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The Quality Diabetes Care programme will be of interest to health care professionals (e.g. doctors, nurses, pharmacists, dieticians, podiatrists) working in diabetes care settings. Read more
The Quality Diabetes Care programme will be of interest to health care professionals (e.g. doctors, nurses, pharmacists, dieticians, podiatrists) working in diabetes care settings. It will equip participants with skills for modern evidence based management of diabetes patients, and offer practical experience in organisational management, reflective practice and quality improvement.

Why study Quality Diabetes Care at Dundee?

Dundee has a particular international reputation for Diabetes research, education and informatics developments. With the growing prevalence of diabetes (currently around 5% in the UK with a doubling of rates predicted over the next 15 years), there is an increasing need for generalists to upskill in diabetes care.

This course will equip you with essential skills and modern evidence based practice for clinical management of diabetes patients. In addition, this programme offers knowledge and practical experience in organisational management, reflective practice and quality improvement.

Much of the work can be completed flexibly in your own free time, and has been designed around the needs of students who are also working full time.

Aims of the programme

The programme aims to:
- Provide a comprehensive programme to enable understanding of diabetes care (from patient to organisational management) for health care professionals
- Establish a stimulating environment for research, teaching and learning about diabetes
- Ensure a high quality evidence based approach in patient management, teaching, research and evaluation.
- Ensure a critical understanding of current issues in diabetes management.
- Enable students with theory and practical tools for healthcare quality improvement.
- Establish students with a basic grounding in educational/ behaviour change theory with application to patient and professional education
- Encourage students to apply critical analysis to complex problem solving.
- Allow development of generic attributes and skills including reflective practice, professionalism, literature appraisal and academic writing
- Encourage a culture of multidisciplinary working in the workplace.

Who should study this course?

This programme will be of interest to health care professionals (e.g. doctors, nurses, pharmacists, dieticians, podiatrists) working either as generalists or in specialist diabetes care settings.

How is this course taught?

The teaching approach is one of blended learning with fixed face to face teaching (lectures, group work, case discussions, workshops, simulation exercises, quizzes) blended with online activities, case based studies and workplace assessment. Much of the later work can be completed flexibly in the students own free time, and has been designed around the needs of students who are also working full time.

The face to face component requires attendance in Dundee, 3 times throughout the year (2 consecutive days teaching each time). The remainder of the course delivered is online.

Other material will be delivered via an online learning zone through online activities in the form of:
Recorded lectures
Quizzes
Interactive e-learning material
Forums
Discussion Board debates
Group
Wikis
Case Discussions

Much of the private study will be self-directed and relate to various work place projects (see assessments). Students are expected to undertake approx. 8 - 12 hours of work per week, either as self directed study or undertaking specific activities associated with the course.

What will you study?

Year 1: PG Certificate
The proposed Year 1 PG certificate programme will be taught over a period of 12 months. It will be taught and assessed as 3 x 20 credit compulsory modules (SCQF level 11 credits), namely:

Diabetes Clinical Care (20 credits)
Diabetes Organisational Care (20 credits)
Enhanced Patient Care and Professional Development (20 credits)


Year 2: PG Diploma
Students who decide to progress to the diploma stage will have the option of doing a further two modules totalling 60 credits. These modules will develop further advanced skills in clinical care and organisation, healthcare quality improvement and research methodology to allow students to develop their own diabetes service more effectively and embed skills required for their 3rd year dissertation (thesis).

Two of the modules also run as part of the MSc in Quality Improvement:
Quality Improvement in Action (30 credits)
Developing Research and Evaluation Skills (compulsory for students continuing to Year 3) (30 credits)

The third optional module for year 2 is
Advanced Diabetes Clinical Practice (30 credits)

Year 3: MSc Dissertation
Year 3 will involve students undertaking a more substantial project in the field of either Diabetes Care with either a Clinical/ Quality Improvement or Educational theme. Students will be allocated an appropriate university supervisor. This work will be presented as a 10-15,000 word thesis.

How is this course assessed?

Each modules will be assessed individually. Assessments include completion of clinical case scenarios, work place projects, and associated reflective essays in an attempt to embed learning and reflection into real life clinical practice. Quality improvement modules will require additional topic specific written work and on-line activities.

Careers

We would envisage this course/ qualification being of interest to health care professionals (e.g. doctors, nurses, pharmacists) working either as generalists or in diabetes care settings. The qualification may be used by primary care doctors for personal development/ CPD accumulation, and to enable them to set up and enhance their own diabetes specialist services.

For the secondary care training doctors, or allied health professionals, the qualifications could be used to help general career progression or be used to aid a move into specialist diabetes care services either within primary or secondary care.

This qualification is NOT equivalent to accreditation onto the diabetes medical specialist register e.g. allowing the individual to operate as a diabetes consultant.

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Criminal justice practitioners and professionals working the law enforcement arena today increasingly require the skills and understanding at an advanced level in order to embed an evidence-based approach into their professional practice and beyond that into their working environment. Read more
Criminal justice practitioners and professionals working the law enforcement arena today increasingly require the skills and understanding at an advanced level in order to embed an evidence-based approach into their professional practice and beyond that into their working environment. This Master’s course will provide graduates with an advanced understanding of crime, criminological theory and criminal justice and will upgrade the skills of senior professionals to enable them to drive an evidence-based approach to policing and to decision-making. It will embed the theories, principles and practices of an evidence-based approach and will equip students with analytical, problem solving and leadership skills necessary to address the challenges they encounter in the twenty-first century.

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The programme is structured around a solid core comprised of the three main analytical techniques – Mass spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Read more

Summary

The programme is structured around a solid core comprised of the three main analytical techniques – Mass spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Each of these techniques contains a number of key common themes (data collection, analysis and management). Supporting modules feature further analytical techniques and serve to embed themes of GLP, facility management and enterprise into the programme.

A group analytical project develops interpersonal skills and the ability to work in a team and will be the first opportunity for students to independently fully exercise some of the components of the course taught in the first semester. The integral research project provides an opportunity to explore any of the main themes directly or as part of a collaborative synthetic/analytical investigation.

Visit our website for further information...



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This programme, delivered by School of Arts and specialist visiting lecturers, develops your skills and provides experience relevant to a career in curating. Read more
This programme, delivered by School of Arts and specialist visiting lecturers, develops your skills and provides experience relevant to a career in curating.

Based at the School of Arts Studio 3 Gallery, you are involved in all aspects of the running of the Gallery. You work closely with partner organisations such as Canterbury museums and the Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA).

You have the opportunity to develop your own project, working within the Gallery’s exhibition programme.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/96/curating

About the Department of History & Philosophy of Art

The History & Philosophy of Art Department within the School of Arts, provides opportunities for graduate study with well-established researchers in the fields of art history, philosophy of art and aesthetics. Staff research covers contemporary art and aesthetics, modernism, theories of art, the historiography of art and the Cold War; biographical monographs, the photograph (in its historical, contemporary and critical contexts), and the historical interplay of image, theory and institutions from the Renaissance to the present (especially European and North American).

Developing areas of interest include the cultural and historical significance of the print, and the role of performance and new media in contemporary art practices, which draw upon our links with other subjects within the School of Arts and the Faculty of Humanities. In particular, postgraduates have the opportunity to participate in the activities of the multidisciplinary Aesthetics Research Centre and the Art History and Visual Cultures Research Centre. There is also a full programme of visiting speakers from across the constituent subject areas within the School of Arts, which includes Film and Drama.

Course structure

Compulsory modules provide an overview of the history of collecting and exhibitions through a series of case studies, taking advantage of our proximity to major London collections. We also cover theoretical issues relating to curating and museology.

Optional modules focus on providing practice-based opportunities for developing curatorial skills.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

HA826 - History and Theory of Curating (30 credits)
HA827 - Curatorial Internship (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is through a combination of coursework essays, critical logbooks and practice-based exercises. A long dissertation is required for the Exhibition Development and Design module.

[[Programme aims
This programme aims to:

- create and interpret knowledge at the forefront of the discipline through the development of critical, conceptual and practical abilities

- develop a self-directed programme of practice and related research

- contextualise and theorise practice in relation to, and through critical evaluation of, the work of contemporary practitioners and leading researchers within the discipline

- develop a comprehensive understanding of methodologies applicable to independent research

- develop autonomy in practice work within a context that fosters collaborative learning

- sustain an advanced practice that encompasses the disciplines of writing, discussion and producing practice-based outcomes

- achieve high-level skills and competencies as a preparation for professional practice and further development in the field of curating

- embed your research within the context of the University and utilise the resources offered in the research environment such as staff expertise, symposia and colloquia

- develop public outcomes outside the University in a range of formats

- attract students from a diversity of arts contexts and contexts that inform artistic practice, including fine art, history of art, sociology, journalism, English literature, film studies architecture and philosophy

- attract intellectually able and talented students who are enquiring, open to experimentation, discussion and collaboration as well able to work independently

- provide a forward-thinking, dynamic learning environment that responds to the current climate of debate and production in the arts.

- forge an international identity within the field of study through developing partnerships with international universities and non-HEIs

- support specialism and progression by allowing students to opt for specific routes of study that include curating, art history, cultural history, arts management, conservation or museum studies.

Research areas

The Department has a collective interest in developing interdisciplinary projects, including projects informed by art history and philosophy of art or aesthetics. Shared areas of research interest include: photography, art theory from the Renaissance to recent times and contemporary art.

Careers

Arts postgraduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to marketing and gallery assistants. Our graduates have found work with Tate Britain, the V&A, Museum of Childhood and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The University of Birmingham, as a partner in The Midlands Energy Graduate School (MEGS), has launched a new taught Masters in Efficient Fossil Energy Technologies. Read more
The University of Birmingham, as a partner in The Midlands Energy Graduate School (MEGS), has launched a new taught Masters in Efficient Fossil Energy Technologies.

Consisting of core and optional modules, delivered by experts from the universities of Nottingham, Birmingham and Loughborough, this MSc will encourage and embed excellence in fossil energy technologies, carbon capture and efficient combustion. It will prepare future leaders and industrial engineers with knowledge and skills to tackle the major national and international challenges of implementing new fossil-based power plant and processes more efficiently, with near zero emissions and CO2 capture.

This course provides expert teaching from three leading universities in the UK a unique partnership to allow students to benefit from a wide range of expertise. Modules studied represent the academic specialism offered by each university and the research project, taken at the university where you register, will focus on specific aspects of fossil energy technologies: Birmingham specialises in managing chemical reactions, plant design and carbon capture technologies; Loughborough in materials technologies for power generation and high-temperature applications; and Nottingham will focus on combustion technologies, power generation, environmental control and carbon capture. It is therefore important to select your choice of university carefully. Full details of these options and specialisms are in the Modules section of the Course Details tab and all enquiries are welcome.

Chemical Engineering is dynamic and evolving. It provides many solutions to problems facing industries in the pharmaceutical, biotechnological, oil, energy and food and drink sectors. It is vital to many issues affecting our quality of life; such as better and more economical processes to reduce the environmental burden, and more delicious and longer lasting food due to the right combination of chemistry, ingredients and processing.

Birmingham is a friendly, self-confident, School which has one of the largest concentrations of chemical engineering expertise in the UK. The School is consistently in the top five chemical engineering schools for research in the country.

About the School of Chemical Engineering

Birmingham has one of the largest concentrations of Chemical Engineering expertise in the UK, with an excellent reputation in learning, teaching and research.
Investment totalling over £3.5 million in our buildings has resulted in some of the best teaching, computing and laboratory facilities anywhere in the UK.
We have achieved an excellent performance in the Research Excellence Framework (REF) – the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. 87% of the research in the School was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent. It was ranked joint fourth overall in the UK for its research prowess and first nationally for research impact.
The enthusiasm that the academic staff have for their research comes through in their teaching and ensures that they and you are at the cutting edge of chemical engineering.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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As instances of global and local food injustice are reported with more frequency, the dysfunction of our food system and complexity of food culture is being more widely recognised. Read more
As instances of global and local food injustice are reported with more frequency, the dysfunction of our food system and complexity of food culture is being more widely recognised. Increasingly, it is understood that reductionist approaches to solving food related issues are ineffective.

A more comprehensive understanding and holistic approach is greatly needed. This MSc provides an opportunity to study food and food systems in a more complete sense. This innovative new course - the first of its kind in Scotland - acknowledges the truly complex nature of food and includes studies in nutrition, production and consumer culture, but also delves deeper to consider food culture within the contexts of anthropology, environment, sustainability, politics and communications. Through experience of diverse food related businesses - from soup kitchens to Michelin Star restaurants, community allotments to large-scale agri-business - students will gain all important exposure to the diverse dynamics affecting how we consume, produce, represent and understand food. Scotland will often be the showcase for this, however the concepts are transferable to other countries, for one thing that people require irrespective of nationhood is the ability to feed themselves. Whether you are looking to enhance your career in the food industry or are simply interested in cultivating a fuller understanding of food, please contact us. We are more than happy to discuss the course in more depth and help you discover if this is what you’ are looking for.

Teaching, learning and assessment

Modules will involve elements of inquiry (problem) based learning, report writing, visual presentations, essays and viva voce interviews. Learning therefore will be diverse and teaching will happen anywhere that there is a relationship to food and drink or ancillary industries. This may be in the University, on the streets of Edinburgh, the hills of the Scottish Borders or in a Michelin star restaurant. The course will therefore embed research-led learning, by requiring students to examine information from a diverse range of sources including academic books/journals, online blogs/wiki’s relating to food and drink agendas, and primary and secondary data. The importance of working closely with industry colleagues cannot be underestimated.

Opportunities to interact with for example, farmers, North Sea fishermen, and cooks and producers at all levels will enhance the learning experience. Class sizes are normally around 15-20 students. This ensures that students receive fantastic support from tutors and benefit from sharing experiences with classmates.

Teaching hours and attendance

Each module consists of 60 hours of teaching time over a 10-week period. There are two core modules planned for each semester, plus a research module that spans the first two semesters. You will be required to carry out independent work and also complete a dissertation.

Links with industry/professional bodies

This course has been developed in collaboration with a broad range of stakeholders involved in the food and drink industries.

Modules

30 credits: Food & Drink: The Relationship to People and Food/ Science of Food/ The System: From Field to Market/ Food Communications

15 credits: Research Methods

If studying for an MSc, you will also complete a dissertation (60 credits).

Careers

Graduates will place themselves in the enviable position of having had exposure to a range of industry experiences and contemporary food issues that will enable them to make interventions and transformations in a wide variety of areas. These may range from education or community work, to advocacy and policy work within the non-profit sector.

Entry requirements

There are several routes to entry.
- Applicants may have a first degree in an associated subject, for example, a BA (Hons) in Hospitality, Culinary
Arts, or Nutrition.
- An honours degree (or equivalent) in a different discipline but where the applicant has a demonstrable passion for food and drink.
- An applicant may potentially be a mature student who has spent a considerable period of time in industry and wishes to formalise their education.

All shortlisted candidates will be interviewed as part of the application process

International: Where your honours degree has not been studied in English, you will be required to provide evidence of English language competence at no less than IELTS 6.5 with no individual component score below 5.5

Quick Facts

-This is the first MSc in Gastronomy in the UK.
-The course has 15 funded places available for potential students resident in Scotland and the EU.

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A unique and innovative MSc with a three-month professional placement. The MSc Modern Building Design provides students with the knowledge of modern building design practice, methodologies and processes that are increasingly sought after by major engineering and design consultancies. Read more
A unique and innovative MSc with a three-month professional placement.

The MSc Modern Building Design provides students with the knowledge of modern building design practice, methodologies and processes that are increasingly sought after by major engineering and design consultancies. It places emphasis on the key engineering and modelling challenges faced during the building design process and prepares students for industry, providing them with the practical and interpersonal skills to stand out to potential employers in a highly competitive market.

This unique and innovative 15-month full-time programme has three core components:
- a taught element, consisting of eight units
- a professional practice placement, where students apply low-carbon building strategies and methodologies from their taught component to establish the industrial impact of their dissertation ideas
- a research dissertation based on a real consultancy project and informed by their industrial placement experience.

We are dedicated to helping you find a placement in industry. We will support and guide you in your applications but cannot guarantee you a position. If you are unable to secure a placement, you will transfer on to our 12-month alternative programme and graduate with an MSc in Low-Carbon Building Design.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/engineering/graduate-school/taught-programmes/modern-building-design/index.html

Learning outcomes

You will develop the hard and soft skills required by professionals working in key carbon-dominated built environment sectors, with the ability to demonstrate an understanding of carbon management of the built environment in practice. The taught element of the programme focuses on student professional development through the design process that is mapped to the 2013 RIBA (Royal Institute of British Architects) plan of work for multidisciplinary working. In particular, you will gain:

- trans-sector skills required by the construction industry, with a focus on employability
- a detailed knowledge of the design tools and strategies that comprise modern design processes
- the capability to demonstrate initiative and originality within the scope of low-carbon modern design strategies, planning and management
- the skills to formulate research projects in real carbon management and low-carbon buildings, independently and in professional multidisciplinary design teams.

Structure

A full list of units and descriptions can be found on the programme catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/ar/ar-proglist-pg.html).

Semesters 1 & 2 (October – June)
The first two semesters consist of eight taught units, co-designed and co-taught with employers. They provide a foundation in the most significant issues related to working in key carbon-dominated built environment sectors and professional development. Each unit comprises lectures, tutorials, practical classes and workshops alongside time for personal study. Assessment is by a combination of coursework and oral examination.

Semester 3 (July – September)
The third semester consists of a three-month professional practice placement. Workshops during the first two semesters will help you improve your employability and prepare you to undertake a placement at one of our partner companies. Assessment is by report and presentation to your placement employer.

Or, if you pass all taught units with an overall average of at least 50% but are unable to go on placement for any reason, you will transfer on to our 12-month programme. You will spend the third semester undertaking your research dissertation and, on successful completion, will graduate with the award of MSc in Low Carbon Building Design.

Semester 4 (October – December)
The final semester consists of a research dissertation. This provides a start-to-finish research experience to embed the research and professional knowledge gained throughout the programme. It builts on the skills acquired in the taught component and is informed by the needs of your industrial placement provider.

Placement

A three-month professional placement is an opportunity for you to learn from our industrial partners. We guarantee to find enough suitable vacancies for all our students but cannot promise that you will be placed as this also depends on your performance at interview. With this in mind, our dedicated Placements Team runs workshops on CV-writing and interview techniques to support you during the application and interview process.

We have links with a large number and variety of organisations offering placements both in the UK and further afield.

- Labox:

“We are a design led multidisciplinary architectural practice specialising in individual site and client specific projects with a strong emphasis on energy efficiency as a means of improving quality of life. We strongly believe that everyone involved in the project is vital, and for a successful end result the technical information that we provide has to be accurate and very well considered. This means, that must be produced by well informed, interested and capable people who understand what they are trying to achieve and why. I would hope that someone who has completed this MSc would have the global vision that we are looking for.”

Career Opportunities

Engineering consultancies and multidisciplinary design consultancies are seeking graduates with knowledge of modern building design. This programme has been developed in conjunction with employers to ensure it provides the range of skills and experience they are looking for when they recruit and, as a result, graduates of this programme should be highly employable.

The Department of Architecture & Civil Engineering has an excellent reputation for employability, and has a strong link with local, national and international employers.

The Department also has links with the Building Research Establishment (BRE) through the BRE Centre of Innovative Construction Materials (http://www.bath.ac.uk/ace/research/cicm/index.html). PhD and other research students conduct research into innovative construction materials, and it is anticipated that the top graduates of MSc Modern Building Design will have the opportunity to further their studies through the PhD programme at Bath should they want to.

Industrial Partners

The programme is co-developed and co-delivered with a number of employers and partners in Architecture & Civil Engineering, including:

ADP
AECOM
AFL Architects
ARUP
Atkins
Balfour Beatty
BDP
Buro Happold
Digital Node
Expedition
Foster & Partners
Keep Architecture
Mott MacDonald
OPS Structures
Pozzoni Architecture
Skanska
WSP
Wiltshire Council

Apply online here - https://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/applications.pl#ace

If you're interested in this course, why not sign up for our Modern Building Design MOOC. Our free online course runs for three weeks from 27 February: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/modern-building-design

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The MSc in Infectious Diseases has been designed for students who wish to gain an advanced education and training in the biological sciences, within the context of a range of human diseases that affect a significant proportion of the global population. Read more
The MSc in Infectious Diseases has been designed for students who wish to gain an advanced education and training in the biological sciences, within the context of a range of human diseases that affect a significant proportion of the global population.

The programme provides training in the modern practical, academic and research skills that are used in academia and industry. Through a combination of lectures, small-group seminars and practical classes, you apply this training towards the development of new strategies to combat the spread of infectious diseases.

You learn skills in experimental design using appropriate case studies that embed you within the relevant research literature. You also gain experience of analysis and statistical interpretation of complex experimental data.

The programme culminates with a research project under the supervision of faculty that currently perform research on disease-causing microorganisms.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/361/infectious-diseases

About the School of Biosciences

The University of Kent’s School of Biosciences ranks among the most active in biological sciences in the UK. We have recently extended our facilities and completed a major refurbishment of our research laboratories that now house over 100 academic, research, technical and support staff devoted to research, of whom more than 70 are postgraduate students.

Research in the School of Biosciences revolves around understanding systems and processes in the living cell. It has a strong molecular focus with leading-edge activities that are synergistic with one another and complementary to the teaching provision. Our expertise in disciplines such as biochemistry, microbiology and biomedical science allows us to exploit technology and develop groundbreaking ideas in the fields of genetics, molecular biology, protein science and biophysics. Fields of enquiry encompass a range of molecular processes from cell division, transcription and translation through to molecular motors, molecular diagnostics and the production of biotherapeutics and bioenergy.

In addition to research degrees, our key research strengths underpin a range of unique and career-focused taught Master’s programmes that address key issues and challenges within the biosciences and pharmaceutical industries and prepare graduates for future employment.

Course structure

The MSc in Infectious Diseases involves studying for 120 credits of taught modules, as indicated below. The taught component takes place during the autumn and spring terms, while a 60-credit research project take place over the summer months.

The assessment of the course will involve a mixture of practical classes, innovative continuous assessment to gain maximise transferable and professional skills, and examinations.

In addition to traditional scientific laboratory reports, experience is gained in a range of scientific writing styles relevant to future employment, such as literature reviews, patent applications, regulatory documents, and patient information suitable for a non-scientific readership.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year. Please note the modules listed below for this programme are compulsory core modules:

BI845 Research project (60 credits)
BI853 - Bacterial Pathogens (15 credits)
BI854 - Fungi as Human Pathogens (15 credits)
BI855 - Advances in Parasitology (15 credits)
BI856 - Viral Pathogens (15 credits)
BI830 - Science at Work (30 credits)
BI836 - Practical and Applied Research Skills for Advanced Biologists (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by examination, coursework and the research project.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide an excellent quality of postgraduate level education in the field of infectious diseases, their biology and treatments

- provide a research-led, inspiring learning environment

- provide a regional postgraduate progression route for the advanced study of diseases that affect a high proportion of the global population

- promote engagement with biological research into infectious diseases and inspire students to pursue scientific careers inside or outside of the laboratory

- develop subject-specific and transferable skills to maximise employment prospects

- promote an understanding of the impact of scientific research on society and the role for scientists in a range of professions.

Research areas

Research in the School of Biosciences is focused primarily on essential biological processes at the molecular and cellular level, encompassing the disciplines of biochemistry, genetics, biotechnology and biomedical research.

The School’s research has three main themes:

- Protein Science – encompasses researchers involved in industrial biotechnology and synthetic biology, and protein form and function

- Molecular Microbiology – encompasses researchers interested in yeast molecular biology (incorporating the Kent Fungal Group) and microbial pathogenesis

- Biomolecular Medicine – encompasses researchers involved in cell biology, cancer targets and therapies and cytogenomics and bioinformatics.

Each area is led by a senior professor and underpinned by excellent research facilities. The School-led development of the Industrial Biotechnology Centre (IBC), with staff from the other four other schools in the Faculty of Sciences, facilitates and encourages interdisciplinary projects. The School has a strong commitment to translational research, impact and industrial application with a substantial portfolio of enterprise activity and expertise.

Careers

The MSc in Infectious Diseases provides advanced research skills training within the context of diseases that affect significant proportions of the UK and global populations. With the UK being a world leader in infectious diseases research and pharmaceutical development, and Kent having a strong research focus in this area, there are significant opportunities for career progression for graduates of this programme in academia (PhD) and industry.

There are also opportunities for careers outside the laboratory in advocacy, media, public health and education.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply-online/361

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- https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/. Postgraduate studies in Fine Art at Kent offer you an energetic, challenging and open framework in which to explore your artistic practice. Read more

This course will be held at the Medway Campus

- https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/

Postgraduate studies in Fine Art at Kent offer you an energetic, challenging and open framework in which to explore your artistic practice.

The programme welcomes independent thinkers who seek to develop their practice in a discursive environment that brings together a diverse set of attitudes to making and producing art work in contemporary culture. As a student, you are encouraged to realise your creative and intellectual potential within your discipline informed by specialists within your field.

The MA Fine Art programme prepares you for a professional career in the arts and we offer new workshops and studio spaces with excellent technical support to realise your practice-based projects. New opportunities to work together on ambitious group projects in public are encouraged and supported by a staff team made up of practicing artists.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/25/fine-art

Course structure

This programme develops your practice towards establishing a creative, critical and independent practice. You have your own studio space in which to explore and test your studio work, with full access to workshops and high-quality resources at our new multimillion-pound development on the Chatham Historic Dockyard, just 55 minutes from London.

The programme welcomes students who wish to pursue any form of artistic practice in an interdisciplinary studio-based research environment. A core series of critical studies lectures, seminars, tutorials and collaborative opportunities allow you to develop your awareness of key issues in contemporary culture. We also offer opportunities for working with museums and galleries outside of the University, developing your specialism towards the achievement of professional excellence within your field.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

FA800 - Fine Art (60 credits)
FA801 - Development of Practice (30 credits)
FA803 - Collaborative Project (30 credits)
MU898 - Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

The programme is assessed by self-directed written and practice-based coursework for each of the modules.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- create and interpret knowledge at the forefront of the discipline through the development of critical, conceptual and practical abilities

- develop a self-directed programme of practice and related research

- contextualise and theorise practice in relation to, and through critical evaluation of, the work of contemporary practitioners and leading researchers within the discipline

- develop a comprehensive understanding of methodologies applicable to independent research

- develop autonomy in practice work within a context that fosters collaborative learning

- sustain an advanced practice that encompasses the disciplines of writing, discussion and producing practice-based outcomes

- achieve high-level skills and competencies as a preparation for professional practice and further development in the field of the arts

- embed your research within the context of the University and utilise the resources offered in the research environment such as staff expertise, symposia and colloquia

- develop public outcomes outside the University in a range of formats

- attract students from a diversity of arts contexts and contexts that inform artistic practice, including fine art, history of art, sociology, journalism, English literature, film studies architecture and philosophy

- attract intellectually able and talented students who are enquiring, open to experimentation, discussion and collaboration as well as able to work independently

- provide a forward-thinking, dynamic learning environment that responds to the current climate of debate and production in the arts

- forge an international identity within the field of study through developing partnerships with international universities and non-HEIs

- support specialism and progression by allowing you to opt for specific routes of study that include Fine Art, Curation and Critical Arts Writing as designators of the final degree award and to be taught together in an interdisciplinary environment.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in fine art is a valuable and flexible qualification which allow students to develop independent practice-based skills, hone analytical and critical thinking and to put these into practice through public projects.

Graduates leave the programme with a grounding and extended knowledge of the arts sector and are well equipped to enter a range of roles as curators, critics, arts administrators, teachers, librarians and other work in the creative industries. Graduates interested in a research career are supported by the University’s Graduate School Researcher Development Programme. The University’s Employability Weeks can also provide valuable support in terms of planning future careers.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The MRes Landscape and Environmental Archaeology is a programme that is divided into a 60 credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits amounting to up to 30,000 words in total. Read more
The MRes Landscape and Environmental Archaeology is a programme that is divided into a 60 credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits amounting to up to 30,000 words in total. The programme is targeted on skills areas that are linked to the needs of the regional labour market and relate to one of the six ministerial priority areas identified by Welsh Government, that of 'Environmental Management and Energy'.

Course Overview

The MRes programme is taught within the School of Archaeology, History and Anthropology, and seeks to embed the student experience into a range of landscapes, both wild and managed, and environments within Wales where unique and particular landscapes are encountered. Many, but by no means all, employment opportunities are focused on the conservation, preservation, exploitation or manipulation of the natural resources.

Industries based on tourism, cultural heritage and sustainability, to name a few, are prime destinations within Wales (and beyond) for graduates from this programme of study. Integral to this is an understanding of what archaeological evidence survives, and what methods and techniques can be used to explore and explain both past and present human relationships to these landscapes and environments.

Along with the emphasis on ‘employability’, students engage in a rigorous academic training grounded in the discipline that is Archaeology which comes to a head in the Dissertation of between 25,000 and 30,000 words. Students are schooled in the concepts and practices required to undertake good academic research. Field and laboratory experiences underpinned with both legal and theoretical frameworks are core attributes of this scheme.

Core staff teaching the scheme are actively engaged with a wide range of professional bodies, undertaking contract research, acting as advisors, or are recognised specialists in their field. Such staff operate at the crossing point of archaeology as an academic discipline and industry and community. The programme benefits considerably from the experience and expertise of UWLAS (University of Wales, Lampeter Archaeological Services) which provides a professional consultancy service across a range of areas including dendrochronology, pollen analysis, archaeozoology, quaternary stratigraphy, soils and sediments analysis.

Modules

Students will choose three modules. Below is an illustrative list of modules available:
-British Landscape and Environmental Field Class (40 credits)
-Research Methodologies (compulsory)
-Heritage Project Management in the Modern World
-Advanced Palaeoenvironmental Methods
-Work Placement
-Dissertation

Key Features

Draws upon a range of expertise in the School. Our lecturers are active within the consultancy world of environmental archaeology which gives the programme a strongly vocational tilt. Extremely good record of finding students who have completed the course employment opportunities many within the sector.

Assessment

A range of assessment methods are used from essays and short written evaluation, to the creation of publicity flyers, feasibility reports, oral presentations and reflective pieces.

Career Opportunities

The programme has a good record of matching students to the needs and requirement of the labour market.

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This programme is ideal if you wish to use your analytic skills to derive and obtain useful insights from large amounts of data. Read more
This programme is ideal if you wish to use your analytic skills to derive and obtain useful insights from large amounts of data. By equipping you with the rigorous modelling and consulting skills needed to understand, manage and communicate useful insights from ‘big data’, it prepares you to inform business decisions or government policies.

Taught modules are delivered by our group of internationally recognised management scientists who are actively working with business, government and non-profit organisations to tackle routine, strategic or policy problems.

Our industry advisory board ensures that the focus of our taught modules is of both academic and practical relevance. IBM, our partner, has jointly developed with us two modules (Customer Analytics and Leading Analytics Initiatives), and sponsors a student prize.

During the summer, you will undertake a supervised consulting or research project. This will give you the opportunity to apply powerful tools such as data mining, forecasting, optimisation, simulation and decision analysis to a particular area of business or policy, equipping you with skills highly prized by employers.

Core study areas include consulting for analytics, discovery analytics, decision analytics, managing big data, customer analytics, leading analytics initiatives, operations analytics, policy and strategy analytics, and a consulting or research project.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/business-economics/business-analytics-consulting/

Programme modules

Semester 1:
- Consulting for Analytics
You will learn the craft and skills required by analytic consultants, and which employers look for but often find lacking. It will cover process aspects of analytics projects, as well as skills in client interaction, problem structuring and data elicitation (with individuals and/or groups, and with hard/soft data), presenting data-driven analyses, report writing, and developing simple bespoke decision support systems.

- Discovery Analytics
You will be introduced to common statistical methods to explore and visualise cross sectional and temporal data. You will also learn about the design and conduct of data collection efforts, together with methods for dealing with data outliers and missing data. Industry-leading tools that are in high demand from employers (e.g. SAS and SPSS) will be used.

- Decision Analytics
Your will be introduced to common operational research techniques to help determine the best course of action for a given decision or problem. Topics covered include optimisation, simulation and decision and risk analysis.

- Managing Big Data
Your will learn about the challenges and opportunities derived from the increased volume, variety, velocity and value of data that is available today. A range of big data topics will be covered including data type, data integration, data technologies, and data security.

Semester 2:
- Customer Analytics
You will focus on analytics techniques that can help organisations gain a deeper insight into customers’ behaviour and attitudes towards their products and services. It will cover approaches designed to provide a profile of customer segments, such as those grounded in data mining and multivariate statistical analysis. Industry-leading tools that are in high demand from employers (e.g. SAS and SPSS) will be used. There is an IBM sponsored student prize on this module.

- Leading Analytics Initiatives
You will learn about the issues associated with implementing an analytics capability in organisations. It will cover topics on how to develop an analytics strategy, how to embed analytics in organisational processes to ensure they deliver value, and how to deploy analytics throughout the organisation to improve decision making. There is an IBM sponsored student prize on this module.

- Operations Analytics
You will focus on analytics techniques that can help organisations to develop a better understanding of operational processes, and identify efficiency and cost reduction opportunities. Topics covered include advanced optimisation and simulation techniques.

- Policy and Strategy Analytics
You will focus on analytics techniques designed to tackle complex policy and strategic issues. It will cover approaches designed to explain the behaviour of complex social systems or assess the consequences of complex decisions, in order to provide the levers for policy and strategy making in a variety of sectors.

Summer:
- Consulting or Research Project

Assessment

Taught modules are assessed by a mixture of coursework and examinations.
The summer project is assessed via a written dissertation.

Careers and further study

Business analytics is a new and rapidly developing field, and individuals with analytics skills are in short supply.
Graduates from this programme can expect to work as management consultants, business analysts, policy analysts, marketing researchers, operations researchers, and data scientists.
We have developed two modules - Customer Analytics and Leading Analytics Initiatives - in close collaboration with our partner IBM, who also sponsor a student prize.

Why choose business and economics at Loughborough?

Loughborough’s School of Business and Economics is a thriving forward-looking centre of education that aims to provide an exceptional learning experience.

Consistently ranked as a Top-10 UK business school by national league tables, our graduates are highly employable and enjoy starting salaries well above the national average.

The rich variety of postgraduate programmes we offer ranges from taught masters, MBA and doctoral programmes, to short courses and executive education, with subjects spanning Management, Marketing, Finance and Economics, Work Psychology, Business Analytics, International Crisis Management and Information Management. New for 2016, we are also launching two exciting new programmes in Human Resource Management. All of this contributes to a lively and supportive learning environment within the School.

- Internationally Accredited
The School of Business and Economics is one of less than 1% of business schools in the world to have achieved accreditation from all three major international accrediting bodies: The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International), EQUIS accreditation from the European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) and the Association of MBAs (AMBA).

- Career Prospects
Our graduates are in great demand. Over 94% of our postgraduate students were in work and/or further study six months after graduating.* As such, you will be equipped with skills and knowledge that will serve you well in your career or enable you to pursue further study and research.

*Source: DLHE

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/business-economics/business-analytics-consulting/

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This course, offered by a leading research institute in grass-microbe-animal interactions in relation to sustainable efficient farming, is aimed at professionals working within the agri-food sector. Read more

Course Starts September, January or May

Course Description

This course, offered by a leading research institute in grass-microbe-animal interactions in relation to sustainable efficient farming, is aimed at professionals working within the agri-food sector. It provides students with an in-depth understanding of the components of ruminant production and mixed farming systems, focussing on the latest research into how these systems can be made more sustainable and efficient.

The aim of this Professional Doctorate programme is to produce a qualification which, whilst being equivalent in status and challenge to a PhD, is more appropriate for those pursuing professional rather than academic careers. Our DAg programme comprises taught modules and two work-based research projects, carried out through two-day workshops, distance learning and a mixture of live and virtual supervisory meetings. While the primary academic focus is on the completion of an advanced piece of research, the collaborative route provided by a work-based research project provides an ideal opportunity to embed new knowledge in the work place and ensure that research is relevant to industry. As such, it is crucial that a student’s employer is supportive of both their research aims and the time commitment that the proposed research will involve. Self-employed students should aim to undertake research which will be closely aligned to their business.

Modules

The ATP DAg is delivered in two parts:

Part I is undertaken for a minimum of two years and comprises two taught modules from the ATP menu*, a taught ‘Research Methodologies’ module; and a portfolio of work or a research thesis (approximately 20,000 words in length). Each taught module is worth 20 credits and takes 12-14 weeks to complete. The short Part 1 thesis should involve analysing existing data from the candidate’s workplace. For example: Reviewing historical mineral deficiency data by species and region; analysing and interpreting the findings. Students may exit here with an MRes.

Part II is undertaken for a minimum of three years and comprises a longer portfolio of work or a research thesis (up to 60,000 words). It will involve experimentation and must embody the methodology and results of original research. It should, ideally, be built upon the Part 1 thesis. Thus, from the example above, could be something like: Changing practices and introducing innovation to combat mineral deficiencies.

* Optional taught modules - some of which are delivered by Bangor University (BU) - may be chosen from:

• Genetics and Genomics
• Grassland Systems
• Home-Grown Feeds
• Organic and Low Input Ruminant Production
• Ruminant Gut Microbiology
• Ruminant Health & Welfare
• Ruminant Nutrition
• Global Ruminant Production
• Silage Science
• Farm Business Management
• Plant Breeding
• Agro Ecosystems Services (BU)
• Carbon Footprinting & Life Cycle Assessment (BU)
• Resource Efficient Farming (BU)
• Soil Management (BU)
• Upland Farming (BU)

Each module is worth 20 credits and takes 12-14 weeks to complete.

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This scheme aims to facilitate knowledge exchange between academia and industry. Students must complete three taught modules and a 120 credit work-based dissertation / research thesis (approximately 20,000 words in length). Read more

Students can choose to start in September, May or January

About the course

This scheme aims to facilitate knowledge exchange between academia and industry. Students must complete three taught modules and a 120 credit work-based dissertation / research thesis (approximately 20,000 words in length). While the primary academic focus is on the completion of an advanced piece of research, the collaborative route provided by a work-based research project provides an ideal opportunity to embed new knowledge in the work place and ensure that research is relevant to industry. As such, it is crucial that a student’s employer is supportive of both their research aims and the time commitment that the proposed research will involve. Self-employed students should aim to undertake research which will be closely aligned to their business.

Students may build on the MRes to work towards a Professional Doctorate.

Course structure and content

An MRes can be completed in 2-5 years but we would expect most students to spend 1 year on their taught modules and 2 years on their work based dissertation. 12 or 14 weeks for one module by distance learning. Three intakes per year (January, May, September).

Students will be eligible for a UK Student loan if their course is completed within 3 years.

Core modules:

MRes Research Project
Research Methods

Optional modules:

Farm Business Management
Genetics and Genomics in Agriculture
Global Ruminant Production
Organic and Low Input Ruminant Production
Plant Breeding
Ruminant Gut Microbiology
Ruminant Health and Welfare
Ruminant Nutrition
Silage Science
Smallholder Agriculture
Sustainable Grassland Systems
Sustainable Home Grown Feed

Contact time

The MRes comprises three taught modules (including Research Methodologies and Advances in Bioscience) followed by a 120 credit work-based dissertation (20,000 words).

We have designed our training to be as accessible as possible, particularly for those in full time employment. Each taught module comprises a 12 or 14 week distance learning module worth 20 credits which can be taken for your own continuing professional development or interest; or built towards a postgraduate qualification. The research elements of our qualifications are carried out in your work place with regular academic supervision. The training is web-based which means that as long as you have access to a reasonable broadband connection (i.e. are able to stream videos such as on YouTube), you can study where and when best suits you. Learning material includes podcast lectures, e-group projects, guided reading, interactive workbooks and discussion forums, as well as assignments and e-tutorials. By signing a re-registration form each year you will have access to e-journals and library resources for the duration of your registration.

Assessment

There are no exams within this programme. Taught modules are assessed via course work and forum discussion. Research is monitored and assessed.

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This two-year Research Master's programma covers Classical Antiquity, the Middle Ages and Early Modernity. You will explore the similarities and differences between these periods. Read more
This two-year Research Master's programma covers Classical Antiquity, the Middle Ages and Early Modernity. You will explore the similarities and differences between these periods. In addition, you will gain fundamental insights into the cultural changes that preceded the modern period.

The programme offers three different specializations: in History (croho code 60139), in Literary Studies (croho code 60814), and in Classics and Ancient Civilizations (croho code 60039). Classical, Medieval and Renaissance Studies offers a multidisciplinary environment. Depending on your background and research interests, you will decide on your main subject. You can focus on history and choose between Ancient, Medieval or Early Modern History. You can also focus on literature. Then your options are Latin, Greek, English or Dutch Literature.

You can design your own programme to fit your interests. You will take specialist tutorials and courses on theory and method, and finish the programme by writing a thesis.

Degree: MA in Classics & Ancient Civilizations (research), MA in History (research), MA in Literary Studies (research)

Why in Groningen?

- Intensive supervision by high-quality researchers in small groups
- Unique approach that allows you to embed your chosen discipline in wider diachronic or synchronic fields
- Research Assistantship Programmes and Talent Grants for excellent students

The programme, which is offered by the Graduate School for the Humanities, is linked to excellent, multidisciplinary research which is carried out at the Groningen Research Institute for the Study of Culture (ICOG) and the national research schools OIKOS (Netherlands Research School for Classical Studies) and Medieval Studies.

Research MA students are required to participate in seminars, courses and summer schools organized by the Dutch national research schools. These 'schools' are organized for the training of PhD students, but some activities are open to or specially set up for you. These events give you, as a Research MA student, the opportunity to deepen your disciplinary profile and to become acquainted with top researchers in your field.

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Equip yourself with the knowledge and skills to be part of the new bio-economy. The focus of this MSc is on substituting plant material for mineral oil and you can choose from a range of modules which incorporate the latest thinking around this. Read more

Students can choose to start in September, May or January

About the course

Equip yourself with the knowledge and skills to be part of the new bio-economy.

The focus of this MSc is on substituting plant material for mineral oil and you can choose from a range of modules which incorporate the latest thinking around this.

This distance learning MSc is delivered by ‌IBERS, with some optional modules being drawn from Bangor University. Both universities have strong, industry focused biotech research portfolios.

Our uniquely structured-yet-flexible format allows you to:

· Study where (provided you have internet access) and when is convenient for you

· Stay focussed and motivated as you work through each module with a cohort of fellow students

· ‘Pick-n-Mix’ the modules which are most relevant to you

· Start in January, May or September

· Take as many or as few modules as you wish over your 5-year registration period

· Supplement your choices with optional modules from Bangor University

· Update your knowledge and develop your critical skills

· Embed your research project into your work

In most cases the research elements of our qualifications are carried out in your work place with regular academic supervision. However, there are also opportunities for research projects to be based at IBERS; ask us if that option would be of interest to you.

Who should take this course?

If you are working in the biotech industry or are developing policy for this sector; or if these are areas you would like to move into, this course is an ideal way to update your knowledge and gain postgraduate qualifications by studying part-time while you are working.

If you are a new graduate interested in pursuing a career in the biotech industry, you can study full or part-time to gain the qualifications and knowledge that you need to start your new career.

How is IBERS Distance Learning Delivered?

This MSc has been designed to be as accessible and flexible as possible, particularly for those in full time employment or living outside the UK. Each 20 credit, 14 week module includes recorded lectures from academics and industry experts, along with guided readings, discussion forums and two assignments. We work very closely with Bangor University, which means that you can also take relevant Bangor modules as part of your studies.

How much work will I need to do?

A typical master’s student is expected to study for 200 hours when taking a 20 credit module. Our students report spending 10 to 15 hours a week per module studying; obviously the more time and effort you can put in, the more you'll benefit from studying the module and the better your grades are likely to be.

How long will it take?

Part-time: From the initial start date you have a maximum of five years to fit in as many or as few modules as you wish. A part-time MSc cannot be completed in less than two years.

Full-time: You should choose your start time to ensure that you will cover the modules that interest you. You will be expected to take two or three modules at a time and complete within two years.

Students will be eligible for a UK Student Loan if the course is completed in 3 years.

Course Content

Students must complete six taught modules - including at least 3 subject specific modules and Research Methods PLUS a 60 credit dissertation (180 credits).

Subject Specific Modules:

Biorenewable Feedstocks
Biorefining Technologies
Biobased product development
Waste Stream Valorisation
Drivers of the Bioeconomy

Core Modules:
Research Methodologies
Work-Based Dissertation

Complementary Modules:

Genetics and Genomics
Carbon Footprinting and LCA
Anaerobic Digestion
Climate Change

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