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The discipline of Counselling is still forming within the field of the Social Sciences and Humanities; many new exciting research developments have opened up, and the interdisciplinary approach which underpins this programme, offers to contemporary trainee Counselling practitioners a fusion of new and traditional approaches backed by research. Read more
The discipline of Counselling is still forming within the field of the Social Sciences and Humanities; many new exciting research developments have opened up, and the interdisciplinary approach which underpins this programme, offers to contemporary trainee Counselling practitioners a fusion of new and traditional approaches backed by research.

Course Overview

This programme in Psychotherapeutic Practice: Emotion-Focused Therapy offers a part-time Counselling training opportunity at Master’s level in a Humanistic modality.

Lesley Greenberg, one of the co-researchers and founder of the modality states that:

“Emotion-focused treatment was developed as an empirically informed approach to the practice of psychotherapy grounded in contemporary psychological theories of functioning. Emotion-focused therapy (EFT) was developed by my colleagues and I in the 1980s out of empirical studies of the process of change and has developed into one of the recognized evidence-based treatment approaches for depression and marital distress as well as showing promise for trauma, eating disorders, anxiety disorders, and interpersonal problems.” FOCUS 2010;8:32-42.

This model of therapy has now been approved of by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence, the quality gatekeepers of the NHS, as having demonstrated significant positive outcome research in a number of areas.

The foundation of this therapeutic modality draws on the work of Carl Rogers and his work on the ‘therapeutic relationship’; from the ‘focusing’ work of Eugene Gendlin and the dialogic and experiential work of the Gestalt tradition. Significantly, however, EFT opens up a greater access to human emotion, as it engages with close interest in the growing understanding of neuroscience and how emotions function differently from cognition in the functioning of the brain. These insights from the work of Damasio and LeDoux, and others, are enabling practitioners in the field to develop a new language and method of addressing psychological distress and putting emotions back at the centre of the constituted self.

The programme will be taught in small groups so that students have a significant opportunity to engage in the practice and development of their therapeutic competence. In addition students will be taught through lecture format and small seminar group, where there will be the opportunity to discuss with each other and the tutor the rich, diverse and sometimes complex issues addressed in the programme.

Modules

The programme is divided into two parts:

PART 1:
The theory and practice of Emotion-Focused Therapy sets the philosophical, ideological and research base of the programme. The module on ‘The Nature and Experience of Human Functioning’ will address the conceptualization of human wellness and distress as described by the EFT model and establish the research base for the formulation and development of these ideas. The concept of ‘dialectical constructivism’ will be investigated in its formation of human meaning, and its implications to human perception and feeling. The module will engage in the most recent research regarding the emotions and the part they play in our human functioning.

The module ‘The principles of working with EFT’ introduces the practice work of the modality, which is initially founded on the establishing of the therapeutic relationship and qualities of empathy. The modules will develop a wider understanding of the concept of ‘treatment’ in the engagement of therapeutic work.

Running alongside these two practice modules will be modules on ethical practice and professional benchmarks; supervision; personal development; identity: sameness and difference; and the context of psychological distress and mental health.

PART 2:
Part two of the programme consists of a dissertation which is undertaken by the student as a supported research project. A student will receive regular supervision and opportunities to attend research workshops on topics which can help to underpin their knowledge of research.

Key Features

-The interdisciplinary approach which underpins this programme, offers to contemporary trainee Counselling practitioners a fusion of new and traditional approaches backed by research.
-The programme will be taught in small groups so that students have a significant opportunity to engage in the practice and development of their therapeutic competence.

Assessment

The programme will offer a range of different assessment methods to give students the opportunity to extend practical and academic skills and encourage your independent learning, these could include: essays, presentation, reflection, practice.

As a Counselling practice programme written up to BACP accreditation/registration standard there are two additional requirement of the course:
-A student will need to complete a minimum of 100 hours of supervised clinical practice as a trainee Counsellor
-Complete a minimum of 12 hours of personal therapy

Career Opportunities

This programme is ideal for those wishing to develop their career within counselling practice using research-led methods to enhance their professional practice.

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The PhD and MSc by Research in Clinical Psychology offer the chance to work with, and be supervised by, a range of clinical academics across many areas of psychology. Read more

Research profile

The PhD and MSc by Research in Clinical Psychology offer the chance to work with, and be supervised by, a range of clinical academics across many areas of psychology.

Candidates should note that these programmes do not lead to Chartered Clinical Psychologist status.

Our research involves national and international collaborations, with many projects involving NHS partnerships.

We have specific research strengths in the areas of children and adolescents; developmental psychopathology of mental health; ageing and older adulthood; adult psychological problems; brain injury; chronic health conditions; psychological therapies research, including cognitive behavioural interventions; emotions and emotion regulation; sex offenders; learning disability; neuropsychology; quality of life; severe and enduring mental health problems; and the development and validation of measures.

Specific areas of interest include cognitive behaviour therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, psychosis, health psychology, and qualitative approaches.

Recent successful PhD topics have included eating disorders and emotion; chronic pain; quality of life and intellectual disabilities; developmental factors in adolescent mental health, and intervention for bipolar disorder.

We have an active research group in the area of applied developmental psychology and psychological therapies research for severe mental health issues. We coordinate the Edinburgh Child and Adolescent Psychology Network. The group’s research areas include child and adolescent health and mental health; cognition, language and learning; social development and relationships; and atypical development.

For more detailed information about potential PhD supervisors in this area, their research interests and publications, please visit our website.

Our research interests include:

onset and recovery from severe and enduring psychological disorder
mindfulness and third wave approaches
medically unexplained symptoms
child and adolescent mental health
eating behaviours and disorders
attachment and emotion regulation and sex offenders.

Training and support

The PhD and MSc by Research programmes allow you to conduct an independent research project that makes a significant contribution to your chosen field of study and to further develop your research skills. We provide expertise in a variety of research methods including qualitative and quantitative approaches.

You will be assigned two supervisors (usually one for MSc by Research) and you will meet with your supervisors regularly. Workshops, seminars and courses in research methods are available to postgraduate students undertaking a higher degree by research.

We work in close collaboration with the Graduate School of Social & Political Science, enabling School of Health in Social Science research students to benefit from the extensive suite of social science research courses offered by both Schools.

With close ties with other humanities disciplines and with colleagues in the College of Medicine & Veterinary Medicine, we offer PhD students excellent opportunities for interdisciplinary supervision and research project development.

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We currently offer the opportunity to gain a postgraduate degree by research at the level of MSc, MPhil or DPhil (PhD). Study can be on either a full-time or a part-time basis. Read more

Course outline

We currently offer the opportunity to gain a postgraduate degree by research at the level of MSc, MPhil or DPhil (PhD). Study can be on either a full-time or a part-time basis. The minimum periods of study for achieving these research degrees are as follows:

• MSc – 1 year full-time or 2 years part-time
• MPhil – 2 years full-time or 4 years part-time
• DPhil – 3 years full-time or 6 years part-time (this is our equivalent term for a PhD)

The Psychology Department fosters a culture of collaborative, multidisciplinary research, and you will join a vibrant community that includes regular work-in-progress seminars to foster an active research environment. You will join one of our four research hubs described below, all of which are engaged in inter-institutional collaborations, including some with non-academic partners such as health-care providers and music conservatoires.

We are happy to consider research proposals on a wide range of topics relevant to our hubs, but may also be looking to fill specific research roles in some areas. Contact us below for more details.

Our Research Hubs

‘CREATE’ (Centre for Research into Expertise Acquisition, Training and Excellence)

The main focus of the centre is the exploration of the drivers of excellence in performance (whether cognitive, creative or practice-based). We welcome applications from potential MSc and DPhil candidates across a wide range of related topic areas, including:

• Insight and creativity
• The drivers of performance excellence and expertise development (e.g. in music, theatre, puzzle-solving, board-games and medicine)
• Hobbies, motivations and characteristics of niche populations
• Music psychology
• Time perception and those with ‘natural’ time-keeping abilities

We have a number of external collaborative projects in the areas of creativity and performance, and also work with internal colleagues in Applied Computing and the University of Buckingham Medical School.

Centre for Health and Relationship Research

The main aim of the hub is to study the impact of the interpersonal world and support structures on health and well-being in clinical and non-clinical settings. This overarching focus has led to the study of topic areas such as:

• Prevalence, impact of and psychosocial challenges facing people following spinal cord injury
• Biopsychosocial understanding of pain and developing interventions for successful pain management
• Social norms as a predictor of health behaviours in young people
• Social factors affecting uptake of health behaviours
• The role of social support in living well with chronic conditions

Together, these projects represent a body of work which seeks to fight patient isolation and to understand health experiences in the context of a social world. The hub aims to identify methods for supporting patients as they live with long-term conditions, including through developing interventions, assessment techniques and knowledge dissemination. With connections and active research work taking part at four local NHS hospitals, we can offer excellent opportunities for research studies with tangible impact.

Emotion and Life-Span Relationships

The Emotion and Life-Span Relationships hub offers diverse research opportunities including:

• Cyberpsychology and Cyberbullying, including online gaming
• Cyber versus real world behaviour
• Social inference and emotion regulation
• Interpersonal relationships, including dating, rejection, relationship maintenance and break down
• Mental resilience and its relationship to social support

Psychology of Educational Development

In this hub, we study the cognitive processes, behavioural issues and developmental factors that affect learning, and how learning environments and individual differences influence educational outcomes. With a focus on the resilience, creativity and happiness of learners, as well as on Specific Learning Difficulties which might impact upon academic performance, we welcome applicants to study a wide range of topics with us, including:

• Children with Specific Learning Difficulties
• Bullying and Cyberbullying in schools
• Educating for Creativity
• Children's understanding of Science
• Excellence in Performance and Academic achievement
• Resilience, Wellbeing and Positive education

For more information, and to apply online, visit us here: http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/sciences/msc/psychology

Or contact us by email below.

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This MA introduces you to recent debates on gender in the disciplines of sociology and media and communications studies, and to the interdisciplinary domains of feminist social and cultural theory- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-gender-media-culture/. Read more
This MA introduces you to recent debates on gender in the disciplines of sociology and media and communications studies, and to the interdisciplinary domains of feminist social and cultural theory- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-gender-media-culture/

Drawing on the internationally recognised and pioneering expertise of staff in the Department of Sociology and Department of Media and Communications, the programme offers you the opportunity to develop cutting-edge critical skills in relation to cultural approaches to gender formation and gender theory.

As well as these theoretical and analytical points of orientation, the MA in Gender, Media and Culture aims to help you grasp the importance of epistemology and methodology for the evaluation of empirical investigations of gender formations.

The programme therefore introduces you to, and offers training in, the key socio-cultural methods for the study of gender in the contemporary world, including methods for the study of visual culture; the body and affect; and memory.

These two elements of the programme are brought together in a dissertation study, which involves tailored supervision in the application of research methods to a specific topic.

This programme relates to the following disciplines:

Sociology
Media and Communications
Humanities
Science and Technology Studies
Philosophy

Overall the programme has the following interrelated aims

to provide in-depth interdisciplinary knowledge of contemporary gender formations
to provide theoretical, analytical and methodological points of orientation for understanding gender and culture transnationally and across different societies and geo-political regions
to offer skilled supervision in the development and completion of a small research project which tests thoroughly a range of research skills
to expose students to a lively research environment and the relevant expertise of the research-led Departments of Sociology and Media and Communications

Convenors

Autumn term convener - Nirmal Puwar
Spring term convener - Sara Ahmed

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Postgraduate Programmes Officer.

Modules & Structure

Core components of the programme will familiarise you with the wide range of debates integral to the fields of gender studies, feminist theory, and cultural studies. These include:

questions about sexual difference and the performativity of gender
gender, science, debates on affect and emotion
gender and migration and the new international division of labour
feminism
You complete one core module and one option module each term, as well as a dissertation module in the spring term. The first core module introduces key debates and developments in feminist theory, cultural theory and, in particular, feminist cultural theory. It introduces both early debates which defined these fields and contemporary developments and departures. More specifically, you will be introduced to social constructivist and post-structuralist perspectives, to ‘new materialism’, to debates on feminism and the critique of universalism; to key questions in relation to feminism and biology; to debates on psycho-analysis and the emergence of queer theory and its intersection with feminist theory.

The second core module examines the place of gender, affect and the body in feminist theory and feminist practice. The course offers you different angles on what has become known as “the affective turn,” placing a strong emphasis on the history of feminist contributions to the study of affect and emotion as well as the body. We ask how bodies are constructed, experienced and lived from a variety of feminist perspectives, attending to questions of corporeal difference, as well as the intimacy of bodies, spaces, objects and technologies. We also reflect on the significance of affect and the body for feminist and queer cultural practices, as well feminist and queer activisms. This module therefore offers instruction in some of the most cutting edge issues in contemporary feminist theory. A team of leading feminist scholars based in the departments of Sociology and Media Communications at Goldsmiths teach this module on the basis of their research specialisms.

There will be a series of dissertation workshops to help you plan and develop your dissertation, especially in regard to issues of methodology and method. Each student will be assigned a supervisor who will work with you to develop your proposal and undertake independent research.

Option modules

You have 60 credits at your disposal, you can choose any 30 credit modules related to gender from postgraduate modules across the University. You can choose either a regular option (30 credits) or two ‘mini-options’ (2 x 15 credits).

For your other options, you can choose modules from either the Department of Sociology or the following Departments across Goldsmiths. Not all modules are suitable for students from all academic backgrounds; you will discuss your choices with the Programme Convenor at the start of your degree.

Assessment

Essays and dissertation.

Skills

Graduates from this programme gain conceptual and methodological knowledge of the key concepts and debates in the study of gender and culture; the skills of critical analysis; the ability to distinguish and appraise a range of socio-cultural research methodologies; the skills to design and develop a research project; and the ability to recognise and account for sensitive ethical issues relating to research and representation.

The two core courses provide you with the necessary skills to understand the relationships between early debates in the fields of gender studies, feminist theory and feminist cultural theory, and the ability to critically engage with new developments in these fields. Furthermore, you will gain a critical appreciation of the role and place of the body and affect in the development of feminist cultural theory and gender theory, and the challenges that contemporary socio-cultural changes bring to the theorisation of the body.

Careers

Previous graduates have embarked on professional careers in social research, think tanks, the arts and cultural sectors, government and public administration, development, human rights, NGOs, and in media and communications globally. They have also progressed to PhD study.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Do our categories of behaviour – normal and abnormal – translate across cultures?. Why do ethnic minorities have different experiences of mental health?. Read more

About the course

Do our categories of behaviour – normal and abnormal – translate across cultures?
Why do ethnic minorities have different experiences of mental health?
Is there a ‘human nature’ underneath all the cultural differences?

Anyone interested in psychological processes, feeling and expression, memory and trauma, culture and personality, will have asked themselves questions of this kind. However, they are less likely to have asked themselves how (or if) we can recognise and analyse different emotions in other cultural settings.

In this new MSc degree, the first of its kind anywhere in Europe, we tackle these and other issues from an anthropological perspective, looking at the social and cultural dimensions of human experience.

By engaging with debates on these important topics and through the examination of world ethnography (including the UK), participants will learn about selfhood, emotion, madness and identity in cultural context.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork: as well as undertaking rigorous intellectual training, all our students are expected to get out of the library and undertake their own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present their findings in a dissertation. Students take this opportunity to travel to a wide variety of locations across the world – see “Special Features” for more details.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

This MSc gives candidates a solid grounding in key topics in psychological and psychiatric anthropology.

Through detailed consideration of cases from Britain and around the world, we explore the ways in which person, emotion, and subjectivity are shaped through cultural practices.

Candidates from backgrounds in health, therapy, social work and psychology will be able to challenge the categories and assumptions inherent in standard approaches to psychological and behavioural issues.

Course Content

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full-time

Compulsory modules:

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Dissertation in Psychological and Psychiatric Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
Themes in Psychiatric Anthropology
Themes in Psychological Anthropology

Optional modules:

Anthropology of the Body
Anthropology of the Person
Kinship, Sex and Gender
The Anthropology of Childhood
The Anthropology of Youth
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the arena of Global Health
Anthropology of Education
Anthropology of Learning
Ethnicity, Identity and Culture
Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings

Part-time

Year 1

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Themes in Psychiatric Anthropology
Themes in Psychological Anthropology

Year 2

Dissertation in Psychological and Psychiatric Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
and optional modules

Assessment

Assessment is by essay, practical assignment (e.g. analysis of a short field exercise), and dissertation. There are no examinations.

Special Features

This degree looks at psychological and psychiatric topics from an anthropological perspective. There is an overlap with psychology and psychiatry in the things we look at (identity, consciousness, cognition, mental health, etc), but the approach is quite different; indeed, the findings can be startlingly different.

In all cases, we explore the point of view and experience of the insider, the ‘native’, in a range of cultures, we analyse this inside view in relation to the social and cultural environment. What we seek is a dynamic conception of human nature that is true to experience as well as illuminating broader social processes of which the individual may be only partly aware.
 
This degree challenges standard assumptions about normality and deviance, social and personal identity, the boundaries of the self, and the constituents of experience.

For those employed in the health, social and educational sectors, it will enhance professional practice and broaden understanding. But for every student it will open up new avenues.

The programme is run by experts in their field, who have worked in countries across the globe including Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, sub-Saharan Africa, Melanesia, India and Sri Lanka, as well as Britain.

All our degrees (whether full- or part-time) combine intensive coursework, rigorous training in ethnographic research methods, and a period of fieldwork in the summer term (final summer term if part-time) leading to an up to 15,000 word dissertation.

Students are free to choose their own research topic and geographic area, in consultation with their academic supervisor. In all cases, the dissertation research project provides valuable experience and in many cases it leads to job contacts – forming a bridge to a future career or time out for career development.

In recent years, students have undertaken fieldwork in locations across the world, including India, Mexico, Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, China, Nepal, Peru, Morocco, and New Zealand as well as within the UK and the rest of Europe.

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Applied Positive Psychology focuses on questions that enable you, and the people around you, to lead fulfilling and meaningful lives. Read more
Applied Positive Psychology focuses on questions that enable you, and the people around you, to lead fulfilling and meaningful lives. From discovering strengths and the importance of positive emotion to ways of fostering hope and building resilience, the course offers the chance to develop knowledge and skills for professional and personal development.

Visit the website: http://bucks.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/health-and-social-sciences/pt/applied-positive-psychology-pt-1719

Is this course for me?

How does science define happiness? What does it mean to flourish? Would you be able to name your 'strengths' or those of others? These are all questions you will explore and answer while studying Applied Positive Psychology. Whatever work you do, whether you're a teacher, counsellor, coach, or team leader, Applied Positive Psychology can help you find ways to improve your own wellbeing and performance, as well as that of others.

The course encourages you to build on your existing skills and experience while exploring how you can use Positive Psychology in your day-to- day life.

We don't assume our students have a background in Psychology. We'll give you the grounding and skills you need to apply your knowledge in a critically reflective way.

Modules

Year One
• Introduction to Positive Psychology: Happiness, Well-being and Flourishing
• Strengths-based Development and Engagement
• Positive Subjective Emotion and Experience
• The Psychology of Hope and Resilience

Year Two
• The Journey of Change
• Positive Psychology in Practice
• Applied Research Skills
• Data Analysis and Interpretation
• Postgraduate Dissertation

Attendance

The full MSc Applied Psychology takes two years to complete on a part-time basis, however you can choose to study over three years and dedicate the last year to your dissertation. There is also the choice of completing the Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma that does not involve completing a dissertation project.

What are my career prospects?

Applied Positive Psychology can be used in a wide variety of job roles. Many of our students take advantage of flexible learning and stay in their current role. You'll immediately be able to apply what you learn. You'll see how Positive Psychology can make a huge difference, whether you need to boost morale in your workplace or improve productivity.

Some of our graduates choose to continue their education by completing a PhD. Continuing your education gives you the opportunity to develop your skills further and research your area of interest.

Other graduates have used their new skills to set a business. Positive Psychology Learning (PPL) was set up by two graduates and offers positive psychology courses, consultancy and coaching.

How will you help me prepare for my future career?

Positive Psychology will change the way you look at the world. From a personal perspective you'll understand your happiness and strengths in a different way.

This Applied Positive Psychology course will provide you with a confident skill set that will support you in any career. You'll immediately be able to apply your knowledge to day-
to-day life.

As well as learning theory and application, you will also learn to analyse and interpret a range of types of data and develop a critically reflective approach to your learning.

How to apply

Apply here: http://bucks.ac.uk/applynow/

Funding

There are a range of funding opportunities for postgraduate students which include sponsorship, bursaries, scholarships and loans: http://bucks.ac.uk/fees_funding/postgraduate-masters-scholarships/

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Understanding all aspects of Human-Robot interaction. the programming that coordinates a robot’s actions with human action as well the human appreciation and trust in the robot. Read more
Understanding all aspects of Human-Robot interaction: the programming that coordinates a robot’s actions with human action as well the human appreciation and trust in the robot.
At present, there are many sensors and actuators in every device – so they may become embedded in a physical reality. For robots that move around in a specific setting there is a pressing need for the development of proper methods of control and joint-action. The embedded, embodied nature of human cognition is an inspiration for this, and vice versa. Computational modelling of such tasks can give insight into the nature of human mental processing. In the Master’s specialisation in Robot Cognition you’ll learn all about the sensors, actuators and the computational modelling that connects them.
Making sense of sensor data – developing artificial perception – is no trivial task. The perception, recognition and even appreciation of sound stimuli for speech and music (i.e. auditory scene analysis) require modelling and representation at many levels and the same holds for visual object recognition and computer vision. In this area, vocal and facial expression recognition (recognition of emotion from voices and faces) is a rapidly growing application area. In the area of action and motor planning, sensorimotor integration and action, there are strong links with research at the world-renowned Donders Centre for Cognition.
At Radboud University we also look beyond the technical side of creating robots that can move, talk and interpret emotions as humans do. We believe that a robot needs to do more than simply function to its best ability. A robot that humans distrust will fail even if it is well programmed. Culture also plays a role in this; people in Japan are more open to the possibilities of robots than in, for example, the Netherlands. We will teach you how to evaluate humans’ attitudes towards a robot in order to use that information to create robots that will be accepted and trusted and therefore perform even better.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/robot

Why study Robot Cognition at Radboud University?

- We offer a great mix of technical and social aspects of robot cognition.

- This programme focuses on programming robot behaviours and evaluating them rather than building the robots themselves. We teach you to programme robots that will be used in close contact with human beings, for example in healthcare and education, rather than in industry.

- Our cognitive focus leads to a highly interdisciplinary AI programme where students gain skills and knowledge from a number of different areas such as mathematics, computer science, psychology and neuroscience combined with a core foundation of artificial intelligence.

- This specialisation offers plenty of room to create a programme that meets your own academic and professional interests.

- Together with the world-renowned Donders Institute, the Max Planck Institute and various other leading research centres in Nijmegen, we train our students to become excellent researchers in AI.

- To help you decide on a research topic there is a semi-annual Thesis Fair where academics and companies present possible project ideas. Often there are more project proposals than students to accept them, giving you ample choice. We are also open to any of you own ideas for research.

- Our AI students are a close-knit group; they have their own room in which they often get together to interact, debate and develop their ideas. Every student also receives personal guidance and supervision from a member of our expert staff.

Our research in this field

The programme is closely related to the research carried out in the internationally renowned Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour. This institute has several unique facilities for brain imaging using EEG, fMRI and MEG. You could also cooperate with the Behavioural Science Institute and work in its Virtual Reality Laboratory, which can be used to study social interaction between humans and avatars.

An example of a possible thesis subject:
- Engaging human-robot interactions in healthcare for children and/or the elderly
Social robots are often deployed with 'special' user groups such as children and elderly people. Developing and evaluating robot behaviours for these user groups is a challenge as a proper understanding of their cognitive and social abilities is needed. Depending on the task, children for example need to be engaged and encouraged in a different way than adults do. What are effective robot behaviours and strategies to engage children and/or elderly people? How can these robot behaviours be evaluated in a proper way?

Career prospects

Our Artificial Intelligence graduates have excellent job prospects and are often offered a job before they have actually graduated. Many of our graduates go on to do a PhD either at a major research institute or university with an AI department. Other graduates work for companies interested in cognitive design and research. Examples of companies looking for AI experts with this specialisation: Philips, Siemens, Honda, Mercedes, Google. Some students have even gone on to start their own companies.

Job positions

Examples of jobs that a graduate of the specialisation in Robot Cognition could get:
- PhD Researcher on Cognitive-Affective Modelling for Social Robots
- PhD Researcher on Automatic analysis of human group behaviour in the presence of robots
- PhD Researcher on Automatic analysis of affective quality of conversations in human-robot interaction
- Advisor and innovation manager in the healthcare industry
- Social robotics and affective computing for robots expressing emotions
- Developer of control algorithms for using optic flow in drones
- Advisor for start-up company on developing new uses for tactile displays
- Team member in design of emotion recognition and training for autistic children

Internship

Half of your second year consists of an internship, giving you plenty of hands-on experience. We encourage students to do this internship abroad, although this is not mandatory. We do have connections with companies abroad, for example in China, Finland and the United States.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/robot

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Opportunities to see live demonstrations and attend practical workshops will help you apply theory to practice. You'll gain an understanding of how developmental theory and research is integrated into psychological/non-psychological organisational practice, documentation and policy. Read more

Why choose this course?

• Opportunities to see live demonstrations and attend practical workshops will help you apply theory to practice
• You'll gain an understanding of how developmental theory and research is integrated into psychological/non-psychological organisational practice, documentation and policy
• Our research-active teaching team are experts in applied developmental psychology - their research informs the content of this course and ranges from topics such as maternity and the newborn through to the role of emotion in recognising words
• Our specialist facilities include a video observation suite, EEG, eye-tracking equipment, and a psychology test bank
• Studying this course will equip you with an excellent basis to pursue PhD study or bridge the gap between further training in developmental, educational or clinical psychology
• The combination of contemporary and applied study ensure that you'll be equipped to consider global opportunities when you graduate

About this course:

Developmental psychology is a dynamic and evolving subject area with an increasing emphasis on the application of knowledge to real-life settings. Our course focuses on the application of theory to various settings which have real world implications, and is consistent with a more impactful relationship between academic and professional psychology in a range of employment contexts.

An expert teaching team

Dr Christopher Barnes: Special research interests include Developmental/Health Psychology: Maternity and the Newborn; Cognitive, Motor and Social Development; Maternal Mental Health; Parenting; Self-Efficacy, Self-Esteem and Attachment

Dr Simon Bignell: Special research interests include Developmental Disorders (e.g. ADHD; Autism; Behavioural Disorders); Children’s Language and Literacy; Cyberpsychology (e.g. Technology-Enhanced Learning, Multi-User Virtual Worlds & Gaming); Psychology of Vegetarianism & Veganism

Dr Jenny Hallam: Special research interests include Exploring children's experiences of art in the classroom and how children would like to see art taught, Designing, implementing and evaluating art interventions designed to enable primary teachers to teach art more effectively

Dr Sigrid Lipka: Special research interests include Language processing in adults: sentence & text comprehension; the role of emotion in recognising words; sentence comprehension strategies across different language; individual differences in language processing; dyslexia

Strong career focus

The content of the course has been developed to ensure that graduates have an up-to-date understanding of the role of psychological theory, research and methodology in the context of applied developmental psychology, as well as developing a range of transferable skills. In order to help you decide on a career pathway, and to facilitate employer links, modules will include lectures from guest speakers across a variety of developmental psychology careers, for example working within the NHS, mental health, teaching, research and consultancy.

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Combining a thorough grounding in philosophy at postgraduate level with an exceptional range of options, the MA Philosophy offers a unique opportunity for advanced work in the subject. Read more

Summary

Combining a thorough grounding in philosophy at postgraduate level with an exceptional range of options, the MA Philosophy offers a unique opportunity for advanced work in the subject.

Students can follow a pathway in aesthetics or 19th-century German philosophy, or choose a pick-and-mix approach to their studies.

Modules

Classic texts in philosophy (CT) 1 (mind, epistemology and metaphysics) and 2 (ethics and value); research skills 1 and 2; dissertation; plus specialised modules from: art and emotion; artificial intelligence; Frege; Heidegger; Kierkegaard; medieval philosophy; Nietzsche; philosophy and biography; philosophy of language; philosophy of music; philosophy of religion; Schopenhauer; Schopenhauer and Nietzsche on art; the nature of art; the nature of reasons; the theory of action; topics in contemporary aesthetics; topics in moral and political philosophy; topics in the history of aesthetics; Wittgenstein.

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Cognitive psychology and neuropsychology bring together a range of different theoretical frameworks. This MSc programme provides an overview and critical evaluation of the major issues, investigative strategies, and empirical findings of recent attempts to integrate these different approaches to 'brain cognition'. Read more
Cognitive psychology and neuropsychology bring together a range of different theoretical frameworks. This MSc programme provides an overview and critical evaluation of the major issues, investigative strategies, and empirical findings of recent attempts to integrate these different approaches to 'brain cognition'.

Examine how cognitive psychological, neuropsychological, neurobiological and computer science approaches can be combined to understand how the human mind/brain solves a variety of complex problems, such as recognising objects, remembering previous experiences, reading, speaking and reasoning.

The programme gives you a detailed understanding of the major analytic techniques and research methodologies employed by cognitive psychologists and neuropsychologists. Study a range of general, historical, theoretical and philosophical issues underlying the discipline that will equip you with specialist knowledge and systematic understanding and prepare you for a career in academia or as a practising psychologist.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/65/cognitive-psychology-neuropsychology

About the School of Psychology

As a student within the School of Psychology at Kent, you benefit from our supportive, dynamic and diverse environment for creative research and learning.

All of our taught Master’s (MSc) programmes have been recognised by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the nationally recognised criteria for preparation training for PhD research.

Conducting both basic and applied research in several areas, Psychology at Kent is highly regarded as a leading European centre for postgraduate research. Our long-established international reputation in social psychology is complemented by our strengths in cognitive, developmental and forensic psychology. We attract excellent visiting scholars and postgraduate students from both within the UK and overseas.

Some of our PhD students are self-funded, and others are funded by grants or awards either from the School, UK or their countries of origin. Some are also paid to undertake part-time teaching within the School. We have a strong track record of attracting ESRC research studentship funding, which involves partnerships with external organisations such as Age UK and the Equality and Human Rights Commission and collaborative studentships with partners such as People United.

Modules

The modules below are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

SP801 - Statistics and Methodology (40 credits)
SP827 - Current Issues in Cognitive Psychology and Neuropsychology (40 credits)
SP998 - Advanced Research Project in Psychology (60 credits)
SP846 - Cognitive Neural Networks (20 credits)
SP850 - Advanced Cognitive (Neuroscience) Methods in Practice (20 credits)
SP851 - Advanced Topics in Cognitive Development (20 credits)
SP853 - The Psychology of Eyewitness Testimony (20 credits)
SP854 - Advanced Topics in Developmental Psychopathology (20 credits)
SP829 - Advanced Topics in Cognition in Action (20 credits)

Assessment

The programme mainly involves lecture and seminar based teaching. In addition, particular option units (such as computational modelling) require 'hands-on' experience and learning of particular skills. Staff contact time is eight hours per week. You are expected to study for 1,800 hours over 45 weeks.

Assessment is mainly by coursework assignment (4-6,000 word essays), examination (for the Advanced Statistics and Methodology module only), plus the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- foster your intellectual development by providing you with specialised knowledge of a range of theoretical approaches to cognitive psychology/neuropsychology and statistical and methodological expertise in order that you should be well equipped to make your own original contribution to psychological knowledge

- provide teaching that is informed by current research and scholarship and that requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- help you to develop research skills and transferable skills in preparation for entering academic or other careers as psychologists
satisfy the academic requirements of the knowledge base specified by the British Psychological Society

- enable you to manage your own learning and to carry out independent research

- help you to develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Research themes

The School of Psychology is highly regarded as a leading European centre for postgraduate research, with an international reputation for excellence in social psychology (including group processes and intergroup relations); cognition and neuroscience; developmental psychology; and forensic psychology. We have staff who can supervise research degrees in all of these areas. The research environment is designed to sustain a strong, vibrant research culture, encourage collaboration, and unite staff and students with shared research interests. Our themes ensure critical mass and create a highly energetic and stimulating intellectual climate.

Research activity is supported by:

- centrally co-ordinated provision and use of laboratories and technical support

- selection of speakers for our weekly departmental research colloquia

- weekly research meetings within each theme

- developing, reporting and analysing research, and hosting our many visiting scholars

- several monthly small meeting series on specific areas of cross-cutting research (such as forensic, social development, emotion, social cognition and health).

Careers

Our postgraduate students commonly go into the fields of health, teaching or further education. For instance, many of our graduates take up roles as assistant psychologists in the NHS with a view to becoming a professional clinical or forensic psychologist. Upon completing our Master’s courses, graduates have also pursued doctoral study and academic careers at higher education institutions.

The programmes we offer help you to develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Professional recognition

All of our taught Master’s (MSc) programmes have been recognised by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the nationally recognised criteria for preparation training for PhD research.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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The MSc in Cognitive Neuroscience is aimed at home and international students who are seeking to build on their undergraduate qualifications to develop their project management skills and theoretical knowledge for a career in research or related disciplines. Read more
The MSc in Cognitive Neuroscience is aimed at home and international students who are seeking to build on their undergraduate qualifications to develop their project management skills and theoretical knowledge for a career in research or related disciplines. In addition, the programme is aimed at those from closely related science backgrounds to build up a knowledge and practical experience of cognitive neuroscience and psychology before embarking on a psychology related career. As the theoretical background to, and techniques of, cognitive neuroscience are rarely available to students at undergraduate level, the main objective of this MSc is to provide students with detailed historical, philosophical, theoretical and practical knowledge of a broad range of cognitive neuroscience techniques. This wide-ranging knowledge will make students extremely strong candidates for future research positions, and provide them with an ability to develop broad research programmes, utilising a range of techniques, as independent researchers.

Course Structure

Teaching is generally organised into a number of 10 week course units involving 2 to 3 hours of lectures, seminars and practicals per week. Each 10 week unit is assessed by means of formative and summative assessments.

The summative assessment counts towards the final degree. For the programme as a whole, this assessment is divided (with small variations across programmes) in equal proportions between examinations (33.3%), written assignments (33.3%) and dissertation (33.3%).

Core Modules:
-Current Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience (30 credits)
-Techniques in Cognitive Neuroscience (30 credits)
-Research Practice (15 credits)
-Critical Analysis (15 credits)
-Applied Statistics (30 credits)
-Dissertation (60 credits)

Learning and Teaching

The MSc Cognitive Neuroscience is delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars, practical sessions, workshops and lab placements. Lectures provide key theoretical information on general topics such as cognition, emotion and neuropsychology and in depth knowledge of a range of techniques used in cognitive neuroscience research (focusing on their strengths and weaknesses). This core knowledge is then enriched by seminars, workshop, practical sessions and lab placements.

While seminars and workshops allow student-led discussions with the aim of developing their critical thinking, their oral communications and their writing skills, practical sessions provide students with in-depth and hands-on knowledge of selected research techniques as well as programming skills (i.e. Matlab included in the Techniques in Cognitive Neuroscience module) - most wanted key abilities in cognitive neuroscience research. Importantly, practicals also include the application of a range of widely-used statistical tests and a critical understanding of research design, project management and data presentation. All skills that are easily transferable to any future career the students might decide to pursue.

Lab placements are a crowning point of the MSc in Cognitive Neuroscience. They allow students to experience directly the “laboratory life” by observing and helping members of staff calibrating lab equipment, recruiting participants and collecting/analysing data. This is a unique opportunity for the students to witness leading experts at work in their own laboratory.

Finally, the dissertation module will give students the opportunity to apply the knowledge of theoretical principles, research skills and statistical techniques during the complete life cycle of a research project, by undertaking a detailed study of a particular area resulting in a significant piece of independent research. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to undertake their own independent study to prepare for their classes and broaden their subject knowledge.

Altogether, the program is focused on supplying students with broad theoretical knowledge and hands-on practical experience on cutting-edge research in cognitive neuroscience and psychology before embarking on a psychology related career.

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In this course, the focus is on religion in its anthropological and sociological perspectives. Read more
In this course, the focus is on religion in its anthropological and sociological perspectives. Durham has particular strengths in the study of Mormonism; death, dying and disposal; shamanism; religion and emotion; religion/faith and globalisation; religion and politics; contemporary evangelicalism and post-evangelicalism; and religion and generational change. It also boasts the Centre for Death and Life Studies and the Project for Spirituality, Theology and Health.

Course Structure

Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion core module, Three option modules, Dissertation.

Core Modules

-Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
-Dissertation

Optional Modules

Optional Modules in previous years have included:
2-3 choices from:
-Ritual, Symbolism and Belief in the Anthropology of Religion
-Theology, Ethics and Medicine
-Literature and Religion
-Christian Northumbria 600-750
-Ecclesiology and Ethnography

Plus up to 1 choice from:
-Advanced Hebrew Texts
-Advanced Aramaic
-Middle Egyptian
-The Bible and Hermeneutics
-The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament
-Paul and his Interpreters
-Gospels and Canon
-Patristic Exegesis
-Patristic Ecclesiology
-The Anglican Theological Vision
-Liturgy and Sacramentality
-Classic Texts in Christian Theology
-Conceiving Change in Contemporary Catholicism
-Christian Gender
-Principles of Theological Ethics
-Catholic Social Thought
-Doctrine of Creation
-Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme
-Level 3 undergraduate module, or any Level 1 – 2 language module offered by the Department of Theology and Religion, taken in conjunction with the Extended Study in Theology & Religion module
-30 credits from another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the University’s Centre for Foreign Language Study)

Learning and Teaching

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & Religion is ‘research led’ at both BA and MA levels, but particularly at MA level. Research led teaching is informed by staff research, but more importantly it aims to develop students as independent researchers themselves, able to pursue and explore their own research interests and questions. This is why the independently researched MA dissertation is the culmination of the MA programme. Such engagement with texts and issues is not only an excellent preparation for doctoral research, it also develops those skills of critical analysis, synthesis and presentation sought and required by employers.

Many MA classes will contain a ‘lecture’ element, conveying information and exemplifying an approach to the subject-matter that will enable students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and improve their own ability to analyse and evaluate information and arguments. Seminars enhance knowledge and understanding through preparation and interaction with other students and staff, promoting awareness of and respect for different viewpoints and approaches, and developing skills of articulacy, advocacy and interrogation. Through small group discussions and tutorials, feedback is provided on student work, with the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.

The Dissertation module includes training in generic research skills, from the use of the Library to issues in referencing and bibliography. The subject specific core module introduces students to questions of interpretation and argument in the disciplines encompassed by theology and religion, and helps them to develop their own interests and questions that will issue in the MA dissertation. The latter is a piece of independent research, but it is fostered and guided through individual tutorials with a supervisor, with whom students meet throughout the academic year.

Other admission requirements

When applying, please ensure that your two chosen referees send their confidential academic references (using the reference form [Word]) to us in a timely manner. Please note that we are unable to accept ‘open’ references submitted by yourself. The referees may send the references by email directly from their institutional email addresses to provided they are signed, or by post to the address provided on the reference form.

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The MSc in Music, Mind and Brain is a truly interdisciplinary programme that attracts students from diverse backgrounds who want to complement their knowledge on music research, neuroscience or cognitive psychology. Read more
The MSc in Music, Mind and Brain is a truly interdisciplinary programme that attracts students from diverse backgrounds who want to complement their knowledge on music research, neuroscience or cognitive psychology. This unique programme combines music psychology with neuroscience, focusing on both the biological and cognitive aspects of musical behaviour- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/msc-music-mind-brain/

The MSc in Music, Mind and Brain (MMB) is highly interdisciplinary and draws on expertise from leading figures in the field, in areas ranging from music cognition, cognitive neuroscience, computational modelling, music education and music therapy.

As a student on the MSc, you will learn about topics in music psychology (from perception to cognition) and the cognitive neuroscience of music, and will acquire all the necessary skills to pursue your own high-quality research.

The programme benefits from good links with institutions such as the Institute of Education, the Royal College of Music, and the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery.

Teaching staff

Programme director Dr Daniel Müllensiefen and deputy directors Prof Lauren Stewart and Dr Maria Herrojo-Ruiz are joined by an expert teaching faculty, all of whom have international profiles within the fields of music psychology and/or the neuroscience of music.

Our Eminent Invited Speaker Series brings world-leading researchers to Goldsmiths to present their latest research to our students.

What kind of project can I do?

We offer a range of research projects, drawing on a variety of approaches: behavioural, computational, neuroscientific. Students are also invited to propose a project of their own choice, providing appropriate supervision can be offered.

If a student has a contact with an external supervisor, it may be possible to arrange for project supervision outside Goldsmiths with the involvement of a faculty member as co-supervisor. Examples of previous projects include:

Exploring Absolute Pitch in Children and Young People with Visual Impairment
An fMRI Study Investigating how Music Impacts on the Perception of Emotion
The Influence of Native Language on Rhythmic Grouping
Neural Correlates of Melodic Expectancy

Further information

This journal article from Psychomusicology outlines the focus and contents of the programme.

Keep up to date with our research via our facebook page.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Val West.

Research Skills (15 credits)

This module provides you with the core skills needed to become a successful researcher. This is achieved via two complementary strands; the first strand covers fundamental research skills: seminars on bibliographic searching, essay writing, research report writing, oral presentation skills and career planning and lab sessions in which students conduct, analyse and write up an experiment from the field of music psychology. The second strand exposes students to cutting edge research in the field of music cognition and neuroscience via the Eminent Speaker Series and involves the opportunity to produce a collaborative report from the series for the Music, Mind and brain blog.

Research Project (60 credits)

This module provides you with the chance to design and pursue a substantial, independent research project on a topic of their choosing, with expert input from a nominated supervisor. You will be offered a selection of possible projects but are also encouraged to generate their own ideas. External supervision may also possible, in cases where students have links to outside institutions. As well as producing a written dissertation, you will have take produce and present a poster of your work to classmates and teachers from the programme.

Assessment

Written examinations; written coursework (essays); oral presentations; research dissertation.

Careers

The programme will appeal to you if you are interested in pursuing doctoral research in this area or if you are already a music professional wishing to approach music scientifically.

Graduates from the Music, Mind and Brain programme have gone on to work in one of the following areas:

-Academia: Either pursuing a PhD, working in research position or engaged with university-level teaching
-Music and media industry
-Music practitioner or performer
-Music teacher

Other careers that would be informed by this programme include music therapy, neuro-rehabilitation, music consultancy and music and advertising.

Other entry requirements

IELTS 6.5 (with a minimum of 6.5 in the written test and no individual test lower than 6.0).

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The MSc in Human-Centred Interactive Technologies is a full-time, one-year taught course that is intended for students seeking a professional career related to human-computer interaction, user experience, usability or related fields or those wishing to pursue research in the area. Read more
The MSc in Human-Centred Interactive Technologies is a full-time, one-year taught course that is intended for students seeking a professional career related to human-computer interaction, user experience, usability or related fields or those wishing to pursue research in the area. The course is intended for students who already have a good first degree in a computer science or an appropriate discipline related to human-computer interaction or have equivalent industrial experience. The course covers a range of topics associated with designing interactive systems for good usability and enhancing the user experience. The course has been specifically designed for students wishing to specialise in the design and evaluation of interactive technologies.

The MSc Human-Centred Interactive Technologies course was updated for October 2016 entry. The course had been running successfully for eight years, but in that time the landscape of interactive systems has changed considerably, with the growth of iPhones and apps and the introduction of tablet computers. We have also responded to feedback from students who have asked for more integrated modules and more opportunities to practice interaction design.

Course Aims
The aims of the course are:
-To provide a specialist education in the theories of and methods for designing and evaluating interactive technologies
-To provide an opportunity to engage in a rigorous and scholarly manner with a range of current research topics around designing and evaluating interactive technologies
-To provide practical experience of designing and evaluating interactive technologies
-To develop the skills necessary to conduct research, particularly with users, into the design, engineering or science of interactive technologies
-To provide experience of undertaking a sizeable individual project, on a subject related to research in human-centred interactive technologies
-To prepare students for entry into research degrees or industry-based projects

Learning Outcomes
A fundamental objective of the course is to provide students with a sound theoretical knowledge and practical experience of the skills essential to the design and evaluation of interactive technologies. Having completed the course, students will be able to understand theories of the design of interactive technologies and critique individual technologies from a theoretical viewpoint. In particular they will be able to:
(a) choose appropriate methods for empirical investigations for the design, prototyping and evaluation of interactive technologies, including both quantitative and qualitative methods

(b) plan and undertake a range of empirical investigations of existing or proposed interactive technologies at all stages of the development lifecycle

(c) analyse, draw conclusions from and present the results of such investigations, and

(d) conduct a range of expert and theoretical analyses of interactive technologies to investigate their usability, accessibility and appropriateness for different user groups.

Graduates completing the course will be equipped to play leading and professional roles related to the designed and evaluation of interactive technologies in industry, commerce, academia and public service. The MSc in Human-Centred Interactive Technologies is also intended to provide a route into a PhD or research in this rapidly expanding field.

Project

The dissertation project undertaken by students over the summer is carried out individually, which might involve collaboration with another organisation. A collaborative project is still supervised by a member of the Department.

Projects are worth 50% of the total mark for the MSc. Examples of previous projects include:
-A Gesture Language for Interaction with Art and Cultural Artefacts in Museums
-Analysis of WCAG 2.0 Techniques and Remote Evaluation by People with Visual Disabilities
-Cultural issues in design of online banking websites: a Chinese case study
-Evaluating Human Error through Video Games
-Have the Same Image in Mind? Investigation of Personas in Web Design
-Inattention and Immersion in Video Games
-Measuring User Experience of Mobile Phones: a Study with Retrospective Protocol and Emotion Word Prompt List
-The Application of Game Mechanics to a Virtual Learning Environment
-The Design and Evaluation of NHS Pharmacy Dispensing Computer Software
-Using User-Generated Content as Discourses on the Gaming Experience

Careers

Here at York, we're really proud of the fact that more than 97% of our postgraduate students go on to employment or further study within six months of graduating from York. We think the reason for this is that our courses prepare our students for life in the workplace through our collaboration with industry to ensure that what we are teaching is useful for employers.

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Cognitive neuroscience is an exciting and rapidly developing field of research that combines the traditional disciplines of psychology and biology. Read more
Cognitive neuroscience is an exciting and rapidly developing field of research that combines the traditional disciplines of psychology and biology.

This course introduces you to modern theory and methods for investigating the biological basis of the mind. It is designed to prepare you for a successful career in cognitive neuroscience.

Course material reflects Sussex research expertise in the fields of consciousness, social neuroscience and addiction. Other exciting topics include:
-Perception
-Memory
-Attention
-Emotion
-Motivation
-Individual differences
-Linear models
-Research ethics

How will I study?
You take a series of taught modules. You’ll gain hands-on experience with modern methods of cognitive neuroscience through a dedicated fMRI module and a wide range of optional methods workshops that include training on TMS, EEG, psychophysics and others.

You’re actively encouraged to network and collaborate, and to discuss findings in self-directed journal clubs to develop the additional skills necessary for a successful career in research.

The taught modules are assessed by a variety of methods that include:
-Term papers
-Presentations
-Unseen examinations

The project is assessed by a dissertation and a research project mentored by a member of faculty.

Scholarships
Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

ESRC 1+3 and +3 Scholarships (2017)
-A number of ESRC-funded standalone PhD and PhD with Masters scholarships across the social sciences.
-Application deadline: 30 January 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers
This MSc prepares you for a potential career in research and enhances your work-related skills such as critical insight and data analysis.

This course is also relevant if you are interested in clinical psychology or in work in the biomedical sector by providing, for example, an understanding of how brain damage affects cognition.

Our graduates have gone on to pursue PhDs and to careers in industry and medicine.

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