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This is an advanced practice-based research programme for students wishing to extend their research into the areas of film, photography and electronic arts- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mres-filmmaking-photography-electronic-arts/. Read more
This is an advanced practice-based research programme for students wishing to extend their research into the areas of film, photography and electronic arts- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mres-filmmaking-photography-electronic-arts/

The programme is particularly relevant for students who have an MA degree and are looking to postion and develop their research and practice work.

It will be tailor-made to your individual research area and practice, giving you the opportunity to develop research skills and pursue your own area of interest.

You'll work closely with a personal supervisor to develop your work in the areas of filmmaking, photography and digital arts.

You’ll also receive training and guidance in ethical and legal obligations, and be encouraged to accommodate feminist, anti-racist, decolonising and other appropriate approaches to your chosen subject.

The programme meets the needs of two groups:

students who have completed an MA in Filmmaking, Photography, or Electronic Arts and cognate programmes (for example, our MA in Photography: The Image & Electronic Arts)
film, photography and electronic arts professionals who wish to extend their research-based practice

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Sean Cubitt.

Structure

A personalised programme
The programme is personalised for each student, and is based on your individual research into your chosen practice. It gives you the opportunity to develop appropriate research skills and to pursue a research practice project of your own design, developed and reworked in discussion with a personal supervisor.

The curriculum is personalised for individual students, but all students will share a common curriculum and receive training and guidance in ethical and legal obligations, and be encouraged to accommodate feminist, anti-racist, decolonising and other appropriate approaches to their chosen subject.

The course will add value to recent MA practice graduates and to film, photography and electronic arts professionals by giving a deeper and more specialised engagement in a major research project supervised by staff experienced in both creative and professional research. Research training will give you the skills to design and complete your own research and to work to research briefs.

All students undertake the Practice-Based Research Methods Seminar in the first term, producing a detailed 5000 word project outline at the end. They will also take in the second term one of a selected range of optional modules to help develop their critical and theoretical awareness. In the first term, they begin work with their personal supervisor on the design and execution of their project. Supervision will determine the specific means used: some students will embark directly on a single piece of work; others may undertake a series of workshop-based activities.

Aims

The programme's subject-specific learning outcomes require you to think critically about a range of issues concerning the media, understood in the widest sense, and to be able to justify their views intellectually and practically. The central outcome will be to design and conduct a substantial practice-based research project.

As appropriate to each individual project, you will be encouraged to analyse, contextualise, historicise, and theorise your chosen medium with reference to key debates in history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of film and the media. You will learn to produce high quality research under time constraints, by working independently.

All students will develop a range of transferable qualities and skills necessary for employment in related areas. These are described by the Quality Assurance Agency as: ‘the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility, decision-making in complex and unpredictable situations, and the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development’. You will be guided to work independently and to think through the intellectual issues.

Progress is carefully monitored, to make sure that you are making progress towards the achievement of the outcomes. Different kinds of practical and intellectual skills are required for each part of the programme. In consultation with supervisors, you will be guided to the most appropriate practical and intellectual approaches, and to the most appropriate technical and critical sources.

Structure

You take the following modules:

Practice-Based Research Methods (30 credits)
This module provides research methods training for the MRes in Film Photography and Electronic Arts, and may be taken by practice-based students in the MPhil programme in Media and Communications. In all years it will address the legal and ethical constraints operating on research by practice. In any given year, the syllabus will address such topics as technique (colour, composition, editing, post-production, sound-image relations, text-image relations), anti-racist, feminist and decolonial critique; hardware and software studies; environmental impacts of media production, dissemination and exhibition; media critical approaches to art, political economy, and truth. The interests of students and supervisors will guide the selection of specific content of the course in its delivery, whose aim is to inculcate advanced thinking on the making, delivery and audiences for research-based practice.

Research Project (120 credits)
The project in the MRes Film, Photography and Electronic Arts comprises a portfolio of practical work (such as photographs, video, film, installation, websites or other digital/print material) alongside a textual component. The work submitted should be original, and be as integral to the research aims, processes and outcomes of the project as the textual component. The final project as a whole will therefore demonstrate the integration of its practical and research components, so that text and practice reflect critically on each other. The length of the textual element should normally be between 5,000 and 10,000 words. The practical component should be a ‘substantial’ body of work. Given the potential range of media that can be used, and their differing potential relationships with the research process and the textual component, it is impossible to be precise. In the case of film/video it would normally entail the submission of a work (or works) of about 25 minutes in length (or more), but detailed requirements will be worked out on a case-by-case basis.

Students will undertake to design and conduct a substantial practice-based research project in collaboration with their supervisor. The project will be informed by research, as appropriate, into the materials, techniques and critical contexts of production, distribution and exhibition in audiovisual, electronic image and allied arts. As appropriate to each individual project, students will be encouraged to analyse, contextualise, historicise, and theorise their chosen medium with reference to key debates in history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of film and the media, especially in relation to anti-racist, decolonial, feminist, environmental and other key ethical and political dimensions of their aesthetic practice. They will learn to produce high quality research under pressure, by working independently. The exact conceptual and methodological direction of the research must initially come from the student, though this will be developed and reworked in discussion with the personal supervisor. Areas of research can be drawn from a wide remit, including the full range of media and cultural forms of contemporary societies and may be theoretical or empirical; technically- or more academically-based. Projects which are conceptually coherent, and practicable in their aims and methods can be considered, subject only to the in-house expertise of staff. The module encourages the development of knowledge and skills specific to the production, distribution and exhibition of contemporary media.

Assessment

There are two assessment points:

A: You are required to write one 5,000 word essay linked to the Practice-Based Research Methods seminar. The exact theme and title will be decided in discussion between you and your supervisor and relate to your specialist field of research, but as a guide it will demonstrate your readiness to undertake the project through critical evaluation of legal, ethical, critical and reflexive parameters and functions of practice-based research.

In addition, you will be assessed in the option module you undertake during the Spring Term.

B: The project in the MRes Film, Photography and Electronic Arts comprises a portfolio of practical work (such as photographs, video, film, installation, websites or other digital/print material) alongside a textual component. The work submitted should be original, and be as integral to the research aims, processes and outcomes of the project as the textual component. The final project as a whole will therefore demonstrate the integration of its practical and research components, so that text and practice reflect critically on each other.

Department

We are ranked:
22nd in the world for communication and media studies**
1st in the UK for the quality of our research***

**QS World University Rankings by subject 2015
***Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

We’ve also been ranked by LinkedIn as one of the top graduate universities for media professionals, because so many of our graduates go on to find jobs in the industry.

The department includes some of the top academics in the world for this discipline – the pioneers of media, communications and cultural studies. They actively teach on our programmes, and will introduce you to current research and debate in these areas. And many of our practice tutors are industry professionals active in TV, film, journalism, radio and animation.

We also run EastLondonLines.co.uk – our 24/7 student news website – which gives students the opportunity to gain experience working in a real-time news environment.

And we run regular public events featuring world-renowned writers and practitioners that have recently included Danny Boyle, Gurinda Chadha, Noel Clark and Tessa Ross. So you’ll get to experience the latest developments and debates in the industry.

Skills & Careers

The course is designed to support students who wish to strengthen their opportunities in professional media, including the media industries and creative practice, private sector firms, public sector institutions and civil society organisations with communications departments.

We envisage that a small proportion of graduates will seek careers in teaching, including secondary and higher education, in which case their projects and supervision will be tailored to that end.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This MA gives practitioners and theorists the opportunity to research and develop the new boundaries of image-making made possible by technological change within the context of post-industrial culture- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-photography-electronic-arts/. Read more
This MA gives practitioners and theorists the opportunity to research and develop the new boundaries of image-making made possible by technological change within the context of post-industrial culture- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-photography-electronic-arts/

This programme joins theory and practice, equipping you to develop and achieve highly effectively in the new image media culture. Practice uses both digital and analogue technology, still and durational as well as the study and production of interactivity.

The programme allows for specialisation in photography and/or electronic arts – which, in addition to still photography, can include interactive, durational and internet work – but encompasses a broader interpretation of practice.

You'll look at the meaning, production and distribution of images, and the relationship between theory and practice in the context of debates about post-modernism and beyond.

You also participate in enabling sessions in photography:

medium/large format cameras
portable and studio lighting technologies and their use
film technology
cinematography
digital imaging
output systems and processes
and/or in electronic arts:

computer and video graphics
post-production
computer-aided design
digital publishing
animation
animatics
2D and 3D computer animation
still and durational image production and manipulation
web construction
interactivity
There is an MRes which follows the MA into a second year, in order to develop your work/voice. This will count as the first year of a PhD. Find out more about the MRes.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the convenor Nigel Perkins.

Modules & Structure

This programme uniquely joins theory and practice in a way that will equip you with the tools and the vision to develop and achieve highly effectively in the new image media culture. Practice uses both digital and analogue technology, still and durational as well as the study and production of interactivity.

You will study

Photography: Durational & Still; Analogue & Digital
Electronic Imagery: Motion & Still
Visualisation: Stand-alone & Interactive
The programme draws on a broad range of cultural references and technical practices. It offers the opportunity to take stock of evolving practices and developments in image media culture, and is structured to develop the intellectual imagination within each individual student. This is achieved through a combined study of practice and theory, with extensive instruction through ‘enabling sessions’ which engage technical familiarity; core tutorials; secondary tutorials; Issues in Media and Culture and additional theory course options.

Recognising the rapidly changing definitions and context of these practice areas,and the value/positioning of traditional practices, these categories may also be understood through a variety of practices which involve image construction and presentation both still and durational, including: film/video, animation, interactivity, installations, motion graphics, and hyperspace constructs, as well as evolving new exploratory categories.

The programme provides an opportunity to develop and/or research aspects of visual style, and draw on a broad range of cultural references as well as aesthetic and technical approaches engaged through ‘Practice Theory Sessions’, visiting lectures and the Issues in Media and Culture course. Fundamental to the programme is the space that it creates to make it possible for you to explore, question, change and consolidate your work and your ideas.

Assessment

Original portfolio submission; coursework and essays.

Tutorials

This course is interested in the development of the individual voice. To this end, there are two types of tutorial:

Core tutorials - which deal with overall development
Secondary tutorials - these are tutorials for each specific area of photographic media

Skills

You'll develop specific practice skills to a high level, and the articulation/understanding of the pleasures of media consumption.

Careers

Graduates from the programme are extremely successful, with finalists working commercially, developing as artists or continuing to enlarge their academic knowledge. During the course particular attention is given to the development of the individual voice. This, plus students' exposure to a range of technologies, means that our graduates can step into the arena of their choice, or sometimes of their making.

Here are just some examples of the sorts of careers graduates have gone onto:

Art Director
Artist
Animator
Senior Interactive Designer
Head of Creative Department
Head Technical Creative, Experimental Film and Dance
Commercial Photography (fashion, editorial, photobooks, social, advertising)
Director (commercial narrative)
Director Of Photography
Installation Artist
Interactive Artist
Producer
Curator

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Technology is becoming closely interwoven into everyday life. How we create and design these interactions is crucial to their success and the positive impact they have on our lives. Read more
Technology is becoming closely interwoven into everyday life. How we create and design these interactions is crucial to their success and the positive impact they have on our lives. This understanding forms the core of the IDEA program’s design philosophy: technology that is designed to delight its users.

We aim to infuse the latest technological innovation with a human-centred design thinking to solve complex problems. The IDEA program promotes a creative and critical approach, within the framework of research-driven interaction design and user experience methodologies. The result is an understanding of how to design interactive products, services and systems that will have lasting cultural and commercial importance.

In a foundation first semester, you will develop the essential industry knowledge and skills for working as an interaction or user experience designer, at ease with web and mobile applications. Once you have these core skills in human-centred design thinking, web/mobile interface design and software programming, you are trained to analyse and evaluate their application in a range of design contexts. This evaluative approach is what enables IDEA students to create meaningful interactive experiences that will become ubiquitous parts of our everyday life.

In the second semester, you will engage in design studio projects to extend these skills, both conceptually and technically. We offer a studio-based teaching environment in which you work individually or in teams to creatively solve design challenges. You will learn to design across multiple platforms and scales - from natural, tangible and wearable user interfaces to interactive architecture, creative robotics and urban informatics. Your ideas may even become the basis of prototype products, patents or start-up services.

You can adapt this program to suit your interests and passions by taking electives from other faculties. You will also build a compelling design portfolio showcasing not only your design skills but also your understanding of how best to convey the user experience of new products and services.

The course culminates in a capstone research project, industry internship or graduation design project. The Faculty draws on industry and alumni contacts to enable opportunities to build your professional network. These factors combine to position you as a well-connected creative industry specialist with expertise across the strategic, creative and technical domains.

The course is timetabled to suit your busy schedule. Subjects are run either in the evening or in intensive mode (a block series of Fridays and Saturdays). You can also study part-time. The course has embedded qualifications, enabling you to graduate after the foundation first semester with a Graduate Certificate, or continue on to Graduate Diploma or Masters level.

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/

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This innovative Arts MRes course offers you the opportunity to undertake a closely-supervised piece of original research within a broad spectrum of arts disciplines, including art and design history, film and television studies, performance, and fine art practice. Read more
This innovative Arts MRes course offers you the opportunity to undertake a closely-supervised piece of original research within a broad spectrum of arts disciplines, including art and design history, film and television studies, performance, and fine art practice.

You will undertake a specialist research project, based upon your own focused proposal, which may be subject-specific or span arts disciplines.

The centrepiece of the Arts MRes is an extended written Dissertation, or for practice-based researchers, a major Practical Project supported by a written dissertation component. This is supported by a framework of three modules, which provide expert knowledge and understanding of appropriate research methods to employ in your project, the wider critical contexts relating to your subject, and how to develop and communicate your research. The programme will enable you to position your research within a wider scholarly field, and furnish you with professional skills such as communication, self-management and planning, preparing you for doctoral study or further career advancement.

This course can also be taken part time, for more information, please view this web-page: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/arts-dtpaar6/

Learn From The Best

The Arts MRes welcomes students from a wide range of interests. Whether your project is focussed on the history and theory of art and design, film and television, fine art or performance practice, or wider aspects of visual and material culture, you will be supported by a supervisory team with expertise in your subject.

Your supervisors will be academic specialists with in-depth knowledge of the critical issues relating to your topic, hands-on experience in appropriate research methodologies, and a highly regarded reputation of publishing scholarly materials, or exhibiting or performing works.Arts staff have specialist knowledge in Fine Art and Performance practice, art and design theory, film and television studies, curating, landscape, architecture, fashion, socially engaged arts, and digital arts practices.

Furthermore, if your project spans disciplines, your supervisory team may include staff members from different departments. Whatever your interests, you will be supported by the expertise of highly research-active staff whose work is of recognised excellence.

Teaching And Assessment

The Arts MRes is based around self-directed study, but you are supported by a framework of three modules. Research Methods and Critical Contexts in semester one are based around a series of seminars, and encourage the discussion and exchange of ideas between students with focussed research interests, but shared intellectual investment in the themes, concepts, practices and methods of visual and material culture. Assessment is through written assignments totalling 6000 words, or a smaller written element supported by materials for practice-based students (30 credits per module).

The semester two Research Development module is shared with students from MRes Humanities courses, to collaborate in all elements of organising (structuring, fundraising, marketing and publicity) and staging a cross-disciplinary symposium. You are assessed on a written paper, and a presentation at the symposium (totalling 30 credits). The culmination of your Arts MRes project is a final 20,000 word dissertation, or 10,000 word dissertation and body of work for practice-based students (90 credits).

Learning Environment

The Arts MRes will embed you in a vibrant postgraduate research culture, in which the formal framework of academic learning is enhanced by a multitude of opportunities to develop your specific research interests and skills, and widen the scope of your scholarly development. The modules themselves are based around seminars which encourage discussion and the exchange of ideas between researchers from a wide range of disciplines.

In addition you have access to specialist postgraduate training workshops, and events both on and beyond the campus. Fine Art practice-based students have access to studio space at the Baltic 39 studios, and all students are continually informed of events and opportunities of special interest to their research through the electronic learning portal, while regular individual tutorials with project supervisors will enable you to develop your project effectively.

Overall the Arts MRes provides a learning environment in which disciplined and self-directed academic rigour is enhanced by opportunities for the interdisciplinary pollination of ideas.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
EL7028 - MRes Dissertation (Core, 90 Credits)
HI7011 - Research Development (Core, 30 Credits)
VA7029 - Research Methods (Core, 30 Credits)
VA7030 - Critical Contexts (Core, 30 Credits)

Research-Rich Learning

With a student-focused course of study, supported by supervisors specifically chosen to compliment your project, research is embedded in the Arts MRes course from your initial project proposal, and you will be encouraged think about, develop, evaluate and refine your research approaches throughout the programme. The first module, Research Methods, will introduce you to generic considerations of research in the arts, before encouraging you to find and develop advanced methodologies specific to your project.

REF2014 placed Northumbria’s Art and Design research within the UK top ten for “research power”, and as you progress, your tutors and supervisory team will advise you on how to hone these approaches, drawing upon their own rich research expertise and knowledge of the latest practices and developments. You will apply your developing expertise to a wide range of research materials, subjecting them to disciplined analysis and interpretation, and presenting your findings in an academic symposium and in your final thesis or project.

Give Your Career An Edge

Graduates of the Arts MRes have proven that they can undertake independent research to a high academic standard. They have demonstrated intellectual curiosity, sophisticated critical thinking and discernment in their investigation, evaluation and interpretation of many types of research materials.

A Masters of Research also develops transferable professional skills of communication, the ability to present intellectually complex information over written, verbal or visual platforms, time and resource management, and professional independence. In directing an individual research project from initial proposal to finished thesis, and through organising an academic symposium with others from different disciplines, MRes students develop a host of skills relating to project organisation, teamwork, marketing, using communication platforms, and event management.

The Arts MRes is an ideal way to develop a set of impressive outlooks, attributes and skills, which are directly transferable, whether you wish to pursue further academic research at doctoral level, or build a career in arts practice, the cultural professions or education.

Your Future

The Arts MRes is well established as a bridge between undergraduate or postgraduate study and focussed Doctoral research. It can also stand alone as an important step in career development.

Through carrying out a focussed project of independent research, MRes students develop skills ideally suited to careers in the contextualisation, communication or promotion of the visual arts. Whether developing careers in creative practice, education, curating, cultural management, community engagement, or traditional and digital media publishing, MRes graduates possess a directly relevant qualification and skill set to push their ambitions forward.

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The Master of Arts in Contemporary Arts Practice is a multidisciplinary degree course for artists from the visual arts, the Performance arts, music and literature. Read more
The Master of Arts in Contemporary Arts Practice is a multidisciplinary degree course for artists from the visual arts, the Performance arts, music and literature. Its starting point is the student’s individual approach and choice of emphases; together with interdisciplinary projects it enables multidisciplinary exchanges with students and teaching staff from other disciplines.

The course aims to foster an independent artistic outlook within a framework of collective and interdisciplinary working interrelationships. The course of study sharpens students’ individual artistic practices through direct engagement with other artistic strategies. A knowledge of current discourse in other art forms causes their view of their own work to change.

Degree Structure

The Master’s degree comprises 120 ECTS credit points and is usually completed in four semesters. The degree is structured into three degree modules.

The degree places independent study and teaching, disciplinary foundations and transdisciplinary expansion in a balanced relationship. At the heart of the Master’s degree is artistic production, which includes an MA project in one of the specialisations. The didactic combination of one-to-one lessons with a high proportion of independent study, the targeted consolidation of technical and theoretical knowledge of the subject and context in elective courses, and the exchange between peers and professionals in various networks and in the joint Master’s fora support artistic production. Since in today’s artworld there is almost no generally binding canon of knowledge and skills, perfecting one’s art rests on individual decisions based on a wide-ranging knowledge of the dynamic state of the art.

Module Groups

Artistic Production/Master's Thesis (70 ECTS)
At the core of the programme, is the students' independent work on their own projects. This individual work is supervised by a personal mentor in one-to-one tuition. Students develop a deep understanding of their own authorship. They learn to present their work and to confront their own creativity with the strategies and approaches of other artists. In this endeavour, they are supported by numerous artistic personalities from the different departments of the BUA, as well as from the Fachhochschule Nordwestschweiz in Basel and from further partner institutions in an international network.

Transdisciplinarity: Individuality in Context (30 ECTS)
The transdisciplinary aspect of the studies is largely based on the study of other genres' strategies of artistic authorship and by the search for common parameters for content and structure.
In lectures and seminars on contemporary art theory and media studies, common terminology is developed to facilitate communication about artistic strategies and production procedures beyond the limits of each discipline's specific vocabulary. The exchange among the different specialisations of the CAP occurs within the framework of tuition as well as in the interdisciplinary projects, but primarily in the common theory blocks, in the encounters with mentors from other disciplines and in the thematic project weeks that take place once per semester. Here, there are talks and practical workshops, transdisciplinary meetings, discussions, project and work presentations as well as courses on research strategies and scientific work. These block events not only heighten the understanding of one's own and unfamiliar working processes, they also prepare students for their professional future, when large projects will be realised in specialised artistic collectives and networks, which must be able to communicate across their fields' boundaries.

There is also tuition beyond the subject's artistic boundaries - on professional skills in economic terms. Students gain a basic understanding of how to set up a company and how to conduct self-promotion. This includes tuition about management, administration, law and copyright, marketing, project management etc.

Subject-related Theory and Practice (20 ECTS)
The third module group addresses the theory and practice of the respective specialisations. This includes courses on technical specialisation and perfection (for instance: composition, musical strategies, specific software knowledge, lighting, curating, exhibiting) and on the subject-related theory (for instance: lectures and guest seminars on contemporary art/music; graduate societies) as well as excursions and encounters with artists, institutions, clients, teachers etc. The various courses are open to all students of the MA CAP and the partner institutions, if they meet the individual course's requirements.

The degree programme culminates in the Master thesis. This consists of the public presentation of an independent artistic creation and the written reflection on the student's own practice. The written part can be conducted as a research project. Content and form of the artistic presentation, reflectiveness and relevance are evaluated by external experts.

Specialisations

Fine Arts
In the Fine Arts specialisation current developments in art and the historical foundations of art are the reference for students’ work. Static and moving pictures in analogue or digital form, sculpture and installation techniques are options as much as conceptual and performative approaches or the treatment of social processes and documentary strategies. The course is notable for its strong engagement with the professional demands of sound, words and performative production. The Fine Arts specialisation collaborates closely with the Master of Fine Arts at the Academy of Art and Design Basel (HGK Basel). Students have a broad range of options from which to assemble the content of their studies according to their own needs. These are extended by the BUA’s membership in the Swiss Master of Fine Arts Network. The discipline-related foundations for the Fine Arts specialisation are generally laid by a Bachelor’s degree in Fine Arts.

Music and Media Art
In this programme the main focus is on sound art, experimental and electronic music. Students develop compositions, sound installations or other sound-based art forms. In seminars and lectures exemplary works of sound art from the past and present are discussed and analyzed. We teach compositional strategies and approach the subject matter from a contemporary and historical-theoretical point of view. Reference to one's own work is a key focus. The aim is not to solely work on the development of one's own artistic practices, but also to acquire a comprehensive knowledge of contemporary compositions and art forms. In addition to the MA CAP program students can attend other courses, which teach practical skills in programming with Max MSP,hardware hacking, audio technology or interface handling. The integration of sound and musical aspects into areas like performance art, literature and fine arts has increasingly gained importance over the last decades. Hence, this study program intensively deals with the musical-sound aspects of different art forms. In the MA CAP the interaction between the visual, performative, literary and sound aspects, brings students from different artistic areas together, encourages exchange and enables collaborative working.

Literary Writing/Translation
Literature reacts to other arts, just as much as it influences them. Students hoping to practice their literary art in the field of tension of contemporary art production and its advanced reflection, find in the CAP a wide range of teachers and students with diverse backgrounds. Alongside this vibrant exchange and proximity, they work on their own texts of all genres, under the supervision of mentors. This constitutes the core of the students` individual study profiles. Something unique about the CAP is, that the work of the literary translators (with the source languages German, French, Spanish, Italian, English and Russian and the target languages German or French) is regarded as artistic production. The offers for translators are expanded thanks to a cooperation with the "Centre de la Traduction Littéraire" at the University of Lausanne.

Performance
In the sense of physical presence, real or conceptual action, performance occurs in various artistic fields. It addresses certain issues relating to body, space and time. Considering the transdisciplinary history of performance, we understand it as a varied and open field of general performativity.
Performance is regarded as part of all the different artistic disciplines united under the umbrella of the CAP.
As an active form and physical action, it resides within music, fine arts and also literary writing and occurs in close connection with these separate forms. In addition, the focus on performativity opens up new forms of representation, viewing and listening, participating, which the studies are supposed to explore in the practical work as well as in the theoretical reflection.

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This programme focusses the creative, historical, critical, technical, and performative aspects of electronic and computer music, emphasising the many ways in which technology and musical practice influence each other. Read more

Overview

This programme focusses the creative, historical, critical, technical, and performative aspects of electronic and computer music, emphasising the many ways in which technology and musical practice influence each other.

You’ll engage with current thinking and practice in areas including experimental electronic music, sound synthesis, electrical and electronic musical instruments, signal processing, technologically-mediated approaches to composition, live electronic music, interfaces and interactivity, sound spatialisation, electronic music in the museum, and more. You’ll also learn to place these developments within the aesthetic, critical, cultural and historical context of electronic music and music technology.

A distinctive feature of this programme is the balance it strikes between creative practice, technical skills and theory, and critical/cultural/historic context in electronic and computer music.

Electronic and computer music is a broad and exciting field of research, and you’ll learn from an academic team with a strong presence in the international computer music, sonic arts, and electronic music research communities. It’s a great opportunity for musicians, creative professionals, educators, scientists, or artists who are interested in the integration of music and technology to collaborate across disciplines in a city with a thriving music and cultural scene.

The degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months. The part-time MA may be of special interest to those who are working in related fields as part of their career development.

Facilities and Resources

We have a variety of excellent facilities to support your learning, including rehearsal, performance and practice spaces, a lab for studying the psychology of music and studios for sound recording, software development and computer music composition.

We also have good working relationships with a range of prestigious arts organisations: we host BBC Radio 3 concerts, Leeds Lieder and the Leeds International Pianoforte Competition, as well as enjoying a close partnership with Opera North and many others in a city with a thriving music and cultural scene.

Course Content

You’ll work on your own practice from the beginning of the programme. A core module will allow you to complete different electronic and computer music exercises using a range of frameworks, while another will introduce you to the development of electronic and computer music and the current state of the art form. You’ll consider the people, institutions, innovations, repertoires, and critical perspectives that continue to shape electronic and computer music.

Throughout the year your knowledge and skills will be underpinned by Professional Studies, a module which introduces you to research methods in music and allows you to build important skills. You’ll also put this into practice with your major project, where you’ll research, plan and document an independent project on a related topic of your choice.

Outside of the field of electronic and computer music, you’ll also choose an optional module from those offered across the School of Music. You could study psychology of music, aesthetic theory or editing, or if you have some experience of composing or performing you could even continue with these.

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This two-year part-time Masters Degree in Literature and Arts course offers the opportunity to study the literature and arts of three different periods of English history (ranging from the c16th to the c19th) in an interdisciplinary manner over four five day residences and two online modules. Read more
This two-year part-time Masters Degree in Literature and Arts course offers the opportunity to study the literature and arts of three different periods of English history (ranging from the c16th to the c19th) in an interdisciplinary manner over four five day residences and two online modules. The course offers full access to the library and electronic resources of the university, a team of expert tutors, and a high level of personal and academic support.

VIDES (volume of interdisciplinary essays)

VIDES 2016 - Volume 4
In the second year, as part of the preparation for the dissertation, each student writes a short essay around two documents or artefacts which they have chosen which comment on a particular topic but from contrasting viewpoints. The student group is divided up into a number of small committees responsible for peer reviewing and editing the journal, deciding on its house-style and designing it.

To make navigation around the journal easier the volume is also presented on the open.conted site where you can find a list of all the essays with their abstracts to help you identify the essays which are of interest you. We hope you enjoy the read!

If you have enjoyed VIDES 2016 - Volume 4 you might also like to read VIDES 2015 - Volume 3, VIDES 2014 - Volume 2 and VIDES 2013 - Volume 1.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-literature-and-arts

Description

This literature and arts course brings together the creative, intellectual and manufactured output of people in the past. It has a twofold aim – to explore the past through the lens of human creativity, and to inform our understanding of that creativity by studying the context within which it emerged. It is therefore an interdisciplinary programme which encompasses literature, art and architectural history, history, philosophy and theology. Based in Oxford, and taking full advantage of the remarkable human and cultural resources which this university has at its disposal, the literature and arts course is designed around three sequential periods of British history, from Early Modern (c.1450) to the early twentieth century (c.1914). By studying each period through a range of disciplines, students will acquire a broad and multi-faceted picture of the past. In this framework giant achievements such as Milton’s poetry or Wren’s architecture can be understood not only as products of their times but also in so far as they stand as uniquely inspired statements, or as harbingers of future developments.

Interdisciplinary study raises challenges for a student in terms of methodologies. How do I analyse and interpret a picture when I have only ever worked with text? A poem when I have only worked with documentary sources? A building when I have only ever studied abstract ideas? How do I make viable connections between these different areas of study? An online element offered towards the beginning of the course will provide the opportunity to discover, practise and develop these skills, and to engage with current theoretical discourses concerning the way scholars relate with their source material. Similarly a more advanced on-line component in the second year will focus on interdisciplinary research skills, including trying out those skills by contributing to a small volume of papers on a subject related to the chosen dissertation topic.

Whilst focusing on British history and culture, the course will begin with an introductory unit which sets Britain in a world context and explores her cultural relationship with the rest of the world since the sixteenth century. Using the layout of the Ashmolean museum’s international collections with its emphasis on global interaction, this unit will principally be concerned with the formation of British culture through the stimuli of influences beyond Europe.

The literature and arts course aims to enable students to specialise in certain disciplines and ultimately in a particular historical period, whilst structuring their learning within a strong contextual and critical framework. It aims to enable students to make the most of the university’s resources (e.g. its libraries, computer facilities, museums and historic monuments), to provide a high quality of academic and pastoral support, and to maximise the potential for learning within a peer group. It sets out to encourage a richly democratic view of cultural history in which all men’s and women’s lives play their part.

Programme details

Structure of the Literature and Arts Course
Year One

Two core courses in year one will introduce students to post-graduate research skills and methodologies and use a series of case studies to explore some of the challenges inherent in the practice of interdisciplinary study.

Students will also take two options during year one, which will allow them to begin to specialise either by period or theme.

Year Two

A third option at the start of year two will enable students to gain wide-ranging insight into their chosen area of study before deciding on their dissertation topic. A final core course in cultural theory will prepare the student for the writing of the dissertation. This involves writing an article for and contributing to the production process of the course's online journal, Vides. The dissertation occupies the final two terms of year two.

Core Courses

Core courses will be both residential and delivered through online distance learning modules.

Residences: students will attend tutorials, seminars and lectures during five-day residences in October, February and late June/July in year one and in October of year two, plus an initial residential induction weekend, prior to the first core course. Residences will account for eighty face to face teaching hours over the two years (structured around intensive discussion in seminars).

Distance-learning: these modules are fully supported by a dedicated Virtual Learning Environment. Students will engage in on-line group discussions using the course website and email. Students will also have access to the electronic on-line resources of Oxford University's Library Services, including the Bodleian Library, and all other University libraries, including the English Faculty Library, the History Faculty Library, the Philosophy Faculty Library and the Theology Faculty Library. These modules are designed such that students need not have a sophisticated understanding of IT; materials may be provided in a variety of ways to suit the student's preference and situation.

In keeping with the Oxford ethos of tutorial instruction, individual tutorials and supervisions will be an integral part of the programme, most notably with regard to the dissertation. Individual supervision will be undertaken both face-to-face and by e-mail.

Options

Each of the options residences is structured in the same way, beginning with an historical introduction to the period and ending with a plenary discussing where connections can be made between the subjects studied through the week. The options are taught in the mornings and afternoons and represent a range of disciplines, specifically Literature, History, Visual Culture and Philosophy/Theology/History of Ideas. Each student chooses two options out of four offered. Please note that due to timetabling constrictions it is not always possible to allocate each student to their preferred options. The following list indicates the subjects which were available in 2014/15, there may be some changes for 2016.

Late Medieval and Early Modern
Shakespeare in History - Dr Lynn Robson
Tudor Monarchy– Dr Janet Dickinson
The Role of Wit, Conceit and Curious Devices in Tudor and Jacobean Art and Architecture - Dr Cathy Oakes
The Uses of History in Seventeenth-century England - Dr Gabriel Roberts

The ‘Long Eighteenth Century’
Writing, Money and the Market - Dr Carly Watson
British Collectors and Classical Antiquities – Dr Stephen Kershaw
The British Empiricists: Locke, Hume and Berkeley – Dr Peter Wyss
Overseas Trade and the Rise of Britain as a Superpower - Dr Mike Wagner

The ‘Long Nineteenth Century’
Love and Sex in the Victorian Novel - Dr David Grylls
Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Late Nineteenth Century British Culture – Professor Barrie Bullen
The British Empire and the Indian Mutiny– Dr Yasmin Khan
'Habits of Heart and Mind' - Victorian Political Culture – Professor Angus Hawkins

Dissertation

A dissertation of 11,000 words will be the focus of the final two terms of the second year.

The final core course, delivered in Hilary term of the second year, is envisaged both as a graduate-level survey of relevant cultural theory, which will provide the necessary intellectual contexts for the students' chosen dissertation topics, and as an opportunity to fine-tune the students' research and writing skills in preparation for the dissertation. After completing Vides, students will decide on their dissertation subject in consultation with the Course Director. They will be advised on reading lists and a timetable of work by their dissertation supervisor.

The dissertation is intended to demonstrate the student's knowledge and awareness of more than one subject discipline in this final piece of assessment.

Who should take the course?

The design of the Masters Degree in Literature and Arts is part-time over two years, and as such it is intended for gifted students who, due to their obligations to professional work or caring duties, would otherwise be unable to pursue higher degrees. The MSt in Literature and Arts is taught in the format of regular short residences in Oxford, together with an element of closely-monitored distance-learning.

The course is ideal for the following:

- Graduates in Humanities disciplines who have entered employment, but who wish to maintain their momentum of study progressing to a postgraduate qualification. This group will include teachers, librarians, and archivists, and others involved in humanities-related professions.

- Humanities graduates who would like to study part-time because of other responsibilities (including caring roles).

- Graduates who have reached a stage in life where they wish to pursue a new area of study, either for personal development, or to establish new career paths.

While the Masters Degree in Literature and Arts can be seen as a stand-alone qualification, it will also prepare students for doctoral work.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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This programme draws upon the strength of the School of Arts as a centre for the study of the art, music and media of Asia, Africa and the Middle East, and their global diasporas. Read more
This programme draws upon the strength of the School of Arts as a centre for the study of the art, music and media of Asia, Africa and the Middle East, and their global diasporas. Students select courses from across the school, developing a cross-discipline understanding of the arts, broadly conceived. They have the option of specialising in a particular interdisciplinary field, such as popular music and film in the Middle East; art, archaeology and music of the Silk Road; or music, media and development in Africa.

The School of Arts is a unique concentration of experts in the art, music and media of the non-Western world, unsurpassed in scale and reach by any other institution worldwide. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff whose work combines disciplinary rigour and innovative interdisciplinary exchange. Teaching is consistently informed by and contributes to the research of members of staff. Students can select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in the languages, history, religions and cultures of Asia and Africa.

The MA Arts of Asia and Africa provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology, Music and/or Media of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including employment in museums, galleries and the creative and cultural industries. The transferable skills that they acquire enable them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. The programme is also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/soasoas/degree-programmes/ma-arts-of-asia-and-africa/

Structure

Students must take one course from at least two of the constituent parts of the School of Arts - History of Art and Archaeology, Media and Music - and will write a supervised dissertation on a relevant topic.

Students may be allowed to study for the MA on a part-time basis. The part-time MA may be taken over two years, in which case the student takes two taught courses in the first year, and one taught course and the dissertation in the second. Alternatively, it can be taken over three years, in which case the student takes one taught course in each year. The dissertation can be written in any year, but it is strongly recommended that it be undertaken in the final year of the programme. It must be submitted in September of the year in which the student registers for it.

Teaching & Learning

- Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion and seminars at which students present papers. Students are expected to take an active part in class presentations.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School of Arts, SOAS and the University of London.

- Assessment

Assessment is by course work and there are no exams, although certain courses may include an unseen element. For example, History of Art and Archaeology courses often have a ‘slide test’ (i.e. visual analysis of images presented under exam conditions), held in class time. For a half unit, the assessment norm is one essay of up to 5,000 words. Students will write a supervised dissertation on a relevant topic

- Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

The MA Arts of Asia and Africa provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology, Music and/or Media of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including employment in museums, galleries and the creative and cultural industries. The transferable skills that they acquire enable them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. The programme is also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Arts-Health covers all the legal, research design, ethical, managerial, facilitation, academic, and theoretical knowledge and skills requisite of professional Arts-Health praxis. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Arts-Health covers all the legal, research design, ethical, managerial, facilitation, academic, and theoretical knowledge and skills requisite of professional Arts-Health praxis. Students design their own research project and funding bid; write and publish a journal article, comparatively evaluating their own Arts-Health praxis with established approaches to health; and manages and facilitates their own Arts-Health project. The PGDip covers all the former, plus the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings and the specialist practical skills for effective Arts-Health praxis, as well as professional placement as a reflective practitioner. Students create, document, and evaluate their own professional Arts-Health project; complete a professional practice placement; and produce a reflective portfolio based upon experiential learning. Studying MA Arts-Health, you will cover all the former, plus synthesis of the entire curriculum into a full-scale publishable professional Arts-Health project or thesis under expert one-to-one supervision.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Study Hours include Contact Hours (attendance) plus Independent Study. We recommend attending all Contact Hours but flexible learning is facilitated for almost the entire course through CD-ROM and tutorials. You learn by: independent study, tutorials, electronic resources, practical skills sessions, role-play workshops, lectures, seminars, and discussion groups. PG Dip students also learn by practice placement; MA students also learn by specialist guidance. You are supported in lifelong learning, personal development, finding placements, and employability or Continuing Professional Development.

Our students achieve absolute excellence and outright success in learning, graduating, and securing employment. We are wholly welcoming, providing optimum support throughout the course and beyond.

PG Cert, PG Dip, and MA: research funding bid and ethics forms, journal article, project and project management documentation . PG Dip and MA: project with evaluation, practice placement and reflective portfolio. MA: integrated project/dissertation.

OPPORTUNITIES

Students achieved careers as:
-Inter-agency Training Managers for criminal justice, health, and social services
-Arts-Health Officers
-Arts-Health Consultants
-Community Managers
-Specialist Teachers
-Project Manager

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Create art that engages audiences directly. Gain work and contacts in the creative industries. Enhance your ability to gain funding for participatory projects. Read more

Course Overview

Create art that engages audiences directly. Gain work and contacts in the creative industries. Enhance your ability to gain funding for participatory projects. Develop both advanced theoretical knowledge and practices of working in participatory settings. Earn a highly relevant Masters qualification.

This course is led by staff who are experienced in working within innovative and prestigious projects in participatory settings themselves, such as The Arts Council funded - The Cultural Spring. Academics also have links to a range of organisations who manage and organise such events.

You’ll engage with practical projects through large and small arts organisations and directly with communities, schools and other groups. The programme also aims to encourage an holistic approach to arts practice and provide a learning structure which will facilitate dialogue, collaborative working and peer support.

Course Content

Modules on this course include:

Certificate stage
Introduction to Working in Participatory Settings (30 credits)
Participatory Arts in Practice (30 credits)

Diploma stage
At Diploma stage, you will explore research methods that are specifically relevant to participatory practice an will also undertake and evaluate a live project reflecting you area(s) of interest.
Research and Praxis (30 credits)
Participatory Arts Live Project (30 credits)

Masters stage
At Masters stage, you can choose a practical dissertation/live project or a written dissertation (60 credits)

Teaching and assessment

You’ll experience a range of teaching methods including online learning, peer learning, student-led seminars, workshops, small group work, individual and collaborative project work, supervised independent learning and tutorials.

You’ll also be encouraged to develop your own theoretical and methodological perspectives to inform your future educational, professional and personal practices. The programme provides a learning and teaching framework within which the growth of subject-specific knowledge, analytic abilities, teamwork, time and organisational management, production, presentation and practice-oriented competencies can be developed and assessed.

Facilities & location

Teaching for this course is based at our state-of-the-art David Puttnam Media Centre. The award-winning facilities available include a 200 seater cinema, radio and TV studios, which also hosts the Centre for Research in Media and Cultural Studies. You will have access to the array of arts and media facilities across the institution.

We subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date articles.

Students are helped to develop their research skills working with lecturers and library staff to develop their awareness of art history as well as contemporary art and design and the wider contexts of the subjects.

Some of the most important sources for your course include:

- Art Full Text + Art Abstracts: A major resource for media and arts information
- Design and Applied Arts Index: Covers journals featuring both new designers and the development of design and the applied arts since the mid-19th century
- British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC): Provides resources for the production, study and use of film and related media
- JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’): Provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences
Lexis, which provides access to legal information as well as full-text newspaper articles
- Screen Online (BFI), which is an online encyclopaedia of British film and television, featuring clips from the vast collections of the BFI National Archive

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The Advanced Electronic Systems Engineering MSc is a broad programme in advanced electronics, reflecting the latest developments in telecommunications, embedded systems, instrumentation and control. Read more
The Advanced Electronic Systems Engineering MSc is a broad programme in advanced electronics, reflecting the latest developments in telecommunications, embedded systems, instrumentation and control.

Despite this considerable breadth, an extensive range of options allows students to tailor the course to suit their individual requirements. The programme enables students to develop advanced skills in various aspects of modern hardware, software and firmware engineering.

The programme reflects the latest developments in electronic system design and illustrates the use of electronic systems technologies in instrumentation, measurement and control. You develop the skills to design and build complex electronic systems, in a wide range of applications, using appropriate technologies and techniques.

We have developed the programme with a number of industrial organisations, which means that successful students will be in a strong position to build a long-term career in this important discipline.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/244/advanced-electronic-systems-engineering

About the School of Engineering and Digital Arts

The School successfully combines modern engineering and technology with the exciting field of digital media. Established over 40 years ago, the School has developed a top-quality teaching and research base, receiving excellent ratings in both research and teaching assessments.

The School undertakes high-quality research that has had significant national and international impact, and our expertise allows us to respond rapidly to new developments. Our 30 academic staff and over 130 postgraduate students and research staff provide an ideal focus to effectively support a high level of research activity. We have a thriving student population studying for postgraduate degrees in a friendly, supportive teaching and research environment, with research funding from the Research Councils UK, European research programmes, industrial and commercial companies and government agencies including the Ministry of Defence.

Our Electronic Systems Design Centre and Digital Media Hub provide training and consultancy for a wide range of companies. Many of our research projects are collaborative, and we have well-developed links with institutions worldwide.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules.

EL822 - Communication Networks (15 credits)
EL844 - Fundamentals of Image Analysis (15 credits)
EL849 - Research Methods & Project Design (30 credits)
EL874 - Computer & Reconfigurable Architectures (15 credits)
EL876 - Advanced Control Systems (15 credits)
EL875 - Advanced Instrumentation Systems (15 credits)
EL858 - Advanced Pattern Recognition (15 credits)
EL829 - Embedded Real-Time Operating Systems (15 credits)
EL890 - MSc Project (60 credits)

Assessment

The project module is examined by a presentation and dissertation. The Research Methods and Project Design module is examined by several components of continuous assessment. The other modules are assessed by examinations and smaller components of continuous assessment. MSc students must gain credits from all the modules (180 credits in total). For the PDip, you must gain at least 120 credits in total, and pass certain modules to meet the learning outcomes of the PDip programme. PDip students are not expected to take the MSc project (EL890).

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- educate graduate engineers and equip them with advanced knowledge of electronic systems for careers in research and development in industry or academia

- produce high-calibre engineers with experience in specialist and complex problem-solving skills and the techniques needed for electronics systems engineering in a number of application areas, including (but not exclusive to) instrumentation, imaging, control and communication systems

- provide you with proper academic guidance and welfare support

- create an atmosphere of co-operation and partnership between staff and students, and offer you an environment where you can develop your potential

- to strengthen and expand opportunities for industrial collaboration with the School of Engineering and Digital Arts.

Careers

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

We have developed our programmes with a number of industrial organisations, which means that successful students are in a strong position to build a long-term career in this important discipline. You develop the skills and capabilities that employers are looking for, including problem solving, independent thought, report-writing, time management, leadership skills, team-working and good communication.

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we offer many opportunities for you to gain worthwhile experience and develop the specific skills and aptitudes that employers value.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This is the only history of art and archaeology degree in Europe focused on the great religious traditions of Asia. Read more
This is the only history of art and archaeology degree in Europe focused on the great religious traditions of Asia. It includes within its scope diverse countries, regions and time periods from antiquity to the present, with a particular emphasis on Buddhism in South, Central and Southeast Asia, the Himalayas, China, Korea and Japan. Hinduism, Shinto and animistic and syncretic practices are also studied. Students consider iconography, ritual, faith and pilgrimage in their multiple regional and historical guises. They study temple buildings, statues and paintings, formal, informal and popular.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of Asia, many of whom are principally concerned with religious art. Their ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as music and religion in Asia, historically and in the present. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in the religions, languages, history and cultures of Asia.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/maraa/

Teaching & Learning

- Teaching
Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

- Assessment
For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September.

- Learning Resources
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Employment

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Would you like to re-evaluate and re-position your creative and pedagogic practice within the context of contemporary art?. Read more
Would you like to re-evaluate and re-position your creative and pedagogic practice within the context of contemporary art?

Developed in partnership with BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, this unique postgraduate degree course, will engage you with contemporary practice and theory, whilst allowing you to develop new skills and research approaches.

Located in the vibrant studio culture of BALTIC 39 in and at BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, this master’s degree is delivered by members of the BALTIC learning team, alongside research-active practitioners who are working at national and international level, all who employ and advocate artist teacher/educator approaches.

As part of a strong arts and education community in a creative environment, you’ll be supported to develop your own artistic and pedagogic practices.

This course is designed for artists from all disciplines, including the performing arts and those working in education environments such as schools, colleges, galleries and community settings.

Learn From The Best

Our teaching team include artists, performers, directors, facilitators and academics who are active researchers with a broad spectrum of specialities that they bring to their day-to-day teaching. They have worked on national collections, prestigious nation and international theatre projects and exhibitions and provided expertise to the BALTIC, Tyneside Cinema, National History Museum, The British Council and non-governmental organisations.

All of our staff are approachable, enthusiastic and committed to your learning experience. You will receive specialist supervision that is highly engaged and crafted to support the individuality of your emerging artistic practice.

You will also be given the unique opportunity to draw on the expertise of national and international artists, educators and academics who will contribute to seminar sessions through our innovative e-Learning platform, Blackboard.

Teaching And Assessment

This course is focused around practice-based learning with an emphasis on independent study.

Lectures, seminars and critiques introduce the breadth and depth of ideas to foster curiosity, while group sessions introduce diverse approaches to create a solid foundation for the ongoing development of personal skills.

Engaging with contemporary practice and theory, you will develop critical and discursive skills, create new work and critically debate the changing nature of contemporary art.

You will also develop innovative research approaches and outcomes, in addition to studying gallery and exhibition practices, and art education.

On completion of this course you will possess the skills necessary to sustain these practices and ideas as an artist, teacher or educator outside of the MA Contemporary Arts and Education course.

This course is assessed via a range of methods including reflective reports, exhibition essays, online portfolios, presentations, assessments and your final dissertation. Some presentations will also be filmed to allow you to build your portfolio and reflect on communication and delivery.

Year One
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
VA7001 - CRITICAL ENGAGEMENT 1 (Core, 20 Credits)
VA7002 - RETHINKING PEDAGOGY 1 (Core, 40 Credits)
VA7028 - DEVELOPING CREATIVE PRACTICE MODULE (Core, 0 Credits)

Year Two
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
VA7003 - CRITICAL ENGAGEMENT 2 (Core, 20 Credits)
VA7004 - RETHINKING PEDAGOGY 2 (Core, 40 Credits)
VA7005 - CREATIVE PRACTICE (Core, 60 Credits)

Learning Environment

This course is delivered at BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art and BALTIC 39 - an exceptional, purpose-built studio environment for Northumbria University’s postgraduate community and a selection of our undergraduates.

You will have access to outstanding facilities and exhibitions and draw on BALTIC’s dynamic, diverse and international programme - ranging from blockbuster exhibitions to innovative new work and projects created by artists working within the local community.

The use of technology is embedded throughout this course thanks to our innovative e-learning portal, Blackboard, which will allow you to utilise resources such as electronic reading lists, films, blogs, Skype and electronic feedback.

The portal will also allow you to connect with national and international artists, collaborators and academics who will contribute to seminar sessions to provide further insight and knowledge transfer.

Research-Rich Learning

Research-rich learning is embedded in all areas of this course and you will be taught by a research-active practitioners and members of the BALTIC learning team.

Your own research is highly important and throughout the duration of your course you will be encouraged to undertake enquiry-based learning by examining contemporary research relating to contemporary art and education.

Our team will support you at every step to allow you to develop the independent research and learning skills necessary to successfully complete your action research project.

Give Your Career An Edge

The MA Contemporary Arts and Education course will build on your already established skills and knowledge and completion of this course will prepare you for the next step of your career.

Whilst studying, you will have regular opportunities to enhance your career edge through additional activities such as participation in our extensive wider programme of guest lecturers, presentations, events, projects and peer networks.

You will be encouraged to broker relationships with a range of regional partners and other organisations that operate within this field.

This course incorporates regular field trips to further enhance your knowledge and understanding.

Your Future

The holistic philosophy of the course encourages a synthesis of pedagogic and creative practices.

Aiming to help you rediscover your artistic practice and significantly broaden your understanding of contemporary art concepts, mediums and theoretical debates, this aligns fresh ideas that support and enrich your approaches as facilitator within your own educational experiences.

With our ongoing support you will have developed a professional portfolio through the intensive studio and exhibition opportunities available on this course.

Many graduates subsequently go on to produce further shows and become active members of artist-teacher networks. Completion of this course may help to support you in gaining promotion within the artistic area of practice in your school, college or gallery education.

You may also decide to pursue a broad range of jobs within the cultural sector, professional research or doctoral studies.

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On this course you gain the knowledge the skills you need to work as an engineer, building on your existing degree in science or technology. Read more
On this course you gain the knowledge the skills you need to work as an engineer, building on your existing degree in science or technology.

A rewarding career

Engineers apply scientific and technological principles to solve problems in a creative way. It’s a well-paid and rewarding career that is constantly changing with new developments in technology. And with a shortage of electrical and electronic engineers in the UK, your skills will be in demand. Electrical engineers are at the forefront of many innovations in the way we live and work today. They design, produce and install systems which power and control a range of products and digital communications.

What you study

You can follow your interests to create the right programme of study for you. Initially, you take two modules in engineering principles. Then, with guidance from your course leader, you select from a range of technical modules covering topics including electrical and control engineering and electronic systems.

In addition to your technical modules, you also take an engineering management subject and participate in a multidisciplinary product development project with MSc students from a range of engineering specialisms. You develop an understanding of how engineering projects work and how they relate to the commercial world, as well as becoming part of our engineering community and learning to think like an engineer.

One third of your study will be an individual project and dissertation. You specialise in a technical area of your interest and carry out your own in-depth investigation into a particular problem. Where possible, this will be an industry-related problem.

Expertise

Many of our academic staff are actively involved in research. Examples of recent projects include • developing equipment to monitor the bone mineral density of young children for Sheffield Children's Hospital • developing palm-sized robots to enable firefighters to safely enter and negotiate hazards in burning buildings.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/msc-electrical-and-electronic-engineering

Course structure

Course structure
Full time – 12 to 18 months
Part time – typically 3 years, maximum 6 years
Starts September

Core modules
-Engineering principles
-Electrical and electronic engineering
-International product development (group project)
AND
-Project and quality management
OR
-Global supply chain and manufacturing strategy

Options
Your remaining four modules are themed in the following subjects. You can choose to specialise in one theme or a mix of both:
Electrical and Control Engineering
-Electrical energy systems
-Efficient machines and electromagnetic applications
-Control of linear systems
-Industrial automation
Electronic Systems
-Digital electronic systems design
-Mixed signal design
-Digital signal processing
-Microprocessor engineering

Assessment: assessments will be a mix of coursework and exam, depending on the specific module studied.

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The Masters in Sonic Arts provides advanced training in creative practice with sound and audiovisual technologies. Read more
The Masters in Sonic Arts provides advanced training in creative practice with sound and audiovisual technologies. The programme offers topics relevant to practicing musicians, artists, and the creative industries, such as sound shaping and design, audiovisual composition, field recording, creative and experimental approaches to technology, live performance, interdisciplinary perspectives on sound, and sonic aesthetics. You then develop an individual portfolio of sonic and audiovisual artwork based on your particular skills and interests.

Key facts

• MMus: 12 months full-time; 24 months part-time
• PgDip 12 months full-time; 24 months part-time
• Contact: Dr Nick Fells:

Why Glasgow

• We are Scotland’s leading research centre in Music, with a mutually supportive community of scholars and practitioners.
• Glasgow offers a huge range of venues, including the Old Hairdressers, the Arches, Tramway, Mono, SWG3, and City Halls, all of which have hosted our students’ work.
• You will benefit from studying in the city of Glasgow, the UK’s first UNESCO city of music, with its vibrant and exciting music scene. Festivals abound, such as Sonica, Behaviour, Counterflows, and Tectonics, as does grass-roots sonic activity such as the Lights Out Listening Group. The presence of ensembles such as the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, RSNO, Scottish Opera, Scottish Ensemble, and experimental music ensembles such as the Glasgow Improvisers Orchestra provides a rich context for your studies.
• Sonic Arts at Glasgow integrates sound design with visual media through a unit in Audiovisual Composition.
• Sonic Arts at Glasgow offers interdisciplinary perspectives and the chance to work with students from Glasgow School of Art through a unit called Sound Art in Dialogue.
• We work with the city’s cultural programme (Glasgow Life) to bring leading sonic artists to Glasgow, with associated workshops and collaborative opportunities for our students.
• Your work can be showcased in our annual postgraduate event Sound Thought, which has taken place at the Arches and the Centre for Contemporary Arts.
• Your work can also be showcased at the GLEAM (Glasgow Electronic and Audiovisual Media) Festival taking place in October this year.
• You can experiment with building devices for making and controlling sound, enhanced by the presence of prototyping facilities in Glasgow such as Maklab, through our Creating with Technology unit.
• Our Sonic Arts students and graduates engage in a wide range of professional creative work including sound design for film and theatre, live performance and award-winning composition.
• You will benefit from access to our facilities including an audio lab, three studios, the University’s Concert Hall with Genelec and d&b sound diffusion system, seminar and practice rooms, and a dedicated postgraduate research space.

Programme structure

The programme aims to:
• provide artistic and technical experience in working with sound as a culturally significant medium
• enable you to build your knowledge of tools and methods for manipulating sonic and audiovisual media
• enable you to design, repurpose and reconfigure technologies for creative compositional ends
• enhance your creative practice through taking an exploratory and critical approach to sonic design and composition

The MMus comprises 180 credits as follows:

Semester 1 compulsory courses (60 credits):
• Sound Shaping and Design
• Creating with Technology

Semester 2 compulsory courses (40 credits):
• Field Recording, Sound and Place
• Audiovisual Composition

Semester 2 option (one 20 credit course chosen from):
• Sonic Art Performance
• Sound Art in Dialogue
• Sonic Art Aesthetics and Criticism
• Music, Sound & Screen

Additionally you will produce an individual creative portfolio over the summer (60 credits).

Teaching methods include small group tutorials, seminars and workshops, lab and studio sessions, and individual guidance meetings.
The Postgraduate Diploma comprises 120 credits. You will produce two 15-minute creative portfolios each with a critical commentary of 2,000 words, under the guidance of a member of academic staff; they also attend research seminars and workshops.

The Postgraduate Certificate comprises 60 credits. You will produce a 15-minute creative portfolio with a critical commentary of 2,000 words, under the guidance of a member of academic staff; they also attend research seminars and workshops.

Career prospects

The attributes you gain will be attractive to employers from the creative industries, and are particularly relevant for contemporary music, sound design and sound production, games, theatre, film and television. Many of our graduates undertake successful portfolio careers as artists and sound practitioners in their own right. The programme also offers an excellent foundation upon which to progress to PhD studies and an academic career.

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