Master of Arts (M.A.) program in clinical psychology is a 45-credit-hour degree program that allows students to develop basic intervention, evaluation, and consultation skills. Read more

The Master of Arts (M.A.) program in clinical psychology is a 45-credit-hour degree program that allows students to develop basic intervention, evaluation, and consultation skills. Graduates of the program are prepared to assume entry-level clinical positions in agency, health-care, and organizational settings. Licensing laws of states vary widely, and students should consult the licensing body in the state in which they intend to practice to determine opportunities and requirements for licensure at the master’s level.

Mission

The mission of graduate training in clinical psychology is to provide quality doctoral training in the scientist-practitioner model within a small private university setting. Science and practice are regarded as inseparable elements. Practice itself is regarded as the application of the theories, methods, and results of scientific psychology to clinical problems. The science of psychology is construed broadly, and students are expected to develop familiarity with a wide range of psychological theories, methods, and results. We encourage students to understand the limits of human perception, reason, and intuition, and to appreciate scientific methods as correctives to the flaws and biases of natural human judgment.

Learning Objectives

Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology. The master’s program shares four training objectives of the doctoral program: (1) provide a generalist model of training in the discipline of psychology; (2) develop fundamental clinical skills based on scientific research; (3) promote high academic, ethical, and professional standards in all aspects of professional development and practice; and (4) prepare students to adapt their methods and practice to meet the needs of diverse populations. Master’s level psychologists who graduate from our program are not prepared for independent practice or licensure. As such, the program’s fifth objective is to (5) prepare students for doctoral study in clinical psychology or further training in related fields (e.g., counseling, social work).

Curriculum Requirements

The program includes formal course work in the core areas of psychology, research methods, personality and psychopathology, principles of psychological assessment and intervention, and professional issues in clinical psychology. Students are also required to complete six hours of practicum training. There is no thesis requirement. Although much of the program is prescribed, students are allowed some flexibility in choice of electives and practicum placements. In addition to providing a solid foundation for a career in clinical psychology, the program requirements satisfy prerequisites for many doctoral programs in clinical psychology.

Clinical Psychology Core (18 Hours)

Methods (3 Hours Minimum)

Practicum (6 Hours Minimum/9 Hours Maximum)

General Psychology Core (12 Hours Minimum)

Complete a minimum of 12 credit hours from courses listed below:

Electives (9 Hours Maximum)

Remaining elective coursework must include one PSY 7973 course not included elsewhere. Electives may include approved transfer courses, or other general psychology courses. MA students may transfer or apply a maximum of six credit hours from another program subject to approval from the graduate program director and the Graduate School.



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Modules can be taken on weekday evenings so that part-time students can fit this Master’s degree around existing commitments (some modules may also run during the day or on weekends). Read more
  • Modules can be taken on weekday evenings so that part-time students can fit this Master’s degree around existing commitments (some modules may also run during the day or on weekends)
  • Tailor the programme to your own needs and interests by choosing from a range of optional modules, including in the areas of early childhood studies; SEN, disability and inclusion; leadership and management in education
  • Reach an informed theoretical position in relation to equality, diversity and social justice in education
  • Learn the theoretical and practical complexities involved in education policy-making
  • Use our new library with its exceptional study facilities including the Froebel Archive for Childhood Studies

Summary

The MA Education Studies programme is designed for education professionals who would like to further their knowledge and understanding of children and young people in society. You will be able to select from a wide range of modules in areas including special education needs, disability and inclusion and leadership and management in education, allowing you to shape the programme to your interests and career aspirations.

Schooling can be viewed as just one context within which education may take place; there are many other contexts in which educational approaches are used to work with children and young people. Some of these contexts include advisory work, early childhood practice, educational administration and policy, learning support and the third sector to enhance educational provision for children, families and communities. This MA will explore education across these different areas.

The programme will draw on the wider professional experiences that students may have of working in contexts where educational approaches are important. These may include experiences such as employment in youth work, sports’ coaching with young people, working for charities with children and young people to provide learning opportunities in this country or internationally.

This MA will cover critical social and educational theories and perspectives, as well as policy and practice relevant to global and local educational contexts. It will support you to achieve a critical awareness and understanding of education in its broadest sense as a process of human learning and development in and for human society.

You will benefit greatly from engaging with the insights, experiences and perspectives of your peers who may come from a diverse range of contexts, backgrounds and experiences. These insights combined with your own experiences and the theory gained from the modules will allow you to deepen your understanding of working with children and young people and of education in its broadest sense.

All lecturers leading modules on this programme have specialist qualifications, teaching or leadership experience in the field of education, with relevant research and scholarship backgrounds, which will help to shape the content of the programme.

Those with less practical experience will need to have studied a degree programme such as BA Education, BA Children’s Studies, BA Youth Work, BA Early Childhood Studies, BA Social Pedagogy or BA Sports Coaching, all of which emphasise the practices of working with children and young people to enable their participation, development and learning.

Content

This MA allows you to engage with a range of topics, across different areas of education, with a particular focus on the critical theories of global policy and of the social relations of difference and power in educational contexts.

You will be introduced to the key concepts of race, ethnicity, class and gender in the Power in Education and Society module. You will be moved beyond theoretical knowledge to reach an informed position in relation to equality, diversity and social justice in education. Awareness will be raised of past and current international discourses in education, critically examining how they impact on children, young people, families and communities.

You will also analyse current debates on education policy and will learn to identify new policy sites and policy actors in the education arena, in the Key Concepts and Current Debates in Global Education Policy module.

The compulsory final dissertation module will give you the opportunity to select a topic of your choice and undertake a critical enquiry of the subject. You must also take a (required) research module, called Undertaking Social and Educational Research, which is designed to teach you about social and educational research and to prepare you for the dissertation.

You can select a further three modules from a range of options, including those from related MA programmes in Early Childhood Studies, SEN Disability & Inclusive Education and Education Leadership and Management. This gives you the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding in an area of education that interests you, or is relevant to your chosen career. A maximum of 2 from any of these programmes can be taken and decisions about which of these are appropriate for each student are made by the Programme Convenor in consultation with students.

Modules

Compulsory module

Required modules

Optional modules

Compulsory and Required modules

Compulsory and/or required modules may change when we review and update programmes. Above is a list of modules offered this academic year.

Optional modules

Optional modules, when offered as part of a programme, may vary from year to year and are subject to viability.



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Our MSc Organisational Psychology course provides you with the necessary skills and knowledge to apply psychological principles, theories and methods to work organisations. Read more

Our MSc Organisational Psychology course provides you with the necessary skills and knowledge to apply psychological principles, theories and methods to work organisations. The course develops your understanding of psychology as well as equipping you with practical skills for working as a psychologist within organisations.

The course at Alliance Manchester Business School:

  • Is fully accredited by the British Psychological Society, providing the basis for achieving Chartered Psychologist status
  • Covers the seven core areas of organisational psychology, giving you a broad basis for future practice
  • Includes Test User: Occupational - Ability and Personality (Level A and B) qualifications for psychometric testing at work, enabling you to enroll on the British Psychological Society's Register of Qualifications in Test Use
  • Is delivered by research-active staff, who draw on their expertise to engage you with the most up-to-date psychological research and methods
  • Develops commercial awareness and business skills necessary in a competitive work environment

The course runs over one year (two years for part-time students) and comprises two taught semesters plus a research dissertation. The taught modules use a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, group work, case studies and practical exercises, and are assessed using a range of techniques, including examinations, essays, applied coursework and presentations.

Special features

MSc Organisational Psychology course was re-accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) for a further six years, with no conditions. We are only one of 20 schools in the UK to be accredited by the BPS to offer the Masters course that allows students to become a Chartered Occupational Psychologist. 

Additional course information

Read Sheena Davidson's article discussing older workers in the workplace.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment across the course units varies, and includes a combination of examinations, report, course work, practical assessments and presentations. A dissertation of around 15,000 words is normally undertaken.

Course unit details

The course provides psychology graduates who are intending to become Chartered Occupational Psychologists with the theoretical knowledge and practical skills required by the Division of Occupational Psychology of the British Psychological Society (BPS), in the following seven required areas: 

  • Psychological Assessment at Work
  • Learning, Training and Development
  • Leadership, Engagement and Motivation
  • Well-Being and Work
  • Work Design, Organisational Change and Development
  • Research Design, Advanced Data Gathering and Analytical Techniques
  • Applying Psychology to Work and Organisations

During the course you will be taking 180 credits in all. The eight taught modules during semester one and two total 120 credits which can be viewed in the list below.  

Over the summer period, you will carry out your Research Dissertation, worth 60 credits. Examples of recent dissertation project topics include:

  • Customers pay our wages: a diary study examining how to optimise customer interaction and employee wellbeing in the service sector
  • Client verbal aggression: an examination of emotional labour and associated outcomes for employees in the legal sector
  • Effects of job stressors, organisational commitment and individual attributes on Malaysian Chinese primary school teachers' burnout
  • Corporate psychopathy: the truth behind the hype
  • Improving safety using a combination of transformational and transactional leadership: a longitudinal study
  • Creativity in the workplace: a self-report measure and unanticipated costs
  • Leader effectiveness and leader-member relations: the role of interpersonal emotion regulation, follower attributions and leader empathy

Please contact us for more information on the part-time two-year route.

Career opportunities

The majority of graduates pursue the practical experience required to become Chartered Occupational Psychologists. This is usually carried out within consultancy firms or within specialist sections of large organisations. Graduates are employed as internal consultants in large commercial and industrial organisations, in HR departments, in the Police, the NHS and as management consultants. Recent recruiters include: Saville Consulting, Occupational Psychology Group, Civil Service and ORC International.

More details on our Careers Service.

Latest information on visa changes and opportunities in the UK for international students.

Accrediting organisations

MSc Organisational Psychology course was re-accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) for a further six years, with no conditions. We are only one of 20 schools in the UK to be accredited by the BPS to offer the Masters course that allows students to become a Chartered Occupational Psychologist. 



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