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This module addresses the following issues. -Introduction to communicable diseases - patterns of infection; infectious disease threats, surveillance systems and epidemiological investigation. Read more
This module addresses the following issues:
-Introduction to communicable diseases - patterns of infection; infectious disease threats, surveillance systems and epidemiological investigation
-Contact diseases - skin and eye conditions; sexually transmitted diseases; HIV/AIDS; malaria; diseases spread through faeco-oral route; air-borne diseases; Tuberculosis, hepatitis viruses, hospital acquired infection
-Global patient safety challenge - sterilization and cross infection control; trends, / prevention and control measures; effectiveness of a number of key national disease control programmes, for example: working on the efficacy, safety and uptake of vaccines in routine use; the uptake and effectiveness of national screening, antibiotic use and misuse
-Role of NGO, WHO, policy and government targets, surveillance of targets. Service planning; contingency, responsibility, inequality, public perception of threat, organizational responsiveness. Role of the media, UK infection control and management of public health threats

Why Bradford?

At the Faculty of Health Studies, University of Bradford, you can choose to study for individual modules, a named award or build module credits through the SSPRD Framework for Flexible Learning to achieve an award relevant to your professional needs.

The Framework for Flexible Learning in Health and Social Care is a Faculty-wide academic structure for Specialist Skills and Post-Registration Development. It offers students increased flexibility and choice in the modules and courses that can be undertaken and it is also responsive to employer needs. The flexibility also allows you to move from one award to another if your career changes or you take time out from regular studying. Shared teaching and research expertise from across the Faculty is offered through interdisciplinary teaching across our core research modules.

The Faculty of Health Studies is regionally, nationally and internationally recognised for its teaching and research, and works with a number of healthcare partners to ensure clinical excellence.

Modules

This module is provided as part of this interdisciplinary Framework within the Faculty of Health Studies. The Framework enables students to create an individualised programme of study that will meet either their needs and/or the employers’ needs for a changing diverse workforce within a modern organisation.

The modules and academic awards are presented in areas representing employment practice or work based or clinical disciplines.

Whilst some students can build their own academic awards by choosing their own menu of module options, other students will opt for a named academic award. The Framework also provides the option for students to move from their chosen named award to another award if their job or personal circumstances change and they need to alter the focus of their studies. The majority of named awards also offer students, the option of choosing at least one module, sometimes more, from across the Faculty module catalogue enabling them to shape their award more specifically to their needs.

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

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This MA is taught in Singapore at the Institute for Adult Learning. Read more
This MA is taught in Singapore at the Institute for Adult Learning. The programme aims to provide professionals with responsibility for managing, delivering or supporting lifelong learning with opportunities to develop their own analysis and practice and equip them with the knowledge and skills relating to leadership in their practice.

See the website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/degrees/lifelong-learning-singapore-ma

Key Information

- Application dates
All applicants:
Open: 19 October 2015
Close: 29 July 2016

English Language Requirements

If your education has not been conducted in the English language, you will be expected to demonstrate evidence of an adequate level of English proficiency.
The English language level for this programme is: Special. Only the IELTS is accepted. Applicants must obtain an overall grade of 7.0 with a minimum of 6.5 in the reading subtest and 6.0 in the writing subtest.
Further information can be found on our English language requirements page http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/life/international/english-requirements .

International students

Country-specific information, including details of when UCL representatives are visiting your part of the world, can be obtained from the International Students website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/international .

Degree Information

Students gain understanding of the context for the emergence of lifelong learning, as well as its incorporation into policies for educational and professional development. They are also able to critically analyse adult learning policy at the national and organisational levels, and acquire the tools to analyse and plan their own professional development and that of others in their organisation.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme comprises four core modules (120 creates) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

- Core Modules
Analysing Adult Education Policy and Practice
Leading and Innovating in Professional Development
Lifelong Learning: Theories and Perspectives
The Design, Conduct and Evaluation of Educational and Social Research

- Options

- Dissertation/report
All students submit a 20,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and Learning

This programme is delivered via face-to-face full-day sessions carried out over five days (including weekends). It is assessed by coursework assignments of up to 5,000 words, essays and portfolios with reflective statements, and a 20,000-word dissertation.

Funding

Scholarships relevant to this department are displayed (where available) below. For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships .

- IOE Centenary Masters Scholarships
Value:
Eligibility: Overseas students
Criteria:

- IOE Centenary Research Scholarships
Value:
Eligibility: EU students
Criteria:

- IOE COLFUTURO Fee Partnership
Value: UCL provides a 50% contribution towards tuition fees. (1 year)
Eligibility: Overseas students
Criteria: Based on academic merit

- IOE Commonwealth Distance Scholars
Value: Fees and some expenses
Eligibility: Overseas students
Criteria:

- IOE CONICyT Fee Partnership
Value: IoE provides a 20% contribution towards tuition fees. (1 year)
Eligibility: Overseas students
Criteria:

- IOE Erasmus Bursary
Value: £350/month (1)
Eligibility: UK, EU, Overseas students
Criteria:

- IOE Fulbright
Value:
Eligibility: Overseas students
Criteria:

- IOE Vietnam International Education Development Scholarships - PGT
Value:
Eligibility: Overseas students
Criteria:

- IOE Windle Trust Scholarship
Value:
Eligibility: Overseas students
Criteria:

More scholarships are listed on the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships

Careers

Graduates can expect to find employment in adult education and development, human resources management, policy-making and implementation, and research. Recent career destinations include:
- Learning and Development Manager, Apple Inc.
- Director, Carrie Academy International
- Global Change Manager, Levi Strauss
- Early Childhood trainer and consultant
- Senior Manager, Enterprise Productivity & Capability Development Office, Workforce Development Agency
- Research and Development - Innovation, Creativity and Entrepreneurship Facilitator, CapitaLand Limited

- Employability
Students will understand the context for the emergence of lifelong learning, as well as its incorporation into policies for educational and professional development. They will acquire tools and conceptual frameworks to critically analyse and plan their own practice and development, as well as evaluate areas of development as managers, and plan and undertake professional development activities. They will also acquire the concepts and theories relating to policy-making, and learn to critically analyse adult education policy at the national and organisation levels.

In addition students develop analytical ability and critical theory, as well as research writing skills.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The MA was adapted from the highly regarded London-based MA in Lifelong Learning to meet the needs of policy makers, researchers, managers, trainers, and others involved in the development of Continuing Education and Training (CET) in Singapore. It plays an important role in the building of research capacity and capability in CET, and forms part of the range of qualifications available to adult educators and others working in CET in Singapore.

In response to student interest, the MA will from 2015/16 include modules on leading and innovating in professional development, and analysing adult education policy and practice.

Part of the attraction of the MA is the networking among students working in education and training or human resources management, in the public and private sectors.

Application and next steps

- Applications
Students are advised to apply as early as possible due to competition for places. Those applying for scholarship funding (particularly overseas applicants) should take note of application deadlines.

- Who can apply?
The MA will be of interest to policymakers, researchers, managers, trainers, and others involved in the development of adult education and/or Continuing Education and Training (CET) in Singapore. This includes
- anyone who oversees educational programmes and learning-related activities in an educational institution or workplace
- anyone who designs and/or delivers formal learning programmes (for example, courses) or informal learning activities (for example, coaching or mentoring)
- anyone who has to formulate or implement learning policy, and oversees professional development in the workplace
- anyone who needs a higher degree pathway to research in CET or lifelong learning

The MA will be of particular interest to those in mid-level management positions in policy-making and implementation, as well as training, development and human resources, in both the private and public sectors.

What are we looking for?
When we assess your application we would like to learn:
- why you want to study Lifelong Learning at graduate level, and how you will benefit personally and professionally from the programme
- why you want to study Lifelong Learning with UCL in Singapore, at our partner organisation the Institute for Adult Learning (IAL)
- what particularly attracts you to the chosen programme
- how your academic and professional background meets the demands of this challenging programme
- where you would like to go professionally with your degree

Together with essential academic requirements, the personal statement is your opportunity to illustrate whether your reasons for applying to this programme match what the programme will deliver.

For more information see the Applications page http://www.ial.edu.sg/index.aspx?id=22 .

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How will East Asia accommodate the rise of a more economically and militarily assertive China? Is the US declining as a superpower in the region, or will it maintain its regional dominance? Does Japan still have designs upon regional economic leadership, and will it come to play a bigger military role in the region? How does a ‘non-state’ conduct international relations?. Read more

How will East Asia accommodate the rise of a more economically and militarily assertive China? Is the US declining as a superpower in the region, or will it maintain its regional dominance? Does Japan still have designs upon regional economic leadership, and will it come to play a bigger military role in the region? How does a ‘non-state’ conduct international relations?

Our MA in International Politics and East Asia gives you the opportunity to approach and answer these questions from a disciplinary basis. This is not a traditional area studies course on East Asia, but rather a disciplinary degree that focuses on the region for its case studies and thus offers unique advantages: strong disciplinary expertise combined with genuine regional expertise. East Asia’s emergence as the most dynamic region in the global political economy continues despite a series of crises since the early 1990s. If anything, the crises reinvigorated the study of the international relations and political economy of East Asia. Instead of just focusing on business and economics, the crises highlighted the politics of international economic relations, the impact of globalisation on the region and existing development paradigms, and the need for greater regional cooperation to cope with future economic shocks.

Our IPEA programme is one of the leading postgraduate programmes of its kind. We have among the greatest concentration of disciplinary based East Asia experts in the UK and Europe, and we are home to the Centre for the Study of Globalisation and Regionalisation, researching issues of Asia-Pacific and East Asian regionalism

Programme content

East Asia’s emergence as the most dynamic region in the global political economy continues despite a series of crises since the early 1990s. If anything, the crises reinvigorated the study of the international relations and political economy of East Asia. Instead of just focusing on business and economics, the crises highlighted the politics of international economic relations, the social, political, and security consequences of economic crises, the impact of globalisation on the region and existing development paradigms, and the need for greater regional cooperation to cope with future economic shocks. At the same time, the region has been faced with a series of major crises and challenges in the political and security dimensions, which are demanding of greater study by students of international relations.



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We live in an increasingly turbulent world, wracked by conflict, instability and insecurity. The roots of these problems are highly complex; the challenges involved in delivering greater peace and prosperity cannot be under-estimated. Read more

Why take this course?

We live in an increasingly turbulent world, wracked by conflict, instability and insecurity. The roots of these problems are highly complex; the challenges involved in delivering greater peace and prosperity cannot be under-estimated. This course is designed for those who recognise the importance of acquiring advanced intellectual skills to be able to understand and analyse current trends in global politics. It studies a broad sweep of issues in international relations, including the rise of fundamentalist terrorism, the resurgence of Russia, the spread of globalisation and the emergence of new regional powers on the world stage.

We are the only university in the UK that offers an internship with the BBC Afrique World Service in Senegal. This opportunity is available to students with French language skills on MA International Relations or MA European Politics.

What will I experience?

On this course, you will:

Deepen your knowledge of some of the most urgent political and security issues facing the world today, informed by cutting-edge research.
Make yourself stand out in an increasingly competitive job market by acquiring subject expertise and advanced research skills.
Have the opportunity to develop expertise in issues relating to Europe, ideal for students who intend to pursue careers in European institutions or with political lobbyists and thinktanks.
Benefit from expert advice from our Employability team on placements, internships, and careers. You can also choose to gain academic credit for experience in the workplace with the Work-Based Learning unit, which can be a useful way to combine postgraduate study with practical experience to create an impressive CV.

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course is particularly suited for students who intend to work for:

National, European or international governance institutions
Civil service
Political parties
Non-governmental organisations (NGOs)
Security and risk analyst
Foreign affairs analyst
Political lobbyists
Thinktanks and research bodies

It also provides excellent preparation for PhD study.

Module Details

All students take the following core units:

Contemporary Security in International Relations: Providers and Challenges: The analysis of security is a fascinating field of study that tackles issues of enormous significance. This unit evaluates a number of the most pressing security issues in International Relations, focusing on challenges such as cyber war, the security implications of the ‘Arab Spring’, jihadism, insurgency, information war, humanitarian intervention, piracy and the Ukraine Crisis.

Global Governance: Today’s policy-makers struggle to grapple with challenges of unprecedented scale and complexity. The ramifications of such issues as climate change and the global financial crisis underline the need for collective action across state borders. However, policy responses at the international level are often criticised for being ineffectual and undemocratic.

Research Management: A postgraduate degree signals to an employer that you are equipped with superior analytical and communication skills and are trained in a variety of research methods.

Dissertation in International Relations: This is an extended research project on a topic of your own choice, which you produce under the guidance of a specialist supervisor.

Students also take TWO of the following options:

Protest, Dissent and Solidarity across State Borders

Nation and Identity

Europe and the World

Challenges to EU Politics and Governance

Negotiation and Lobbying in the EU

Europe: Integration and Democratisation

Independent Project

Work-Based Learning

Units (30 credits per unit, 60 credits for the dissertation) are offered individually as credit-bearing short courses, or as part of the Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), or MSc International Development Studies (180 credits).

Programme Assessment

The course is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars in the afternoons and evenings. Part-time students who may be in employment are usually able to structure their course over two years such that tuition is concentrated on no more than two afternoons and evenings per week.

Assessment for most units on the course is in the form of an extended essay or project plus a 15,000-word dissertation at the end.

Student Destinations

Changes such as the enlargement of the EU to the East, the further integration of the EU and the emergence of the EU as an international actor have meant that more than ever there is a demand for people with an advanced knowledge of European affairs and the workings of the EU. This course therefore provides an excellent basis for those seeking careers in such areas where interdisciplinary knowledge is required.

In addition, the course provides advanced training in a range of transferable skills which can be applied in different areas of employment. Students could go on to work in various areas including local government, the UK civil service, foreign government and European and international institutions, NGOs, teaching and further research as well as applying their expertise in the commercial sector.

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This MSc provides participants with a theoretical understanding of research questions and methodologies in the study of past human-environment interactions, including subsistence and subsistence change. Read more

This MSc provides participants with a theoretical understanding of research questions and methodologies in the study of past human-environment interactions, including subsistence and subsistence change. The Institute of Archaeology has a long research and training tradition in environmental archaeology, and has well-established laboratory facilities and reference collections as a result.

About this degree

Students gain practical experience in laboratory analysis of at least one of either: identification of animal bones, identification of plant macro-remains, sedimentological analyses. They develop an understanding of stratigraphic formation processes and their implications for developing sampling strategies, and are trained to collect and analyse data and report scientific results.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

Students are required to take the following: 

  • Environmental Archaeology in Practice
  • Resources and Subsistence

Optional modules

  • Aegean Prehistory: Major Themes and Current Debates
  • Archaeology of Hunter-Gatherers from Emergence of Modern Humans
  • British and European Prehistory: Neolithic to Iron Age
  • Funerary Archaeology
  • Key Topics in the Archaeology of the Americas
  • The Mediterranean World in the Iron Age
  • The Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of the Near East: The emergence of villages and urban societies

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project, normally based on practical laboratory-based research, which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words (90 credits).

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, presentations, laboratory sessions, practicals, and site and museum visits. Assessment is through the dissertation, and a combination of essays, coursework, presentations, practical examination and laboratory reports, depending on the options selected.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Environmental Archaeology MSc

Careers

Some graduates of the programme go on to PhD studies but others will be well-placed to pursue a wide range of professional careers both within and beyond archaeology, including employment as environmental specialists for contract archaeology units.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Trainee Archaeologist, Cotswold Archaeology
  • Freelance Researcher, Self-Employed Rearcher

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study.

The institute boasts a wide range of laboratory facilities relevant to this degree including dedicated laboratories for zooarchaeology (with a comparative collection of Near Eastern and European faunal remains), archaeobotany (with extensive comparative collections for seeds, wood, tubers, phytoliths and pollen); phytolith processing, sedimentology and scanning electron microscopy.

UCL is located in central London, close to the resources of the British Museum, the British Library and the Natural History Museum.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute of Archaeology

73% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The Archaeology MA is an intensive induction programme on current archaeological theory and interpretive trends which equips students to undertake research in their chosen field. Read more

The Archaeology MA is an intensive induction programme on current archaeological theory and interpretive trends which equips students to undertake research in their chosen field. The flexible programme of study serves as an excellent expansion of undergraduate studies or as a self-designed foundation for further postgraduate and professional work.

About this degree

The programme provides a wide-ranging introduction to archaeology as a comparative, anthropologically-informed, and socially situated discipline. Students develop critically aware perspectives on archaeological practice and research processes and gain an in-depth understanding of approaches to the collection, analysis and interpretation of archaeological data. The programme is extremely flexible, with a wide choice of options available allowing students to tailor the programme to their own interests.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

All students are required to take the following: 

  • Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Foundations
  • Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Current Issues

Optional modules

Students choose to follow further optional modules up to the value of 60 credits from an outstanding range of Master's programme options available at the UCL Institute of Archaeology. Some of the most popular choices include: 

  • Aegean Prehistory: major themes and current debates
  • Ancient Italy in the Mediterranean
  • Archaeologies of Modern Conflict
  • Archaeology of Buddhism
  • Archaeology and Education
  • Archaeology of Hunter-Gatherers from the Emergence of Modern Humans
  • Aztec Archaeology: Codices and Ethnohistory
  • Beyond Chiefdoms: Archaeologies of African political complexities
  • British and European Prehistory: Neolithic to Iron Age
  • Cities, States and Religions in Ancient India
  • Funerary Archaeology
  • Interpreting Pottery
  • Key Topics in the Archaeology of the Americas
  • Making and Meaning in Ancient Greek Art
  • Making and Meaning in Ancient Roman Art
  • Maya Art, Architecture and Archaeology
  • Medieval Archaeology: Select Topics and Current Problems
  • Prehistoric Stone Artefact Analysis
  • Society and Culture in Ancient Egypt
  • The Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of the Near East: The Emergence of Villages and Urban Societies

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 15,000 words (90 credits).

Teaching and learning

The core modules are seminar based, and the sessions are interactive, with an emphasis on student participation and critical discussion. The optional modules are delivered through seminars, lectures, practicals, laboratory sessions, tutorials, and site and museum visits, as appropriate for specific modules. Assessment is through essays, oral examination and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Archaeology MA

Careers

Some recent graduates of the programme have gone on to PhD studies while others have pursued an incredibly wide range of professional careers both within and beyond archaeology.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Project Manager, Korea Cultural Heritage Foundation
  • Freelance Archaeologist, Murray Archaeological Services
  • Sales Executive, Harper Collins
  • MPhil/PhD in Archaeology, UCL
  • Assistant, Museum of Nicosia

Employability

As the most general of the MA/MSc programmes, the experience and skills acquired depends on the optional modules selected, and how those skills are developed through assessed work, developing expertise in the archaeology of specific regions, periods or themes, or specific field, museum and analytical skills. All students acquire a detailed understanding of specific theoretical debates and the critical skills to evaluate existing arguments and interpretations and to develop their own research, develop a range of research skills, and design and carry through original research. Taught from a comparative anthropological perspective, understanding cultural differences, in the past and present, is fundamental.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and one of the most highly regarded centres for archaeology, archaeological science, cultural heritage and museum studies in Britain, highlighted by its leading position in university assessments and National Student Survey results. It is one of the very few departments in the world undertaking research on a truly global scale. Its degrees offer an unrivalled variety of modules. The institute hosts events on many different aspects of archaeology and is linked to heritage organisations, museums and archaeological societies, providing an outstanding research environment for students.

It is truly international in outlook and membership, with students and staff from over 40 countries, and involvement in field research projects around the world.

UCL is located in central London, within walking distance of the British Museum and the British Library. UCL's own museums and collections constitute a resource of international importance for research.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute of Archaeology

73% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This programme draws on specialist staff with expertise in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Literature, Romanticism, Children’s Literature, and Contemporary Literature and theory. Read more
This programme draws on specialist staff with expertise in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Literature, Romanticism, Children’s Literature, and Contemporary Literature and theory. It also makes use of the holdings of the Special Collections of the Roderic Bowen Library: a unique resource which houses the Special Collections of the University of Wales Trinity Saint David, including over 35,000 printed works.

Course Overview

Underpinned by instruction in advanced research methods and skills and the comparative study of theoretically informed critical approaches, this MA, based on the Lampeter Campus of the University, enables students to undertake an advanced level study of literature in English and associated aspects of culture in the period from 1790 to the present day.

Romanticism, post-Romanticism, the Victorian, Decadence, Modernism, Post-modernism – are explored in two core modules, ‘Visions of Society’ and ‘The Shock of the New’. Informed by established and emerging theoretical positions, these will critically examine the connections and tensions between the ideas and kinds of literary production traditionally associated with those movements: for example, the emergence of the individual, shifts in religious belief, the importance of the city and urbanisation, attitudes to class, race and gender, the dominance of the novel and the impact of new media forms, commodification and the emergence of competing views of the real.

These modules are supported by topic-specific modules reflecting staff expertise, for example the consideration of the figure of the child as a shifting ideological construct within and across these movements; writing by American Black Women writers; and the utopian urge in the literature of the period.

Modules

-Research Methods
-Comparative and Critical Approaches
-Visions of Society
-The Shock of the New

And optional modules in topics such as:
-Utopian and Dystopian Fiction
-The Child in Time
-Black American Women Writers

Key Features

The programmes are delivered on the University’s campus in Lampeter. They are taught through seminars, small workshops and individual tutorials and supervision that enable detailed and personalised feedback.

Access to a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) enables additional learning, especially work-shopping, to take place outside the sessions and supports the development of a mutually supportive cohort of committed writers. Graduates from the programmes have gone on to become successful and prize winning authors.

Moreover this programme will offer:
-Expert tuition from research active specialist staff
-Exceptional resources in the specialist holdings of the Roderic Bown Library
-Small seminar based classes
-Residential programme based on our beautiful and inpiring campus in Lampeter
-Online and distance learing option

Assessment

Assessment is through a mixture of assignment and presentation supported by tasks designed to enhance research skills. The dissertation allows students to undertake a sustained research project on a topic of their choice under expert individual supervision.

Career Opportunities

-Professional Writers
-Editors
-Publishers
-Marketing
-Expert tuition from professional writers, poets, novelists, dramatists, script-writers
-An opportunity to learn about publishing through the design and production of the annual anthology
-An opportunity to read your work at such events as the Hay Festival
-Programme delivered on our beautiful and inspiring campus in Lampeter

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Prestigious Scottish Funding Council Awards are available to high calibre applicants for this programme. The SFC has selected this programme in recognition of the high demand for students with these qualifications. Read more
Prestigious Scottish Funding Council Awards are available to high calibre applicants for this programme. The SFC has selected this programme in recognition of the high demand for students with these qualifications. The awards cover all tuition costs; for further information, please see: http://www.glasgow.ac.uk/postgraduate/funded/

This Masters introduces you to the study of the history of collecting, as it has been pursued by individuals and by civic, educational or national institutions. It examines cultures of collecting and various modalities for the presentation of collections as developed in Asia, Europe, and more specifically Britain, from the late 18th century onwards through to the present. You will consider a range of theoretical and ethical issues as well as financial and societal mechanisms, which have informed collecting practices historically and that continue to do so. You will explore methodological approaches and core concepts, such as connoisseurship, taste and professionalisation, and consider how international travel, the trajectory of the art market and other types of exchange have impacted upon collecting practices.

Key facts

• MLitt: 12 months full-time; 24 months part-time
• Contact: Dr. Minna Torma:

Why Glasgow

• You will learn from world-leading researchers and develop expert knowledge in this specialised area within History of Art.
• Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing. The University’s own Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery is the oldest public museum in Scotland and has extensive holdings covering fine art, geology, anatomy and the history of medicine.
• Our research forum provides you with a lively and stimulating introduction to methodological debates within art history. It provides a sense of art history’s own history as well as contemporary concerns and practice, examining the beliefs and values that have informed various forms of historical and visual analysis and enquiry. It is focused around a series of seminars or workshops run by members of staff and visiting academics.

You will take five core courses and one optional course and complete a dissertation 15,000 words in length (including footnotes but excluding bibliography) which will be on a topic chosen in consultation with the tutors and the programme convenor. You will also have the opportunity to take part in a field trip.

Core courses

• Research methods in practice
• Cultures of collecting
• Collecting East Asian art
• Collecting landscapes

Optional courses

• Patterns of collecting Chinese art
• Economies of collecting contemporary art

And then you may choose
• a Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institute (HATII) course: 2D Digitisation (Theory and Practice)
• a course from elsewhere in the College of Arts, subject to the approval of the programme convenor.

Or from these options offered by History of Art
• Independent study
• Hunterian placement
• Work placement

Background

This programme introduces you to the study of the history of collecting, as it has been pursued by individuals and by civic, educational or national institutions. It examines cultures of collecting and various modalities for the presentation of collections as developed in Europe, Asia, North America and more specifically Britain, from the late 18th century through to the present. You will consider a range of theoretical and ethical issues alongside cultural, financial and societal mechanisms that have informed collecting practices historically and which continue to do so. You will also have the opportunity to explore a range of different collections from the encyclopaedic to the concise, and to question their context and strategies of presentation and their circulation through loan.

Themes of the programme include:
• How collections have been framed by: questions of subjectivity; by the emergence of nation states or the pursuit of empire; by the emergence of exchange and circulation mechanisms such as the market; and by broader societal processes informing the collecting practices of institutions and individuals
• The significance of a range of factors to collections and their histories, including: connoisseurship, taste and travel, the operations of the market, patterns of exchange, the professionalization of the curator, specialisation of knowledge, civil society and benefactors

Through its courses and the work placements it offers, the programme seeks to offer you sustained engagement and contact with collections in context. Teaching is based partly in the classroom and partly in collections, and the University’s own Hunterian collections provide a consistent point of departure and contextualisation for the students. The programme makes use of public and private collections accessible in Glasgow, Edinburgh, Dundee and further afield in Scotland.

The programme includes a field trip to Newcastle and the Northeast.

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Unprecedented change in communications and media content, forms, technology and policy in the last decade has wide-ranging implications for business, politics, public administration and everyday life. Read more
Unprecedented change in communications and media content, forms, technology and policy in the last decade has wide-ranging implications for business, politics, public administration and everyday life. The Master of Communications and Media Studies builds your understanding of changing global contexts of media and communication practices. You will gain a critically informed understanding of key issues affecting the global communications industry focusing on the challenges posed by the emergence of digital media, globalisation and increasing levels of cross-cultural exchange. Industry engagement through guest speakers, internships, and opportunities for site visits in Australia and abroad will enhance your knowledge and professional competency.

As the most established program of its type in Australia, the Master of Communications and Media Studies has built up a long record of success. Ranked No.19 in the world in the QS World University Rankings by Subject for 2014, the program draws strongly on specialist expertise and focuses on fostering industry ready graduates.

The course is particularly relevant to those employed or seeking employment in communications and media industries (for instance, electronic journalism, policy formulation, public relations, or tourism marketing), as well as those who wish to expand their expertise for teaching purposes or further study.

You will be introduced to the latest developments and research in communications and media – including in social and online media – always with a view to "real world" application. Study units feature guest professional speakers in conjunction with industry focussed field trips to media outlets in Sydney, Melbourne and Shanghai.

In the Master of Communications and Media Studies course, you will have the opportunity to undertake industry internships in Australia and overseas. For example, students in our program have recently completed internships with the United Nations in New York and with Shandong Television in China.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/communications-and-media-studies-a6003?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in three parts. Part A. Foundations for advanced communications and media studies, Part B. Core Master's study and Part C. Advanced expertise. All students complete Part B. Depending upon prior qualifications, you may receive credit for Part A or Part C or a combination of the two.

[Note that if you are eligible for credit for prior studies you may elect not to receive the credit.]

PART A. Foundations for advanced communications and media studies
These studies will introduce you to communications and media studies at advanced undergraduate or graduate level. They are intended for students whose previous qualification is not in a cognate field.

PART B. Core Master's study
These studies draw on best practices within the broad realm of communications and media studies practice and research to further your understanding of communications and media systems both locally and globally. Studies focus on the challenges posed by the emergence of digital media, globalisation and increasing levels of cross-cultural exchange.

PART C. Advanced expertise
The focus of these studies is professional or scholarly work that can contribute to a portfolio of professional development. You have two options.

The first option is a program of coursework study where you select the units to suit your own interests. This option includes the opportunity to undertake an internship in the field.

The second option is a 24 point research thesis. Students wishing to use this Masters course as a pathway to a higher degree by research should take this second option.

Students admitted to the course, who have a recognised honours degree in a cognate discipline including humanities or social sciences, will receive credit for Part C, however, should they wish to complete a 24 point research project as part of the course they should consult with the course coordinator.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/arts

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/communications-and-media-studies-a6003?domestic=true#making-the-application

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International Political Economy is one of five specializations within the Master's degree in International Relations. Since the 1970s, IPE has developed as an independent sub-discipline in International Relations (IR). Read more
International Political Economy is one of five specializations within the Master's degree in International Relations.

Since the 1970s, IPE has developed as an independent sub-discipline in International Relations (IR). It focuses on the interaction between states, markets and societies. Its primary aim is to increase our understanding of the dynamics of these three building blocks. In doing so, IPE is interdisciplinary by its self-same nature.

Why is it fascinating coming to grips with a globalizing world economy? While states cannot be conceived of as homogenous actors that perfectly take care of the preferences of all of their citizens, one can nevertheless reveal degrees of freedom for negotiation about regional and international cooperation in the fields of trade, production, finance and knowledge. It is a scholarly exertion to reveal the complicated nexus of states, markets and societies.

Why in Groningen?

The specialization IPE:
- Enables to design a study programme tailored to your needs and interests.
- Offers a research-led and policy-oriented curriculum taught by committed staff.
- Includes an internship that excellently prepares for the labour market.
- Provides you with a research-oriented profile which makes you fit for participation in a Research Master and/or a PhD track.
- Is embedded in a university that provides a genuine international environment in the sparkling city of Groningen.

Job perspectives

The Master's specialization is broad in scope and gives students a solid foundation in international relations. There is consequently a wide range of employment opportunities for International Relations graduates. The most obvious profession is a policy advisor, but you could also become a researcher, lobbyist, diplomat, or PR officer. You can work in international business, non-profit or government organizations, in the media, and at a university or a private research institute.

IPE Research

In Groningen, IPE research focuses in particular, but not exclusively, on processes of institutional change. Rather than scrutinizing the impact of given institutional settings on the interplay of states, markets and society, the leading research thread is the dynamics of institutions. What explains the emergence of institutions in the realm of international political economy? The overarching idea is to come to grips with converging institutional settings in on-going globalization.

Groningen IPE research on institutional change distinguishes two themes.

The first is designed around the topic of transformation & integration. It focuses on the transition to a market economy embedded in a democratic order in the regions of Eastern Europe and Central Asia. (See e.g. Herman W. Hoen (2011), “Crisis in Eastern Europe: The downside of a market economy revealed?”, European Review, 19(1), 31-41.) In this research, which is partly financed by the Volkswagen Foundation, there is close collaboration with the universities of Göttingen and Indiana (Bloomington) and the Institute for East and Southeast European Studies (Regensburg).

A second research line addresses the problem of convergence. At a regional level, the studies zoom in on the emergence of and changes in trade, investment, and labour regimes. At the enterprise level, the research focuses on ‘corporate governance’ and the extent to which it converges between Europe and the United States.

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How can (and should) we talk about the challenges and possibilities for development in the 21st century?. Development has long been held up as an ideal for societies and peoples, and the pursuit of it has been decisive in shaping the modern world. Read more

How can (and should) we talk about the challenges and possibilities for development in the 21st century?

Development has long been held up as an ideal for societies and peoples, and the pursuit of it has been decisive in shaping the modern world. Many degrees treat it as an uncontested term and presume that the only task is to consider the best means towards this end. By contrast, the MA in Politics, Development and the Global South begins by showing that in the 21st century ‘development’ – what it means and how it is to be achieved – has become a site of struggle, one where new forms of politics and theory have emerged.

Major changes in recent decades, including the emergence of new geopolitical powers on the international stage, growing challenges to neoliberal dogmas, heightened concern with increasing global inequality, and recognition of the danger of ecological devastation, have meant that the study and pursuit of development requires a fresh, innovative approach. Throughout this degree you’ll study the Global South as a producer, not simply a consumer, of theory, and as a site where novel forms of political struggle are emerging.

The MA in Politics, Development and the Global South reflects Goldsmiths’ interdisciplinary academic spirit, drawing on expertise in the Centre for Postcolonial Studies, the Department of Politics and International Relations, and other departments from across the university. You’ll learn from scholars with an international reputation across a diverse range of research and area specialisms including Latin America, India, China, Japan, the Middle East and Africa.

Alongside the core modules, you’ll also gain insight into development as a career through a series of industry and activist seminars. You’ll have the opportunity to shape the speakers, format and content of these events to explore different facets of development, such as: politics, activism, policy, journalism, charities, consultancy and NGOs.

Modules & structure

In this innovative and interdisciplinary course of study you’ll be able to explore:

  • The defining features of contemporary forms of capitalism
  • The emergence of geopolitical powers over the past 20 years
  • The interplay between informal and illegal economies
  • The connections between violence, politics and religion
  • Patterns of immigration worldwide
  • The slum as a fundamental site of the contemporary world
  • The current debates on globalisation from below
  • The prospects for radical politics

There will also be the opportunity to get involved in a student-led speaker and event series, where you’ll be encouraged to approach industry partners including journalists, activists, senior staff in NGOs, politicians, and public intellectuals, who can offer differing perspectives and expose you to current debates in the professional community.

Core modules

Option modules

You’ll also choose options from a wide range of courses available through the Department of Politics and other departments at Goldsmiths, including Anthropology, Cultural Studies, History, Media and Communications, and Sociology.

Assessment

Assessment consists of coursework, extended essays, reports, presentations, practice based projects or essays/logs, group projects, reflective essays, and seen and unseen written examinations.

Skills & careers

You’ll consider a range of debates and approaches that are pertinent to the development sector, and so this is an ideal programme for anyone thinking of pursuing a career in this area – whether you’re interested in working for high profile charities, grass-roots organisations, social enterprises, or global activism.

It’s also an ideal foundation for a career in research or policy, or if you’re thinking of pursuing a research degree in the future.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.



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Conflict resolution is now a global activity and concerns engaging both academics and practitioners in finding durable solutions to the most pressing conflicts of the twenty-first century. Read more
Conflict resolution is now a global activity and concerns engaging both academics and practitioners in finding durable solutions to the most pressing conflicts of the twenty-first century.

This course attracts students from all over the world, and the optional modules reflect the key expertise of the faculty. You will acquire subject-specific knowledge and understanding of:
-The theories and concepts of peace and conflict and their application to global, regional and local contexts
-The emergence, nature and significance of conflict analysis/ conflict resolution as a distinct field of academic enquiry
-The nature of conflict and the variety of mechanisms and processes available for its management and resolution

You will also acquire a strong ability to evaluate different explanations of conflict analysis/conflict resolution and to articulate such evaluations at recognised postgraduate level.

Conflict Resolution is concerned with understanding the causes, dynamics and consequences of conflict, and employing that knowledge in practical efforts to mitigate or resolve conflict, and to respond to some of the most pressing challenges of the 21st century. This MA balances formal academic study and vocationally-relevant learning, opening up options for careers ranging from local mediation to work with international peacebuilding or humanitarian organisations.

To find out more about the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/conflict-resolution-ma-part-time

Why Bradford?

This is a flagship course for both teaching and research in this area and has gained a global reputation for its pioneering work. The MA is located in Peace Studies, a Rotary International recognised centre of expertise for teaching and research on peace and conflict issues.

Modules

Core modules
-Conflict Resolution Theory (20 Credits)
-Introduction to Peace Studies (20 Credits)
-Applied Conflict Resolution Skills (20 Credits)
-Dissertation project in a topic of your choice (related to Conflict Resolution) (60 Credits)

Option modules
-Arms Trade and Arms Control (20 Credits)
-Fragile States and the Security-Development Nexus (20 Credits)
-International Politics and Security Studies (20 Credits)
-Introduction to African Politics (20 Credits)
-Peacekeeping, Peacebuilding and Statebuilding (20 Credits)
-Religions, Conflict and Peacemaking in a Post-secular World (20 Credits)
-Africa Study Visit (20 Credits)
-Cities in Conflict (20 Credits)
-Gender, Conflict and Development (20 Credits)
-Natural Resource Governance, Conflict and Co-operation (20 Credits)
-Social Movements, Globalisation and Political Change (20 Credits)
-The Authoritarian Challenge to Democracy (20 Credits)

You have the opportunity to define your own engagement with the discipline by choosing from the full range of modules offered by Peace Studies. It is therefore up to you to decide what specific dimensions of peace you wish to focus on, with possible options ranging from modules on: the environment, human rights, Islam, Christianity and politics, African politics, nationalism, international political economy, international politics and security studies, conflict resolution, East Asia, Latin America and the Middle East.

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

A graduate of this degree will be able to:
-Explain the emergence and development of conflict resolution, with an understanding of key events or trends in the 20th and 21st centuries which have shaped the field
-Critically analyse key theories of conflict, using theory to develop effective conflict case-studies
-Identify and evaluate the main approaches to ‘peacemaking, peacekeeping and peacebuilding’ that are practised and theorised within Conflict Resolution, demonstrating a critical understanding of their applications and limitations
-Demonstrate increased competence in a range of skills relevant to professional practice in conflict resolution

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The MRes programme in Contemporary literature is divided into a 60 credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits amounting to up to 30,000 words in total. Read more
The MRes programme in Contemporary literature is divided into a 60 credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits amounting to up to 30,000 words in total. It covers a wide range of literary topics from the Romantics to contemporary literary theory and is tailored to allow students to pursue their own particular interests.

Course Overview

This programme draws on specialist staff with expertise in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Literature, Romanticism, Children’s Literature, and Contemporary Literature and theory. It also makes use of the holdings of the Special Collections of the Roderic Bowen Library: a unique resource which houses the Special Collections of the University of Wales Trinity Saint David, including over 35,000 printed works.

Underpinned by instruction in advanced research methods and skills and the comparative study of theoretically informed critical approaches, this MRes, based on the Lampeter Campus of the University, enables students to undertake an advanced level study of literature in English and associated aspects of culture in the period from 1790 to the present day.

Romanticism, post-Romanticism, the Victorian, Decadence, Modernism, Post-modernism – are explored in a range of modules. For example two modules, ‘Visions of Society’ and ‘The Shock of the New’, critically examine the connections and tensions between the ideas and kinds of literary production traditionally associated with those movements: for example, the emergence of the individual, shifts in religious belief, the importance of the city and urbanisation, attitudes to class, race and gender, the dominance of the novel and the impact of new media forms, commodification and the emergence of competing views of the real. Other areas of focus include the consideration of the figure of the child as a shifting ideological construct within and across various C19th cultural movements; writing by American Black Women writers; and the utopian urge in the literature of the period.

Modules

Students will choose three modules. Below is an illustrative list of modules available:
-Research Methods (compulsory)
-Comparative and Critical Approaches
-Visions of Society
-The Shock of the New
-Utopian and Dystopian Fiction
-The Child in Time
-Black American Women Writers

Key Features

The programme is delivered on the University’s campus in Lampeter. They are taught through seminars, small workshops and individual tutorials and supervision that enable detailed and personalised feedback.

Access to a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) enables additional learning, especially work-shopping, to take place outside the sessions and supports the development of a mutually supportive cohort of committed writers. Graduates from the programmes have gone on to become successful and prize winning authors.

Moreover this programme will offer:
-Expert tuition from research active specialist staff
-Exceptional resources in the specialist holdings of the Roderic Bown Library
-Small seminar based classes
-Residential programme based on our beautiful and inpiring campus in Lampeter
-Available as an online and distance learning option

Assessment

Assessment is through a mixture of assignment and presentation supported by tasks designed to enhance research skills. The dissertation allows students to undertake a sustained research project on a topic of their choice under expert individual supervision.

Career Opportunities

-Professional Writers
-Editors
-Publishers
-Marketing
-Expert tuition from professional writers, poets, novelists, dramatists, script-writers
-An opportunity to learn about publishing through the design and production of the annual anthology
-An opportunity to read your work at such events as the Hay Festival
-Programme delivered on our beautiful and inspiring campus in Lampeter

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The MA in Psycholinguistics will provide you with a general background in psycholinguistics while giving you a practical training in the techniques and methodologies associated with the field of study. Read more
The MA in Psycholinguistics will provide you with a general background in psycholinguistics while giving you a practical training in the techniques and methodologies associated with the field of study. You will have the opportunity to develop your interest in areas such as bilingualism, syntactic processing in special populations and early phonetic and phonological development.

Overview

The MA in Psycholinguistics will:
-Impart a general foundation and background in psycholinguistics
-Give you a practical training in techniques used in psycholinguistics, including statistical methods
-Enable you to apply your skills and knowledge to linguistic data
-Introduce you to research questions and methodologies in psycholinguistics
-Enable you to perform original research in psycholinguistics

Course structure

Autumn Term
There are two different routes in the Autumn Term, depending on your prior background. Students with no prior background in Linguistics or Psycholinguistics take the modules in Route A, below. Students who already have some background in these subjects take Route B. We will help you to determine which route you should take, when you apply.

Route A
-Quantitative methods (10 credits)
-Language acquisition (10 credits)
-Psycholinguistics (10 credits)
-Syntax (10 credits) OR Phonetics and phonology (10 credits)

Route B
-Quantitative methods (10 credits)
AND 30 further credits from among the modules below and the modules in Route A:
-Advanced comparative syntactic or semantic typology (20 credits)
-Advanced phonology (10 credits)
-Advanced phonetics (10 credits)
-Emergence of structure from use (10 credits)
-Phonological development (20 credits)
-Directed readings in phonological development (10 credits)

Spring Term
In the Spring Term you will take two 20-credit modules from a range of options. Options may include:
-Topics in phonological development (20 credits)
-Bilingualism (20 credits)
-Learning mechanisms (20 credits)
-Second language phonology (20 credits)
-Second language syntax (20 credits)
-Psycholinguistic approaches to second language acquisition (20 credits)

Note that module offerings may vary from year to year. Not every module is offered every year.

Spring and Summer Terms
-Key ideas in linguistics (20 credits)

Summer Term and Summer vacation
-Dissertation (60 credits)

All terms
-Research training seminar (20 credits)

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Your programme of study. If you want to widen the scope of careers open to you within the discipline or go on to teach, work in the ministry, in church leadership or charitable organisations this programme may help you achieve your career aspirations. Read more

Your programme of study

If you want to widen the scope of careers open to you within the discipline or go on to teach, work in the ministry, in church leadership or charitable organisations this programme may help you achieve your career aspirations. Biblical and Religious Studies has been taught at Aberdeen since its inauguration in 1495 making it one of the oldest and most established universities to study this discipline area. Teachers are highly regarded internationally and the programme is made up of wide ranging spiritual areas of study. Students come from the British Isles and overseas and follow a wide range of professions upon graduation.

The programme in Biblical Studies is designed to stimulate reflection on the use of the Bible in theology by crossing the conventional disciplinary boundaries between biblical exegesis and systematic theology. Special attention will be given to the issues of canonical criticism, narrative reading, and the use of Scripture in the construction of theological arguments.

Courses listed for the programme

  • The Emergence of Christology
  • Jewish History and Culture
  • Readings in Systematic Theology
  • The Christian Doctrine of God
  • Creation in Christian Ethics
  • Great Thinkers in Theological Ethics
  • Spiritual Formation
  • Patterns and Principles of Church Leadership
  • Special Subjects x 2
  • Senior Honours Special Subject x 2
  • Reading New Testament Greek x 2
  • Hebrew Language lii and lv

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • One of the oldest universities in the UK, with one of the oldest departments founded in 1495
  • Alumni have gone on to teach, work in the ministry, church leadership, charitable organisations and doctoral studies
  • You are taught by a great range of experts with access to the library and special collections

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • Full Time and Part Time
  • 12 Months and 24 Months
  • September

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen

Living costs



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