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MA Development Journalism is an interdisciplinary course offered jointly by LSBU’s School of Arts and Creative Industries and School of Law and Social Sciences. Read more
MA Development Journalism is an interdisciplinary course offered jointly by LSBU’s School of Arts and Creative Industries and School of Law and Social Sciences. It brings together our established expertise in Development Studies with our industry-informed provision in journalism education.

Development issues such as migration, poverty, the environment, aid and governance are increasingly relevant in journalism, and this course develops a theoretical understanding of these issues alongside practical journalism skills.

The course also provides you with a solid grounding in key theories, concepts and debates around development and contemporary development journalism. It offers hands-on practical professional training in broadcast and podcast radio journalism, equipping you with skills in audio production, interview techniques, editing, mixing and ‘live’ studio operation.

The course also provides training in research methods, enabling you to become an effective researcher in the field of development journalism.

You'll have access to our new media facilities in Elephant Studios at LSBU.

This course is subject to validation and content may change.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/development-journalism-ma

Modules

- Contemporary issues in development
- Researching the media industries
- Development journalism
- Radio production for development journalism
- Dissertation

Plus one optional module from:
- International law and human rights
- Human development in a globalised world
- Forced migration and human rights
- Forced migration and development

All modules are assessed by coursework.

Employability

A humanities Masters opens up careers in a number of professions such as teaching, social work, administration and higher level education. Graduates have forged exciting careers in research-related work, public relations, advertising, retail, management and media-related work.

Previous Development Studies students have entered careers in many fields working for international organisations such as the United Nations and its constituent organisations, the World Bank, the International Labour Organisation and the World Health Organisation. Many students take up posts in their home countries within government, non-government and civil society organisations, or with non-governmental development organisations in the UK, in addition to teaching posts in universities and colleges specialising in development research and practice.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Teaching and learning

Class contact time is typically ten hours per week plus tutorials and independent study. You'll have access to LSBU's Moodle Virtual Learning Environment, where you can access electronic versions of core texts and other resources.

Facilities

- Elephant Studios at LSBU
The £4 million studio complex includes: Arri Cameras, Dolby Atmos Surround Sound studios and cinemas, grading suites, news room and games design centre, digital design suites, and industry-ready film and photographic studios. For student use and commercial hire.

- Keyworth Arts and Media Centre
Our Keyworth Arts and Media Centre has eight laboratories holding 123 Apple G5 Intel computers that run all the major software packages you'd expect to find in a professional environment, from Apple Final Cut Studio and Autodesk 3DS Max to Virtools and istopmotion.

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Our MA Photography course approaches photography as an expanded visual discipline. You'll be encouraged to confidently produce complex and extended photographic projects and engage with experimental and speculative approaches to making. Read more
Our MA Photography course approaches photography as an expanded visual discipline. You'll be encouraged to confidently produce complex and extended photographic projects and engage with experimental and speculative approaches to making.

We offer a dynamic and exciting environment for studying the critical theory of photography, and this course engages with practices of reading and writing about the image. MA Photography also pays close attention to the dissemination, exhibition and publication of photographic work.

We provide specialist digital and analogue facilities for large-format colour and black-and-white exhibition prints.

Our course offers a considered balance of support that develops practical skills and fosters a high standard of diverse critical approaches. You'll take risks, explore and develop your interest, and exchange, debate and discuss ideas. You'll respond to the diverse field of contemporary photography and explore practices of representation that engage with the still and the moving image, as well as performance and installation.

Your studies will be supported by a number of internationally renowned staff in a department that encourages experimentation. This will enable you to establish yourself as a rounded professional who can formulate ideas in a sophisticated framework whilst also being able to communicate to others, both visually and verbally.

We place a strong emphasis on publication, enabling you to find creative ways to disseminate your work beyond the academic context and into the public arena.

Facilities

Our range of equipment and technical support enables specialist and professional-grade work, whilst also encouraging experimental and speculative approaches to making.

Industry Partners

Our MA Photography course enjoys extensive links with a number of photographic, media and fine art professionals, curators, publishers, specialist printers and book designers. These connections enrich your experience through visiting lecturer and seminar programmes.

In the last three years, speakers on the course have included photographers and other creative practitioners such as:
-Ori Gersht
-Esther Teichmann
-Margaret Salmon
-Sarah Jones
-Matthew Stone
-Criodhna Costello
-Chris Coekin
-Carey Young
-Lisa Castagner
-Rod Dickinson
-Jo Longhurst
-Jason Evans
-Joseph Walsh
-Eva Bensasson

Additionally, creative professionals and industry links for our course include:
-Benedict Burbridge, editor of Photoworks
-Stuart Smith, book designer at Smith-Design
-Sarah James, writer at Art Monthly and Frieze
-Lucy Soutter, writer at Source
-Clare Grafik, curator of The Photographer's Gallery
-Jennifer Thatcher, Folkestone Triennial
-Jean Wainwright, writer at Art Newspaper
-Terry King, specialist printer
-Emily Pethick, directs The Showroom
-Robert Shore, editor of Elephant Magazine
-Edward Dorrian, organiser of Five Years
-Joyce Cronin, manages the Cubitt Gallery

Careers

Our postgraduate degree prepares you for your career through professional practice units, talks by visiting artists and portfolio reviews with figures from across the photographic industry. Career opportunities include:
-Freelance photography
-Fine art
-Fashion
-Advertising and editorial
-Post production/digital imaging
-Picture editing and research
-Curating
-Image, arts and community arts management
-Gallery administration

Graduates of MA Photography have gone on to win the Jerwood Photography prize; to exhibit their work in The Photographers' Gallery, Photofusion, ArtSway and the Geffyre Museum as well as publishing their outputs in different venues ranging from The Sunday Times Magazine to monographs with Dewi Lewis Publishing.

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This specialist creative writing MA course enlists the expertise of our team of writer-lecturers, five of whom are currently published in the field of children’s writing. Read more
This specialist creative writing MA course enlists the expertise of our team of writer-lecturers, five of whom are currently published in the field of children’s writing. It is supported by visiting speakers from the children’s publishing world, including agents, editors, publishers and authors.

Leading Children's Literary Agent Jodie Marsh (United Agents) offers an annual prize for the 'most promising writer for young people'. We have an excellent track record of graduates achieving publication. Novels by Gill Lewis, Sam Gayton, Elen Caldecott, Jim Carrington, Alex Diaz, Marie-Louise Jensen, Sally Nicholls, Maudie Smith, Che Golden, C.J. Skuse and Sarah Hammond and picture books by Karen Hughes have all been published in the last five years. Ways to Live Forever by Sally Nicholls won the Waterstones Children's Book of the Year Award and the Glen Dimplex New Writers Award 2008. Marie-Louise Jensen and Elen Caldecott were both shortlisted for the 2009 Waterstones Prize, and Elen was longlisted for the Carnegie award for How Kirsty Jenkins Stole the Elephant.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course is for writers for children of all ages, from the picture-book age through to adolescent and ‘crossover’ writing which aims at markets among adults as well as young people. Though prose fiction is likely to be the main area studied, students will have the chance to look at writing in all forms, including poetry, picture book texts and non-fiction.

The course supports students to create a significant body of writing, with practical plans for its place in the real world of publishing. It is based on the principle that most writers learn and benefit from working closely with their fellow writers, in a disciplined supportive setting, and with tutors who are practising and published writers in their field.

MODULES

Writing Workshops - In the first semester’s writing workshop you will explore a variety of formats and approaches, gaining a sense of the different age- ranges and forms. This is also an introduction to the writing workshop experience which is the heart of the course. In the second semester’s workshop you will be asked to choose your area of writing, and use the workshop’s feedback and encouragement to explore it in more depth. Full-time students take one writing workshop in Semester One and one in Semester Two. Part-time students take one workshop each year.

Context Modules - Each full-time student takes one of these in the first semester and one in the second semester. The first semester’s context module, Writing for Young People: Forms, Ages and Stages, is concerned with the writer’s relationship with their audience, a sense of the history of and issues raised by children’s writing. The second semester’s module looks at Contemporary Children’s Publishing, and aims to give a realistic grasp of the choices open to new writers in the field. Part-time students take one of these context modules in each year of study.

Manuscript - This is the development of a manuscript as near to publishable quality as possible. It is supported by tutorials with a manuscript supervisor. It may be a novel, a book of stories, a collection of poems or picture book texts.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

The course is modular and offered for full and part-time study. Part-time students take the same course over a two-year period, taking one module each semester. Students complete four taught modules (two writing workshops and two context modules) plus a manuscript (double module).

Modules are normally taught via tutor-led writing workshops, organised in 11 weekly three-hour sessions on the Corsham Court campus. The manuscript is taught via one-to-one tutorials, working with a tutor with particular knowledge of your field of work. Throughout the course, there will be special events to bring in writers to discuss their work, plus literary agents and editors with practical advice on the publishing process. Our current writer in residence is Marcus Sedgwick.

TUTORS

This course is taught by publishing writers and depending on timetables will include:

• Julia Green: her novels for young adults include Blue Moon, Baby Blue and Hunter’s Heart (Puffin), Breathing Underwater, Drawing with Light and Bringing the Summer (Bloomsbury)and her most recent novel for younger children is Tilly’s Moonlight Fox (Oxford University Press).
• Steve May: author of Dazzer Plays On and One Chance (Egmont).
• Jonathan Neale: his novels for children are Lost at Sea and Himalaya.
• Mimi Thebo: author of Wipe Out, Hit the Road Jack, Get Real (Harper Collins); Drawing Together (Walker).
• Steve Voake: his novels include The Dreamwalker’s Child, The Web of Fire, The Starlight Conspiracy, Blood Hunters, Fightback and Dark Woods (Faber & Faber), plus his Daisy Dawson and Hooey Higgins series for younger readers (Walker Books).
• Children’s publishing industry specialists John Mclay and Janine Amos

ASSESSMENT METHODS

The assessed coursework for each Writing Workshop is a folder of creative writing. For the first Context Module the coursework is an essay of approximately 2,500 words and a folder of creative responses. The second context module is assessed by a portfolio of writing tasks connected to the children’s publishing industry, including two book proposals. The manuscript is 35,000-40,000 words, or the equivalent in poetry or picture book texts.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Most of our students want a career as a published children’s author, and many have gone on to achieve this. Others have found work in the children’s publishing industry, or in libraries, bookshops and teaching or other work with young people.

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The MA in Heritage Practice offers students an in-depth opportunity to gain a thorough understanding of the heritage sector from the perspective of different disciplines, including anthropology, archaeology and history. Read more
The MA in Heritage Practice offers students an in-depth opportunity to gain a thorough understanding of the heritage sector from the perspective of different disciplines, including anthropology, archaeology and history. It also enables students to gain critical acumen in exploring the meanings of heritage as a concept and how such concepts are applied in the UK and on a worldwide basis, thus providing valuable insights and an understanding of a sector that is gaining increased significance in today’s world.

Course Overview

The programme of study offers students a unique opportunity to explore a wide range of heritage issues. It combines broadly based compulsory modules with two distinct and specialised optional pathways in Cultural Heritage and Museums and Archives.

The Cultural Heritage pathway consists of two modules, focusing upon the notion of heritage as cultural practice. It enables students to explore important questions, for example where does heritage come from, how is it constructed, what does it do, how does it relate to the past and present, and what are its potential uses for the future? This pathway also encourages students to investigate relationships between heritage and the construction of identity, as well as the role of landscape, architecture and monuments in determining and embedding heritage.

The second pathway, on Museums and Archives, is also composed of two modules, which explore many of the issues surrounding the management, conservation, practice and legislation surrounding the operation of museums and archives.

In both pathways, students are encouraged to undertake a work placement at a museum or heritage site of their choice, while those on the Lampeter campus can undertake their placement in the Roderic Bowen Research Centre.

Students therefore gain understanding and appreciation in a broadly defined field of heritage in addition to a more concentrated and specialist knowledge based on a particular strand. Running through all these modules is a focus upon the practice based, employability side of heritage. The work placement module permits students to enter the work place, taking with them the knowledge and understanding from the course which they apply in a practical, hands-on setting.

Modules

Part 1
Compulsory modules:
-Research Methodologies (20 credits)
-Heritage: Representation and Interpretation (20 credits)
-Heritage Tourism Contexts (20 credits)

Optional modules:
-Exhibiting the Past Museums, Collections and Heritage (20 credits)
-Documenting the Past Archives: Libraries and Heritage (20 credits)
-Heritage and Architecture: Heritage and the Built Environment (20 credits)
-Heritage Project Management in the Modern World (20 credits)
-Work placement (20 credits)
-Independent project (20 credits)

Part 2
-Dissertation (60Credits)

Key Features

Teaching staff who deliver this programme rely upon their established research and expertise in heritage and heritage related concerns. The range of projects they have undertaken over a number of years, sometimes with partners in other institutions, includes:
-The excavation and conservation of the Newport Ship, Wales
-The excavation of a medieval bishop’s palace at Fetternear, Scotland, as well as the post-excavation research on and exhibition of the finds
-The development of a collaborative museum exhibition of Egyptian scarabs
-The excavation of the medieval abbey site at Strata Florida, with community and schools engagement
-Landscape heritage and interpretation
-The construction of social memory through war remembrance and memorials
-The Tregaron Elephant project, with its community engagement
-Research into ancient Andean textiles in association with the British Museum

This considerable bank of knowledge and skills underpins the programme, contributing to a high quality educational experience. As part of their research and project management, staff have worked with bodies including CADW, Historic England/English Heritage, Heritage Lottery Fund, National Trust, RCAHMW, UNESCO, Qatari Museums Authority, the British Museum, Blairs Museum (Aberdeenshire) and St Fagans National History Museum.

This experience feeds into teaching that offers unique insights into the heritage sector, its organisations and structures, its operational procedures and regulation, as well as its ethical and conservation considerations. It provides students with strong opportunities for entering heritage-related employment.

For residential students, most of the teaching takes place on the Lampeter campus, where the university is built round an archaeological site. Old Building is a listed building which backs onto a medieval motte.

Assessment

A range of assessment methods are used from essays and short written evaluation, to the creation of publicity flyers, feasibility reports on a heritage site, project designs, an exhibition, oral presentations and reflective pieces.

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The MA Cultural and Media Studies is part-time and designed to fit around professional working life. The degree is project-centred, giving you the chance to carry out a creative, practice-based or academic project in Cultural and Media Studies. Read more
The MA Cultural and Media Studies is part-time and designed to fit around professional working life. The degree is project-centred, giving you the chance to carry out a creative, practice-based or academic project in Cultural and Media Studies. You'll conduct a project over two years, under our supervision, as well produce a dissertation in the second year on a related theme.

The MA Cultural and Media Studies is part of our successful Creative Media Arts scheme. Our MA students have undertaken projects such as developing film and television scripts, creating websites that build on new ideas, curating exhibitions of cutting edge work, writing innovative fiction, making documentaries and dramas, creating portfolios of digital photographs, and researching aspects of the media, arts and educational organisations. In negotiation and agreement with your tutor, the kind of project you choose to do for your Masters is up to you.

Students have full access to digital media facilities, a theatre and a digital gallery, supported by dedicated technicians. With LSBU close to the South Bank, across the river from the West End and Soho, our students have unrivalled access to the capital's creative and media arts communities.

LSBU will open a new £4million Media Centre for School of Arts and Creative Industries students in early 2016.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/cultural-media-studies-ma

Modules

Year 1:
- Project proposal
- Project research and development

Year 2:
- Project production
- Project evaluation

Brief assessment outline:
- Project proposal of 2,500 words or in an alternative form agreed with your tutor and the course director.

- Research report in the form of 1,500-2,500 words which, where appropriate, includes a prototype project in a relevant media form negotiated and agreed with your tutor and the course director.

- Project production in a form to be negotiated with your tutor and agreed with the course director.

- Project evaluation in the form of a 2,500 word report or in an alternative form agreed with your tutor and the course director.

Employability

Employers support our project-centred Masters because they enable active learning, project management, skill development, innovation and experimentation. The programme enhances career development in the cultural industries as well as changes in direction within the creative arts. The MA is also a strong foundation for an MPhil or PhD, with a number of our students going on to further study each year.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

We have strategic relationships with a number of international cultural institutions on the South Bank including Tate and the National Theatre, as well as industry links with the BBC, BSkyB and the International Game Developer Forum. Our staff have an excellent record of international publications, as well as successful creative practices in the cultural industries and media arts.

Teaching and learning

Our staff are able to provide expert guidance for a wide range of projects and dissertations, and most of the teaching on the course takes place through one-to-one tuition with a Cultural and Media Studies specialist. As a Masters student, you are invited to the School's regular research seminars and public lectures.

Facilities

- Elephant Studios at LSBU
The £4 million studio complex includes: Arri Cameras, Dolby Atmos Surround Sound studios and cinemas, grading suites, news room and games design centre, digital design suites, and industry-ready film and photographic studios. For student use and commercial hire.

- Borough Road Gallery
The gallery is a home for visual art and a unique part of the University's heritage. Opened in 2012, the Borough Road Gallery contains valuable and significant works of Post War British Art in a public collection, produced by the celebrated artist and teacher David Bomberg (1890-1957).

- Arts, music and cultural events in London
The University couldn't be better located being only a 10-15 minute walk from the Southbank Centre, National Theatre, BFI IMAX, Tate Modern, Royal Festival Hall, The Old Vic Theatre, The Young Vic and therefore the best of London's plays, performances, exhibitions and screenings.

Read less
The MA Digital Film is part-time and designed to fit around professional working life. The degree is project-centred, giving you the chance to carry out a creative, practice-based or academic project in Digital Film. Read more
The MA Digital Film is part-time and designed to fit around professional working life. The degree is project-centred, giving you the chance to carry out a creative, practice-based or academic project in Digital Film. You'll conduct a project over two years, under our supervision, as well produce a dissertation in the second year on a related theme.

The MA Digital Film is part of our successful Creative Media Arts scheme. Our MA students have undertaken projects such as developing film and television scripts, creating websites that build on new ideas, curating exhibitions of cutting edge work, writing innovative fiction, making documentaries and dramas, creating portfolios of digital photographs, and researching aspects of the media, arts and educational organisations. In negotiation and agreement with your tutor, the kind of project you choose to do for your Masters is up to you.

Students have full access to digital media facilities, a theatre and a digital gallery, supported by dedicated technicians. With LSBU close to the South Bank, across the river from the West End and Soho, our students have unrivalled access to the capital's creative and media arts communities.

LSBU will open a new £4million Media Centre for School of Art and Creative Industries students in 2016.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/digital-film-ma

Modules

Year 1:
- Project proposal
- Project research and development

Year 2:
- Project production
- Project evaluation
- 3 months extension for your dissertation

Assessment:
- Project proposal of 2,500 words or in an alternative form agreed with your tutor and the course director.

- Research report in the form of 1,500-2,500 words which, where appropriate, includes a prototype project in a relevant media form negotiated and agreed with your tutor and the course director.

- Project production in a form to be negotiated with your tutor and agreed with the course director.

- Project evaluation in the form of a 2,500 word report or in an alternative form agreed with your tutor and the course director.

- Dissertation of 12-15,000 words, the subject and format of which must be agreed with your tutor and the course director.

Employability

Employers support our project-centred Masters because they enable active learning, project management, skill development, innovation and experimentation. The programme enhances career development in the cultural industries as well as changes in direction within the creative arts. The MA is also a strong foundation for an MPhil or PhD, with a number of our students going on to further study each year.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

We have strategic relationships with a number of international cultural institutions on the South Bank including Tate and the National Theatre, as well as industry links with the BBC, BSkyB and the International Game Developer Forum. Our staff have an excellent record of international publications, as well as successful creative practices in the cultural industries and media arts.

Teaching and learning

Our staff are able to provide expert guidance for a wide range of projects and dissertations, and most of the teaching on the course takes place through one-to-one tuition with a Digital Film specialist. As a Masters student, you are invited to the School's regular research seminars and public lectures.

Facilities

- Elephant Studios at LSBU
The £4 million studio complex includes: Arri Cameras, Dolby Atmos Surround Sound studios and cinemas, grading suites, news room and games design centre, digital design suites, and industry-ready film and photographic studios. For student use and commercial hire.

- Arts, music and cultural events in London
The University couldn't be better located being only a 10-15 minute walk from the Southbank Centre, National Theatre, BFI IMAX, Tate Modern, Royal Festival Hall, The Old Vic Theatre, The Young Vic and therefore the best of London's plays, performances, exhibitions and screenings.

Read less
The MA Digital Photography is part-time and designed to fit around professional working life. The degree is project-centred, giving you the chance to carry out a creative, practice-based or academic project in Digital Photography. Read more
The MA Digital Photography is part-time and designed to fit around professional working life. The degree is project-centred, giving you the chance to carry out a creative, practice-based or academic project in Digital Photography. You'll conduct a project over two years, under our supervision, as well produce a dissertation in the second year on a related theme.

The MA Digital Photography is part of our successful Creative Media Arts scheme. Our MA students have undertaken projects such as developing film and television scripts, creating websites that build on new ideas, curating exhibitions of cutting edge work, writing innovative fiction, making documentaries and dramas, creating portfolios of digital photographs, and researching aspects of the media, arts and educational organisations. In negotiation and agreement with your tutor, the kind of project you choose to do for your Masters is up to you.

Students have full access to digital media facilities, a theatre and a digital gallery, supported by dedicated technicians. With LSBU close to the South Bank, across the river from the West End and Soho, our students have unrivalled access to the capital's creative and media arts communities.

LSBU will open a new £4million Media Centre for School of Arts and Creative Industries students in early 2016.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/digital-photography-ma

Modules

Year 1:
- Project proposal
- Project research and development

Year 2:
- Project production
- Project evaluation
- 3 months extension for your dissertation

Brief assessment outline:
- Project proposal of 2,500 words or in an alternative form agreed with your tutor and the course director.
- Research report in the form of 1,500-2,500 words which, where appropriate, includes a prototype project in a relevant media form negotiated and agreed with your tutor and the course director.
- Project production in a form to be negotiated with your tutor and agreed with the course director.
- Project evaluation in the form of a 2,500 word report or in an alternative form agreed with your tutor and the course director.
- Dissertation of 12-15,000 words, the subject and format of which must be agreed with your tutor and the course director.

Employability

Employers support our project-centred Masters because they enable active learning, project management, skill development, innovation and experimentation. The programme enhances career development in the cultural industries as well as changes in direction within the creative arts. The MA is also a strong foundation for an MPhil or PhD, with a number of our students going on to further study each year.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

We have strategic relationships with a number of international cultural institutions on the South Bank including Tate Britain and the National Theatre, as well as industry links with the BBC, BSkyB and the International Game Developer Forum. Our staff have an excellent record of international publications, as well as successful creative practices in the cultural industries and media arts.

Teaching and learning

Our staff are able to provide expert guidance for a wide range of projects and dissertations, and most of the teaching on the course takes place through one-to-one tuition with a Digital Photography specialist. As a Masters student, you are invited to the School's regular research seminars and public lectures.

Facilities

- Elephant Studios at LSBU
The £4 million studio complex includes: Arri Cameras, Dolby Atmos Surround Sound studios and cinemas, grading suites, news room and games design centre, digital design suites, and industry-ready film and photographic studios. For student use and commercial hire.

- Borough Road Gallery
The gallery is a home for visual art and a unique part of the University's heritage. Opened in 2012, the Borough Road Gallery contains valuable and significant works of Post War British Art in a public collection, produced by the celebrated artist and teacher David Bomberg (1890-1957).

Read less
The MA New Media is part-time and designed to fit around professional working life. The degree is project-centred, giving you the chance to carry out a creative, practice-based or academic project in New Media. Read more
The MA New Media is part-time and designed to fit around professional working life. The degree is project-centred, giving you the chance to carry out a creative, practice-based or academic project in New Media. You'll conduct a project over two years, under our supervision, as well produce a dissertation in the second year on a related theme.

Our staff are able to provide expert guidance for a wide range of projects and dissertations, and most of the teaching on the course takes place through one-to-one tuition with a New Media specialist. As a Masters student, you are invited to regular research seminars and public lectures.

The MA New Media is part of our successful Creative Media Arts scheme. Our MA students have undertaken projects such as developing film and television scripts, creating websites that build on new ideas, curating exhibitions of cutting edge work, writing innovative fiction, making documentaries and dramas, creating portfolios of digital photographs, and researching aspects of the media, arts and educational organisations. In negotiation and agreement with your tutor, the kind of project you choose to do for your Masters is up to you.

Students have full access to digital media facilities, a theatre and a digital gallery, supported by dedicated technicians. With LSBU close to the South Bank, across the river from the West End and Soho, our students have unrivalled access to the capital's creative and media arts communities.

LSBU will open a new £4million Media Centre for School of Art and Creative Industries students in early 2016.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/new-media-ma

Modules

Year 1:
- Project proposal
- Project research and development

Year 2:
- Project production
- Project evaluation
- 3 months extension for your dissertation

Brief assessment outline:
- Project proposal of 2,500 words or in an alternative form agreed with your tutor and the course director.

- Research report in the form of 1,500-2,500 words which, where appropriate, includes a prototype project in a relevant media form negotiated and agreed with your tutor and the course director.

- Project production in a form to be negotiated with your tutor and agreed with the course director.

- Project evaluation in the form of a 2,500 word report or in an alternative form agreed with your tutor and the course director.

- Dissertation of 12-15,000 words, the subject and format of which must be agreed with your tutor and the course director.

Employability

Employers support our project-centred Masters because they enable active learning, project management, skill development, innovation and experimentation. The programme enhances career development in the cultural industries as well as changes in direction within the creative arts. The MA is also a strong foundation for an MPhil or PhD, with a number of our students going on to further study each year.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

We have strategic relationships with a number of international cultural institutions on the South Bank including Tate and the National Theatre, as well as industry links with the BBC, BSkyB and the International Game Developer Forum. Our staff have an excellent record of international publications, as well as successful creative practices in the cultural industries and media arts.

Facilities

- Elephant Studios at LSBU
The £4 million studio complex includes: Arri Cameras, Dolby Atmos Surround Sound studios and cinemas, grading suites, news room and games design centre, digital design suites, and industry-ready film and photographic studios. For student use and commercial hire.

- Arts, music and cultural events in London
The University couldn't be better located being only a 10-15 minute walk from the Southbank Centre, National Theatre, BFI IMAX, Tate Modern, Royal Festival Hall, The Old Vic Theatre, The Young Vic and therefore the best of London's plays, performances, exhibitions and screenings.

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The MA in Editing and Post-Production (EPP) offers the opportunity to study part-time in the evenings and several weekends using our purpose built, outstanding media facilities within Elephant Studios at LSBU. Read more
The MA in Editing and Post-Production (EPP) offers the opportunity to study part-time in the evenings and several weekends using our purpose built, outstanding media facilities within Elephant Studios at LSBU.

The teaching is delivered by industry professionals and it emphasises professional collaborative workflows and the roles of all personnel in the Editing Department in the context of digital film production. Subjects covered include: working with digital cinema camera recording formats (e.g. Arri’s Log C format), colour grading, audio post production and delivery platforms.

The course offers deep exposure to the skills, knowledge and creativity required to get a secure foothold in the competitive world of Editing and Post Production (EPP). We aim to produce job-ready postgraduates who have the know-how and insight required to embark on careers in the challenging context of the creative industries, delivering professional practice skills around freelance work, enterprise, and new economic models for the creative industries.

The MA is designed for students who wish to further their skills, enhance their experience and establish new contacts while developing their professional career in the industry.

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The MRes in Heritage Practice is a programme with a 60-credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits, which has an allowance of up to 30,000 words. Read more
The MRes in Heritage Practice is a programme with a 60-credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits, which has an allowance of up to 30,000 words. The taught element enables students to engage critically with concepts of heritage and its practice in Wales as well as in other parts of the world. It enhances your skills, enabling you to develop research strategies for use in exploring your chosen angle on a sector that is gaining increased significance in today’s world.

Course Overview

The programme of study offers students a unique opportunity to explore a targeted range of heritage issues because the taught modules lead to a programme of research devised by the individual student, under the direction of a supervisor. All MRes students take the Research Methodologies module, but then their routes diverge as they select one module from each of two distinct and specialised pathways, one in Cultural Heritage and the other in Museums and Archives. This preparation leads to the student’s own dissertation project.

The Cultural Heritage pathway focuses upon the notion of heritage as cultural practice. It enables students to explore important questions, for example where does heritage come from, how is it constructed, what does it do, how does it relate to the past and present, and what are its potential uses for the future? This pathway also encourages students to investigate relationships between heritage and the construction of identity, as well as the role of landscape, architecture and monuments in determining and embedding heritage.

The second pathway, on Museums and Archives, explores many of the issues surrounding the management, conservation, practice and legislation surrounding the operation of museums and archives.

Students who complete the MRes programme are equipped with a sound basis for undertaking a research degree. Alternatively they may take their specific knowledge and understanding to apply in the workplace or in other settings.

Modules

Students will choose three modules. Below is an illustrative list of modules available:
-Research Methodologies
-Heritage: Representation and Interpretation
-Heritage Tourism Contexts
-Exhibiting the Past Museums, Collections and Heritage
-Documenting the Past Archives: Libraries and Heritage
-Heritage and Architecture: Heritage and the Built Environment
-Heritage Project Management in the Modern World
-Work placement
-Independent project

Key Features

Teaching staff who deliver this programme rely upon their established research and expertise in heritage and heritage related concerns. The range of projects they have undertaken over a number of years, sometimes with partners in other institutions, includes:
-The excavation and conservation of the Newport Ship, Wales
-The excavation of a medieval bishop’s palace at Fetternear, Scotland, as well as the post-excavation research on and exhibition of the finds
-The development of a collaborative museum exhibition of Egyptian scarabs
-The excavation of the medieval abbey site at Strata Florida, with community and schools engagement
-Landscape heritage and interpretation
-The construction of social memory through war remembrance and memorials
-The Tregaron Elephant project, with its community engagement
-Tesearch into ancient Andean textiles in association with the British Museum

This considerable bank of knowledge and skills underpins the programme, contributing to a high quality educational experience. As part of their research and project management, staff have worked with bodies including CADW, Historic England/English Heritage, Heritage Lottery Fund, National Trust, RCAHMW, UNESCO, Qatari Museums Authority, the British Museum, Blairs Museum (Aberdeenshire) and St Fagans National History Museum.

This experience feeds into teaching that offers unique insights into the heritage sector, its organisations and structures, its operational procedures and regulation, as well as its ethical and conservation considerations. It provides students with strong opportunities for entering heritage-related employment.

For residential students, most of the teaching takes place on the Lampeter campus, where the university is built round an archaeological site. Old Building is a listed building which backs onto a medieval motte.

Assessment

A range of assessment methods are used from essays and short written evaluation, to the creation of publicity flyers, feasibility reports on a heritage site, project designs, an exhibition, oral presentations and reflective pieces.

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Behind every beautiful fashion shoot is a talented photographer. Be that photographer. As a student of MA Fashion Photography, you’ll build upon your existing fashion and photography knowledge to identify, develop and manage a Masters project. Read more
Behind every beautiful fashion shoot is a talented photographer. Be that photographer.

As a student of MA Fashion Photography, you’ll build upon your existing fashion and photography knowledge to identify, develop and manage a Masters project.

Throughout the course you’ll have access to UCA’s state of the art photography and participate in a variety of lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops, with regular off-campus visits to shoots and exhibitions.

Our MA Fashion Photography course offers you the opportunity to develop your practical fashion photography skills whilst giving you a solid grounding in critical thinking and theory.

Your studies will be supported by a number of internationally renowned staff in a department that encourages experimentation. This will enable you to establish yourself as a rounded professional who can formulate ideas in a sophisticated framework whilst also being able to communicate to others, both visually and verbally.

We place a strong emphasis on publication, enabling you to find creative ways to disseminate your work beyond the academic context and into the public arena.

Facilities

Our range of equipment and technical support enables specialist and professional-grade work, whilst also encouraging experimental and speculative approaches to making.

Industry Partners

Our MA Photography courses enjoy extensive links with a number of photographic, media and fine art professionals, curators, publishers, specialist printers and book designers. These connections enrich your experience through visiting lecturer and seminar programmes.

In the last three years, speakers on the course have included photographers and other creative practitioners such as:
-Ori Gersht
-Esther Teichmann
-Margaret Salmon
-Sarah Jones
-Matthew Stone
-Criodhna Costello
-Chris Coekin
-Carey Young
-Lisa Castagner
-Rod Dickinson
-Jo Longhurst
-Jason Evans
-Joseph Walsh
-Eva Bensasson.

Additionally, creative professionals and industry links for our course include:
-Benedict Burbridge, editor of Photoworks
-Stuart Smith, book designer at Smith-Design
-Sarah James, writer at Art Monthly and Frieze
-Lucy Soutter, writer at Source
-Clare Grafik, curator of The Photographer's Gallery
-Jennifer Thatcher, Folkestone Triennial
-Jean Wainwright, writer at Art Newspaper
-Terry King, specialist printer
-Emily Pethick, directs The Showroom
-Robert Shore, editor of Elephant Magazine
-Edward Dorrian, organiser of Five Years
-Joyce Cronin, manages the Cubitt Gallery

Careers

Our postgraduate degree prepares you for your career through professional practice units, talks by visiting artists and portfolio reviews with figures from across the photographic industry. Career opportunities include:
-Freelance photography
-Fine art
-Fashion
-Advertising and editorial
-Post production/digital imaging
-Picture editing and research
-Curating
-Image, arts and community arts management
-Gallery administration.

Graduates of MA Photography have gone on to win the Jerwood Photography prize; to exhibit their work in The Photographers' Gallery, Photofusion, ArtSway and the Geffyre Museum as well as publishing their outputs in different venues ranging from The Sunday Times Magazine to monographs with Dewi Lewis Publishing.

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