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The MA Cultural Geography (Research) is celebrating its 20th birthday in 2015-2016. The course was founded in 1995 as one of the first masters programmes in the world to offer students focused engagement with the then emerging sub-discipline of Cultural Geography. Read more
The MA Cultural Geography (Research) is celebrating its 20th birthday in 2015-2016. The course was founded in 1995 as one of the first masters programmes in the world to offer students focused engagement with the then emerging sub-discipline of Cultural Geography.

Twenty years later and Cultural Geography is one of the most dynamic sub-disciplines in contemporary geography. Our course reflects this dynamism. We combine core concepts with research methods training and interdisciplinary scholarship and practice. We develop this alongside innovative placements and research engagements with some of world’s top cultural institution, located on our doorstep in London.

Thematically cultural geography focuses on the interconnections between place,landscape, environment, mobilities and identity, and thus has profound relevance for the contemporary world. Our graduates go onto work in a range of sectors, including the arts and cultural sector, publishing, planning and urban policy, private and public sector research work as well as many carrying on to further doctoral study.

As profiles of our recent students (https://landscapesurgery.wordpress.com/2014/11/13/maculturalgeography/) show, the course attracts a diverse range of students from a range of backgrounds, not just those with geography degrees.

To see more about the activities around the MA Cultural Geography at Royal Holloway, please look at our research group blog Landscape Surgery - https://landscapesurgery.wordpress.com/ .

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/geography/coursefinder/maculturalgeography.aspx

Why choose this course?

- This well established course aims to provide research training and practice at Master’s level in Human Geography, with a particular emphasis on Cultural Geography; to prepare you for independent research at doctoral level in Human Geography; and to develop specialised knowledge and understanding of research, particularly involving cultural analysis, interpretation and practice.

- The course has a strong track record in gaining Research Council Funding for students. This includes ESRC 1+3 funding as well as funding from AHRC TECHNE. Please see the funding opportunities page for further details.

- The MA in Cultural Geography (Research) combines the vibrant research of the outstanding Social and Cultural Geography group with cutting edge teaching. The quality of our course was recognised by our external examiner as offering a gold-standard for the sector. Our teaching was nationally recognised by the student nominated award for “Best Teaching Team” (Arts and Humanities) at the National Prospects Post-Graduate Awards (2013).

- The programme includes cutting-edge conceptual teaching in themes such as theories of place and space, postcolonial geographies, geographies of knowledge, mapping and exploration, landscape, memory and heritage, geographies of consumption, material geographies, geographies of embodiment, practice and performance, critical urbanisms and creative geographies.

- At RHUL we are known for our commitment to collaborative research, offering you the chance to develop your seminar and tutorial-based learning alongside world leading cultural institutions. These include the Science Museum, V&A Museum, Museum of London, British Library, Natural History Museum, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, Institute for International Visual Arts, and the Royal Geographical Society.

- You will be well prepared to continue to a PhD, building on the research you have completed on this course.

Department research and industry highlights

Social and Cultural Geography at Royal Holloway emphasises the cultural politics of place, space and landscape. The Group's research stresses theoretically informed and informative work, values equally contemporary and historical scholarship, and engages with diverse geographical locations within and beyond the UK.

SCG is home to a large and intellectually vibrant postgraduate community. There are around 40-50 postgraduates in the Group at any time. Many of the past graduates of the MA and SCG PhDs are now established academics in their own right.

SCG is well-known for its collaboration with a range of cultural institutions beyond the academy; recent partners include the the Science Museum, Victoria and Albert Museum, National Maritime Museum, British Library, British Museum, Museum of London and the Royal Geographical Society. The Group also has a tradition of including creative practitioners within its activities, as artists in residence, as research fellows and through participation in major research projects.

Many leading journals are edited by group staff, including Cultural Geographies, the Journal of Historical Geography, Geoforum, History Workshop Journal and GeoHumanities. Please see the Landscape Surgery blog for further information on Social and Cultural Geography activities at RHUL.

Course content and structure

The programme consists of four elements, all assessed by coursework.

- Element 1: Contemporary Cultural Geographies
This is a programme of seminars on current ideas, theory and practice in Cultural and Human Geography. It includes the following themes: theories of place; colonial and postcolonial geographies; biographies of material culture; embodiment, practice and place; geographies of consumption; culture, nature and landscape; space, politics and democracy; cultures of politics.

- Element 2: Methods and Techniques in Cultural Geography
This consists of a programme of workshops devoted to research methodologies and techniques in Cultural Geography. It includes research strategies and project design; reflexivity and ethics; ethnographic research; social survey; qualitative data analysis and computing; visual methodologies; interpreting texts; interpreting things; interpreting movement; negotiating the archives; the arts of cultural geography.

- Element 3: Research Training
You will be introduced to the culture of research in Human Geography and provided with a broad training for independent research within contemporary cultural geography. This element supplements the more specialised research training in research techniques in Element 2, and culminates in a 5,000 word research proposal for the Dissertation.

- Element 4: Dissertation
You will produce a substantial (15-18,000 word) research dissertation, under supervision.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- advanced knowledge and expertise in the field of Cultural Geography and its current research questions
- advanced knowledge in the ideas, approaches and substantive themes of contemporary Cultural Geographies
- advanced knowledge of the research methods and techniques of Cultural Geography
- knowledge of the culture of research.

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework only. Formative feedback and detailed ongoing discussion of work before final submission is a central part of the teaching ethos of the course. Students also have significant autonomy in the selection of topics for coursework and dissertation allowing them to develop particular interests and specialisms.

Contemporary Cultural Geographies (Element 1)
Assessed by two course essays of up to 5,000 words (25% of final mark).

Methods and Techniques in Cultural Geography (Element 2)
Assessed by two workshop reports of up to 5,000 words (25% of final mark).

Research Training (Element 3)
Assessed by a 5,000-word dissertation proposal and satisfactory completion of modules taken in the element (Pass required).

Dissertation (Element 4)
Assessed by submission of a completed dissertation of 15-18,000 words. (50% of final mark).

Employability & career opportunities

Throughout the MA we spend time exploring possible career trajectories with our students.

This includes working on PhD applications – over 50% of our students go onto do PhDs and many go into academic position thereafter.

We also run a series of placement days with key cultural institutions in and around London including, British Library, Royal Geographical Society and Kew that help students develop skills, experience and contacts.

In recent years our graduates have entered a range of sectors, including the creative industries (advertising and marketing), the museum and research sectors (British Library, National Archive, and research assistantships in various academic projects).

We offer a series of course and activities to support career development:

1) Transferable Skills sessions

During the course staff on the MA not only teach key ideas and research methods, but also help students hone a series of transferable skills. As well as writing and presentation skills, activities on Element three enable the development of team-working and delegation skills. We also hold a series of dedicated skills sessions during the course including social media skills and networking skills run both by staff and by specialists from the careers office.

2) Career Development sessions and workshops

Both staff on the MA and the specialist staff at RHUL career centre offer tailored career development sessions. These might involve talking about developing an academic career, exploring careers in the cultural sector, as well as generic skills such as preparing your CV and developing a Linkedin profile.

3) Cultural Engagements and Placements

Staff on the MA course make the most of their research links with arts and cultural organisations to help students develop placement based work during their course.

Element three activities are designed to help students build up their CVs but also their contacts, and we are happy to help arrange shorter placements during element 1 and 2 pieces or longer-term placements for dissertation work. Past placements have seen students working with a range of key cultural institutions in and around London including the Royal Geographical Society, Kew Gardens, Furtherfield Digital Media and The British Museum.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This pioneering MA offers interdisciplinary perspectives on international performance, and aims to understand performance in relation to the culture to which it contributes- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-performance-culture/. Read more
This pioneering MA offers interdisciplinary perspectives on international performance, and aims to understand performance in relation to the culture to which it contributes- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-performance-culture/

The Masters takes in diverse forms of theatre, including multicultural and street theatre, and such practices as:

performance art
dance
ritual
site-specific performance
a wide range of hybrid forms
It leads you to explore performance as sociocultural process by using analytical principles from sociology, the sociology of culture, cultural theory, anthropology, history, philosophy, politics and theatre and performance.

We have numerous links, locally and internationally, with a wide variety of theatres, companies and performers, all of which enhance your research possibilities.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Department of Theatre and Performance Secretary.

There are three compulsory core modules which focus on a range of issues concerning performance as a sociocultural practice. They involve:

conceptual and theoretical material, their interweave and their relationship to performance
historiographical methodologies and textual issues
analysis of live performances
cultural difference, ethnicity and cross-culturalism
questions to do with corporeality, alternative spaces and performance in terms of social inclusivity
A choice of options or independent study constitutes the fourth component, and a dissertation on your individual research completes your programme of study.

Core modules

The three core modules consist of:

Cultural Theory, Performance, Interdisciplinary Perspectives:
This module is an introduction to the whole programme and focuses on the interdisciplinary use of a range of theories from sociology, anthropology, theatre and other areas to understand live performance. As part of this module you are expected to see as many performances as possible.

Historicising Theatre:
This module is concerned with exploring the problems and possibilities of theatre history, and the relationship between theatre, text and cultural context.

Corporeality, Embodiment, Alternative Spaces:
This module includes work on rituals, shamanism, dance, hybrid forms, site-specific, multi-ethnic performance and theatres of exclusion.

Assessment

Each compulsory module and the option module carry equal weight, each representing 15% of the overall mark. The dissertation is worth 40%.

Skills

You will develop writing and oral skills at a high academic level, demonstrating the ability to think and work in an interdisciplinary manner using a range of methodologies. your ability to work collaboratively and to facilitate and participate in group discussions will be enhanced.

You will also develop skills in identifying the socio-cultural, historical and political issues and pressures specific to varied types of performance.

Careers

This programme provides a strong grounding in the principles of research and of learning through independent research. It is particularly suitable if you wish to pursue further academic work in creative, performative fields.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/. Read more
The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/

The established and exciting degree is designed to help you understand digital transformations in media, culture and society and apply this understanding in practice, in the media and creative industries and in further research. You will be equipped with skills that can be applied to current and future developments in digital media, social media, computing and other aspects of technology.

The MA in Digital Media educates aspiring media practitioners and academics as well as early and mid-career professionals who seek to reflect on their roles in a structured and stimulating learning environment designed to give all students up-to-the-minute knowledge of digital media and the skills to apply that knowledge to future developments.

The MA offers two pathways:

-Pathway 1 is a theory programme where you learn about developments in digital media and technology from a wide range of perspectives

-Pathway 2 is a theory and practice programme where you improve your skills, understanding and experience in one of the following areas:

Documentary
Image making
Journalism
Writing

Acclaimed academics and practitioners

Benefit from the experience and expertise of one of the world’s leading media and communications departments. You'll be taught by theorists and practitioners of international standing: Sarah Kember, Joanna Zylinska, Graham Young, Tony Dowmunt, Angela Phillips, Julian Henriques and David Morley.

Work placements and internships

The MA in Digital Media regularly attracts offers of work placements and internships. Recently these have come from Google, The Science Museum and N1creative.com.

Facilities

Our students have access to state-of-the-art facilities including well-equipped lecture and seminar rooms, exhibition spaces, computer facilities and digital media suites.

The department is also currently host to the renowned philosopher of media and technology, Bernard Stiegler and students will have access to his modulein Media Philosophy as well as priority access to the innovative and popular option After New Media. Designed to complement the MA in Digital Media, this course provides a framework for thinking about the current media environment as well as future forms of human and computer interaction.

An established record

The MA in Digital Media has been redefining media theory and practice since 2004. Our students become proficient in:

the history, sociology and philosophy of digital media
the application of critical conceptual skills to specialist areas and future forms of media
multimedia skills in image making (photography, video, animation, graphic art) script writing, journalism and documentary
MA Digital Media students have access the pioneering option ‘After New Media’, a non-assessed online module which explores the themes of self mediation, ethical mediation and intelligent mediation, and develops a framework for thinking about 'life' after new media. As befits a course of this kind we will be combining media, and exploring their pedagogic potential – uniting digital-online technologies with more traditional teaching formats, such as reading groups, seminars and an end of year symposium.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Sarah Kember.

Modules & Structure

The programme consists of:

Two compulsory core modules
Pathway 1 - between two and four option modules (worth 60 credits) OR
Pathway 2 - a two-term practice block (worth 30 credits) and either one or two option modules (worth 30 credits)
The dissertation or the practice/theory project

Assessment

Seen take-home paper; essays; dissertation or practice/theory project and other production work in the area of documentary, image-making, journalism or fiction.

Programme overview

This is an exciting programme which offers a critical, contextual and practical approach to digital media and technology. It problematises approaches to the 'new' media in academic and professional debate, especially those which overemphasise the potential for radical social change led by a homogenised technology itself.

The programme is defined by its resistance to technological determinism and its insistence on the importance of addressing the social and historical contexts within which a range of media technologies are employed. In order to provide a contextual framework and facilitate the conceptualisation of digital media and technologies as fully cultural forms and processes, the programme will draw on a range of disciplines including: media and cultural studies, sociology, anthropology and philosophy. However, the programme will remain focused on key contemporary concerns about the potential role of digital media in society and on refiguring the contours of the 'new' media debate.

The programme offers two pathways. Pathway 1 addresses central theoretical and conceptual concerns relating to digital media. Pathway 2 combines theoretical analysis and practical work, offering students the opportunity to explore new media theories and concepts in practice. Pathway 2 is primarily aimed at students who already have some experience in one of the areas on offer: documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism; writing. It is meant to appeal to media industry professionals who are keen to reflect critically on their practice within a structured learning environment, graduates of practice-based courses but also those who have gained their practical experience in documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism or writing in informal settings.

Programme structure

The first compulsory core course is Digital Media - critical perspectives and this is taught in a small workshop format in the Autumn term. This course functions as a foundation for the second core course and offers students a map of the key debates in digital media. The course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions and is supported by the provision of one-to-one tutorials.

The second compulsory core course is Technology and Cultural Form - debates, models, dialogues and this develops questions of technology, power, politics and subjectivity which were introduced in the first core course. The first part of this course highlights the key conceptual concerns of a contextualised approach to digital media plus the relevant debates and models formulated by key figures in the field. The second part of this course aims to generate a dialogue between theoreticians and practitioners around some of the most intellectually stimulating, contentious and contemporary ideas in the field without necessarily seeking a resolution. This course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions during the Spring term and is supported by the weekly provision of one-to-one tutorials.

Students are required to take options from the lists provided by the Media and Communications, Anthropology, Comparative Literature and Sociology Departments as well as the Centre for Cultural Studies. Examples might include: After New Media, Nature and Culture, Cultural Theory, Globalisation, Risk and Control, Embodiment and Experience, Political Communications. Options are taught primarily through lectures and seminars and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

Each student's option profile is discussed with the programme convenor in order to ensure that the balance of subject-specific topics is appropriate for the individual concerned. Option courses are taught primarily through lectures, seminars and tutorials and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

All students are required to produce either a 12,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor or a practice/theory project in the area of documentary, photography and image making, journalism or fiction. The length of the practical element is dependent on the media and the form used and will be agreed in advance with the supervisor. It will, however, be comparable with practical projects undertaken in practice MA programmes in the relevant field. Students undertaking the practice/theory project will also be expected to submit a 3-4000 word analysis of their practice which locates it within the theoretical debates explored in the MA as a whole. This essay may be presented as a separate document or as an integral part of the project depending on the nature of the project and by a agreement with both theory and practice supervisors.

Programme outcomes

The programme's subject specific learning outcomes require students to analyse and contextualise developments in digital media and technology with reference to key debates in the history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of the media. Students who opt for the practice/theory pathway will also be required to produce material of publishable or broadcast standard and to evaluate the ways in which theoretical and practical insights intersect. All students will develop a wide range of transferable qualities and skills necessary for employment in related or unrelated areas. These are described by the Quality Assurance Agency as: 'the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility, decision-making in complex and unpredictable situations, and the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development'.

By the end of the programme students will be able to:

-Map and critically evaluate key debates in the field of new media
-Analyse and contextualise current and future developments in digital media and technology
-Evaluate and articulate key historical, sociological, anthropological and philosophical approaches to the study of digital media and technology
-Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of at least four differing areas of inquiry
-Demonstrate an advanced level of conceptual knowledge and (where relevant) practical skill appropriate for a sustained piece of work in the field
-Prepare and deliver clearly argued and informed work
-Locate, retrieve and present relevant information for a specific project
-Manage a complex array of competing demands and work effectively to a deadline
-Work resourcefully and independently
-Think critically and/or work practically within a given context

Skills

We provide graduates with skills that are cutting edge: in the critical analysis and/or creative production of digital media; in the disciplinary knowledge and conceptual frameworks necessary for current and future forms of media and technology; in the awareness of how digital media and technologies are re-shaping society from the ways we communicate (through social media and web 2.0) to the increasingly ‘smart’ environments in which we live.

Careers

Our programme provides a theory and practice pathway and prepares students for work in the following areas:

-media and creative industries; advertising, marketing and PR (graduates of the MA Digital Media have found work with Virgin Media, Google, the BBC and other leading organisations worldwide)
-research and academia (graduates from this programme have gone on to study for PhD degrees in higher education institutions around the world and also here with us)
-media production and new media art (graduates have exhibited, published and produced work in photography, journalism, TV, documentary, film and multimedia)

Graduate Ekaterina discusses her career:

"I work for a company, called Visual DNA, which already sounds like life happening After New Media. The company is the largest data provider in Europe and is totally multinational. We actually try to analyse human visual DNA, you memories, feelings, thoughts about the future, anticipations, etc by creating personality quizzes where instead of verbal answers we tend to use images.

My role is as Creative Developer. It involves working with images from concept to finding/shooting and post-production. My qualifications perfectly matched what they’ve been looking for, Digital Media rocks!

My tip for the new-to-be-graduates is this: physically go to places and companies and talk to people. It really opens up loads of possibilities, and when I tell someone where I’ve graduated from they look impressed, and there is some sort of respect coming from them."

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This Masters is concerned with outlining and critically evaluating the concept of the ‘avant-garde’ both theoretically and in terms of its applicability to representative areas of 20th-century art. Read more
This Masters is concerned with outlining and critically evaluating the concept of the ‘avant-garde’ both theoretically and in terms of its applicability to representative areas of 20th-century art. Dealing with art from the early twentieth century to the present, you will investigate concepts such as historical avant-garde, neo-avant-garde, and post-avant-garde, paying close attention to the theorists who have elaborated these ideas.

Why this programme

-Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing. You are granted privileged access to the extensive collections in our own Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery.
-You have the opportunity to take part in a project-based work placement, where you can explore a possible future career while meeting professional practitioners and developing your skills and experience.
-If you want to learn from world-leading researchers and develop expert knowledge of 20th-century Avant-Gardes, this programme is for you.
-Our research forum provides you with a lively and stimulating introduction to methodological debates within art history. It provides a sense of art history’s own history as well as contemporary concerns and practice, examining the beliefs and values that have informed various forms of historical and visual analysis and enquiry. It is focused around a series of seminars or workshops run by members of staff and visiting academics.

Programme structure

Closely focused on the visual and historical specificities of the subject, the core teaching will have you examining the politically oppositional and ‘transgressive’ impulses of the avant-garde.

You will interpret ‘transgression’ in the widest sense and in relation to a range of diverse historical contexts, including: the anti-art concerns of Dada; the political tensions arising from conflicts between nationalist and internationalist currents in European art of the early 20th century and the Nietzschian/Bataillean testing of the boundaries of conventional moral positions, particularly regarding sexual identity and the body.

The optional courses available are closely geared to the research interests of our staff. Their content will draw upon current exhibitions and debates.

You will take five core courses and one optional course. This is followed by a period of self-study towards a dissertation 15,000 words in length (including footnotes but excluding bibliography) and will be on a topic chosen in consultation with the tutors and the programme convenor.

Core courses
-Research methods in practice
-Theories of the Avant Garde
-Readings in Duchamp: anti-art, blasphemy, sexuality
-Art, embodiment, transgression
-Dada in Switzerland and Germany.

Optional courses - you may choose from the following options in the College of Arts
-A Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institute (HATII) course: 2D Digitisation (Theory and Practice)
-A course from the MLitt Modernities: Modernism, Modernity & Post-Modernity run by English Literature
-a course from elsewhere in the College of Arts, subject to the approval of the programme convenor.

Or from courses run by History of Art
-Art in the making: modern and Avant-Garde techniques
-Independent study
-Work placement

Career prospects

Career opportunities include positions in curation, digitisation and research within museums and other cultural and heritage institutions. The programme also provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career.

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This innovative course focuses on dissident writing and transgressive texts, from the early modern period to the present. Read more
This innovative course focuses on dissident writing and transgressive texts, from the early modern period to the present. Engaging with recent developments in theoretical and critical practice, the course will develop your knowledge and understanding of English literature and will sharpen your skills of literary research, writing and analysis.

Key features

-This course enables you to become part of a vibrant postgraduate community and attend lectures and events organised by the London Graduate School and the Kingston Writing School.
-Capitalising on our location, several modules are complemented by field trips (for example, to the British Library, museums and theatres) to enhance and support your learning experience.
-The English department is home to two archives relating to the work of Iris Murdoch, as well as the Sheridan Morley archive of theatrical life writing and ephemera. It also contributes to the Cultural Histories and Suburban Studies at Kingston, the Life Narrative Research Group, the Iris Murdoch Centre and the Victorian Popular Fiction Association.

What will you study?

The core module, Transgression and Dissidence, introduces the course's central themes by focusing on texts that explore the limits of human experience and contravene cultural boundaries. You will explore how literature, through such transgression, has provided opportunities for dissent and resistance, and will consider the extent to which writing has acted as a catalyst for social and political change. You will then study various conceptual approaches to literature through your choice of option modules, which provide the opportunity to analyse and discuss a range of contentious issues across a number of historical periods and with respect to different genres.

The option modules involve the study of traumatic experience, human rights work and life narrative (Trauma and Justice); the complex relationships between desire, embodiment and writing (Sex and Text); gender, culture and international exchange in early modern Europe (Markets and Materiality); the construction of place and identity in 19th-century travel writing and adventure fiction (Mappings and Crossings); and the 'post-human' and interspecies interaction in recent global literature (Humans and Animals).

The MA programme has been devised to allow you to study diverse topics and periods or, if you prefer, to focus on areas in which the Department of English Literature has particular research strengths: Renaissance literature and culture; Victorian literature, 20th-century and contemporary writing; literature, sex and gender; and writing, space and the environment.

Your 15,000-word dissertation will allow you to research a subject of your choice, produced under the supervision of a specialist academic member of staff.

Assessment

Essays and other written coursework, presentations, and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-English Literature Dissertation
-Transgression and Dissidence

Optional modules
-Diffractive Creativities, Transversal Practices
-Humans and Animals
-Mappings and crossings
-Markets and Materiality
-Sex and Text
-Special Study: American Dreaming: Suburbia, Literature and Culture
-Special Study: Bruce Springsteen and Contemporary American Culture
-Special Study: Monsters: Theory, Fiction, Culture
-Special Study: Music and Theory
-Special Study: Shakespeare and Renaissance Drama
-Special Study: Writing Women in the 20th and 21st Century
-Trauma and Justice

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Architectural regeneration is the collective activities of reusing, adapting and evolving existing buildings within an urban or rural context. Read more
Architectural regeneration is the collective activities of reusing, adapting and evolving existing buildings within an urban or rural context. The activities recognise the impacts these decisions and interventions have on the regeneration of a place, and are underpinned by the principles of environmental, social and cultural sustainability.

This programme promotes an interdisciplinary approach that combines critical thinking and analysis, as well as creative design. It is based on the ethos that the regeneration and development of the inherited built environment, with its social and cultural fabric, is an essential component of sustainable development.

It prepares you for a practical and leading role in organisations involved in architectural regeneration and development. It is international in focus, with an emphasis on field research and design/implementation projects.

Why choose this course?

Oxford Brookes has an established international reputation for its excellence in teaching and research related to international vernacular architecture, architectural conservation and regeneration. Staff teaching on the programme, including Dr Aylin Orbasli and Dr Marcel Vellinga, combine different disciplinary backgrounds with academic and practice experience, and active involvement with projects in different parts of the world. We house the Paul Oliver Vernacular Architecture Library.

We stimulate students towards more innovative approaches and dynamic ways of thinking that are now essential to secure a viable future for historic urban environments, traditional settlements and the world’s vernacular architecture. The international nature of the programme builds up skills to work in different cultural contexts and will introduce students to a network of international organisations in the field.

This course in detail

The course is offered at three levels: as a postgraduate certificate, a postgraduate diploma and a master's degree. Normally candidates enrol for the master's degree, but it is possible to enrol directly on the PGCert or PGDip, either on recommendation from the admissions tutor or as an exit point from the MA.

In total, 180 credits are required to complete the MA in International Architectural Regeneration and Development. These are divided into two parts: 120 credits must be successfully completed to qualify for the postgraduate diploma. During Semesters 1 and 2 all MA students take taught core modules amounting to 90 credits and choose options amounting to 30 credits. Research methods seminars and the dissertation itself account for a further 60 credits required to achieve the MA. For the postgraduate certificate 60 credits are needed.

The programme is made up of core (compulsory) modules and optional modules that are explained in more detail below.

Core modules:
-Architecture, Culture and Tradition
-Applications in Regeneration
-Globalisation, Environment and Development
-Regeneration and Development Project

Optional modules include:
-Vernacular Architecture, Sustainability and Development
-Master Classes
-Development and Urbanisation
-Urban Design Theory
-Independent Study

Other compulsory modules for the MA stage are:
-Research Methods
-Dissertation/Design Project

The course is international in focus and throughout the course references and visits to international contexts are made. A field trip is organised each year to look at international examples of regeneration projects. The international body of students on the course are encouraged to reflect on and present experiences from their countries.

NB As courses are reviewed regularly, the module list you choose from may vary from that shown here.

Teaching and learning

The aim of the course is to provide the knowledge and tools that will enable you to recognise the potential of, and contribute creatively to, the appropriate and sustainable regeneration of the inherited built environment in urban or rural contexts, including vernacular architecture.

The course will help you develop a critical awareness of the cultural embodiment of the built environment and associated regeneration and development processes, and attain skills and tools that are necessary to propose and implement innovative yet culturally sensitive and environmentally sustainable strategies and interventions.

Teaching methods include a combination of lectures and seminars, design studios, workshops and group discussions, field study and master classes.

Careers and professional development

Jobs in architectural regeneration can include a wide range of prospects including private sector consultancy assignments, public sector decision making positions or working for not for profit organisations delivering or assisting the regeneration process.

Graduates of this programme have gone on to work in a wide range of positions in the regeneration field internationally. Much of the success of a career in regeneration is combining the knowledge and skills learnt in the programme with professional skills gained in previous study and practice. Although we are unable to directly ‘find’ jobs for programme graduates, we regularly make recommendations through a good network of contacts and alumni and share employment opportunities with current students and graduates of the programme.

Graduates with architecture backgrounds often go on to work in practices specialising in regeneration or rehabilitation. Younger graduates have found that regeneration expertise has given them an edge and therefore more responsibility in practices they are working at. Those with more experience have found opportunities to diversify and gain positions in consultancy or multi-disciplinary practices.

There are also a wide range of jobs in the non-governmental sectors, ranging from managing small non-governmental (charitable) organisations to working on projects for major donor bodies like UNESCO. We have had an Indian graduate working on post-disaster rebuilding in Haiti, a Japanese graduate working on the preservation of vernacular architecture in Vietnam, and a Canadian graduate running donor-assisted construction programmes in Papua New Guinea. Closer to home, a UK graduate with a background in law is managing a townscape heritage initiative on behalf of the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Overseas students in particular, who have joined the programme from public sector assignments, have found that the degree has helped them both specialise and progress in their departments on their return. One graduate has gone onto head the procurement team in the Ministry of Municipalities specifically dealing with major regeneration projects. Several others work for their respective national heritage authorities.

Other graduates have used the programme as a stepping stone for PhD study, at Brookes or elsewhere. A number of former graduates are now teaching regeneration and conservation at degree and postgraduate levels.

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This course looks at the economic, political, social and cultural changes that were seen throughout the world between c.1500 and c.1800. Read more

About the course

This course looks at the economic, political, social and cultural changes that were seen throughout the world between c.1500 and c.1800. Events such as the British civil wars, the settling of the ‘New World’, the early stages of industrialisation, and the French Revolution transformed the way people thought and lived. This MA allows you to explore this momentous period with a group of internationally renowned scholars.

Our department

We are one of the largest, most active and successful centres for teaching and historical research both in the UK and internationally. Our academic reputation means that we are ranked third in the UK for research excellence (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Our team of over 35 academic staff and 100 postgraduate students work together to create a thriving and supportive research culture. This vibrant community includes a regular research seminar series, covering a huge range of topics, and a range of research centres and networks exploring interdisciplinary themes. Our students also run an active Postgraduate Forum organising a wide variety of social and research events, and collaborating with staff and students both in Sheffield and further afield.

Our teaching

Our world-leading research informs what we teach. We offer a flexible degree structure with a wide range of modules covering a variety of periods, locations, themes and approaches.

An MA degree in history will further develop the range of transferable skills at your disposal. You will have the freedom to tailor your research and focus on the skills that are most important to you. We offer modules that are specifically designed to provide you with skills in public history – Presenting the Past, History Writer’s Workshop and Work Placement all give you real, hands-on experience.

Your future

These kinds of skills are why our graduates are successful in both further study and a wide range of careers – from taking PhDs, lecturing and working in the museum and tourist industry to business management, marketing, law and working in the media.

In addition to the personal and professional development you will experience through your modules, we offer dedicated careers support to enable you to successfully plan your future.

Studentships

University and AHRC Studentships are available. Please contact us or see our website for further details. You’ll need to submit your application by the appropriate funding deadline.

Teaching and assessment

You’ll be taught through seminars and individual tutorials. Assessment is by bibliographical and source-based exercises, written papers, oral presentation, and a 15,000 word dissertation.

Part-time study

All our masters can be taken part-time. Seminars are held during working hours (9am–6pm) – there are no lectures. The number of contact hours will vary over the two years, but you’ll usually have at least one two-hour seminar each week. You’ll take one core module each year and the rest of your course will be made up from optional modules giving you plenty of choice and flexibility over what you study.

Core modules

Research Presentation; Early Modernities; Dissertation.

Examples of optional modules

Microhistory and the History of Everyday Life; Burying the White Gods: Indigenous People in the Early Modern Colonial World; The Early Modern Body: Identity, Politics and Embodiment, c1640-1800; Eighteenth-century Print Culture; Language and Society in Early Modern England; Religious Tolerance and Intolerance in Early Modern Europe.

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On this part-time MA in Coaching and Mentoring Practice course you will integrate your prior work and life experiences with the theoretical concepts underpinning coaching and mentoring. Read more
On this part-time MA in Coaching and Mentoring Practice course you will integrate your prior work and life experiences with the theoretical concepts underpinning coaching and mentoring. You will expand your knowledge and understanding of theories and then relate that understanding to the skills and approaches necessary to develop professionally as a coach or mentor. This will help you to research and informs your models and modes of practice. With a unique blend of tutor input and individual coach-supervisor support, you will apply your knowledge to a variety of working contexts.

This course is aimed at internal or external coaches, consultants, mentor co-ordinators, coaching psychologists, counsellors, managers, human resources development or leadership professionals from the voluntary, public and private sectors. It is not always necessary to have a degree, as long as you have an appropriate level of experience.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/coaching-and-mentoring-practice/

Why choose this course?

This practice-based course has several unique elements, each designed to enhance your learning experience:
- It is delivered via a series of monthly study days held in Oxford (Wheatley Campus) plus regular online workshops and conferencing to support and extend your learning. Regular online workshops and discussions support the face-to-face sessions.

- Approximately 50% of the programme is delivered online, allowing you to fit your studies around other commitments. The course is also available in Hong Kong at the HKU School of Professional and Continuing Education. For further details please visit their website

- The focus is on your personal and professional development as well as relevant organisational and psychological dimensions of coaching and mentoring.

- Throughout the first year of study you have your own independent, professional coach-supervisor to support the development of your coaching or mentoring.

- Oxford Brookes is at the leading edge of the coaching and mentoring professions. Our master's programme is taught by leading researchers in the field, including Dr Elaine Cox, Dr Tatiana Bachkirova and visiting professors such as Professor David Clutterbuck and Dr Anthony Grant.

- We are an active part of the coaching and mentoring community, hosting the International Journal of Evidence Based Coaching and Mentoring, an Annual Coaching and Mentoring Research Conference and the Oxford Brookes Coaching and Mentoring Society, which provides collaboration and networking opportunities for academics and professionals from a wide spectrum of coaching and mentoring interests.

Teaching and learning

This programme is taught through a series of Friday or Saturday seminars and workshops (approximately one a month). We use a variety of teaching and learning methods designed to enable you to develop active learning techniques, reflect on practice and undertake independent research. You can choose Friday or Saturday as your preferred day of attendance.

Approximately 50% of the programme is delivered online in the Oxford Brookes virtual learning environment through which you can discuss, debate and support each other in your studies. You are encouraged to communicate electronically with your supervisor and tutors (eg by email, Skype, etc).

All teaching, learning and assessment activities draw on the professional backgrounds, experience and knowledge of all participants and encourage critical reflection. Teaching staff have research interests and expertise in coaching and mentoring and related fields. Visiting speakers from business and industry provide further input. You can attend events from the Oxford Brookes Coaching and Mentoring Society (OBCAMS), which meets monthly, and attracts outside speakers and presenters from all areas of coaching and mentoring.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is based on coursework assignments and a dissertation - there are no exams.

Specialist facilities

Our Business School Postgraduate Centre at Wheatley Campus has a state-of-the-art lecture theatre, well equipped seminar rooms and a postgraduate lounge and private study area.

The Wheatley Campus library provides specialist business resources including 1,000 sets of UK and overseas companies' annual reports, statistics on all aspects of business and management, postgraduate MA, MBA, MSc and PhD theses in business and management and business examination papers.

Free language courses for students – the Open Module

Free language courses are available to all full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students who are studying any course on our Headington (including Marston Road), Harcourt Hill or Wheatley Campuses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Attendance pattern

The programme is taught through a series of Friday or Saturday seminars and workshops (approximately one a month).

How this course helps you develop

In addition to a thorough theoretical and practical grounding in coaching and mentoring practice, the course provides opportunities for networking with other coaches/mentors and to work with volunteers to develop your practice in a particular area. You are also encouraged to join our coaching and mentoring community by attending OBCAMS and joining our LinkedIn groups.

Careers

Oxford Brookes University Business School is the UK's leading provider of master's-level education in coaching and mentoring practice. Our postgraduate courses develop you as a coach or mentor and demonstrate your coaching credibility and expertise. Anyone looking to establish a reputation and build a career in coaching and mentoring will benefit from one of our part-time postgraduate level qualifications.

Graduates of this course find that their employment opportunities are enhanced or that their business increases as a result of their greater depth of understanding of the field and the variety of new networks and contacts formed during the course.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research areas and clusters

The International Centre for Coaching and Leadership Development is at the forefront of coaching and mentoring research. Our journal, our annual conferences and our professional network OBCAMS (the Oxford Brookes Coaching and Mentoring Society) offer excellent opportunities for the dissemination and sharing of research and ideas.

We acknowledge a range of public definitions of 'coaching' and 'mentoring'. We see coaching and mentoring as two different, but closely linked, approaches to helping people increase their sense of self-direction, self-worth, efficacy and achievement. Coaching and mentoring are both human development processes that involve structured, focused interaction and the use of appropriate strategies, tools and techniques to promote desirable and sustainable change for the benefit of the client and other stakeholders.

Our team, led by Dr Tatiana Bachkirova and Dr Elaine Cox, have research interests in the following areas:
- Philosophical underpinnings of coaching
- Developmental, leadership and team coaching
- Resilience
- Embodiment
- Transfer of learning
- The coaching relationship

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The MA in Cognitive Linguistics is primarily aimed at those students who wish to undertake a taught programme of graduate-level study in order to pursue research in some aspect of Cognitive Linguistics. Read more
The MA in Cognitive Linguistics is primarily aimed at those students who wish to undertake a taught programme of graduate-level study in order to pursue research in some aspect of Cognitive Linguistics.

Cognitive Linguistics is a modern and innovative approach to the study of language and mind, and their relationship with embodied experience and culture. The MA provides a focused and comprehensive programme of graduate-level training in the core subject matter of Cognitive Linguistics, including the most important theoretical frameworks. The subject matter covered includes conceptual structure and organisation, figurative language, grammar and mind, the relationship between language, thought and culture, lexical and cognitive compositional semantics, the issue of embodiment, and contemporary methodology in Cognitive Linguistics. The MA also provides a platform for those interested in pursuing an advanced research degree such as a PhD.

Students must take 180 Credits in total from the lists below:



Modules
The modules for this degree vary each year, but a selection will be offered including:

Issues in Cognitive Linguistics
Metaphor and Thought
Language and Communication
Grammatical Systems and Change,
Language Space and Time
The Bilingual Mind

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This Master's programme focuses on contemporary theatre and dance studies and dramaturgy, from an intermedial, interdisciplinary, intercultural and international perspective. Read more
This Master's programme focuses on contemporary theatre and dance studies and dramaturgy, from an intermedial, interdisciplinary, intercultural and international perspective.

Fully taught in English, the Master's in Theatre Studies takes an academic approach to theatre and dance while also keeping close track of contemporary practices. We incorporate these practices into the programme to explore them, pose questions, and surprise ourselves: why this, why here, why now, and for what purpose?

Our research focus areas include: dance, embodiment, and corporeal literacy;
theory and practice of dramaturgy; community arts and participatory and political performance; impact of technology on contemporary performance practice and emerging intermedial vocabularies; relationships between the performing arts and visual culture.

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This MSc focuses on how individuals construe the social world and the processes that underlie social judgment and behaviour. Read more
This MSc focuses on how individuals construe the social world and the processes that underlie social judgment and behaviour. The programme draws on the research of outstanding academic staff working in the areas of social psychology, neuroscience, and cognitive science to provide unique, cutting-edge perspectives on humans as social beings.

Degree information

The programme provides an understanding of how the human emotional, cognitive and neural systems have evolved to sustain social coordination and adaptation to the environment. Key topics include: social perception, motivation, attitudes, embodiment, emotion, social judgment and decision making, and social neuroscience.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Understanding Individuals and Groups
-Social Cognition, Affect, and Motivation
-Current Issues in Attitude Research
-Social Neuroscience
-Research Statistics
-Social Cognition: Research Methods

Optional modules - options may include the following:
-Knowledge, Learning, and Inference
-Applied Decision-making
-Principles of Cognition
-Human Learning and Memory
-Social Psychology
-The Psychology of Health
-Organisational Psychology
-Cognitive Neuroscience
-Consumer Behaviour
-Consulting Psychology
-Business Psychology Seminars
-Current Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience II: Elaborative and Adaptive Processes
-Current Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience III: Translational Research
-The Brain in Action
-Programming for Cognitive Science
-Judgment and Decision-making
-Talent Management
-Judgment and Decision-making

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, tutorials and seminars. The Division of Psychology & Language Sciences has advanced technology for the study of socio-cognitive processes, including fMRI, eye-, speech- and motion tracking equipment for dyadic and group settings, as well as a 360o video camera. Assessment is through coursework, online assessment and the dissertation.

Careers

Graduates have taken up positions in research, marketing, teaching, and management consultancy.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Business Director, Mindshare
-University Lecturer, Northumbria University and studying PhD Self-perception, Northumbria University
-Marketing Director, Evolution Ticno
-Market Researcher, Carnegie Consulting
-Research Consultant, Behaviour Change Partners

Employability
On completion of this programme students will have acquired an understanding of the processes involved in the construction of the social reality, in particular how cognitive and affective processes guide social judgement and behaviour, and how these processes are implemented in the brain. The students will have acquired methodological skills to design and carry out socio-cognitive research which will enable them to address real-world social problems and/or pursue an academic career. In addition, they will have acquired knowledge related to theoretical and philosophical issues underlying psychological research.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language.

Our work attracts staff and students from around the world. Together they create an outstanding and vibrant environment, taking advantage of cutting-edge resources such as a behavioural neuroscience laboratory, a centre for brain imaging, and extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for graduate students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation, from basic processes to applied research. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

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The University of Edinburgh has one of the top-ranked Philosophy departments in the UK for research. Read more

Programme description

The University of Edinburgh has one of the top-ranked Philosophy departments in the UK for research.

In the latest UK Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), 65% of our research activity was judged to be either "world-leading" or "internationally excellent" (as a guide, this puts us on a par with the Departments of Philosophy at Oxford and Cambridge).

While we have particular areas of particular research strength (as indicated by our seven research groups listed below), we are able to supervise a thesis on almost any area of analytical philosophy.

We maintain close links with other disciplines/subject areas within the University, such as psychology, linguistics, cognitive science, informatics, jurisprudence, politics, classics and the Science Studies Unit. Within Scotland, we have close ties with the Philosophy departments of all the major universities, in particular those of St Andrews, Stirling, Glasgow and Aberdeen.

Our teaching and research span most areas of philosophy but our main strengths are in five main research clusters.

Ancient Philosophy

Ancient Philosophy includes research interests in ancient metaphysics and ethics, ancient and medieval philosophy and science, Presocratics, Plato and Aristotle.

Epistemology

We have a unique wealth of research talent in Epistemology. In particular, we host researchers who are interested in scepticism, epistemic value, contextualism, social epistemology, epistemic responsibility, perceptual knowledge, rationality, the nature of cognitive processes and virtue epistemology.

Ethics

Ethics is one of the central areas of philosophy and one in which there have been exciting recent developments. We have particular strengths in ethical theory, meta-ethics, normative theory and political philosophy.

Mind and Cognition

Our research team ranks among the world leaders in this fast-moving area, and specialises in the study of embodiment, consciousness, perception, action, and situated reason. Our researchers benefit from close links with the University’s world-leading School of Informatics.

Philosophy of Science

Philosophy of science at the University of Edinburgh specialises in the philosophy of the natural sciences, and the philosophy of cognitive sciences. Topics we cover include: laws, causation, realism, time, models, explanation, measurement and fictionalism.

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The Master of Cultural Studies investigates the changing meanings of culture in our everyday world. It explores the studying of culture not as a monolithic, self-evident construct, but as a constantly shifting field through which life is experienced and negotiated. Read more
The Master of Cultural Studies investigates the changing meanings of culture in our everyday world. It explores the studying of culture not as a monolithic, self-evident construct, but as a constantly shifting field through which life is experienced and negotiated. You will gain insight into the ideologically charged meanings of identity, self‑expression and embodiment.

Our Cultural Studies program allows you to engage critically with culture in its manifest expressions. Using real-world examples across the topics of popular culture, media, gender, sexuality, globalisation and consumer culture, you will analyse cultural forms and debate their significance in relation to given contexts.

Cultural Studies will lead you to question identity, community, representation, power, values and the practice of everyday life. The course draws on diverse critical perspectives as you gain the theoretical tools to understand how culture is produced, circulated and lived.

The Master of Cultural Studies is the only specialised program in Australia. Housed in the internationally recognised Department of Gender and Cultural Studies – a leading centre for research into gender and culture – you will critically engage in a dynamic postgraduate community and learn under the guidance of esteemed researchers in the field.

An optional cultural studies internship also gives you the opportunity to undertake cultural research in a business, government or non-governmental body, enhancing your appreciation of applied cultural work.
The Master of Cultural Studies assumes no background in the field; however those familiar with the discipline are also welcome to extend their knowledge.

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/

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Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical and social significance of works of art, artefacts and other cultural products from classical antiquity to the present. Read more
Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical and social significance of works of art, artefacts and other cultural products from classical antiquity to the present.

Art is an expression of the human spirit. The study of art deals with cultural, social, religious, political and aesthetic meaning in the time it was created, the present and the eras in between. Think of how the Greek mythology of Narcissus – who has been portrayed in countless sculptures and paintings over the ages – was used by Freud to name a psychological disorder and is today used by politicians to symbolise the flaws of modern society. And think of how the destruction of art, be it by Byzantine iconoclasts, sixteenth-century Dutch protestants, or present-day adherents of IS, teaches us that the emotional and political significance of art goes far beyond the loss of objects.

The research Master’s in Art and Visual Culture studies the relationship between art, the past and the present from various angles, including the interpretation of the cultural contexts of visual expressions and their transformations throughout the ages up to now. This programme is geared towards classical archaeologists, art historians and cultural scholars alike. You’ll gain insight into general humanities methods and theories as well as those specific for those three fields. You can then go to focus on your own topic in the field of Art-Historical, Cultural Studies and Archaeology.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/arts-culture 

Europe and ‘its worlds’

The programme welcomes students with interest in all forms of art and visual culture. Our own research primarily focuses on Europe and ‘its worlds’, including how European artefacts interact with and differ from the rest of the world. Our research studies artefacts in the broadest sense, ranging from the more traditional forms as sculptures, paintings and architecture to modern ones as film, digital art, the performing arts and even fashion. All our research is performed in collaboration with scientists from other fields within the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS). We are joined in thirteen themed research groups .

Why study Art and Visual Culture at Radboud University?

- We teach you to look at the physical, artistic and visual qualities of an artwork or artefact, seen from the perspectives of three different disciplines: Classical Archaeology, Cultural Studies and Art History.
- In your first year, you take several courses with students from the other HLCS research Master’s specialisations in Historical Studies, and in Literary Studies. This unique construction will allow you to view your own field from the perspective of the other humanities.
- A personal tutor will guide you throughout the entire programme. He/she will give you advice on how to tailor our programme to best suit your interests, act as a sounding board for your research ideas, and help you make the right connections in the academic arena.
- You’ll receive thorough preparation for PhD research, including the writing of a publishable scholarly article and a proposal for a PhD project.
- This programme strongly encourages you to go abroad for at least a semester. Students can use our connections to other universities (IRUN network ) and research institutes to find a place that meet their academic interests.

Our research in this field

Any research done by students of the Master’s in Art and Visual Culture will be supervised by a researcher at the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS) in Nijmegen. HLCS research focuses around the theme Europe and its Worlds and questions whether ‘Europe’ consists of different worlds, how it is addressed, how it differs from the rest of the world, and how it interacts with other worlds. Researchers from a variety of humanities disciplines collaborate in thirteen different thematic groups to explore the spaces, cultural practices, beliefs, texts and ideas related to Europe and its World.

Thematic research groups
There are art and cultural scientists in many of these thematic groups. Although all the groups could be of interest to an art and cultural researcher, our experience is that the following generate a lot of interest among the Art and Visual Culture students:

- Matter And Culture: Analysis, Discourse & Aesthetics of/in Material Culture
The common framework of this group is research into material culture as the bearer of meaning in the broadest sense.

- Creative Industries: Society, Culture and Aesthetics in the 21st century
This group aims to gain a socio-cultural understanding of the creative industries. The group views the creative industries as a dynamic sector of autonomous and applied arts that range from theatre, music, media, literature and museums; to gaming, film, fashion and television, as well as to design, arts education, heritage and festivals.

- Memory, Materiality and Meaning in the Age of Transnationalism
This group studies the material as well as immaterial media and forms of embodiment through which we create memory through meaning-making and performative practices.

Master’s thesis topics in Art and Visual Culture:
For their Master’s thesis research, students can work together with researchers from one of the HLCS research groups or choose a topic in a non-related area. A small sample of thesis topics that you could research in this programme:
- Understanding the Post-Pompeian Era: Wall painting in the Roman Empire (AD 79-395)
- Crime in a Nordic Space: The Production of Space in Forbrydelsen
- William Marlowe in his time: an eighteenth-century view painter rediscovered
- Unravelling the Fabrics of Time: A New Materialist Perspective on Slow Fashion Becomings
- A Pyramidal Structure along the Via Appia. Documentation and reconstruction


See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/arts-culture 

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This course is about learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of literary texts and how they function within society. Read more
This course is about learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of literary texts and how they function within society.

Whether you prefer ancient Greek dramas, medieval Dutch poetry, contemporary American literature, or general literary theory, this Master’s is suited to students wishing to contribute to textual research. The Master’s in Literary Studies will teach you how to approach historical and contemporary texts from an international perspective, as well as to examine the current societal significance of literature. By the end of the programme, you’ll be able to discuss literary texts and scholarly approaches with other scholars at the highest academic level.

At Radboud University, we believe that to fully understand literature, you need to broaden your scope. You will gain insight into methods and theories in both literary studies and the humanities in general. You’ll become familiar with a wide range of literary traditions, critical approaches and theoretical debates. This will enhance your own research. In order to expand your horizon as a literary scholar, you’ll spend a semester conducting research and taking courses abroad.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/hlcs/literary

Europe and its worlds

The programme welcomes students with interest in all fields of literary studies, but our own research primarily focuses on Europe and ‘its worlds’, including the ways Europe interacts with and differs from the rest of the world. All our research is performed in collaboration with scientists from other fields within the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS). We are joined in thirteen themed research groups.

Why study Literary Studies at Radboud University?

- There is a strong focus on textual scholarship and methods of literary interpretation. The programme studies all forms of literary texts and written records from all historical periods.
- In your first year, you take several courses with students from the other HLCS research Master’s as Historical Studies, and Art and Visual Culture. This unique construction will allow you to view your own field from the perspective of other disciplines within the humanities.
- A personal tutor will guide you throughout the entire programme. He/she will give you advice on how to tailor our programme to best suit your interests, act as a sounding board for your research ideas, and help you make the right connections in the academic world.
- You’ll receive thorough preparation for PhD research, including the writing of a publishable scholarly article and a proposal for a PhD project.
- This programme strongly encourages you to go abroad for at least a semester. Students can use our connections to other universities (IRUN network) and research institutes to find a place that meet their academic interests.

Our research in this field

Any research done by students of the Master’s in Literary Studies will be supervised by a researcher at the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS) in Nijmegen. HLCS research focuses around the theme Europe and its Worlds and questions whether ‘Europe’ consists of different worlds, how it is addressed, how it differs from the rest of the world, and how it interacts with other worlds. Researchers from a variety of humanities disciplines collaborate in thirteen different thematic groups to explore the spaces, cultural practices, beliefs, texts and ideas related to Europe and its World.

- Thematic research groups
There is a literary scientist in many of these thematic groups. Although all the groups could be of interest to a literary researcher, our experience is that the following generate a lot of interest among the Literary Studies students:

- European Literary History
This group explores the various forms, functions, agents, media, infrastructures, traditions and theories of literature that, now or then, have been involved in relating ‘Europe’ to a certain space, tradition, or identity.

- Studying Criticism And Reception Across Borders
This group researches literary reception in its broadest sense, from analysing the practice of book reviewers and literary criticism, to studying all sorts of literary institutions like publishers, literary magazines.

- Memory, Materiality and Meaning in the Age of Transnationalism
This group studies the media and forms of embodiment through which we create memory through meaning-making and performative practices.

Master’s thesis topics in Literary Studies:
For their Master’s thesis research, students can work together with researchers from one of the HLCS research groups or choose a topic in a non-related area. A small sample of thesis topics that you could research in this programme:
- Classicism under Justinian. A study of Justinian's classicising policies in the fields of literature, legislation and military conquest.
- The early transmission of Sappho's songs reflected in the ancient sources.
- Performing the Past, Staging the Future: Memory, Modernity, and (Inter)nationalist Identities at the Dublin Gate Theatre.
- Austen: The Next Generation. Modern reworkings of Pride and Prejudice and the Quest for New Audiences.
- De naam van de schrijver. Auteur, lezer en pseudoniem.
- Lolita - ethiek, lezer & effect. Een cognitief narratologische analyse van Vladimir Nabokovs Lolita (1955).

Academia and beyond

This programme is initially intended to prepare its students for an academic career, in particular as PhD researchers. About half of our graduates find such a position in the Netherlands or abroad. The other half also do well and often find academic positions with research orientated duties. Examples include:
- Researcher at a cultural or scientific organisation or research centre
- Assistant of a senior researcher
- Teacher at an institution for higher education
- Policy-making official in the fields of culture and science
- Editor in the field of historical or cultural scholarship
- Staff member of a publishing company or and text agency, usually with regard to scientific, historical or cultural journals
- Curator of a cultural heritage institution or in the museological sector
- Consultant for a political party

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/hlcs/literary

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